Chandrian Kill – Bring Out Your Dead

Maybe there should be no surprise the craft and magnetism to the Bring Out Your Dead EP, the debut release from British outfit Chandrian Kill, but it still makes for a strikingly unexpected and attention entangling introduction. The band is the creative union of vocalist Nic Whitmore who previously fronted Number One Son and songwriter/guitarist Ted Clark renowned for his past creativity as part of Moesaboa and Life in the Making. Both men have been a potent part of the UK metal scene and are looking likely to continue so as Chandrian Kill.

Clark began writing for Chandrian Kill a couple of years back; in time contacting Whitmore and luring him back from his long break from music to develop and arrange the songs. This led to the duo entering the studio this past March to record the three tracks making up Bring Out Your Dead. Subsequently mixed and mastered by Brad Tuttle (Seventh Studios), the EP has emerged a riveting proposition with its weave of predacious melodic metal with the eager animation of alternative metal aided by more than a hint of the gnarly attributes of djent.

Bring Out Your Dead opens up with new single I Collide. Instantly voice and guitar link up in a rich melodic lure as darker rhythms keenly prowl. It is a warm enticement though swiftly showing its volatile nature as irritability surfaces through djent natured trespasses and rawer throated vocals. Similarly there is an increase of fire to the melodic enterprise as the pair creates a cauldron of contrasts and emotive intimation in the music alone, Whitmore’s ever alluring vocals sharing that internal conflict within the exploration of the external one perpetually working away through our lives.

It is a captivating introduction to release and band which is as powerfully backed by the calmer but even darker Filter Off. Its entrance is a sonic mist of sorts but soon spreading for the wiry melodic and rich vocal enticement of the track to involve ears and imagination. As with the first, shadows lurk and rise in vocals and sound as the track revolves its unpredictable spiral of emotive suggestion. The turns become more voracious and antagonistic as the song proceeds, each twist a new fresh proposal to get enticed by with an increasing appetite.

Remain Alive concludes the release, the track casting its own individually melodic flames within another tempestuous climate. Its turmoil though has a stronger temper in the melodic web of the song, keeping it relatively restrained throughout though it is always bubbling away trying to break free. It is a tension crafted by Clark which is emulated in the vocal dexterity of Whitmore, the pair creating a trespass as fearsome as it is seductive.

The first in a sequence of planned EPs, Bring Out Your Dead as forcibly pleasures as it mercifully captivates. The band’s sound has been referenced to the likes of Deftones and Stone Sour, and there are moments when Skyscraper (the great nineties rock outfit) flicker in thoughts, but truthfully Chandrian Kills have a sound individual to all and just as flavoursome as all mentioned.

Bring Out Your Dead is out now via Bar3 Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Chandriankill/   https://twitter.com/ChandrianKill

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

First Signs Of Frost – The Shape Of Things To Come

Pic Ben Ashton

The Shape Of Things To Come is the first EP since British rock band First Signs Of Frost emerged from a hiatus a couple of years back; its title as much a declaration of the fresh blossoming sound and creative chapter within the band as the themes it explores across five absorbing tracks.

Formed in 2004, the quartet of guitarist/vocalist Owen Hughes-Holland, guitarist Adam Mason, drummer Will Gates, and bassist Dan Oehlman grabbed keen attention with their debut EP, In Our Final Chapter. 2007 saw Daniel Tompkins join up as lead vocalist before the acclaimed release of first album Atlantic and a period see the band play alongside the likes of Deaf Havana, Enter Shikari, Architects, You Me At Six, We Are The Ocean, Senses Fail, Devil Sold His Soul and many more. Before the fuss had settled around the release, Tompkins left to join TesseracT. His departure left a gap the band struggled to fill; thus their hiatus until Hughes-Holland resurrected the band in 2015. Linking up with Mason again as well as bassist Andy C Saxton (ex-Cry For Silence), vocalist Daniel Lawrence (ex-Kenai / All Forgotten), and drummer Alex Harford, the London quintet immediately sought to explore and push their sound to new imaginative heights with The Shape Of Things To Come the first glimpse of their success.

Immersing inspirations from the likes of Deftones, Tool, Further Seems Forever, and Glassjaw into their invention, First Signs Of Frost swiftly lures ears with opener Meat Week. Its atmospheric calm is a quick enticement, the gentle caress of guitar a matching lure before the brooding air also there sparks a bolder expulsion of sound. Lawrence’s vocals immediately impress, his melodic expression matched by the colluding warm and wiry textures of the sounds around him. An infectious energy is equally as persuasive within the song, every element bold without being forceful but making a strongly emotive and technically alluring temptation on ears and imagination.

The following White Flag potently backs up the great start; its enterprise similarly resourceful and ear catching without making over aggressive trespasses upon the senses. There is elegance to the First Signs Of Frost sound which charms as the craft of the individuals captivates; again making for a gentle almost smouldering seduction carried in a contagious and skilfully conjured proposal.

Latest single Look Alive Sunshine is next up with its own individual melodic rock venture veined by djent scented progressive metal intricacies. There is jaggedness which bites as the vocals and melodies hug the senses; a union which grips and lingers even if the song just fails to touch the plateau of its predecessors before the evocative climate and atmospheric ambience of Atlantis drifts in with the superb vocals of Lawrence and keys to the fore. An instinctive emotional intensity rises within the song, simmering down again before repeating its cycle within the graceful serenade.

The EP closes with Sharks; it too an initially serene coaxing but one soon revealing its djent nurtured teeth and creative volatility within a subsequent sea of melodic and technical but emotionally inflamed tranquillity. It is a fine end to a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable release. The Shape Of Things To Come feels like the first step towards something bigger and bolder but is a full pleasure in its own right; a mix which makes First Signs Of Frost a band which just has to be followed closely.

The Shape Of Things To Come is out now via Basick Records and available @ https://basick.supplies/collections/first-signs-of-frost or http://music.basickrecords.com/album/the-shape-of-things-to-come

https://www.facebook.com/FSOFofficial/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Life’s December – Colder

Lifes-December_RingMasterReview

It is probably apt with it being called Colder, that ears feel like they are amidst an unstoppable sonic avalanche listening to the new album from Swiss metallers Life’s December. It is a proposal which devours and obliterates the senses, leaving them bare to the emotional trespass and creative enmity which fuels the band’s raw deathcore tempest. It is a punishing proposal even more intimidating with the band’s embracing of djent bred animosity within their sonic savaging but equally a release which given time makes an increasingly compelling persuasion on the imagination.

Hailing from St. Gallen, Life’s December consists of vocalist Rico Bamert, guitarists Dave Mühlethaler and Valens Wullschleger, drummer Jérémie Gonzalez, and bassist Simon Mäder, a quintet which quickly has the imagination involved with album opener Final Speech. It is a scene setting, sonic landscape laying introduction with a portentous narrative being embraced by sonic mist before breeding a moment of predatory ferocity in vocal and sound. Instantly showing the band’s penchant for djent and down-tempo trespasses within a deathcore shaped animus, the track leads the listener into the initially subdued but soon ravenous jaws of Lest I Forget. Quickly in full venomous prowl, the track entwines corrosive riffs and toxic grooves, immersing them in a death charged tempest of sound and emotion driven by guttural vocals and a web of guitar and bass hostility. All the while though, an underlying sonic intrigue and adventure lurks, never quite breaking from the storm but persistently flirting and coaxing closer attention to match the lure of the vocal variety which also emerges.

Lifes-December-Colder_RingMasterReviewIt is hard to say that Life’s December is yet offering anything boldly new in sound but from this song alone there is plenty of fresh resourcefulness to get the teeth and appetite seriously into; a potent and dynamic persuasion which continues with Memories and World Of Blame. The first gets right under the skin in no time with its steely grooves and grouchy riffs. Once in control it then uncages a rapacious torrent of melodic intrusions and rhythmic rancor which in turn is soon involved in a net of more welcoming and emotively lively exploits. Across the song, the band seamlessly slips into mellower or more cancerous endeavours, contrasts and extremes skilfully woven together to create one of the more dramatically unique and memorable passages within the album. In comparison, its successor is a carnal tempest of noise and spite; a fall into sonic causticity and vocal ire which without matching up to its predecessors still has ears fully engaged especially as it expands its stark and increasingly cancerous landscape of sound and emotion.

The brief melodic seducing of Interludium allows a moment to reflect and engage with calmer essences within the band’s imagination before Snow Falls Silently envelops the listener in sonic and emotional confrontation. Once more, there is no major moment of uniqueness involved with the track but its virulent tide of riffs and invasive grooves grip attention, success whipped up further by the throat shredding vocals and their pungent intent and variety.

The austere yet intimately melancholic landscape of My Existence is revealed next, a passage of sound and emotion littered with melodic lures and primal eruptions within a chilled and ravaged ambience. From there, the album’s title track explores similarly evocative scenery of thought and tone but within a far more grievous soul sucking doom soaked climate equipped with rabid assaults of raw guitar and biting rhythms perpetually accentuated by the bone shuddering resonance of the bass. With mouth-watering spirals of sonic toxicity veining its body too, the song hits the spot whilst numbing the senses before the instrumental Hero Missing brings the album to a sombre close with, in many ways, its most disturbing emotional moment, certainly its most haunting.

There are moments within Colder that truly ignite a greedy appetite and other times where fascination takes over; successes which together ensures Life’s December, a band with striking potential, is worthy of proper attention as equally its re-release through Dark Wings.

Colder is out now via Dark Wings across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/LifesDecember

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Hacktivist – Outside The Box

Photography and editing by Perry Westphal

Photography and editing by Perry Westphal

It has been a fair time in the coming but the highly anticipated debut Hacktivist album is finally about to be uncaged. It is a rage living up to the heights and promise of the UK band‘s previous self-titled EP whilst pushing further the band‘s imaginative distinct fusion of nu/alternative /progressive metal with extreme and electronic textures aligned to rap/hip hop fuelled incitement. In some ways it is not bold enough in its exploration and creative drama. Occasionally there is the feeling that the band missed opportunities to create a landmark proposition, but truthfully from start to finish Outside The Box leaves an already established appetite for their sound more than thickly satisfied.

Emerging in 2011, it is fair to say that the Milton Keynes quintet has been leaving deep marks on the British metal/rock landscape whether through their ravenous live presence or that aforementioned EP and surrounding singles. They have been devoured by fans and media alike even with a sound naturally which is going to make as many enemies as long term friends such its unconventional and unpredictable character. Festivals have equally have embraced the band, and Hacktivist them by lighting up the likes of Reading, Leeds, Sonisphere, Rock Am Ring, and Rock Im Park these past years. So as suggested, Outside The Box has bred plenty of intrigue and expectations in the wait for its eventful arrival, a pressure it more than deals with, if without quite realising its own potential at times.

The album opens with Our Time; a track featuring Marlon Hurley which lays out a dystopian atmosphere as an emotive climate springs from keys and spoken vocals before the muscular weight and intensity of the band bears down on the senses and imagination. It is a stalking rather than an assault but with djent spicing to its teeth, the track is a waking up of attention for the following tempest of Hate. An electronic coaxing entices ears initially, though its touch is as sinister as it is magnetic, especially once the subsequently duelling and colluding vocal rapacity of J Hurley and Ben Marvin steer the descending storm. Like a cantankerous cousin to The Kennedy Soundtrack, the track lures and berates the senses; eventually unleashing its full animus with intrusive grooves from Timfy James and predatory rhythms spawned in the creative venom of bassist Josh Gurner and drummer Rich Hawking.

art_RingMasterReviewThe track is a gripping affair followed by Deceive & Defy. It is the first in a trio of re-recorded older tracks amongst eight new provocations, and features Jamie Graham from Heart Of A Coward as guest vocalist. With ambience soaked smog around a rapped narrative, the song’s entrance is restrained yet dramatic, increasingly so as firmly swung beats and agitated riffs build towards an open almost carnal hostility of sound and tone. The track swiftly and increasingly pleases yet it is one which maybe holds back and never quite delivers the raw intensity and explosive adventure hinted at and expected.

It is something Taken certainly offers; its snaky steel lined tendrils of guitar and combative mix of melodic, raw, and spat vocals firing up the passions for antagonistic confrontation alone. The band builds on that with imaginative slips into harmonious vocals and warm melodies shared by James, moments which surprise and reveal the blossoming invention of the band’s songwriting. With Rou Reynolds from Enter Shikari guesting, the song leaves ears and thoughts eagerly involved as does the instrumental, The Storm. It is an evocative moment in time reflecting the physical and emotional aspect of its name, time giving the listener time to regroup before No Way Back launches its dissension. With a scent of Heart of a Coward and Monuments to it, the track badgers and tears into the senses with its jagged stabs of guitars and barbarous rhythms, soothing the wounds with the sighing caress of keys whilst a triple threat of vocals keeps ears consumed and eager to embrace the volatile textures being blended.

A re-working of False Idols comes next, the song moving from an opening romancing to a mountain of groaning rhythms and gnarly riffs bound in viperish grooves. The track certainly pleases without making a big stir in its opening moments but as each passing minute uncages more creative and intimidating adventure, the song blossoms to impress in a way fresh to its original version, even though the differences are not as dramatic as they might have been. The track is a standard bearer all the same but eclipsed by Rotten which sees Astroid Boys and Jot Maxi involved. Weaving essences reminding of Tech N9ne and Twizted into a progressively atmospheric climate, the track simply seduces the imagination as it provides a new strain of invention and diversity to the album.

Elevate has been re-tuned for its place within Outside The Box, given new sonic oil and vocal attitude as it builds build on its first outing in the band’s earlier EP. It is a dogfight for ears and a showdown for emotions as it attacks and stirs up a bedlam of carnivorous textures and electronic trespasses. Melodic and harmonic caresses add a great tempering but they never subdue the thrilling discord and friction of sound and voice.

Lyrically the band is as sharp and incisive as expected but at times they seem to carry a chip on their shoulder which does not lie quite as well as their more politically incited targets. It is something which can be said about the album’s title track where, even with the broadening investigation of its narrative, it captivates most potently in sound.

The album is brought to an exhilarating close by firstly the volcanic and bestial enterprise of Buszy, a deft entangling of contrasting textures in a maelstrom of ire and creative intensity, and lastly by The Storm II, a melodically elegant and sonically ravenous flight into uniting emotional resonance and turbulence. Both provide a climactic and impressing close to an album which itself is only striking.

Whether Outside The Box could have been even more impressive and impacting will surely be debated, our thought being that maybe it missed a trick or two knowing the invention and craft of the band. From start to finish though, it had ears and emotions enthralled and greedy for more; a success no one can turn their nose up at.

Outside The Box is released March 4th via UNFD / Rise Records through most online stores and @ http://www.hacktivist.uk.com/store/products/outside-the-box-cd-2/

http://www.hacktivist.uk.com   https://www.facebook.com/Hacktivistband

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

I, Ohms – Parallel Connection

I, Ohms Promo_RingMasterReview

Making a potent debut with their new EP, US quintet I, Ohms is a metalcore band from Virginia with an appetite for fiery melodies and djent inspired confrontation. As the five-track Parallel Connection shows, the blend of flavours they embrace makes for an attention luring proposition which, without reeking of major originality, is fresh, aggressive, and an invitation to find out more.

Consisting of vocalist Andrew Belmont and guitarists Rachel Scott and Ryan Baggett alongside the rhythm section of bassist Andrew Horn and drummer Brittany Yarnell, I, Ohms is a bit of a mystery in background information but certainly forceful with their music. Their first release is proof of that; an encounter which drummer Yarnell talked about ahead of release, saying “Recording the EP was really fun and we’re super excited to be sharing it with everyone! It’s meant to reflect our darkest times and the way we heal; be it a riff that feels empty, a chaotic breakdown, or words that you would tell yourself repeatedly to dig yourself out of a hole. We’re all one way on the surface, but there’s so much more beneath.

Parallel Connection opens with Terms and Conditions which comes into view upon an ear caressing guitar melody. It has an evocative air which flirts with the imagination, all the time setting up the moment for carnivorous riffs and heftily swiping rhythms to erupt and invade the senses. Belmont’s raw growls are just as formidable too, but they, as the sounds around him, only leading to another twist of a clean vocals led stroll of melodic enterprise. As the song settles down a touch, all the elements are soon entangled as the unpredictable encounter grabs the imagination even tighter. Simultaneously it is a predator and temptress, the band weaving a tapestry of contrasting textures and volatile emotions to excite and wrong-foot with accomplished craft.

Deep Divide is even more predacious and intensive once taking over from its predecessor. The swinging beats and bass enticement borders on bestial as djent seeded riffs create a jagged wall of senses tearing teeth again backed by the harsh attitude of the vocals. As is soon realised with the band though, any uncompromising endeavour is cleverly tempered by melodic and harmonic imagination. The end product is something which may not be unique but always, as here, proves to have an individualism which sparks thorough enjoyment and intrigue.

The band’s songs also come with their own noticeable characters too; the following Civil War showing a more rabid nature compared to the controlled but ravenous stalking of the last song for example. To that though, it has no qualms about slipping into bolder passages of suggestive calm with infectious percussive bait as well as senses gnawing trespasses courtesy of the guitars. Together it all goes to create one of the most adventurous and arguably original tracks on the release.

The pair of Scream Your Heart Out and latest single End: Disclaimer brings the EP to a close. The first is an imposing tempest of sound and emotion from its first breath; a maelstrom of wiry grooves and bone cracking beats corralled by throat bruising vocals and a brooding bassline, not forgetting belligerent riffery. It too shows a great shade in catchy tempting and melodic dexterity, musically and vocally, whilst its successor is a drama of cantankerous sound drawn into an antagonistic brawl and a melodic soothing enticed into a harmonic hugging of the senses. It is a skilfully nurtured and shaped proposal, and with the previous song, taking favourite song honours with Civil War running them to a photo finish.

Parallel Connection is a very strong and increasingly impressing offering from I, Ohms; an introduction which suggests that the band is still developing its own sound but already has developed something rather refreshing about their music which can surely only blossom further.

The Parallel Connection EP is out now @ https://iohmsband.bandcamp.com/album/parallel-connection

https://www.facebook.com/iohmsband   https://twitter.com/i_ohms

Pete RingMaster 28/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Train Arrival – Dramatic Existence

cover

An engrossing proposition for ears and imagination, it is fair to say that Russian band Train Arrival has given one impressive introduction to itself through debut album Dramatic Existence. Oozing creative theatre as striking and potent as the technical craft bringing it to life, the eight track encounter is a riveting adventure of instrumental progressive metal. To that cinematic canvas though, there are also inventive weaves of djent voracity, symphonic ambiences, and oriental and Eastern beauty captivating the senses. It makes for one mouth-watering offering, one not lacking either familiarity or fresh invention, but ultimately providing a thoroughly enjoyable and imaginative emprise of sound and intent.

Train Arrival is the solo project of Krasnodar composer and guitarist Max Ben and that is about all we can reveal about the talented artist. Then again Dramatic Existence does all the talking starting straight away with opener History. A lone melancholic guitar melody wraps around ears first, its sweet tone soon joined by darker caresses and a classical air. It is a gentle and captivating start, immersing senses and thoughts with great potency as keys and a symphonic breeze brings new warmth and expression to a by now rhythmically bold proposal. As becomes a constant success across the release, the imagination is already conjuring a landscape of peace and beauty echoing the dramas and turbulence of past times. The track as all subsequent songs is an aural paint box for thoughts, inviting interpretations addition to the piece’s own suggestiveness, and finding new twists with every listen.

The following Returning takes the listener into a far more aggressive and agitated climate, but equally as tempting and inviting. Rhythms cast a web of intimidation whilst jagged stabs of guitar only accentuate the danger and imposing presence of the new soundscape. A djent bred examination shows its first grouchy signs whilst keys again cast an immersive embrace over the volatile heart of the track. It is a gripping and skilful theatre of sound and invention from Ben, every second of its six minutes providing persistent magnetism, the same which is easily said about all tracks and immediately evidenced by Theatre Of War. The outstanding third track does not enter with the hostility its title might suggest, in fact is less forceful than its predecessor in many ways, but offers drama and epic grandeur aligned to intimate aggression for one transfixing exploit. Again ragged djent persuasion colludes with elegant and immersive symphonic arrangements courted by emotionally colourful keys, whilst mystique and melodic hues of the Oriental with far reaching Eastern spices bring their intrigue to track and ears as the listener is taken again on their travels musically and mentally.

There is an underlying fatality to the track though and its aftermath is echoed in Devastation next, its colder air a telling introduction though soon succumbing to another tempestuous climate, sculpted imaginatively and powerfully by the guitar skills and keys crafted adventure of Ben. To that technical prowess there is a creative resourcefulness too which makes this and all pieces a fluid and tenacious theatre of sound and expression. The track has thoughts and emotions instantly and firmly involved, their premises uniting with the artist for another peak of the already highly impressing album.

Majesty just about sums up the air and presence of the next song, keys dancing provocatively over ears with an endearing renaissance charm before rhythms and riffs bring a creative turmoil to the expanding adventure. Predatory shadows and sounds stalk the melodic flaming of guitar and the bewitching radiance of keys, each of their twists bringing striking textures, creative hues, and sheer mesmeric enterprise best described as, yes majestic.

The ten minutes epic temptation of Badlands is next, provocative balladry and stormy climates colliding and entwining for another spellbinding offering which is simultaneously seductive and fiercely erosive on the senses. Possibly a touch overlong, though there is never a point where attention and appetite waivers, the track is a journey and adventure all on its own, and that is another impacting thing about Dramatic Existence, tracks work just as powerfully alone or as one act in the album’s whole sonic libretto. The song flows straight into the reflective embrace of Ashes Of Time, a serenade skirted by a carnivorous bass tone and raw edged riffs. It is the melodic lure of the song and guitar though which prevails in the increasingly volcanic atmosphere and intensity of the track, both assisted by the warm and emotive tides of the key’s invention.

   History Repeats brings it all to a fine, epilogue like end. The piece is maybe not the most impacting and gripping, relative to what came before, but provides a final richly satisfying and suggestive voice to the breath-taking exploit. It also provides one last slice of evidence to not only the impressive technical craft of Ben but his pleasing understanding and restraint in not over powering impressive songwriting with indulgent excesses of technique.

Dramatic Existence is a tremendous entrance by Ben and Train Arrival, progressive metal which simply ignites ears and imagination. The album might not be imposingly pushing progressive metal boundaries but it is giving them a damn good shaking as it thrills.

Dramatic Existence is available now @ https://trainarrival.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/TrainArrival

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Amber Sea – Infantile Vision

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Alongside the full enjoyment Infantile Vision offers one prominent thought is, if their debut is this good just how impressive and potent can French progressive metallers Amber Sea, become. The furiously gripping EP from the Lille band is not perfect, at times its tsunami of invention and imagination bordering on bedlamic tendencies, but for every minor niggle in its chaotic tenacity there is a maelstrom of appetite igniting ingenuity. The attention grabbing five track fury is mouth-watering, and the band’s future subsequently even more so, but right now with their turbulent take on progressive metalcore, Amber Sea have announced themselves as more than a cut above similar creatively driven bands.

The release opens with White Materia: Sideral, and an enchanting caress of piano within a shadowed ambience. Clean vocals add to the warmth of the song’s entrance, crisper heavier beats only enhancing the atmosphere as the song slowly steels itself for an impending tempest. Soon vocals squalls from Matt Rouland rage and the muscular swipes of drummer Guy Tornel assault, the eruption an instant intimidation. Just as pungent are the throaty tones of Axel Richet’s bass, its grouchy touch the perfect ally to the twisted enterprise and sonic invention of guitarist Kevin Chesnais. It is striking stuff, if not yet majorly surprising, though the already impressive and enjoyable diversity to and mix of vocals, clean and hostile, has thoughts and emotions absorbed by song and its blossoming originality. Comfortable raging and bruising the senses or serenading them, the track entangles djent ferocity and death metal viciousness with progressive and melodic toxicity, the result one heavily engaging and commanding song.

Things only grow bigger inventively and impress more as Deci (Mate) takes over, to be followed by the just as exciting Violette. The first of the two has no need of a gentle persuasion in its AS_infantile_vision_ep_cover (300 DPI)start, thumping beats and squirming sonic acidity surrounding ears as Rouland unleashes his guttural belligerent might. Featuring Chris Barretto of Monuments, the song proceeds to savage and charm with spurts of melodic calm and seduction amidst a hellacious landscape of riffs and rhythms. Enticing grooves and deeply rooting hooks are no strangers to the storm either, both offering tempering persuasion within the corrosive atmosphere. Eventually welcoming a wonderful passage of melodic mystique and eye of the storm beauty, the track emerges as the best of the EP, a destructive beast with at times the warmth and peace of a sunrise. Its outstanding successor also uncages venom dripping snarls and bewitching radiance, all within unpredictable and severely tempestuous scenery. As the previous track, it roars and blusters, smooches and prowls around the listener, coming at them from numerous angles and twists of ideation simultaneously. In the hands of another you imagine things would unravel and fall into that chaotic well of going too far, but Amber Sea hold everything which bursts from their minds and skills with superbly accomplishment and riveting craft.

The song’s at times poetic drama makes way for Shinigami, a serpentine trespass of ears and psyche but prone to lapses of melodic and exotic imagination. As proven by all songs, its deep avenues of ideas, sounds, and ferocious enterprise are not suited to one or two listens, but offers ever massing rewards for a concentrated attention whilst confirming Amber Sea as a band destined to and deserving now of enthused intrigue and full attention.

The release is brought to a close by Black Materia: Meteor. Including a guest appearance of Pierre Dane from Kadinja, the track rages and infests the senses with debilitating noise and vocal spite from its first breath. The ever pleasing vocal depth and diversity shines but is courted by the jagged surface of the riffs and the erosive intensity of the song in general, whilst keys paint a warmer hue to the forceful lyrical narrative and intent.

It is fair to say that every twist and turn, surface and corner of Infantile Vision is forcibly impressive, every listen ironing out more of the pernickety ‘issues’ which could be offered up. Such the pleasure and welcome surprise incited by Amber Sea and their introduction to the world, a full recommendation of they and their excellent debut is all that is left to say, especially to fans of bands such as Architects, Monuments, Periphery, and Gojira.

Infantile Vision is available from February 10th via Famined Records @ http://www.victorymerch.com/merch/packages/56429/amber-sea-infantile-vision-shirt-free-download-package

https://www.facebook.com/thisisambersea/

RingMaster 10/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today