Parasitic Twins Interview

Having been more than taken with their the debut EP, ‘All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other’, it is with pleasure we bring you a recent interview between its creators, British hardcore duo Parasitic Twins, and our guest and friend Elliot Leaver.

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Dom Smith (drums): I’m Dom. Max (guitars, vocals) is the other one. He’s the talented. He’s too busy, and important. You can’t sit with him.

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

DOOM.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

Bongripper. Death. Generic Questions

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

It’s a Dillinger Escape Plan song, and an accurate reflection on our relationship.

How did you approach this release (All That’s Left To Do Now, Is Sleep With Each Other EP) in terms of writing and recording?

We went in to Melrose Yard Studios in York, worked with another dude with exactly the same name as me. He’s way more talented than me also. It was a pleasure. We wanted a live feel, and that’s what we got. We put ourselves under pressure to come up with three songs, it was tough but if you like it, then we’re happy. Do you like it? If you want to know what the songs are about, do check out the lyrics on Bandcamp: https://theparasitictwins.bandcamp.com/

Max is influenced by people he meets, sees and despises, mostly.

Did you try anything differently this time around than with previous efforts?

We both loved being in Seep Away, but we realised that we have to much respect for each other’s completely pointless misery to separate when that band died a tragic, horrible, fiery death. We’re stuck together now, and there’s nothing we can do about it. So, the only thing we did differently this time was work with each other instead of two or three other musicians. It’s been DELIGHTFUL.

What was it like to record the EP?

We recorded it live, and that’s the way (uh-huh, uh-huh) we like it, for now.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

I like them all. I hope you do too! Wouldn’t it be weird if you published an interview with me saying I hated everything I’ve ever put drums on?

Explain the meaning behind the album title.

Those that know, know. But basically, me and Max have done everything else but sleep with each other, so that’s that. I mean, we’ve never done anything sexual, just to clarify. But, there’s still time, I suppose. He’s so miserable, but I do love him. He has nice pectoral muscles, FYI.

Do you have any dates lined up at present?

Not right now, I’m in a new relationship, not with Max though. Other than that, we play Oldham, Ashton-Under-Lyne, York, Hull and Stockport with our mates in The Carnival Rejects – it’s our first “tour”, and I say it like that, because it isn’t really a tour, but it’s a series of dates, and that’ll be lovely.

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

Massive’ and a bunch of new ones that we’ve not released yet. I’m excited to do those. There’s one called ‘Autopsy’, and it’s very cheery, as you might imagine.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

Seep Away played a couple of shows with Hands Off Gretel, they were great. BUT, with this band, we’re looking forward to shows with Pat Butcher, and Carnival Rejects.

Worst shows? Our first band, not (Seep Away), played with a terrible goth band beginning with R and ending in hombus. One of that band’s members was a dick to my friend, and that’s not okay. Aside from that, it wasn’t our most triumphant show. Maybe because there was too much smoke. Goths love smoke.

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

Code Orange, or Turnstile.

What’s the plan for the rest of 2018?

Celebrating the fact that this interview happened. Thank you for your attention.

https://www.facebook.com/ParasiticTwinsBand

Check out our review of ‘All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other’ @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2018/10/17/parasitic-twins-all-thats-left-to-do-now-is-sleep-with-each-other/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

RingMaster Review 07/12/2018

Lower Automation – Shoebox Companion

Two years ago Chicago trio Lower Automation seared and pleasured ears with their debut EP Maps.  Now the band returns with its successor in Shoebox Companion and six tracks which also scorch, disorientate, and simply excite the senses and imagination. In some ways it is more of the same invention found in that first release pushed and taken to a whole new plateau but in far more avenues it is a new rabid animal of sound and enterprise.

Creating a ravenous spiral of math punk and rabid noise which never takes a moment to relax its tempest, the threesome of guitarist/vocalist Derek Allen, bassist Brian Sutton, and drummer Matt Walen use bare seconds to infest ears and peace. As proven by both EPs, it is a welcome invasion which despite its individuality, an essence escalated within Shoebox Companion, breeds part resemblance to a feral mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, At The Drive In, and mclusky.

Shoebox Companion opens up with Coax, a track immediately luring attention though there is nothing gentle or gradual about its initial sonic trespass. The corkscrew of guitar which instantly erupts is seductively violent as too the rampant rhythms which join it. Sutton’s bass is a grumbling joy while Allen’s subsequent vocals are mellow and charming against the building meshuga of sound.  It is all though just the trigger to greater disorientation in sound and imagination as the track creatively veers this way and that like a dervish; every one of its spiky wires adding to the pleasure.

It is a glorious start kept in full charge by next up Cattle Prod Hypochondriac. Allen’s voice and guitar ravages the senses from the song’s first breath yet it is an infectious violation driven by the rapier swings of Walen and the ever compelling guttural rumble of Sutton’s bass. Discord and dissonance flood every turn, the tangle of sound as unpredictable as it is virulent across two and a half minutes of inventive chaos.

Tethered has a touch more control to its maelstrom as harmonic strife and relative calm align within the song’s sonic chasm. The irritable incursion of rhythms equally makes for a tempering contrast to the intoxicated antics of the wailing guitar; it all uniting for increasing layers of magnetism before 30 Second Song provides just that but a half minute of carnal magnificence with more than a whiff of early Birthday Party to it.

The final pair of Phil and Phyllis Philler and Swing Flesh ensures the EP’s high never dipped. The first has the body bouncing as the senses cower before its citric assault, both eagerly taking a breath within the song’s post rock nurtured lulls which bring the imagination further into play whilst its successor is a visceral fingering of psyche and anatomy. Its skeletal dance is irresistible, the rhythmic animation addictive, and sonic mutation bewitching; the perfect end to a moment of creative voracity.

Lower Automation powerfully announced its arrival with the psychotic frenzy of the acclaimed Maps, now they have not only underlined their presence but declared themselves an essential proposition with one of the year’s musts in Shoebox Companion.

Shoebox Companion is available now @ https://lowerautomation.bandcamp.com/album/shoebox-companion

http://lowerautomation.com/    https://www.facebook.com/lowerautomation   https://twitter.com/lowerautomation

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Deathflux – Execrated

With its members previously part of death metal outfit Cacodaemonic and one of our favourites in progressive metallers Akarusa Yami, there was certain anticipation in hearing the debut album from British metallers Deathflux and Execrated certainly rewards that intrigue and excitement. It is a raw and uncompromising trespass upon ears and senses quipped with rich enterprise the imagination quickly took to.

Formed in 2016 by Nottingham guitarist Tom Clarke, who as mentioned enlisted band mates from his former propositions, Deathflux creates a sound which cannot be precisely pinned down. Led by a rousing and enjoyable senses abusing dual vocal attack, the sextet entangle everything from death and heavy to technical and groove metal with plenty more flavouring involved. Their first year saw the Bludgeon, Consume, Transcend EP uncaged, the band’s second bringing the current line-up together with vocalist Adam Jones joining the raucous bellows of Patrick MacDonald. Now Deathflux is ready for full and hungry attention which it is very easy to expect to be crowding them through Execrated.

It is a release which from opener Forsaken which manages to grab ears and captivate as it trespasses the senses while hinting we are just in on the beginnings of even bigger and bolder things ahead. Maybe that means there is an open potential not quite realised within the album yet it just adds excitement for the future to that gained though the bracing assault of the release. The first track immediately infests the listener as the twin fury of the vocals joins the predacious lure of the guitars and instantly threatening touch of the rhythms.  Soon as it hits its imposing stride, the song winds its creatively malicious tendrils around ears, animosity matched in the individual and united antipathy of the vocalists. Often lurching along between its fevered intrusions as imagination fuels twists and turns, the track lays potent seeds for things to come.

The following Consume finds an even more predatory lilt to its voice and presence, extreme and melodic metal converging on ears and each other as again vocals challenge as they align their discontent. Dissonance soaks every note, syllable, and word; its dystopian coating breeding a conspiracy of enterprise and imagination within the track and subsequent album as proven by next up Devolution. Similarly woven yet individual in its character and rapacious attack, the song springs nu metal hues into its infestation of styles and the web of rancor woven from them. It too jabs and snaps as well as careers across the senses, the guitars alone weaving magnetic intrigue and adventure including a delicious groove as rhythms blossom in their predatory dynamics.

Toxin initially dances in ears with catchy intent, it’s pent up animosity and frustrations waiting to be subsequently unleashed through the riveting exploits of vocals and the persistently unpredictable landscape of the song. As much as all its predecessors hit the spot, the track truly grabbed our attention and appetite, that intimation of even richer and bolder layers to the band’s creativity a nagging pleasure.

Easily our favourite track, it is more than backed up by Bludgeon which simply lives up to its title as it accosts the listener but an assault built with an imagination and diversity of touch which at one point seems to embrace inspirations of a Slipknot or Mudvayne in other moments the likes of Fear Factory and Dillinger Escape Plan.

Next up Transcend is even more bullish and irritable, deathcore traits seeping venomously into its grooved trap set by the guitars, Clarke relishing the dynamics as he casts melodic dexterity into the thrilling mix before Exile brings the album to a vicious conclusion. It epitomises every aspect of the band’s sound; from their ferocious energy and nature to the creative touch and technical flair each member brings to the war.

Though first impression were potent, Execrated really flourishes over subsequent plays as each track reveals more of their individuality and invention which might have escaped notice first time around. Expect to be assaulted and richly pleasured by Deathflux’s first album and anticipate being addicted as its potential ignites in the future.

Execrated is out now through iTunes and other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/deathflux/   https://twitter.com/deathfluxband

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Czar – Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal

cover-front_RingMasterReview

Finding something which stands out from the crowd let alone presents something truly unique gets harder and harder but Czar and their new album Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal easily tick both boxes. Creating a compelling experimental, bordering on psychotic, brew of sound bred in the raw essences of anything from progressive metal, hardcore, and grind to mathcore, post punk and more, all woven with avant-garde tendencies, the Tacoma, Washington based Czar infest ears and infect the psyche with relish. Certainly it is a challenge not all will take to, yet every intrusive assault, off-kilter trespass found within their album has an instinctive infectiousness which rewards as it devours. Like a mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, Mr. Bungle, and Psyopus, yet as suggested creating its own individual character, sound and indeed Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is one of those times when you really feel something special is in the making.

The album makes a subdued entrance with the beginning of Owls, etc; electronic throbs and melodic coaxing a minimalistic but potent lure. Soon the enjoyably strained and captivating tones of vocalist Dr. Landon Jared Wonser join in with lively beats and a brooding bassline alongside. The track is still restrained but smouldering greater volatility in its belly. With the funk of Red Hot Chili Peppers and the progressive lilt of The Fall of Troy laced into its Every Time I Die like swing, the song never does explode and only benefits from that teasing of expectations for a thrilling start to the release.

Too Many Yetis quickly follows; its agitated heart and enterprise a caustic invasion as the guitar of Nicholas J. McManus drizzles sonic psychosis upon the rhythmic battering of drummer David Joseph Dorran Jr. and Peter Joseph Ruff’s throbbing bass meandering. Its brief but potent escapade further whets an already awoken appetite before Arachnochondriac casts its unhinged waltz on the senses, guitars a web of irrational melody and bass a roaming grumble as the keys of Christopher Duenas intensely sizzle. It is a frenzied ear twisting affair as magnetic as those before it with its unstable yet skilfully nurtured trespass.

Antelope Mask steps to the fore next, it’s extremely short hunt the perfect appetiser for Beware the Flies, Orestes and its unleashing of a post punk woven landscape littered with cold stabbing riffs, steely grooves, and vocal predation. The eye of its tempest sees keys sharing a classical beauty as harmonies float behind the corrosive squalls of Wonser, the combination as riveting as it is enjoyably testing as it leads ears into the Latin kissed melodic festivity of Vultures Never Eat In Peace. This is a hot bed of unpredictability and cracked emotional turbulence hugged by the toxic sonic craft of guitar and the perpetual imposing enticement of rhythms; drama soaking every twist, sinister deceit each throat spewed syllable.

With a psychedelic lining, The Worm Enters the Moon prowls the listener next, its theatre of sound and imagination sharing attributes found in UK band Japanese Fighting Fish and indeed Dillinger Escape Plan. The open variety of the flavours making up the band’s sound and individual songs is already clear and only reinforced by Canine, No Eyes Just Teeth, spoken word nestling in raw lo-fi sound and straight after the ferocious punk and metal bedlam of Shark Cancer, a track suffocating and igniting the senses simultaneously. Its mordant assault is then matched by that of The Golden Calf, its breath scathing and touch scalding yet equally captivating as it fluidly shifts from venomous pattern to corrosive irritability; and even when the movement is more of a clunky sidestep it works perfectly.

