Morass of Molasses – These Paths We Tread

The first album from UK trio Morass of Molasses has definitely been one encounter we have here been keenly anticipating, almost from the day the band first stepped forward with a couple of senses infesting, psyche twisting tracks. Their fusion of doom, sludge, and stoner bred textures served in a swamp of aural filth just fed all the instincts and continued to through their debut EP a few months after. Now we have These Paths We Tread to devour, an album which we will admit had us a touch unsure initially.

Instantly enjoyable, These Paths We Tread still had thoughts crowding to contemplate its new proposal of sound. Morass Of Molasses has lured their music from the filth infested depths of the swamp into a cleaner yet still aurally clinging landscape. That is not to say that it does not still come with a healthy coating of scuzz and doom lined dirt but it is a lumbering trespass of sound which is almost more celebratory than predatory. Quite simply their sound has matured, grown up even, and hindsight through listening back at certainly that last EP, So Flows Our Fate, shows it was an evolution on the cards even back then. To be honest we miss the filth but it has not stopped These Paths We Tread through time and listens blossoming into one seriously striking encounter loaded with the potential of even greater adventures ahead with the threesome of vocalist/baritone guitarist Bones ‘The Beard’ Huse, lead guitarist Phil ‘The Mountain’ Williams, and drummer Chris ‘The Beast’ West.

These Paths We Tread gets off to a mighty start with My Leviathan, its gentle caresses of melody and atmospheric waves a deceptive coaxing into the waiting jaws of colossal riffs and flirtatiously tangy grooves. Settling into a predacious crawl entwining raw causticity with salacious seduction, the song roams ears and imagination like a primal siren. Bones’ raw throaty roars share pure toxicity at times, his hostile tones matched by the punchy rhythms of West but tempered by his own calmer vocal tempting and the sonic web cast by Williams. Continually twisting through an array of perpetual incitement on ears and appetite, the track is glorious, its emerging funkiness icing on the feral cake.

Recent times has seen MOM tear into stages alongside the likes of Orange Goblin, Ohhms, Vodun, Elephant Tree, Desert Storm, Space Witch, Sea Bastard, Gurt, and Limb among many others, and there are essences of a few of these within second track So They Walk. Its grooves seep Orange Goblin/Kyuss like taunting whilst its irritable side has a Sleep like causticity, all merged into a distinct MOM recipe and a track like its predecessor which hits the spot with relish.

Continuing themes of “mythic sin and ancient archetypes”, album and next up Serpentine lyrically and musically bind the listener in evocative textures. The third track winds around ears with a dexterity and sonic adeptness emulating its title, grooves almost slithering across the imagination as rhythms bite. Bones’ warm if emotionally deceitful vocals contrast the underlying volatility of the track superbly, also erupting at times to spark a sonic wave fuelling greater weight and intensity throughout. It is a bewitching affair, not as instantly gripping as the first pair of songs but blossoming with every listen into an instinctive temptation before the brief incantation of The Ritual lures and the haunting presence of Centralia descends. A weave of stoner bred enterprise lined with provocative shadows and ghostly whispers as infectious rhythms drive a rolling canter, the second of the two is a well of suggestion coloured by the skilful adventure of Williams on guitar strings.

Next up Maenads is a psychosis of drama and sound, simultaneously enthralling and threatening with seduction and primal toning. It is fair to say, as the album, the track grows and infests deeper into the psyche with every taking of its inflamed intoxication; its melodic anaesthetic fascinating and feral instincts tantalising before things end with Wrath Of Aphrodite, a song which maybe did not quite spark the passions as richly as its companions yet has body and appetite for more bouncing to its groove woven, heavily boned rock ‘n’ roll.

Certainly for fans of the band, These Paths We Tread  will maybe need time to grow and develop on ears and thoughts though newcomers will find Morass of Molasses a quick persuasion we are sure. Yes we still miss the filth but the album blossoms into something thickly compelling and increasingly pleasurable; how stupid of us to doubt with those first thoughts.

These Paths We Tread is out now through HeviSike Records in various formats @ https://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com and http://www.hevisike.com/product/morass-of-molasseslp

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Pete RingMaster 24/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Show Of Bedlam –Transfiguration

They may not be the most prolific of bands recording wise but without doubt when Canadians doomsters Show Of Bedlam uncage their creative imaginations and sonic dexterity it results in something truly irresistible and memorable. That claim is richly confirmed yet again with the band’s new seven track EP/mini album, the quite stunning and unnerving Transfiguration.

The Show Of Bedlam sound has never been solely confined by that doom tagging, their fusion of sludge, post hardcore and punk, and atmospheric malevolence a cauldron of raw and transfixing invention and suggestion but never has it been so mesmeric, bone-chilling, and psychotically arcane as within Transfiguration. The release is a furnace of raw emotion and intensity soaked in a suffocating beauty; the band creating an evocation of macabre intrigue and corrosive psychosis which if the Witchfinder General was still a figure of ‘responsibility’ would have Show Of Bedlam burning at the stake.

From their debut release as one half of the split Autocannibalist with Jucifer in 2009 to first album Roont in 2012 and now Transfiguration, Montréal hailing Show Of Bedlam has kept ears and fears waiting and richly rewarded. The time between releases has seen the band continue to nurture and hone, push and experiment with a sound which is instinctively unique and dramatically imposing. For all their previous successes, Transfiguration is easily the band’s finest moment to date and the moment they surely blossom from a widely known secret to a fully-fledged inspiration within the metal scene.

Twelve minute opener Blue Lotus immediately engulfs the senses with its sonic smog of intrigue and melodic discord; enticing and intimidating in equal measure as it crowds the listener ready for the equally haunting and inescapable prowess of Paulina Richards’ presence and voice. There is virulence to all the dark thoughts and visceral imagery escaping the stifling atmospheric density; infectiousness as easily trespassing body and thoughts as the psychosis of sound carrying it. With a gothic wash equally blossoming and recalling Xmal Deutschland at times, the glorious predator of a track swallows the listener with its tapestry of creative spite and despair simultaneously disturbing and invigorating with its oppressive magnificence and intimate examination of the senses.

Latest single Taelus swiftly follows, teasing ears with its melodic beckoning as beats wait to lay an occasionally anthemic hand on an already eager appetite. As a sample lurks, the song simmers and bubbles, bursting from its confines as vocals and guitars entwine in another caustic wash of sonic tempting stalked by the hungry rumblings of bass. As its predecessor, the similarly deceitfully catchy track is as descriptive sonically as it is vocally, every fresh wave and adventure of intensity and cunning a new twist in the nightmarish landscape painted note by note, syllable by syllable.

At two minutes plus, the album’s title track is a short and powerful insight into a blossoming defiance and turning of the worm within a rhythmically entrancing and gripping affair, inciting the senses physically and  emotionally before Hall of Mirrors rises from its slumber with carnivorous breath and intent. It crawls over the listener, dragging its sludgy weight and doomy intensity with rapacious relentlessness as Richards roars with unbridled emotive intensity and persuasion. It too ebbs and flows with energy and greater volcanic urgency, consuming the senses with lava-esque ferocity lined with more of the band’s contagious groove spited toxicity; it all leading to a climax which simply consumes all before it.

Lamentation offers a respite of sorts, its twenty odd seconds a detour into a fresh fly infested charnel house from which the oppressive elegance and invasive almost cancerous  tempest of Easter Water broods and escapes. With every passing second it looms up and imposes its weight and immersive embrace, bullying whilst igniting ears and imagination. Subsequent slips into less intensive though no less spine-chilling and fearsome pastures as well as the darkest corners only adds to the theatre of sound and its realm of the portentously obscure, and to the imagery festering and conjuring in the imagination.

Closed by the brief sonic ruin of L’Appel Du Vide, quite simply Transfiguration is glorious; daunting and alarming for sure but a sonically and emotionally distressed alchemy of sound and invention which leaves the majority of releases this year so far and easy to suspect to come, looking bland and uneventful. As the world falls further into disaster and decay, so Show Of Bedlam rises, their sound and new offering the perfect soundtrack and antidote.

Transfiguration is released May 12th through PRC Music and Sentient Ruin Laboratories with pre-ordering available now @ http://www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1447 and https://sentientruin.bandcamp.com/album/transfiguration

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Pete RingMaster 18/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hollow Leg – Murder EP

hollow-leg_RingMasterReview

With a new drummer on board, John Stewart (Bloodlet/Caribou King) replacing departed founding member Tim Creter, Florida doomsters Hollow Leg unveil a their two track trespass this March. An individual grumbling fusion of the doom/sludge fuelled metal the band has already been the subject of acclaim for, the Murder EP reveals a new fresh roar and growth in that proposition and, as suggested by its press release, emerges “the band’s strongest material to date”.

murder-final-cover_RingMasterReviewMixed by Sanford Parker and mastered by Collin Jordan, Hollow Leg starts its proposal with Raven. The initial volley of firm beats almost stalks the listener as the song makes its first move. A momentary breath then follows, opening the way for dirty riffs and scowling vocals to lay their hand on the senses as rhythms bring their heavily sinew bound incitement to bear on the blues scented, sludge fuelled consumption of ears. Shifting through the gears back and forth in attack, the track quickly becomes a grumbling treat; essences of the likes of Eyehategod, Weedeater, and Crowbar making tempting hues in the band’s provocative web of sound and texture.

The following title track is just as generously flavoured but veering towards the more stoner-esque side of their sludge/ doom collusion. Tangy grooves are swiftly entwining rapacious rhythms and eager ears, riffs a bed of controlled antagonism beneath them as vocals carry a more open snarl to their character. Though generally a more energetic proposal, the song does slip into moments of  lumbering doom threat only increasing its intensity and bait as melodies gather in the shadows waiting to provocatively dance on a subsequent passage of lighter flirtation before things return to the predatory incitement it all began on.

Both tracks bring a fresh wind to an already in place appetite for Hollow Leg and their compelling sound found through debut album Instinct a fair while back, and a keener anticipation for what is to follow.

The Murder EP is released March 3rd through Argonauta Records on all digital formats with a physical release to follow later in the year.

 

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Pete RingMaster 03/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Desert Kingdom – Self Titled

desert-kingdom_RingMasterReview

Hailing from the suburbs of Melbourne, Desert Kingdom recently made their introduction to greater attention with their self-titled debut release offering seven slabs of fiercely muscular stoner bred rock ‘n’ roll relishing the band’s inspirations. Certainly uniqueness is not as forceful as the physical power and prowess of the band but there was no escaping a richly pleasing and rousing first glimpse of the potential loaded quartet.

Consisting of vocalist Ritch, guitarist Emmett Young, bassist Brett Wright, and drummer Paul Coste, Desert Kingdom swiftly get down to business as opener You’ll Burn descends on ears with sinew woven riffs and swinging beats. Instantly infectious, it is a commanding coaxing for ears only increasing its potency as choppy tenacity infects those initial chords and a heavy grumble escapes the bass. The raw scowling tones of Ritch are equally as persuasive, it all combining for a fiery slice of stoner heaviness clothed in the influences of bands such as Orange Goblin, Kyuss, and Down.

desert_kingdom_art_RingMasterReviewThe atmospheric, drama soaked entrance of Mafiaso Opera deceptively makes a gentler proposition but its sinister air is soon a tempestuous torrent of catchy beats and predacious riffs. As vocals rage spicy grooves wind around the rhythmic temptation, varied metallic strains linking arms in a familiar yet fresh incitement. Brawling with the senses through every passing second, the track quickly eclipses its impressive predecessor, stomping with raw aggression and captivating enterprise before Doghouse Blues prowls with an equally rapacious intent to that of the previous track while military seeded rhythms impose their agreeable authority. Like a blend of Gruntruck and Pantera with a whiff of Mary Beats Jane, the track irritably rumbles leaving satisfaction full if not quite matching the heights sparked by the pair before it.

If the last track prowls then 7 Years stalks the senses with its doom bred trespass, sonic flames erupting within the pressure as choice grooves entwine voice and the engaging ponderous gait of the rhythms. It too lacks the sparks of those early successes but again only and increasingly pleases as its waspish sound intensifies in tandem with the song’s boisterous aggression with subsequent blues toxicity adding to the fun.

Abstainer rocks like a lustful dog next, its hungry riffs and heftily swung rhythms alone a carnal incitement while Fuck You is sonic belligerence and muscular aggravation bred to raise the spirit as the release re-hits the early plateau it began upon. With spicy hooks and scorching grooves, the track has all the attributes and open potential to raise expectations that Desert Kingdom will come under the scrutiny of the broadest spotlights if not now in the time ahead.

Concluded by the boozy blaze of Whiskey, sawdust and spit rock ‘n’ roll with all the groove laced liquor you could wish for, the release is a very easy to return to stomp. Originality might be a touch on the scarce side but enjoyment is full, something never drawing complaints.

The Desert Kingdom album is out now via Black Bow Records across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 01/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Heavy Temple – Chassit

heavy-temple_RingMasterReview

Listening to Chassit from US trio Heavy Temple is like staring into a fire. At the heart of both, there is a siren like lure transfixing and drawing closer attention; a physical and imagination sparking coaxing soaked in danger and magnetism as suggestive images dance in its flames. Heavy Temple’s creative pyre is an aural blaze of psych/doom with a blues fuelled roar within a fuzz loaded proposal; a dark realm sizzling with warm sonic seduction and heavy visceral trespasses on body and psyche. It is also behind a rather fine quartet of tracks making up the attention demanding Chassit.

Formed at the rear of 2012, the latest line-up of Heavy Temple sees founding member and vocalist/bassist High Priestess Nighthawk joined by guitarist Arch Bishop Barghest and drummer SirenTempestas. 2014 saw the well-received release of the band’s self-titled debut EP, a release marking the cards of a great many to the quality and potential of Heavy Temple. The current threesome have realised that promise and more with Chassit, calling on mind and spirit with its fiery and imposing furnace of sound.

Opener Key and Bone swiftly lays a raw fuzzy hand on the senses, backing it up with just as muggy scuzzy grooves as High Priestess Nighthawk’s voice melodically roars. With the weight of song and emotion packing the leviathan crawl of the rhythms, the track is as captivating as it is intrusive even when slipping into a low key oasis of intensity, that the prelude to a rousing surge of stoner inflamed rock ‘n’ roll. Built on open strands of individual prowess and craft, the song is a weighty proposition full of ravenous intent mixing searing beauty and bestial rapacity.

heavy-temple-art_RingMasterReviewThe following Ursa Machina is an even more imposing and tempestuous affair. Its doom bred heart instantly crawls over the listener yet in its air a smouldering melodic heat resonates with suggestive, devilish eroticism. That siren like comparison is no more apt than here with High Priestess Nighthawk’s tones the beacon coaxing ears from within the track’s haze lit predatory rocks. From its bewitching start, the song lumbers with a raw seductive swing, its carnivorous creative bones prowling the senses and imagination as vocals heartily croon. As with its predecessor, the song’s landscape is an evolving adventure, uncaging new energies and inventive gaits to match its fuzzily flickering canvas of sound.

Pink Glass provides sludgy throat searing liquor next, sharing intoxicating melodies and woozy grooves as bass and drums swagger with irritable intent through ears. That alone is enough to ignite the passions but only a taster as lustier reactions meet the surf rock lined lure of calm and suggestion which rises midway. As minimalistic as it is, the passage has thoughts and appetite aflame with its sultry noir lit blues croon before, from its simmer, the track flares up again, catching ablaze with scorching grooves and attitude clad bass grooves aligned to SirenTempestas’s swinging beats.

Closing track In the Court of the Bastard King is instinctive rock ‘n’ roll clad in Heavy Temple’s fervid scuzz blessed sound. The instrumental is a rousing, spirit sparking stoner/psych dripping stomp which just hits the spot on every level while providing a glorious end to an increasingly enjoyable release.

There is freshness about Heavy Temple which alone picks them out from the crowd and with their inventive craft and the heartiness of their music; they are a band destined for major attention.

Chassit is released January 27th via Van Records with its cassette version out through Tridroid Records.

https://www.facebook.com/HeavyTemple/    https://heavytemple.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Camel Of Doom – Terrestrial

camel-of-doom-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Already working on their next album for uncaging next year, British progressive doomsters Camel Of Doom have just re-released fourth album Terrestrial, which came out earlier this year as a limited release. A ravenously invasive and emotionally corrosive affair carrying an inescapable magnetism, Terrestrial is another step forward in the evolution of the band’s sound and bold creativity.

Officially formed back in 2001 by the then 13 year old Kris Clayton, Camel Of Doom released a series of rough EPs before debut album, The Desert At Night, was unveiled in 2003. Recruiting some schoolmates, Clayton took the band onto the live scene before recording a second album which was subsequently released in 2008. Before then the band had already shown signs of slowing, little activity appearing from them as the decade came to a close. It was a time though seeing Clayton honing his songwriting and craft as well as becoming a member of Esoteric.

2011 saw the release of an EP of freshly recorded versions of tracks originally upon The Night After Time. Mixed by Esoteric frontman Greg Chandler, it provided the spark for multi-instrumentalist Clayton to re-ignite the project and work on a third album. Psychodramas: Breaking the Knots of Twisted Synapse came out in 2012; co-engineered and mixed as each album since the previous EP by Chandler and an encounter bred from the psych/prog/doom exploration its creator had been aiming for since the project’s first breath. For its successor, Clayton doubled the Camel Of Doom line-up with bassist Simon Whittle and in time session drummer Thomas Vallely (Lychgate, Omega Centuri) was enlisted as the following album was being written. In 2015 drummer Ben Nield came in just as fourth album Terrestrial was completed and the band’s live presence was re-activated, though the three became and remained two as Whittle left the band soon after it hit stages again.

camel-of-doom-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewAs mentioned Terrestrial now gets its broader release with the band working on its successor. The album works as individual trespasses of the senses or as one complete physical and mental consumption, the latter our preferred assault. Opener Cycles (The Anguish of Anger) sets the scene and tone of the release; its melodic and atmospheric presence melancholic and haunting while its rhythmic touch is intensive. Clayton’s vocals are as emotively harrowing and imposing as the emotionally bruising weight of the funereal toned and moving track, yet throughout the sinew wielded beats of Vallely and grievous breath of Whittle’s bass incite a magnetism alone which infests as Clayton weaves with guitar and keys.

The brief melancholy soaked instrumental of A Circle Has No End pulls the imagination into the waiting jaws of Pyroclastic Flow next, the track embracing the melodic coaxing of its predecessor in its electronically rimmed cauldron of emotional venting and sonic devouring. The outstanding track quickly swallows the senses; invading and ravaging them with its creative ire whilst brewing virulence as contagious as it is predacious and just irresistible whether storming ears or crowding them with bestial sludgy rancor.

Through the mercurially venomous Singularity ears and imagination are further seared and ignited. It is a similarly dangerously catchy slab of creative and emotion flooded enmity, Clayton revelling in his prowess at fusing heavy and darker textures, cancerous and hope gifted essences united in one compelling invasion. Vocally he matches the sounds around him, guttural poison aligning with cleaner throated roars before another major highlight within Terrestrial makes way for the distorted sonic limbo of Nine Eternities.

The near on twelve minutes of Euphoric Slumber provides a testing magnetic proposal straight after. With the steely throes of bass and keys throbbing and pulsating through its portentous prowl, the track explores the depths of it and the listener’s psyche before unexpectedly dropping into a sonic wasteland. That desolate calm springs a lone, sepulchral melody soon skirted by the rhythmic incitement of Vallely as a godforsaken atmosphere brews and intensifies. It is an absorbing, senses violating affair matched by the even more extensive examination and length of Sleeper Must Awaken. Raw and drawing on the broadest array of styles and flavours yet on the album, the track rapaciously grows with each passing minute casting a fiercely provocative and emotionally torturous yet often sonically beautiful landscape throughout.

Concluded by the suggestive beauty of the sonically cast desert Extending Life, Expanding Consciousness, the demanding and rewarding Terrestrial leaves senses and emotions ringing and pleasure rampant. There is much more to the album’s sound than even the psych, prog, doom tag suggests yet an appetite for either will find a treat in Camel Of Doom and certainly this exhaustingly fine proposition.

Terrestrial is out now through all stores and @ https://camelofdoom.bandcamp.com/album/terrestrial

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Pete RingMaster 06/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Arcade Messiah – III

john-bassett-promo_RingMasterReview

This past week saw Arcade Messiah unveil its third album in as many years, each a November treat instantly challenging thoughts on best of year nominations.  III is a mighty continuation of that trend, a release where imagination might not be rampant in its title but in its kaleidoscope of suggestive sound and inventive flavours, it simply ignites ears and thoughts.

Arcade Messiah is the solo project of Sligo based songwriter/multi-instrumentalist/producer John Bassett, the founder and driving force of the outstanding UK band KingBathmat. It is a true solo effort with every detail the imagination, creation, and work of Bassett, all apart from the art of III which sprung from the craft of Michael Kerbow. Arcade Messiah has persistently taken ears through a myriad of sonic and powerfully evocative landscapes, pushing the union of creator and listener’s imaginations to new heights. III unsurprisingly is no different to its predecessor, exploring a new depth in textures and invention which just lights up mind and spirit.

To simplify things, Bassett weaves his music from the merger of everything from post and stoner rock to doom, sludge, and metal doom. It is still a narrow description of his sound which defies labels yet openly embraces inspirations whilst turning them into something inescapably unique to Arcade Messiah. Like a melodic siren with the growl and intensity of a bear, his instrumental endeavours to date have fascinated and consumed ears and mind alike; III as mentioned does not deviate from that success. It is though, the heaviest, most compelling and exhilarating offering from the man yet. Across six tracks, the album is creatively ravenous, melodically seductive, and often emotionally irritable and quite bewitching.

It opens up with Revolver, a prowling slice of heavy metal with an air of Sabbath to it which is soon entangling ears in a net of melodic and sonic intrigue. Rhythms barge through the maze of sound, imposing on the senses with poise and aggression as guitars weave their web. The first surprise is the sudden expulsion of vocals from Bassett, they more a texture than an attention stealer but carrying a clarity as ripe and potent as the cauldron of sounds around them. Simultaneously confrontational and welcoming, the track continues to disturb and beguile like a dramatic carousel.

It is a glorious start swiftly backed by the bestial presence of Citadel, a lumbering slab of crawling doom which looms up over the senses, submerging them in its sludgy tar before veins of melodic enterprise and emotive grace wrap around body and imagination. Dark and dangerous, alluring and captivating, the song gets under the skin and into the psyche; its aural scenery an irresistible adventure to navigate and explore.

arcade-messiah-iii-album-cover_RingMasterReviewAt over ten minutes, Deliverance is an epic proposal which devours time with its craft and magnetism. From a gentle opening as warm as it is melancholic with guitars and keys entwining with earthbound celestial beauty, the piece brews a darker side. Striding rhythms are the first deceptive shadow, again a sure invitation with a portentous edge though their threat merely simmers for its first third. Eventually though there is no holding back the energy and intensity of the skirting shadows, their fiery eruption the spark to a lava flow of melody and carnivorous energy. It is impossible not to get lost in the depths and suggestiveness of the track, the imagination casting its pictures and tales as the track continues to ebb and flow in touch and creative fire, perpetually burning its presence into appetite and spirit while captivating with its variety of attack.

It is impossible to pick a best track, all providing unique aspects and characters to immerse in, but the song certainly makes a highly persuasive argument as too its successor Life Clock. Washing over the senses with its space rock like atmosphere and fertile layers courted by the dark lures of bass and beats, the track is another femme fatale resembling encounter luring ears onto its ravenous rhythmic rocks and predacious intensity which lay in wait as the track builds its apocalyptic climax.

Once consumed, the song makes way for the Hades like realm of Black Tree; another predatory piece which stalks and infests with a seductive prowess as powerful as its acrimonious side, both having their moments to make their case across the outstanding trespass. Of course this and every track will inspire a scenario and emotion unique to the individual, one of the many glorious aspects of the Arcade Messiah tapestries.

III closes with the relative calm and peace of Sanctuary, though it too has tempestuousness to its heart and touch which only fires up the senses and imagination as Bassett casts another canvas of melodic suggestion, sonic rabidity, and all that lies between.

III is glorious, a riveting slice of aural alchemy which should not surprise considering the strength and prowess of its creator and predecessors but does at every twist and turn. Time to take another look at those End Of Year lists folks.

III is out now on Stereohead Records @ https://arcademessiah.bandcamp.com

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Pete RingMaster 30/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright