Maziac – Forged

When a release instantly and impressively smacks you in the face and proceeds to tease, taunt, and fascinate thereon in you know there is something rather special in the brewing. Forged is one such proposition, the new album from UK based outfit Maziac devouring ears and attention from its first breath and only continuing to captivate with its eclectic body through every passing second.

Formed in 2017, the London residing trio of guitarist/vocalist Tony Best, bassist/synth player Tim Stokes, and drummer Marc Vachon have already faced potent fan and critical praise through their first EP, the Justin Hill (SikTh) mixed and mastered Parallel unveiled in the May of 2018. Its success alongside the band’s rousing sound and live presence has led the band to share stages with the likes of The Ever Living, Epsilon, Derange, On Hollow Ground, and Winchester; it all adding to their growing reputation. All previous acclaim though should be quickly paled by that destined to be garnered by Forged, one of the year’s brightest gems so far.

Again recorded with Hill, Forged erupts with an immediate predacious hunger, opener Symptomatic a tempest sweeping in and consuming the senses. Rhythms bludgeon as riffs dismantle the senses, Best’s vocals just as urgent and rapacious as a cyclone of djent/technical and alternative metal/rock disgorges its rabid temptation. It is a starting introduction which only continued to incite and thrill as the song reveals its craft and prowess. As quickly and continually proven, Maziac have a sound which enjoyably proves very difficult to pin down with references to others but certainly within its ferocious sonic kaleidoscope essences resembling bands such as Fear Factory, Deftones, The Contortionist, Between the Buried and Me, and Spineshank swirl.

It is a stunning start keenly and powerfully matched by the following Escapism. Relatively restrained in comparison, the track still prowls with a definite predatory intent; its rich body wrapped in melodic wiring as alluring as they are cutting. Best’s vocals equally have a calmer harmonic edge in a delivery as varied as the sounds around it, the band’s alternative rock instincts a thick colour to the inventive metal of the song. It is hard not to think of the track as a beast, stalking and preying on willing ears tempted by sonic plumage of inventive temptation.

Cortisol teased an already eager appetite right away with the rhythmic rapping of Vachon, his beats taunting attention as the guitar brews up its subsequent eddy of bold enterprise and melodic flaming. The song’s progressive nature shapes its imagination; rock ‘n’ roll contagiousness fuelling the animated gait of unpredictability. There is a touch of Voyager to the track as too Muse but once again, it emerges solely Maziac before Prisoners saunters in with its swiftly beguiling lures. A whiff of The Kennedy Soundtrack shades its beginnings, a Muse-esque hue adding to the mix as the riveting track unfurls its intrepid enterprise and adventure to challenge for best track honours.

The melodic intimation of brief instrumental Vicissitudes had the imagination conjuring ready for the far more feral but composed dynamics of Again. Once more progressive and djent elements collude in its buoyant design, Stokes’ bass not for the first or last time a rousing snarl of incitement in the midst of skilled melodic and sonic endeavour. It is fair to say that as potent tracks are on first listen, each following play only reveals fresh depths and textures for greater rewards as no better proven than here.

Deceptive of its title, Allure instantly embroils ears in a pestilential cauldron of metal but soon relishes the band’s melodic dexterity and the almost poppy catchiness that breeds. It is a thunderous encounter teasing with glimpses of the peace at the eye of the storm, never giving in to predictability or anything less than compelling while closing track, Resolution, casts its own experiment in texture and tone to bring the album to a fine close. In certain moments almost primal in its climate and in others like a melodic sunspot, the song just enthralled as another aspect to the Maziac sound and imagination is shared.

With Forged ringing in our ears it is easy to be excited about what is ahead for and from Maziac because as suggested, they have created one of the year’s finest moments so far.

Forged is released July 5th; available @ https://maziacband.bandcamp.com/album/forged

https://www.facebook.com/MaziacBand/   https://twitter.com/maziacband

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Borders – Purify

Described by the band as years in the making, Purify bares all the intensities, angst, and determination which you can assume accompanied its journey. The debut album of UK metallers Borders, it is a cauldron of emotion, passion, and sonic dissonance delivered with an energy and prowess which demands and indeed commands eager attention.

