Seething Akira – Sleepy Skeletor

Since emerging back in 2011 within the sea faring surroundings of Portsmouth, British crossover outfit Seething Akira has been teasing away at rich attention with increasing success. We suggest though that it has been a mere nagging compared to the hunger the band can and should expect with the release of debut album Sleepy Skeletor. It is a web of alternative metal and electro rock imagination with plenty more to entice and ensnare. It is a sleepless affair rousing body and spirit which even in its calmer moments has the body bouncing and imagination feasting.

Created by Charlie Bowes (songwriter/keyboardist/vocalist) and Kit Conrad (lead vocalist), the band has leap from local success to national recognition through their sounds and a dynamic live presence which over the years has seen them shares stages with the likes of Skindred, The Qemists, Hacktivist, Senser, Don Broco, and Pop Will Eat Itself as well as play Bloodstock Festival, Victorious Festival, Breakout Festival, Mammothfest amongst others. This year the band was chosen as one of five upcoming bands, alongside, Saint Apache, Damn Dice, The Rocket Dolls and The Sixpounder, to support Pitchshifter on their first UK tour in ten years. The Incoming Transmission EP of 2012 was when our fascination with Seething Akira began, it becoming so much keener as for so many others through their acclaimed 2015 single Airstrike, a song frequently eclipsed and more than matched by the offerings within Sleepy Skeletor.

Walking a fine balance between alternative metal, industrial rock, and electro punk; never fully committing to any but always entangling the richest traits of all and more, Sleepy Skeletor opens properly with The Monster from Brussels. Instantly the synths of Bowes provide an infectious pulse, the guitar of Harvey Ware swiftly adding its lure before the rest of the band jump in with fevered energy to create a Senser like confrontation. Thick and imposing, it is a captivating wall of temptation creating a grooved stroll alongside a Beastie Boys inspired vocal arousal rather easy to become addicted to, its tenacity interrupted by melodic washes of intimation and seduction.

It is an outstanding start quickly matched by recent single Matching Poles of Magnets. With steelier textures to its electro metal predation, bands like Axis Mundi and Silent Descent coming to mind, the track twists and turns with instinctive and rapacious adventure before Half Empty brings a warm calm to the senses. Immediately vocals echo this mellow breath with their melodic unity but equally a rising discontent in the heart of the song brews as things become more intense and irritable. It never reaches an aggressive state though, revolving through melancholic elegance and emotive exposure as a weave of rich enterprise wraps vocal reflection.

I Am The Devil, another single released earlier this year follows, instantly infests ears with its electro metal rumble and a hook which needs meres seconds to have us lustfully wanting more. Something akin to G.R.I.M meets dirt encrusted Pop Will Eat with the rousing catchiness of Hadouken, the track throbs and snarls as the rhythmic prowess and incitement of bassist Richard Ellis Speaight and drummer Stu Radcliffe manipulate.

Featuring Olly Simmons from Brighton band The Qemists, Backlash is next up and similarly merges heavy almost dissonant attitude and sound with electronic trespass as it prowls the senses. It is a predacious edge which never dissipates across the track’s mercurial but persistently invasive landscape. Another of the songs released prior to the album as a single in 2018 ensuring its anticipation was heightened; the absorbing encounter passes over attention to the outstanding Pack Animals. It too has a whiff of Senser to its emotionally and lyrically charged incitement; synth and guitar weaving an intimation of intrigue and danger around the threat of the rhythms as once again vocals irrepressible entice.

The character of successor Paralysed is similarly natured and conjured but swiftly evolving into a melodic croon and seduction which inspired even greater participation before the cycle repeats with greater volatility but equally greater elegance in its respective moments.

The album ends with firstly Even Angels Break Hearts which sees Dani Uziel guesting and finally Disconnect. The first of the two is a fluid blend of sonic antagonism and melodic beauty with Uziel’s tones simply beguiling, she almost like a siren luring ears into Conrad’s feral attack and the song’s tempestuous depths. The second provides three and a half minutes of electro punk metal thick in attitude and malcontent but equally rich in rousing energy and adventurous imagination.