Through the creative surf hued snare of Mister Reindeer and the melodic calm of Domesticated Wolves, ears and imagination are effortlessly reeled in with the rest of the body disturbed into compliance by the predatory jazz infested mania of the exceptional first and the poetic serenade of the second. That track is an oasis in the certifiable invention and nature of the album, a gripping dementia fuelling the crumbling climate and emotional erosion of You Were a Comatose Lion and in turn the jazzily bipolar Wine Hog, both revealing an array of crazed facets to their attention demanding personalities.

So often a nineteen track release is sharing a filler or four along the way but there is no such moment within Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal, the celestially bent x̌ʷiqʷadiʔ provoking grateful reactions while Blind Mice provides a bewitching espionage of twisted enterprise and haunted frenzy with interruptions of dark repose with their successors in Prawn and after that RxABBITS invasively exploring and stretching the psyche respectively. The later of the songs is especially striking with its incendiary fusion of raw and composed sonic belligerence.

Concluded by the minimalistic lure of Taking Roadkill to the Vet, a track warming up to the task of seducing the listener with sonic malignancy through every second of its low key but haunting  electronically spun three minutes,  Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is a rare gem as creatively murderous as it is formidably tempting. Czar themselves are a fresh breath which you will not have to go searching for; their music and talent will do the hunting.

Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is out now @ https://czar.bandcamp.com/album/life-is-no-way-to-treat-an-animal

http://czarband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/czartheband

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Hands – Nobody Exists on Purpose EP

thumbnail_ep-cover_RingMasterReview

Just over a year ago, we were taken by and aback by the noise infested fury of British band Sexwolf! and their debut release, the Hangin’ With The Boys EP. Our submission to their senses devouring sound was followed by their demise in the first half of this year. It was a frustration though quickly replaced by intrigue as three quarters of the band, linking up with one half of fellow Midlanders A Werewolf and a second guitarist, emerged as Dead Hands. They have just released debut EP Nobody Exists on Purpose and fair to say any gap left by the loss of one band has been more than filled by a new encounter which sears ears as it excites them.

Creating a maelstrom of fiercely infectious noise from texture reaped from the likes of mathcore, hardcore, grind, and numerous other punk and metal based savagery, Dead Hands have taken little time to stir up attention and it is easy to hear why with Nobody Exists on Purpose. The six track violation is an irritable tempest of abrasive sound and toe curling intensity delivered through an invasion of twisted hooks and demented grooves within a sonic savaging fuelled by some viciously catchy enterprise. It is merciless, at times painfully inhospitable, and constantly a joyously addictive abuse of body and senses.

It all starts with the band’s recent acclaimed single Open Bracket. Straight away guitars are squirting sonic toxicity, tangy riffs soon joined by the heavy insatiable rumble of bass and the scything viciousness of drummer Jenks’ rhythms. It is intensive furious stuff just as infectious as it is barbarous with Richard Phillips spilling his lyrical and vocal venom into the compelling mix. All the flavours mentioned above and more are in open sight within the furious turbulence, all adding to the thick lure of the track.

It is a sign of things to come within the EP, the following Elephants Crush People just as crabby and uncompromising and just as fascinatingly littered with unpredictable trespasses, inventively virulent hooks, and ear catching twists. A mix of The Chariot, Every Time I Die, and Dillinger Escape Plan is an obvious but maybe closest equivalent to the Dead Hands roar with additional Cancer Bats/Brutal Truth hostility.

Diving Board (Jack Christ-Ho) instantly and fractiously devours and punishes while gripping the appetite with more virulently contagious enterprise, it all springing from the Jenk’s initial rolling rhythms. Guitarists Niall Jones and Dabby Gough in turn lay their creative snares, further unavoidable traps as the song overwhelms and sparks body and mind into lustful responses. Of course this is not going to be for everyone but if noise does not annoy but inspires than Dead Hands have the ability to raise the strongest ardour through songs like this and its successor Buck Angel’s Challenging Movies. Arguably the catchiest proposal within the release, the track is a quarrelsome stomp led by the deliciously testy tone and grooves of Daniel San Mogg’s bass, its truculence matched by that of the guitars and vocals. Moments of calmer, post punk lined imagination only adds to the thrilling character of the song, the pinnacle of the EP with ease.

The closing pair of 7 Days (of Craig David) and Close Bracketté finish off Nobody Exists on Purpose, the first a mouth-watering ear plundering wall of heart bled enmity and sonic rancor while the last blasts and tangles ears in a tetchily red-blooded incursion of technical and emotional fury. Both tracks also come equipped with even bolder invention and experimentation and it is no coincidence that as each song gets braver the EP only gets stronger and more irresistible ending on a rousing high.

 Nobody Exists on Purpose is superb, a triumph in many ways with its seeds in the previous exploits of Dead Hand members but blossoming into not only something totally new to them but distinct to pretty much anything else out there. It is a must!

The Nobody Exists on Purpose EP is out now @ https://deadhandsband.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/deadhandsmusic   https://twitter.com/DEADHANDSBAND   https://www.instagram.com/deadhandsband/

Pete RingMaster 14/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mouth of Ghosts – Falling Down/Somebody Like You

Artwork_RingMaster Review

It has been two years since UK alternative rock band Mouth of Ghosts unveiled something new to captivate ears and ignite the imagination, but a time seeing the band grow creatively richer and bolder in sound and invention. Equally the already potent temptation in their songs has been honed into a thicker seduction; the evidence is all there in the London based band’s new single. Already this decade Mouth of Ghosts has given ardour an outlet through one of the decade’s best singles in the shape of When The Sun Sets, now they stoke the fire again with a pair of riveting gems, with as potent accompanying videos, in Falling Down and Somebody Like You.

The beginning of Mouth of Ghosts goes back to 2011, guitarist Simon Langford and bassist Marco Italia starting the project with vocalist Alla Seydalieva joining the pair soon after. With their band name taken from a Dillinger Escape Plan song, Mouth of Ghosts quickly whipped up ears and attention with debut EP When The Sun Sets in 2012, its title track as previously mentioned, the bewitching lead into a fascinating merger of romantic melodies, atmospheric textures, and a theatre of expression. The following year its successor, the You Will Go Again From Me EP confirmed the impressive emergence and potential of the band, luring a wealth of new fans and media attention in turn. Now it is the double A-sided single doing the inescapable tempting with real prospect of the trio, Langford, bassist Polyannidis, and drummer Phil Page stepping into the broadest, greediest spotlight.

Falling Down instantly kisses ears with melodic romanticism blessed with warm ambience and the stunning vocal lure of guest singer Elisa Zoot from Black Casino and The Ghost. The recognisable creative hue of Mouth of Ghosts is right there seducing the senses and appetite from the start but already there is a more dynamic energy to the structure of the song and its drama loaded textures. Keys court thoughts and emotions as rhythms build a shadowy landscape over which a sonic and vocal expression glides with infectious charm. A Portishead meets Jingo like air comes with the uniqueness of the song but also a less pronounced but spicy essence which reminds of The Capsules also warms the imagination. The song is aural seduction, a spellbinding slightly tempestuous hug filled with inventive drama, vocal beauty, and enthralling magnificence.

Somebody Like You is a different kind of temptation, a song again fuelled by the distinctive Mouth of Ghosts craft and imaginative colour but exploring a noir lit landscape with more than a hint of Bond inspired cinema to it. The song, as Zoot’s vocals, flow seductively but every element from the slow paced rhythms to the immersive croon are lined with a dark tint of shadowed emotion amidst a similarly smoky ambience. The track, as its predecessor, is pure magnetism; a compelling event in its own right that takes the listener into a world of dramatic aural alchemy.

Mouth of Ghosts has returned better than ever with two songs sure to linger in hearts and push the band to deserving new heights.

Falling Down/Somebody Like You is out now and available for download http://www.themouthofghosts.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheMouthOfGhosts     https://twitter.com/Themouthofghost

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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I Cried Wolf – Hollow Heart

Lamp Shade Press Shot _RingMaster Review

Real uniqueness in music is a long sought after and if we are honest rarely found aspect in the current music scene. But there are always a few exceptions and many more which come pretty close to finding that clear originality, and one such incitement is UK post-hardcore/punk ‘n’ rollers I Cried Wolf. The band is poised to release their new EP Hollow Heart, and it is a rousing roar of fierce invention and raw intimacy which sets the case for the Banbury quintet being the next big thing in certainly the British hardcore scene, if not its rock ‘n’ roll landscape, whilst creating an incitement which sets ears aflame and the band well away from the crowd.

Hollow Heart is a diverse and unpredictable encounter which you can at times reference to the likes of Dillinger Escape Plan and Every Time I Die as well as others such as Pantera and Reuben in certain moments and aspects, but an invigorating trespass on the senses and imagination which has a character and invention of its very own. The EP is the work of a band formed in 2012 and becoming quickly renowned for their ferocious live presence which has in turn garnered an increasingly potent and loyal following. The past couple of years or so has seen I Cried Wolf share stages with the likes of Bleed From Within, Hacktivist, Create To Inspire, Let’s Talk Daggers, Red Seas Fire, Bad Sign, and Surrender The Coast around the UK. Recorded with producer Sam Winfield (Bring Me The Horizon, Dry The River), Hollow Heart is the band’s broadest wake-up call for the country yet and one hard to imagine being ignored by very many.

Lyrically relating to the life of vocalist Harry Davies, “his reluctance to let go of the past….Of loss, lust, and betrayal”, Hollow Heart opens up with Scratching My Head With Ink and a scratching of riffs before exploding in a howl of sonic turbulence and vocal angst. To that though, is an immediate swing and volatile stroll bursting with imagination and quickly gripping hooks. The guitars of Louie Hodgson and Alex Gibbons cast raw smog of irritable riffs and gripping grooves whilst the drums of Oli Hampshire ransack the senses with their rugged yet rousing incitement. It is a thrilling and bracing proposal enhanced by the roaming throaty bassline spread by Jacob Rudman and the impassioned squalls from the lungs of Davies. That alone would be enough to provide potent bait for the appetite but it is the unpredictable nature of the song which makes a great song something special. The grooves just get heavier and spicier whilst Davies as he digs deeper into his emotions discovers a gripping Anselmo like grizzle to his delivery, whilst the song, well that just bristles punk attitude and heavy rock tenacity as it twists and turns.

ICW_Hollowheart_EP_RingMaster Review     The outstanding start is not let down by its successor, Massokiss Me an agitated swarm of toxic riffs and rhythmic rumbling from the off only breeding keener grooves, greater vocal diversity, and serious invention as it explores a host of flavours all bred in rock ‘n’ roll of some design. That subsequently leads into an impassioned post-hardcore seeded outpouring of melodic and vocal emotion, the track evolving within ears with broader and bolder enterprise before making way for the enthralling It Takes A Slave. It starts with a swing which is best described as blues meets ska punk meets jazz rock where Davies uncovers a dusty growl to his tones as the guitars weave a sultry enticing and the bass a funky lure behind him. It is an entrance which eventually expands into another fascinating and exciting entwining merger of diverse flavours, Faith No More a suggested hint to the ingenuity at play. Each song in a way is ordered bedlam, a vat of individual textures and styles twisted and aligned for songs which, as here, smash expectations and leaves a lingering and inescapable intrigue which simply draws ears keenly and swiftly back into its midst for more exploration.

Kensopia is a spiral of melodic revelry and suggestion from the off next, guitars almost duelling with their individual exploits as rhythms tenderise ears ready for the vocal prowess of Davies and band. Jagged riffs bring another new shade to the sound and release whilst an air of bands like Bring Me The Horizon comes forward briefly as the track moves on to pastures new and old in the strike of a chord or swing of a stick. It is another enjoyable aspect to the I Cried Wolf sound, it never stands still, always in creative motion meaning ears and thoughts have to be lively and willing to rerun the bruising fun again, and again to grasp all the rewards.

Sharkfeet brings Hollow Heart to its close, the track another cauldron of emotion and mouth-watering revelry in songwriting and a tenaciously uncaged tempest. Sonically burning, rhythmically intimidating, and consistently engrossing, the song simply boils over in adventure and almost psychotic invention yet, as all songs, manages to find a coherent and fluid passage across the whole of its explosive passage.

Impressive on the first listen and increasingly impacting and thrilling thereafter, there is only one word for Hollow Heart…remarkable!

Hollow Heart is digitally available from September 11th via Crooked Noise Records.

Pete RingMaster 11/09/2015

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