Lincoln hailing, Borders has been busy luring keen praise and support since their pretty much first days but especially since the release in 2017 of their second EP, Diagnosed. In many ways it was a potent teaser to Purify though the album swiftly reveals it is a massive leap in craft, imagination, and adventure whilst building on the striking groundwork of its predecessor. Live the band is renowned for its dynamic and power soaked presence, one definitely captured within the imposing, often infectiously corrosive, and always compelling tempest of Purify.

The album is a ravening cyclone of varied metal bred styles and textures, a fusion as hostile and brutal as it is skilled and unapologetically captivating. Led by the magnetically bold and versatile tones of Jordan Olifent, the ten tracks making up Purify entice as they devour, arouse as they punish. Opener 731 quickly shares the virulent nature and ferocious intent of the band’s sound, the dexterity in its making as open as the song sidles up to ears from a distance, quickly teasing and enticing with a web of lures from guitarist Gavin Burton. Soon it is dominantly striding forth, the rhythms of bassist Tom Britton and drummer Daniel Hodson inciting and biting as Olifent’s raw throated squalls infest ears and song alike. Continuing to ebb and flow in its aggression whilst concentrating its lyrical observation and emotive intensity across an ever twisting landscape, the song is a powerful start and draw into the heart of the album.

It is quickly eclipsed though by the following Wake Up which from its first breath is seducing and ravaging the senses; djent and death nurtured enterprise colluding with sonic and melodic taunts as vocals again bring a great fusion of attacks to the feral trespass. No prisoners are taken in word and sound with every syllable and note a virulent incitement before Damage Everything jabs and swings at the listener with its own individually contagiousness enmity. It too outshone the song before for personal appetites, an Anti-Clone-esque essence adding to its voracious character and grippingly unpredictable tempest.

The even darker and heavier climate of Bad Blood follows, melodic toxicity uniting with physical ferocity as easily as harmonic backing aligns with Olifent’s flesh scarring causticity. At times there is a portentous calm to the atmosphere of the track, one bringing greater discontent to the breath of the track before its instinctive animosity is embraced and twisted into another major highlight of Purify in the rousing crossover/ extreme discord of War. The track epitomises everything potent in the Borders sound, melodic and bloodthirsty enterprise fused in another savagely inspiring provocation.

As Demon’s Reach, with its equally barbarous and adventurous infestation of imagination and craft, and the hardcore lined Nothing To Lose consume and ignite attention and appetite, Purify only tightened its grip and fascination with next up A World Apart adding yet another creatively fierce and esurient peak to its impressive landscape.

Purify is definitely as album which caught and hooked our ears from the off but provides so much more pleasure and revelation with further attention, each play unveiling another layer and texture to the character and individuality of tracks as proven by the predator that is Faded. With every listen fresh nuances are revealed to its surface blood thirst, melodic and sonic rapacity woven with increasing craft and imagination highlighted by the play with its briefness accentuating its feral magnificence.

Closed up by the boisterously crawling exploits of Walking Dead, a prowling unrelenting devourment of the senses and the political chaos of today, Purify just consumed the spot. The lengthy time of its making has no doubt brought many frustrations to the band but used as further fuel to the rage against the toxic state of the world which has inspired the heart, imagination and skill within one mighty beast of an album.

Purify is out now via Long Branch Records and available @ https://borders.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/BordersBandUK/   https://twitter.com/BordersbandUK

Pete RingMaster 21/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chandrian Kill – Bring Out Your Dead

Maybe there should be no surprise the craft and magnetism to the Bring Out Your Dead EP, the debut release from British outfit Chandrian Kill, but it still makes for a strikingly unexpected and attention entangling introduction. The band is the creative union of vocalist Nic Whitmore who previously fronted Number One Son and songwriter/guitarist Ted Clark renowned for his past creativity as part of Moesaboa and Life in the Making. Both men have been a potent part of the UK metal scene and are looking likely to continue so as Chandrian Kill.

Clark began writing for Chandrian Kill a couple of years back; in time contacting Whitmore and luring him back from his long break from music to develop and arrange the songs. This led to the duo entering the studio this past March to record the three tracks making up Bring Out Your Dead. Subsequently mixed and mastered by Brad Tuttle (Seventh Studios), the EP has emerged a riveting proposition with its weave of predacious melodic metal with the eager animation of alternative metal aided by more than a hint of the gnarly attributes of djent.

Bring Out Your Dead opens up with new single I Collide. Instantly voice and guitar link up in a rich melodic lure as darker rhythms keenly prowl. It is a warm enticement though swiftly showing its volatile nature as irritability surfaces through djent natured trespasses and rawer throated vocals. Similarly there is an increase of fire to the melodic enterprise as the pair creates a cauldron of contrasts and emotive intimation in the music alone, Whitmore’s ever alluring vocals sharing that internal conflict within the exploration of the external one perpetually working away through our lives.

It is a captivating introduction to release and band which is as powerfully backed by the calmer but even darker Filter Off. Its entrance is a sonic mist of sorts but soon spreading for the wiry melodic and rich vocal enticement of the track to involve ears and imagination. As with the first, shadows lurk and rise in vocals and sound as the track revolves its unpredictable spiral of emotive suggestion. The turns become more voracious and antagonistic as the song proceeds, each twist a new fresh proposal to get enticed by with an increasing appetite.

Remain Alive concludes the release, the track casting its own individually melodic flames within another tempestuous climate. Its turmoil though has a stronger temper in the melodic web of the song, keeping it relatively restrained throughout though it is always bubbling away trying to break free. It is a tension crafted by Clark which is emulated in the vocal dexterity of Whitmore, the pair creating a trespass as fearsome as it is seductive.

The first in a sequence of planned EPs, Bring Out Your Dead as forcibly pleasures as it mercifully captivates. The band’s sound has been referenced to the likes of Deftones and Stone Sour, and there are moments when Skyscraper (the great nineties rock outfit) flicker in thoughts, but truthfully Chandrian Kills have a sound individual to all and just as flavoursome as all mentioned.

Bring Out Your Dead is out now via Bar3 Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Chandriankill/   https://twitter.com/ChandrianKill

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

First Signs Of Frost – The Shape Of Things To Come

Pic Ben Ashton

The Shape Of Things To Come is the first EP since British rock band First Signs Of Frost emerged from a hiatus a couple of years back; its title as much a declaration of the fresh blossoming sound and creative chapter within the band as the themes it explores across five absorbing tracks.

Formed in 2004, the quartet of guitarist/vocalist Owen Hughes-Holland, guitarist Adam Mason, drummer Will Gates, and bassist Dan Oehlman grabbed keen attention with their debut EP, In Our Final Chapter. 2007 saw Daniel Tompkins join up as lead vocalist before the acclaimed release of first album Atlantic and a period see the band play alongside the likes of Deaf Havana, Enter Shikari, Architects, You Me At Six, We Are The Ocean, Senses Fail, Devil Sold His Soul and many more. Before the fuss had settled around the release, Tompkins left to join TesseracT. His departure left a gap the band struggled to fill; thus their hiatus until Hughes-Holland resurrected the band in 2015. Linking up with Mason again as well as bassist Andy C Saxton (ex-Cry For Silence), vocalist Daniel Lawrence (ex-Kenai / All Forgotten), and drummer Alex Harford, the London quintet immediately sought to explore and push their sound to new imaginative heights with The Shape Of Things To Come the first glimpse of their success.

Immersing inspirations from the likes of Deftones, Tool, Further Seems Forever, and Glassjaw into their invention, First Signs Of Frost swiftly lures ears with opener Meat Week. Its atmospheric calm is a quick enticement, the gentle caress of guitar a matching lure before the brooding air also there sparks a bolder expulsion of sound. Lawrence’s vocals immediately impress, his melodic expression matched by the colluding warm and wiry textures of the sounds around him. An infectious energy is equally as persuasive within the song, every element bold without being forceful but making a strongly emotive and technically alluring temptation on ears and imagination.

The following White Flag potently backs up the great start; its enterprise similarly resourceful and ear catching without making over aggressive trespasses upon the senses. There is elegance to the First Signs Of Frost sound which charms as the craft of the individuals captivates; again making for a gentle almost smouldering seduction carried in a contagious and skilfully conjured proposal.

Latest single Look Alive Sunshine is next up with its own individual melodic rock venture veined by djent scented progressive metal intricacies. There is jaggedness which bites as the vocals and melodies hug the senses; a union which grips and lingers even if the song just fails to touch the plateau of its predecessors before the evocative climate and atmospheric ambience of Atlantis drifts in with the superb vocals of Lawrence and keys to the fore. An instinctive emotional intensity rises within the song, simmering down again before repeating its cycle within the graceful serenade.

The EP closes with Sharks; it too an initially serene coaxing but one soon revealing its djent nurtured teeth and creative volatility within a subsequent sea of melodic and technical but emotionally inflamed tranquillity. It is a fine end to a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable release. The Shape Of Things To Come feels like the first step towards something bigger and bolder but is a full pleasure in its own right; a mix which makes First Signs Of Frost a band which just has to be followed closely.

The Shape Of Things To Come is out now via Basick Records and available @ https://basick.supplies/collections/first-signs-of-frost or http://music.basickrecords.com/album/the-shape-of-things-to-come

https://www.facebook.com/FSOFofficial/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Life’s December – Colder

Lifes-December_RingMasterReview

It is probably apt with it being called Colder, that ears feel like they are amidst an unstoppable sonic avalanche listening to the new album from Swiss metallers Life’s December. It is a proposal which devours and obliterates the senses, leaving them bare to the emotional trespass and creative enmity which fuels the band’s raw deathcore tempest. It is a punishing proposal even more intimidating with the band’s embracing of djent bred animosity within their sonic savaging but equally a release which given time makes an increasingly compelling persuasion on the imagination.

Hailing from St. Gallen, Life’s December consists of vocalist Rico Bamert, guitarists Dave Mühlethaler and Valens Wullschleger, drummer Jérémie Gonzalez, and bassist Simon Mäder, a quintet which quickly has the imagination involved with album opener Final Speech. It is a scene setting, sonic landscape laying introduction with a portentous narrative being embraced by sonic mist before breeding a moment of predatory ferocity in vocal and sound. Instantly showing the band’s penchant for djent and down-tempo trespasses within a deathcore shaped animus, the track leads the listener into the initially subdued but soon ravenous jaws of Lest I Forget. Quickly in full venomous prowl, the track entwines corrosive riffs and toxic grooves, immersing them in a death charged tempest of sound and emotion driven by guttural vocals and a web of guitar and bass hostility. All the while though, an underlying sonic intrigue and adventure lurks, never quite breaking from the storm but persistently flirting and coaxing closer attention to match the lure of the vocal variety which also emerges.

Lifes-December-Colder_RingMasterReviewIt is hard to say that Life’s December is yet offering anything boldly new in sound but from this song alone there is plenty of fresh resourcefulness to get the teeth and appetite seriously into; a potent and dynamic persuasion which continues with Memories and World Of Blame. The first gets right under the skin in no time with its steely grooves and grouchy riffs. Once in control it then uncages a rapacious torrent of melodic intrusions and rhythmic rancor which in turn is soon involved in a net of more welcoming and emotively lively exploits. Across the song, the band seamlessly slips into mellower or more cancerous endeavours, contrasts and extremes skilfully woven together to create one of the more dramatically unique and memorable passages within the album. In comparison, its successor is a carnal tempest of noise and spite; a fall into sonic causticity and vocal ire which without matching up to its predecessors still has ears fully engaged especially as it expands its stark and increasingly cancerous landscape of sound and emotion.

The brief melodic seducing of Interludium allows a moment to reflect and engage with calmer essences within the band’s imagination before Snow Falls Silently envelops the listener in sonic and emotional confrontation. Once more, there is no major moment of uniqueness involved with the track but its virulent tide of riffs and invasive grooves grip attention, success whipped up further by the throat shredding vocals and their pungent intent and variety.

The austere yet intimately melancholic landscape of My Existence is revealed next, a passage of sound and emotion littered with melodic lures and primal eruptions within a chilled and ravaged ambience. From there, the album’s title track explores similarly evocative scenery of thought and tone but within a far more grievous soul sucking doom soaked climate equipped with rabid assaults of raw guitar and biting rhythms perpetually accentuated by the bone shuddering resonance of the bass. With mouth-watering spirals of sonic toxicity veining its body too, the song hits the spot whilst numbing the senses before the instrumental Hero Missing brings the album to a sombre close with, in many ways, its most disturbing emotional moment, certainly its most haunting.

There are moments within Colder that truly ignite a greedy appetite and other times where fascination takes over; successes which together ensures Life’s December, a band with striking potential, is worthy of proper attention as equally its re-release through Dark Wings.

Colder is out now via Dark Wings across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/LifesDecember

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Hacktivist – Outside The Box

Photography and editing by Perry Westphal

Photography and editing by Perry Westphal

It has been a fair time in the coming but the highly anticipated debut Hacktivist album is finally about to be uncaged. It is a rage living up to the heights and promise of the UK band‘s previous self-titled EP whilst pushing further the band‘s imaginative distinct fusion of nu/alternative /progressive metal with extreme and electronic textures aligned to rap/hip hop fuelled incitement. In some ways it is not bold enough in its exploration and creative drama. Occasionally there is the feeling that the band missed opportunities to create a landmark proposition, but truthfully from start to finish Outside The Box leaves an already established appetite for their sound more than thickly satisfied.

Emerging in 2011, it is fair to say that the Milton Keynes quintet has been leaving deep marks on the British metal/rock landscape whether through their ravenous live presence or that aforementioned EP and surrounding singles. They have been devoured by fans and media alike even with a sound naturally which is going to make as many enemies as long term friends such its unconventional and unpredictable character. Festivals have equally have embraced the band, and Hacktivist them by lighting up the likes of Reading, Leeds, Sonisphere, Rock Am Ring, and Rock Im Park these past years. So as suggested, Outside The Box has bred plenty of intrigue and expectations in the wait for its eventful arrival, a pressure it more than deals with, if without quite realising its own potential at times.

The album opens with Our Time; a track featuring Marlon Hurley which lays out a dystopian atmosphere as an emotive climate springs from keys and spoken vocals before the muscular weight and intensity of the band bears down on the senses and imagination. It is a stalking rather than an assault but with djent spicing to its teeth, the track is a waking up of attention for the following tempest of Hate. An electronic coaxing entices ears initially, though its touch is as sinister as it is magnetic, especially once the subsequently duelling and colluding vocal rapacity of J Hurley and Ben Marvin steer the descending storm. Like a cantankerous cousin to The Kennedy Soundtrack, the track lures and berates the senses; eventually unleashing its full animus with intrusive grooves from Timfy James and predatory rhythms spawned in the creative venom of bassist Josh Gurner and drummer Rich Hawking.

art_RingMasterReviewThe track is a gripping affair followed by Deceive & Defy. It is the first in a trio of re-recorded older tracks amongst eight new provocations, and features Jamie Graham from Heart Of A Coward as guest vocalist. With ambience soaked smog around a rapped narrative, the song’s entrance is restrained yet dramatic, increasingly so as firmly swung beats and agitated riffs build towards an open almost carnal hostility of sound and tone. The track swiftly and increasingly pleases yet it is one which maybe holds back and never quite delivers the raw intensity and explosive adventure hinted at and expected.

It is something Taken certainly offers; its snaky steel lined tendrils of guitar and combative mix of melodic, raw, and spat vocals firing up the passions for antagonistic confrontation alone. The band builds on that with imaginative slips into harmonious vocals and warm melodies shared by James, moments which surprise and reveal the blossoming invention of the band’s songwriting. With Rou Reynolds from Enter Shikari guesting, the song leaves ears and thoughts eagerly involved as does the instrumental, The Storm. It is an evocative moment in time reflecting the physical and emotional aspect of its name, time giving the listener time to regroup before No Way Back launches its dissension. With a scent of Heart of a Coward and Monuments to it, the track badgers and tears into the senses with its jagged stabs of guitars and barbarous rhythms, soothing the wounds with the sighing caress of keys whilst a triple threat of vocals keeps ears consumed and eager to embrace the volatile textures being blended.

A re-working of False Idols comes next, the song moving from an opening romancing to a mountain of groaning rhythms and gnarly riffs bound in viperish grooves. The track certainly pleases without making a big stir in its opening moments but as each passing minute uncages more creative and intimidating adventure, the song blossoms to impress in a way fresh to its original version, even though the differences are not as dramatic as they might have been. The track is a standard bearer all the same but eclipsed by Rotten which sees Astroid Boys and Jot Maxi involved. Weaving essences reminding of Tech N9ne and Twizted into a progressively atmospheric climate, the track simply seduces the imagination as it provides a new strain of invention and diversity to the album.

Elevate has been re-tuned for its place within Outside The Box, given new sonic oil and vocal attitude as it builds build on its first outing in the band’s earlier EP. It is a dogfight for ears and a showdown for emotions as it attacks and stirs up a bedlam of carnivorous textures and electronic trespasses. Melodic and harmonic caresses add a great tempering but they never subdue the thrilling discord and friction of sound and voice.

Lyrically the band is as sharp and incisive as expected but at times they seem to carry a chip on their shoulder which does not lie quite as well as their more politically incited targets. It is something which can be said about the album’s title track where, even with the broadening investigation of its narrative, it captivates most potently in sound.

The album is brought to an exhilarating close by firstly the volcanic and bestial enterprise of Buszy, a deft entangling of contrasting textures in a maelstrom of ire and creative intensity, and lastly by The Storm II, a melodically elegant and sonically ravenous flight into uniting emotional resonance and turbulence. Both provide a climactic and impressing close to an album which itself is only striking.

Whether Outside The Box could have been even more impressive and impacting will surely be debated, our thought being that maybe it missed a trick or two knowing the invention and craft of the band. From start to finish though, it had ears and emotions enthralled and greedy for more; a success no one can turn their nose up at.

Outside The Box is released March 4th via UNFD / Rise Records through most online stores and @ http://www.hacktivist.uk.com/store/products/outside-the-box-cd-2/

http://www.hacktivist.uk.com   https://www.facebook.com/Hacktivistband

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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I, Ohms – Parallel Connection

I, Ohms Promo_RingMasterReview

Making a potent debut with their new EP, US quintet I, Ohms is a metalcore band from Virginia with an appetite for fiery melodies and djent inspired confrontation. As the five-track Parallel Connection shows, the blend of flavours they embrace makes for an attention luring proposition which, without reeking of major originality, is fresh, aggressive, and an invitation to find out more.

Consisting of vocalist Andrew Belmont and guitarists Rachel Scott and Ryan Baggett alongside the rhythm section of bassist Andrew Horn and drummer Brittany Yarnell, I, Ohms is a bit of a mystery in background information but certainly forceful with their music. Their first release is proof of that; an encounter which drummer Yarnell talked about ahead of release, saying “Recording the EP was really fun and we’re super excited to be sharing it with everyone! It’s meant to reflect our darkest times and the way we heal; be it a riff that feels empty, a chaotic breakdown, or words that you would tell yourself repeatedly to dig yourself out of a hole. We’re all one way on the surface, but there’s so much more beneath.

Parallel Connection opens with Terms and Conditions which comes into view upon an ear caressing guitar melody. It has an evocative air which flirts with the imagination, all the time setting up the moment for carnivorous riffs and heftily swiping rhythms to erupt and invade the senses. Belmont’s raw growls are just as formidable too, but they, as the sounds around him, only leading to another twist of a clean vocals led stroll of melodic enterprise. As the song settles down a touch, all the elements are soon entangled as the unpredictable encounter grabs the imagination even tighter. Simultaneously it is a predator and temptress, the band weaving a tapestry of contrasting textures and volatile emotions to excite and wrong-foot with accomplished craft.

Deep Divide is even more predacious and intensive once taking over from its predecessor. The swinging beats and bass enticement borders on bestial as djent seeded riffs create a jagged wall of senses tearing teeth again backed by the harsh attitude of the vocals. As is soon realised with the band though, any uncompromising endeavour is cleverly tempered by melodic and harmonic imagination. The end product is something which may not be unique but always, as here, proves to have an individualism which sparks thorough enjoyment and intrigue.

The band’s songs also come with their own noticeable characters too; the following Civil War showing a more rabid nature compared to the controlled but ravenous stalking of the last song for example. To that though, it has no qualms about slipping into bolder passages of suggestive calm with infectious percussive bait as well as senses gnawing trespasses courtesy of the guitars. Together it all goes to create one of the most adventurous and arguably original tracks on the release.

The pair of Scream Your Heart Out and latest single End: Disclaimer brings the EP to a close. The first is an imposing tempest of sound and emotion from its first breath; a maelstrom of wiry grooves and bone cracking beats corralled by throat bruising vocals and a brooding bassline, not forgetting belligerent riffery. It too shows a great shade in catchy tempting and melodic dexterity, musically and vocally, whilst its successor is a drama of cantankerous sound drawn into an antagonistic brawl and a melodic soothing enticed into a harmonic hugging of the senses. It is a skilfully nurtured and shaped proposal, and with the previous song, taking favourite song honours with Civil War running them to a photo finish.

Parallel Connection is a very strong and increasingly impressing offering from I, Ohms; an introduction which suggests that the band is still developing its own sound but already has developed something rather refreshing about their music which can surely only blossom further.

The Parallel Connection EP is out now @ https://iohmsband.bandcamp.com/album/parallel-connection

https://www.facebook.com/iohmsband   https://twitter.com/i_ohms

Pete RingMaster 28/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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