Major attention upon Seething Akira has been a little overdue to our mind; Sleepy Skeletor should remedy that, arousing a whole new tide of fans to their insatiably and dramatically potent sound.

Sleepy Skeletor is out now; available on all major streaming platforms.

Upcoming shows:

Sleepy Skele-tour:

July 6th – Anvil, Bournemouth (Album release show)

July 7th – The 27 Club, Liverpool

July 8th – Mulberry Tavern, Sheffield

July 9th – Satan’s Hollow, Manchester

July 10th – The Underground, Plymouth

July 11th – Fat Lil’s Bar, Witney

July 12th – The Unicorn, Camden

July 13th – The Junction, Ashford

July 14th – The Sussex Arms, Tunbridge Wells

July 15th – The Joiners, Southampton

———————————————–

August 25th – Electrowerkz London supporting CUBANATE

August 26th – BYLINE FESTIVAL, Pippingford Park, Ashdown Forest with Pussy Riot, Badly Drawn Boy, The Vapors, The Blow Monkeys, John Cleese, Hugh Grant, Alexie Sayle…

November 19th – Wedgewood Rooms, Portsmouth supporting PITCHSHIFTER

http://www.seethingakira.com/   https://www.facebook.com/seethingakira   https://twitter.com/SEETHINGAKIRA

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sonic Tides: talking Oceans with guitarist Tom Hollands

The release of a new EP suggests 2018 is set to be a potent and busy year for Brighton, UK based Oceans. It is a multi-flavoured, ear grabbing incitement of the band’s post hardcore and alternative rock blended sound building on their previous encounters whilst venturing into new imagination. We recently had the pleasure to dive into Oceans and their new offering with guitarist Tom Hollands, exploring their beginnings, fresh endeavour and more….

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Much like the actual Oceans, we are a band made up of 5 mostly water based entities: Zach Silver – vocals, Conor Hyde & Tom Hollands – guitars, Jack Warren – bass and James Gillingham – drums. We all either lived, partied or performed alongside each other before the current line-up was formed, that and our shared desire to create made Oceans happen!

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Collectively we’ve all played in bands or made music of many different genres. Perhaps without being fully aware of it we draw on this when writing – We’re all quite different as musicians too so I think we’re bound to end up with quite an eclectic sound.

What inspired the band name?

We came to Brighton and based it on things we saw – So it was either something to do with seagulls, falafel (love it), or the ocean… No unfortunately that’s not true; our guitarist Conor got it from a Mallory Knox song!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

The idea has always been to try to make music that we love and hopefully others do too, and to do this as a career – We always strive to be somewhat original yet familiar enough to still fit into a scene.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Most of us didn’t have any real direction until we decided to pursue music. We also love playing live and like most bands can’t wait to hopefully play to bigger crowds and do more tours!

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We’re evermore critical with our songwriting and I’d say we’re starting to really refine our sound – The music has grown darker sonically and thematically and we’ve tried to strike a balance between more poppy hooks and heavier riffs.

This has been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Although it’s felt like a natural progression, we’re actively trying to make the best songs we can and sometimes that means tearing apart or scrapping ideas we’ve worked on for ages and doing something completely new instead.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We all have rather different tastes in music; artists that have had a considerable impact on us are Incubus, Don Broco, Black Peaks, Deftones, Marmozets… There’s so many. We’ve heard of some bands that will try dozens of different melodies or ideas before settling so we’re just trying to be as critical as possible!

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

We don’t have a set method, however it usually starts with guitar riffs written at home and then built upon bit by bit in rehearsals. We all have a say in every part of the process so it really is a collective effort. Now we do demos and backing tracks to try out synths and things like that.

Where, more often than not, do inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs come from?

Our singer Zach writes the lyrics – Subject matter is usually based on personal struggles or stories relative to what’s happening in our lives (get over ourselves, right?) – We try to leave things open to interpretation, we want our audience to be able to relate.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our new EP, Far From Composure dropped on March 13th. It’s available on practically all platforms and we see it as a big milestone for Oceans.

How about some insight into the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

Thematically the EP spans elements of coping with mental instability and it’s causation due to physical condition, relationships with yourself/others, escapism… The premise of this EP was to really capture our progression as a band from previous works and most importantly create something very emotive that connects with listeners. We also wanted to write big riffs, hit stuff and make loud noises.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Our intention has always been to enter the studio with finished songs, however we always end up adding bits and pieces and coming up with extra ideas – We actually recorded a whole extra song last time!

Tell us about the live side to the band?

We play with a lot of energy and really like to throw ourselves about, I’d like to think if you don’t enjoy our recorded music at first our live set would… Captivate you… (Pun FFO Marmozets…)

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

It can be tough for any new band to branch out from their hometown and it certainly hasn’t been any different for us. It helps being driven for sure – We lost count long ago of the amount of gigs we’ve played around trying to make a name for ourselves. We’ve had our fair share of bad luck but we’ve found that the harder you work the more chance of creating positive opportunities you have – Though there are many other factors to consider!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Social media has played a big part in enabling us to reach people we otherwise wouldn’t have been able to. However, working round changing algorithms and the like can be difficult when trying to connect with fans (Or gain new ones). It’s a big discussion, though now it’s pretty much a necessity for new artists to engage in social media. Like with anything, it’s really about figuring out how to utilize it most effectively for your band, we’re definitely still learning! I’d say do what you can without losing sight of what’s important, the rock and/ or roll (or whatever genre you play). Cliché I know…

For further dips into Oceans check them out @

https://www.facebook.com/pg/oceansukband   https://twitter.com/oceansukband     http://instagram.com/oceansukband   http://oceansuk.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 13/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Greyhaven – Breathe EP

A year and a handful of months ago, British alt-rock quintet Greyhaven aroused rich praise and attention with their EP, State Of Mind. It suggested a band with the potential to become a rich part of the British heavy rock scene. Now the London hailing outfit are ready to release its successor in Breathe, an EP which maybe does not quite realise its predecessor’s promise as anticipated but only confirms thoughts that the quintet has a potent future.

Emerging in either the autumn of 2014 or early 2015 depending where you read, Greyhaven quickly whipped up local support and following through their live shows and debut EP, The Flood. The following State Of Mind, produced by Daniel Kerr (Shields, Create To Inspire, Despite my Deepest Fear), was the moment broader attention was lit, the release sparking praise and coverage with the likes of Scuzz TV and Kerrang, as well as finding a place on one of Metal Hammer’s front cover CD. Since then the band has experienced changes in its line-up and as a momentary foursome uniting once again with Kerr to record Breathe.

Truth opens the release up and quickly has attention in its grasp with a tempting shuffle of beats and a rapacious lure of riffs. It is an opening hinting at a furious expulsion but instead is followed by a calmer if still slightly volatile breath allowing the strong vocals of Sam Paterson to step forward into the already woven web of melodies. Harmonies soon wrap the frontman’s potent tones, the rhythms of drummer Connor Tate and brooding texture of Jack Hudson’s bass a dark almost portentous echo of the song’s emotional heart fuelled angst. With the guitar of Alex Hills as suggestive as it is sonically wiry, the song makes a fine introduction to the EP though for personal tastes is soon eclipsed by its companions.

When We Divide is next, bringing its own tempestuous air and drama to bear on ears and imagination. Great nagging riffs accompany Paterson’s ever tempting voice, rhythms just as thick a welcome trespass as the song mixes sharp hooks and sonic enterprise with emotive energy. Whereas its predecessor, though sounding fresh, held few surprises, the second track is rich with twists and unexpected turns which if anything it does not fully exploit.

Nevertheless, the track is a magnetic persuasion soon matched in almost similar success by the following Crows. There is rawness at its core which enjoyably contrasts the lively shimmer of keys and melody, the song evolving through mellow and crystalline climes but always one sigh away from its tempestuous instincts.

The EP’s title track brings things to an end, the song rising on a caress of keys with a jangle of guitar flanking its move into poppier rock exploits. Temptingly catchy and vocally alone magnetic, Breathe strolls along with a confident smile, its inner fire catching further along to flame with increasing intensity and attraction.

It is hard to say that the Breathe EP has managed to be as richly memorable as State Of Mind before it but it is more of a grower and with every listen impresses and increasingly satisfies and if you have an appetite for bands such as 30 Seconds To Mars, Don Broco, and Alexisonfire, it is an encounter which really should be checked out.

The Breathe EP is released January 12th through Outsider Records.

https://www.facebook.com/greyhavenuk/    https://twitter.com/greyhavenuk   https://www.instagram.com/greyhavenuk/

Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lost Without Cause – Revival

Karly Edge Photography

It has been a while since outfit Lost Without Cause had ears and appetite grabbed with mini album Take Back Everything, six years in fact, but now they are back with a brand new release and a sound which has matured and blossomed into one powerful statement. The Revival EP is an encounter which if it does not get you first time around will on its second sweep through ears. Each of its four songs comes blessed with melodic enterprise and instinctive infectiousness, traits admittedly just as open in its predecessor, but bred with a new confidence of imagination and craft which alone commands attention.

Hailing from the South East of England, Lost Without Cause consists of vocalist/bassist Simon Marks, drummer JamesJJ’ Jaggers, and newest member in guitarist Tony Stead. Formed in 2004, the band swiftly stoked eager fans and attention with their pop infused alternative rock sound. 2011 saw Take Back Everything stir up a whole new ball game of recognition with its lead single, Trigger and accompanying video, being heavily featured on Kerrang TV and supported on national and online radio shows. Live the band has shared stages with the likes of Bastille, Kids In Glass Houses, Fozzy, Don Broco, Lower Than Atlantis, Sacred Mother Tongue, My Passion, The Crave, Koopa, Fei Comodo, None The Less, Saving Aimee and many more. Revival in some ways reflects the ‘return ‘of the band and what is sure to be a regenerated rise in their reputation and presence within the British music scene.

Breathe starts things off and the track instantly has attention hooked as the dark grumble of Marks’ bass lines up alongside his strong expression carrying vocals. JJ‘s beats in turn hit with relish before it is all wrapped in the melodic enterprise of Stead.  Instantly appetising and swiftly infectious, the song proceeds to stroll with wild nostrils and flirtatious hooks, its melodic jangle a teasing lure in the jungle of more exacting rhythms. It is fair to say that previous song Trigger has been the marker for Lost Without Cause up to this point but no longer as Breathe steals its thunder.

The following Depleted brings a Green Day-esque feel to its rousing canter, a hue soon immersed in the band’s own character of sound and invention. Great vocal harmonies and support to Marks across the band light up an already earthily anthemic incitement; swinging rhythms and spicy grooves all adding to the riotous yet skilfully controlled encounter.

Teardrops and Cigarettes in contrast is a mellow aired, warm seduction playing like a blend of China Crisis and Placebo with a further spice of Jimmy Eat World involved. Its gentle but lively sway has hips quickly involved, the sultry strains of the guitar courting the imagination as swiftly though it is the vocal unity again and the song’s adventurously imaginative landscape which seals the deal, not forgetting one glorious finale of emotion and power.

The EP finishes with Another End, a slice of rock pop which might not quite match up to those before it for personal tastes but only adds to the overall pleasure with its catchy rock ‘n’ roll and sonic dexterity.

Listening to Revival, it is easy to feel that Lost Without Cause’s time to make an indelible mark is imminent, if not with their fiercely flavoursome new EP with whatever comes next.

Revival is out now across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 10/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Orestea – Elements

Already embracing a fair wash of attention and acclaim through previous EP This is An Overture and a spirit sparking live presence, UK outfit Orestea have pushed their creative bar on again with their striking new album Elements.  Bringing rich essences of melodic rock and alternative metal together in collusion with what can only be described as pop virility, the Guildford hailing band weave a seriously infectious proposition which boils time and time again within an album which has body and imagination bouncing.

Cored around the energy and craft of guitarist Lloyd Wilson, bassist Mike Quinn, and the vocal magnetism of Lisa Avon, a line-up completed by guitarist Johno Madgwick since recording the album, Orestea irrepressibly build on a potent reputation earned through songs and performances alongside the likes of alongside Ashestoangels, Forever Never, ESO, and Wednesday 13 as well as plaudit drawing sets at festivals such as Bloodstock, Download and Guildfest, in swift time upon Elements. As soon as opener Welcome to Surviville comes forth, there is a sense of fresh adventure and assured maturity in songwriting and sound at work. Drama accompanies the approaching sound just as harmony soaks the vocal invitation of Avon whilst imagination instantly infests every twist and turn as the song settles into its rock pop temptation. Driven by the rhythmic web cast by drummer Jack Slade across the release, the song simultaneously rumbles upon and serenades the senses, that adventurousness continuing to fuel guitars, keys, and the heart of an excellent opener setting the creative template and heart of things to come.

The following Here’s The Plan immediately saunters in with a vibrant air, melodies and metallic riffs uniting around Avon’s increasingly potent tones. Her voice is an instinctive roar, as much a seductive flame as it is a steely incitement and as virulent as the sounds around her. Though maybe not quite finding the boldness of its predecessor, the track keeps attention and pleasure burning bright before the album’s title track sizzles on ears. The dancing enterprise of the guitars brings its own raw edge to match the biting and dark temptations of drums and bass, the latter’s grumble especially magnetic in the heated contagious blaze of the song.

References to the likes of Paramore and Don Broco seem to crop up more often than not and it is easy to hear why but as fourth track Ghost of Letting Go steps forward, Orestea only establish their own individual character upon thought and sound. The song is a fiery ballad built on the metallic strains of Quinn’s bass; a song with irritability in its roar and harmonic grace in its calm which only captivates before Alive or Just Existing shows the band is just as adept at kicking up a storm though that attack is unsurprisingly bound in an infectiousness which has the body bouncing and energies rising. It is pure pop rock ‘n’ metal mastery and another pinnacle upon the already praise stamped proposition.

Through the reflective beauty of Getaway, Avon sheer radiance within its warm atmospheric contemplation, and the rowdier stroll of Eggshells, ears are treated to further invention and an enjoyably inescapable persuasion which The Wreckage continues as it burns in ears with emotion and sonic flames like a drama woven sunset. All three leave pleasure and thoughts enamoured before Got Your Back echoes their persuasions with its own enticement if one not quite matching their heights of those but only due to personal preference.

The album is completed by the emotive sigh of Burning Bridges, Avon and music a release of emotive intensity which caps a fine album with a melodic passion hard to not get wrapped up in. It is a fine conclusion to a release which confirms Orestea as one stirring proposition with still the potential of even greater adventures ahead. If being over fussy, there are times within Elements when the band might have pursued its imagination and invention with even braver boldness but it is just a greedy quibble upon something which excites from beginning to end.

Elements is out now @ http://shop.orestea.com/product/elements-album

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Pete RingMaster 26/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Skies In Motion – Life Lessons

It is probably fair to say that there are a couple of metal bred flavours we are finding ourselves uninspired by at The RR right now, metalcore being one. There are plenty of good and enjoyable bands emerging within the genre but few which truly break from the familiar and creatively routine. UK outfit Skies In Motion is one which defies that thought especially with their new debut album Life Lessons now leading their persuasion.  It is a ferocious magnetic collection of songs as irritable and aggressive as they are creatively and melodically captivating. Certainly plenty of its appeal is down to striking potential but equally there is an imagination and enterprise at play which only excites.

Hailing from Derby, Skies In Motion stepped forward in 2012 and has increased their reputation year on year  with their live presence alone which has seen them share stages with the likes of Killswitch Engage, Devil Wears Prada, August Burns Red, While She Sleeps, Unearth, Slaves , Skindred, Don Broco, Our Hollow Our Home, Gnarwolves and many more. Their initial sound was more hardcore driven though still embracing melodic strains. Life Lessons merges those flavours with its metalcore instincts, resulting in an assault which at times maybe embraces familiar essences but is a relentlessly fresh and intriguing proposition.

The press release for the album suggests bands such as While She Sleeps and Architects are good comparisons and it is not too hard going along with that as opener Architect bites. It initial melodic invitation is a deceit giving no suggestion of the creative carnage to follow though it is not long before an invasion of riffs and rhythms accompany enticing throat raw vocals. Intrigue is quickly gripped and fed as the track evolves into successor Cascades where djent spice predation is followed by hardcore causticity and metal antagonism, vocalist Adam Connor tenaciously riding the tempest. It is a stirring mix which welcomingly infests ears and appetite, the rhythms of bassist Dan Wheeler and drummer Sam Gaines continuing the predatory invasion as guitarists Dave Stewart and Andy Shaw weave a carnal tempest of craft and temptation. Connor is as striking as the sounds around him, the diversity of his attack thoroughly enjoyable and as potently backed by those around him.  There is also infectiousness to the track which borders on poppy, a catchiness which never undermines the ferocity.

The following Realizationship is similarly woven if even more irritable and too a web of seduction and sonic violence which never stops twisting and turning within its storm. The song lacks the final striking essences of its predecessor yet with teasing grooves and fury loaded flames of melody it masterfully hits the spot and an imagination already submissive to the inventively evolving landscapes the band shares within songs.

Another plateau is breached by next up Happy Families, its stabbing riffs and wiry tendrils an instant trap to fall into which only tightens as steely grooves and rabid riffs join rapacious rhythms and a virulence of contagious antics. Connor impressively leads into and drives the chorus of vocal spirit, sound relaxing a touch to embrace the infectious roar though that moment of unity is surrounded by a compelling net of discord and unpredictability. The track is superb and another reason to suggest Skies in Motion is a real force in the making.

Learn The Hard Way is next, its grooved body a fiery cauldron of sound and emotion with some of the most delicious melodic and harmonic lures heard in a fair time while the following Ugly lives up to its name in tone though it too has a swing and exhaustive rigour which simultaneously incites and devours the body. Both songs reveal more of the bands craft in writing and performance, the latter simply a beast of cyclonic contagion to become increasingly greedy for even before Finding Myself Lost has the chance to stamp its intense authority over the senses. It is fair to say that some tracks, like this one, needs time to truly appreciate; to explore and discover its deep qualities beneath a surface which pleasures if not overwhelms though truthfully every song has a wealth of adventure ready to share with increasing listens.

Both the carnivorous Sword Swallower and the emotively conjured Gonvena provide a mercurial adventure of sound and imagination, the first a savage turbulence which flows into an emotionally acute oasis of calm while the second goes from poetic beauty and melodic reflection to blistering intensity. The second is especially bewitching, Connor further impressing with his melodic prowess and the band with its fluidity through extremely contrasting climates.

When Home Feels Distant (And Distance Feels Like Home) lacks some of the captivation and adventure of the previous two but still has ears gripped and pleasure lit with its Avenged Sevenfold spiced tapestry, next up Five Years finding the same success with its own heart bred tempest of sound and raw aggression. It too misses some of the keen ingredients of earlier encounters but leaves satisfaction full and a want for more, hungrier.

Concluding with Hopebringer, another track which needs time to blossom into a fascinating and invasive fury of sound and potential, Life Lessons needs no help in luring ears and attention back again and indeed again. It is a debut which more than suggests, actually declares Skies In Motion as a band able to bring a fresh breath to the hardcore/metalcore scene. Whether they can live up to its potential time will tell but we would not bet against it.

Life Lessons is out now @ http://skiesinmotionuk.bigcartel.com/product/pre-order-life-lessons-albumu

http://www.skiesinmotion.com/    https://www.facebook.com/skiesinmotion    https://twitter.com/skiesinmotion

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

All Ears Avow – Edge Of This

As voices and words gain momentum in offering attention and praise to All Ears Avow, the UK rockers add fuel to the rising fire with their new EP Edge Of This. Six tracks of melody wrapped, riff driven alternative rock, the release is a fresh and appetising slice of rock ‘n’ roll sure to reinforce if not give new impetus to their growing reputation.

Since emerging in 2013, the Swindon quartet has released a pair of increasingly well-received EPs, in the shape of Home (2013) and Reach (2016), and nurtured an eager following and praise for a live presence taking in shows with the likes of Decade, The Computers, Empire, Verses, Jonah Matranga (Far), and Milk Teeth among many, as well as successful slots at festivals such as Wychwood and Gloucester Guildhall’s Underground Festival amidst their own successful UK tours. Edge Of This points to the band being ready to attract even keener and bigger spotlights whilst carrying the potential of even bolder and unique exploits ahead.

The band has drawn comparisons to the likes of Muse, Don Broco, and Biffy Clyro with their sound, references easy to understand as EP opener Caged instantly demands and commands attention; Lower Than Atlantis coming to mind too. As a blurred background assembles, a wiry hook taunts; its intriguing bait soon joined by the potent tones of vocalist/guitarist Claire Sutton. In no time it all comes to a focus driven by the fiercely punchy beats of Sean Ivens. That initial hook still makes a rich lure, even as just as tasty riffs and chords between Sutton and fellow guitarist Jake Willcock collude. By this time Sutton’s voice is seizing a fair share of attention, her tones swiftly impressive alongside that lingering and still deliciously grouchy hook. The track is superb, a mighty way to kick things off and for personal tastes never equalled across the remainder of the highly enjoyable release.

The song is pure hungry rock ‘n’ roll setting a lofty bar which next up Gone certainly has a keen go at rivalling. With its angular but warm melody, the song is a much mellower proposal carrying steel in its presence and attitude rather than the kind of snarl fuelling its predecessor. The dark basslines of Joe Bishop add a great contrast to the lighter but thickly emotive aspects whilst Iven’s swings again have an imposing weight even if showing more restraint than before. With Sutton again pure enticement as melodic flames are ignited by the guitars, the track has ears and imagination hooked before new single Hurricane saunters in with a confident smile to its character and an infectious swagger to its swinging grooving. With unbridled catchiness shaping its rousing chorus and indeed instrumental asides, the song hits the spot dead centre.

Earlier single Just For Me comes next, showing with its muscular body and dark shadows why it alone sparked strong anticipation for the EP. Almost nagging ears with its array of hooks and temptation, the song provides a meaty piece of emotion soaked pop ‘n’ roll with a good spicing of electronic goodness while the following EP title track delves even deeper into the band’s pop natured creativity. The song still has a heavy essence and stubbornness to its physical skeleton but within a melody woven balladry with its own catchy captivation.

Completed by the similarly emotional power ballad of The Middle, a song like the last needing a touch more time to spark the same level of pleasure as those before but undoubtedly getting there with ease, Edge Of This is a potent next step in the ascent of All Ears Avow. As suggested, it does feel like a step in the way to something bigger and finer from the foursome whilst offering a relentlessly enjoyable outing easily outshining a great many similar genre based releases heard this year so far; suggesting there are big times ahead for All Ears Avow.

Edge Of This is out now and available through http://www.allearsavow.bigcartel.com/ and https://allearsavow.bandcamp.com/

http://www.allearsavow.com/    https://www.facebook.com/allearsavowband    https://twitter.com/AEAOfficial

Pete RingMaster 03/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright