Hardball – Dirty

We are not sure if the North East is Britain’s capital of rock ‘n’ roll trespass but there has been a definite vein of rousing rock bands escaping its depths over the decades. The latest is Darlington quartet Hardball who have just uncaged their debut single/EP in the shape of Dirty. Offering three tracks as individual to each other as they are united in stirring up eager attention, the release is a bruising yet inescapably inviting slice of hard and punk rock embroiled in aggressive enterprise. It is also a potential stocked introduction from a band already sparking a real appetite to hear much more of.

Months maybe mere weeks old, Hardball consists of vocalist/guitarist Tim Smith, guitarist Phil Bailes, bassist Neil MacGillivray, and drummer Denz (Gareth Westgarth). There is little more we can tell you about the band though there is probably little more to share with the band so early in its emergence though you might recognise Denz’ uncompromising dextrous swings from bands such as Hung Like Jack, ill fated riot, and Supercharger.

Recorded live at White Wolf Studio, the band’s debut encounter swiftly had ears on board with opener Dirty. A lure of guitar dangles potent bait first, its classic rock feel a tease into the waiting rapacious embrace of the track. Riffs and rhythms instantly impose once unleashed but with incitement rather than threat while the harmonious tone of the vocals only adds to the rousing temptation already raised, as too the grooves which need seconds to get under the skin. Though surprises were few, everything about the track was fresh and distinctly individual ensuring that the first contact with Hardball was strong, highly enjoyable, and firmly memorable.

The invention within the song was soon escalating as Ballad Of John Fox stepped up next, the song a calm but bold saunter with shimmering melodies and intimation fuelled enterprise to its instrumental and a spirited raucousness to its vocal expulsions. It has an anthemic feel which grows by the minute and a great weave of guitar enterprise as bluesy as it is hard rock inspired.

Our favourite track though is Closed For Inventory, a real gem of a proposal from its initial groove draw to its punk ‘n’ roll roar and scheming rhythms. Carrying a predatory intent at times, especially when those delicious grooves steer the rack’s inescapable manipulation, the final track stole the passions with ease here even against the definite prowess and quality of its companions.

With a first release, any band can only hope for attention and an awakening of their presence as its main success and Hardball will surely achieve that and much more with Dirty. You want some honest, spirit sparking rock ‘n’ roll? Then look to the North East for some Hardball.

https://www.facebook.com/Hardballrock/

Pete RingMaster 28/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Aborym – Dirty

Aborym2

Listening to Dirty, the new album from Italian industrial metallers Aborym, takes thoughts back to the early days of the genre when Ministry and Godflesh corrosively chewed senses and KMFDM had a true snarl to their sound. It was the time when the genre was at its purest, as generally any style is at its seeding time, and when there was a malevolence and creative spite which arguably has since dispersed over the past decade in the industrial arena. Formed in 1992 the band has continued and explored their origins, combining the essences of the genre from back then with blackened venom and extreme metal savagery. Aborym have set high standards across the years which have inspired and shaped the intent of a wealth of bands and it is with confidence that you can assume Dirty will continue that influence.

Released through Agonia Records, the sixth album from the ignites fires in the passions but as easily quells them at times too, it is an experience of mixed ideas and results but one which is thoroughly captivating and deeply intriguing from start to finish. Like their sound overall, the album unleashes a predatory expanse of what they call “hard-industrial-electro extreme metal”, an unpredictable confrontation which is lingering and at times irresistible. The trio of Fabban (vocals, bass, programming, synth), Paolo Pieri (guitars, keyboards, programming), and Bard Eithun “Faust” (drums), whose past and current invention is found in bands such as Emperor, Hour Of Penance, Mongo Ninja, and Blood Tsunami, take thoughts and senses on an intense and caustically carved journey through black hearted emotive depths and synapse challenging intrusions.

Opening track Irreversible Crisis has a tantalising beckoning to recruit thoughts from the start, its blend of sizzling metallic pulsesAborym_dirty_cover300dpi_rgb within a scrappy blistered ambience evoking instant thoughts before the ravaging blackened charge of sonic malevolence consumes the ear. It is a viciously driven persuasion with the vocals of Fabban squalling with serpentine intensity upon the rhythmic bombardment and quarrelsome riffing. It is not long though before the industrial veins move in to shift the emphasis and creative temptation, the vocals seizing a Marilyn Manson like enticement whilst the song itself moves from a black metal like scourge through to an electro industrial wantonness. Imagine Behemoth meets Ministry and Treponen Pal before engaging with Wiseblood and The Amenta and you get an idea of this outstanding track and start.

The following Across the Universe wraps its electro arms tightly around the ear initially before slowly stretching its metal sinews and resonating breath into another intensive provocation. Clean vocals set the narrative up with potent clarity whilst the melodic teasing of the song inspires thoughts before being drenched in a squall of blackened toxin. Though not as immediate in its persuasion as its predecessor, the song is a riveting sonic travelogue through rapacious and magnetic scenery which reveals and persuades more with each subsequent course.

Next up the title track is a filth clad tsunami of nastiness, its erosive breath working silently behind the violent hunger and insidious exploits created by the venomous maelstrom elsewhere. It is the brink of the abyss, its industrially sculpted ferocity a virulently contagious assault with an intensity and energy which is hellacious at best and primal destruction at its most rabid.

Both the scintillating Bleedthrough, a track which infuses a storm of blackened carnivalesque like sounds, diverse essences, and exhausting emotive warfare, and the nightmare that is Raped by Daddy, continue to keep the album on the highest plateau. The second of the two  breeds its deepest agonies  through a magnetic mesh of extreme and electro metal, rhythms chewing on bone whilst the sonic acid scars beside a seductive electronic coaxing. Once at the heart of its distress there is a bottomless pit of emotive torment impacting on every sense, thought, and emotion, making for an experience which is lingering and explosive.

From this point on things do not find the same potency and draw as the first half of the album, though songs like I Don’t Know, even with its dodgy clean vocals at one point, The Factory of Death and closing song The Day the Sun Stopped Shining never find less than full involvement from the mind and attention from the ear for their still inventive and expressive enterprise. Amongst them one more pinnacle does shine through. Helter Skelter Youth is a schizophrenic fire of industrial, avant-garde, and electro devilment, an insatiable fury upon the listener with a thrilling body of epidemically infectious invention.

Though not holding on to its full triumph across all its length Dirty is an outstanding album which feeds the appetite for the origins of industrial metal whilst refusing to neglect the experimentation and intensive adventure of the now. Also released with a second CD available only on digipack, double gatefold LP featuring covers of tracks by Iron Maiden, Pink Floyd and Nine Inch Nails, two completely re-arranged and re-recorded tracks older songs and one new track, the album is a must investigate release as a bare minimum for all fans of the genre.

www.facebook.com/aborymofficial

8/10

RingMaster 29/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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