Opensight – Ulterior Motives EP

Opensight band picture smaller_RingMaster Review

Described as cinematic metallers, London based Opensight take ears and imagination on a drama laced, mystery fuelled adventure with their new EP Ulterior Motives. A collection of tracks which have thoughts running this way and that like a classic noir lit crime thriller and a weave of sounds which manage to be as intimate as they are expansively suggestive, and at times bordering psychotic, Ulterior Motives is a release which simply has the listener lost to the world within its riveting theatre.

Opensight is the brainchild of Colombian guitarist/vocalist Ivan Amaya, an idea which began in his homeland but realised and evolved further once he moved to the UK. Subsequently the band grew with the addition of guitarist Genia Penksik, drummer Redd Reddington, and bassist Danni Stanner. Originally a more concentrated progressive metal project the band’s sound and imagination has blossomed to embrace a vibrant array of genres and cinematic influences, which going by Ulterior Motives seem to embrace visual inspirations as well as soundtrack seeded ones. Debut album Prosthetic Soul was released in 2008 with the well-received The Voice of Nothing EP following two years later. For many though, us included, Ulterior Motives is the first introduction to Opensight and a meeting long overdue.

OPENSIGHT_Ulterior_Motives_RingMaster Review    The release opens with Alibi and a Nintendo-esque dance of electronic shimmer. It is soon clutched by a web of dramatic rhythms and melodic flaming which in turn spawns a sonic shuffle around the instantly striking tones of Amaya. Barely a handful of seconds in and the song is a creative jungle, hooks and grooves colluding with the darker shadows of bass and the lively attitude of drum beats. Atmospheric colour comes from wistful keys whilst the guitars spin a weave of grooves which understandably seem to incite Bond like references from a great many. We would not go quite that specific in their description but imagine Faith No More crafting the soundtrack to a sixties espionage themed show and you get some idea of the visual potency on the imagination and the intricate yet seemingly simple tapestry of sound seducing ears.

Such the persuasion of the track you are almost crouching in secrecy as you move to its instrumental lure, only stepping into bold clearance as the lyrical narrative returns and leads the song to its ripe end and into the waiting funk kissed arms of The Chase. Whereas the first song also had a feel of artists such as 6:33 and Diablo Swing Orchestra to it, its successor takes a more dramatically intensive turn nearer to a mix of Voyager and Native Construct, with at times a whiff of Between the Buried and Me. There is an adrenaline rush and urgency to the track which matches the hinting of its title, whilst seventies flavoured electronic bubbling only adds mystique and flirtatious intrigue to the whole exploration.

Vanishing Point explores more rugged scenery initially, subsequently settling into a sultry climate and evocative persuasion with crescendos of intensity and emotion. Vocally the song is a bit mixed, Amaya’s slow vocal walk not as powerful and impressive as his lung busting roars or anthemic incitements but it does not defuse the fiery blaze of sound and enterprise rippling through the song. All the same, the thoroughly enjoyable and captivating track does not quite spark ears and thoughts as successfully as the songs around it, especially the outstanding Ulterior Motif right after.

The track is a symphony of aural colour and imagination seducing tempting. A first slow caress blooms into a soundscape of exotic beauty and sinister shadows, a canvas inspiring new adventures with every listen and if any track was evidence of the band’s talent at cinematic songwriting alone it is this glorious flight of craft and suggestion.

The EP is finished by Antagonist, an emotional and physical cliff hanger of a finale driven by creatively imposing rhythms, fascinating sonic invention, and a vocal delivery which is part the story teller part the protagonist in it all. With smouldering beauty and jazzy elegance reminiscent of The Chase earlier, the song drifts and erupts with bewitching craft and ingenuity. Sometimes it feels like a celestial flight into the unknown and the broadest emprise and in other moments a close romance wrapped in personal mystique and earthbound theatre; and at all times slavery for body and mind.

It frustrates that it has taken to now to discover the band but better late than never as we suggest all think about immersing into the dark and enthralling world of Opensight.

The Ulterior Motives EP is available from September 4th

Pete RingMaster 04/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Acrania – Fearless

Acrania Color Publicity #1_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

You would imagine it hard to be thrown off kilter and truly surprised within the broad landscape of metal nowadays, even in the avant-garde and experimental realms which blossom and scintillate from the unique creative minds of bands like Trepalium, 6:33, Pryapisme, and Hardcore Anal Hydrogen to name a few. One band which has and continues to through new album Fearless is Mexican death metallers Acrania. The release is a psychotic fusion of extreme metal and lyrical confrontation with virulent Latin rhythms, celebratory melodic revelry, and schizophrenic imagination. You could call it death jazz or funk core to make up tags, we call it one of the most exhilarating encounters you will hear this year.

Mexico City based Acrania began in 2006, taking their time to unite and hone their blend of Latin Jazz and Metal before releasing their first encounter, the In Peaceful Chaos EP the following year. Three years later debut album Unbreakable Fury was unleashed, its well-received presence supported by the band playing a mini tour in Germany with the support of The Wacken Foundation. Its 2012 successor stirred up even more attention and acclaim, An Uncertain Collision named Best Album Of The Year in the Kalani Metal Awards. From there Acrania has extensively toured around Mexico and Europe sharing stages with bands such as Diablo Swing Orchestra, Death To All, Exodus, The Agonist, The Faceless, Legion Of The Damned, and Havok along the way. Now Fearless has all the qualities to thrust the quartet into the broadest keenest spotlight, and the presence to inspire listeners to salsa and bomba whilst head banging like a dervish.

Fearless explodes from its first breath through People of the Blaze, the opener a tidal wave of rigorous rhythms aligned to a hypnotic groove. Its air is instantly and furiously busy as a sonic aggression surrounds it all whilst percussion get rowdy and the vocals of rhythms guitarist Luis F. Oropeza growl and squall over the concussive web of sound. Predictability is as absent in the band’s sound and song as dullness, a quick step into a temptation of throaty bass and spicy jazz seducing from Alberto Morales G. and César A. Gallegos respectively, a trigger for hips and feet to heavily flirt with the floor. At the same time a trespass of bruising rhythms and metal bred antagonism becomes the spark to testing neck muscles. It is a fascinating and bewitching incitement which never settles in one form or moment for more than a clutch of body moves before twisting in on itself all over again for a breath-taking maelstrom of addictive flavours and incendiary intent.

Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     The excellent start continues through Poverty Is in the Soul, the beats of drummer J.C. Chavez S. a swift protagonist rifling through ears and stirring up an eager appetite. Its lively start slips into a reflective few seconds before challenging and inviting the listener through a slim but intimidating lead into the relentless fierce shuffle of its body. The sturdiest rhythms throw themselves around like a mosh pit whilst the more traditional percussive tempting just lights ears with exotic persuasion. The scythes of melodic and sonic enterprise from lead guitarist Gallegos equally spark the imagination, especially when they evolve into acidic strands of incitement alongside the same musician’s sax exploits.

Undoubtedly Fearless is a proposition needing numerous plays to explore all of its involved and finely entwined textures and corners, but equally it is an immediately impacting adventure sparking ears and energies as proven again by I Was Never Dead. The track is a bracing and hostile fury, though as much as it is fearsome it is irresistibly tempting as rhythms and sax stir up a hornets nest of lustful responses reinforced by another lively bass line and the spiralling invention of the guitars. The great rabid tones of Oropeza are the least adventurous aspect, his delivery pretty much the same raw assault on every track and for personal tastes and to be fussy lack the desired diversity to match the sounds, though to be honest it has no negative impact on songs at all. The malicious jazz of the song makes way for the funkier caustic escapade of Blinded by Power, it as expected a constant evolution slipping through ravenously aggressive, sublimely beauteous, and melodically charming climes in creating its progressive tango. It is a glorious adventure, a roller coaster of turbulence and melodic radiance before the punkish festivity of Overflow rouses ears and appetite into another seriously wanton greed, after which a respite for the body comes through the brief and evocative instrumental En el Puerto. Its quaint and nostalgic air slips into Hypocritical Conflict, an instant thick embrace of discord and raw intensity which brews and grows into a hellacious swamp of sound and agitation, though in turn that spins into a transfixing blaze of jagged jangly riffs and bass bait. Everything gets fiery and intense again before…well the changes and turns are numerous and a treat for all to find out in another major pinnacle of the album.

Man’s Search for Meaning starts with a hypnotic cacophony of percussive beats and a roaming dark bass line aligned to the potent narrative and tones of Oropeza. From there the song’s every second heads towards another seamlessly aligned and mixed collective of sounds, styles, and ingenuous ideation. As the album, the track is ripe with Latin tradition and flavours bound in a death metal breeding and malevolence, though it has to be said at no time within Fearless is there ever a moment when the suffering and oppression lyrically portrayed is matched by a similarly destructive musical assault.

Fearless is completed by Point of Collision, a final riveting tapestry of deranged imagination and experimentation which just grips ears and pleasure like a mix of System Of A Down meets Cynic meets Pryapisme. It is a final treat to an outstanding release, a triumph for those prepared to be challenged, at times bewildered, and ultimately thrilled. Acrania should definitely be a recognised world-wide presence after this.

The self-released Fearless is out now @ https://acraniaofficial.bandcamp.com/album/fearless

http://www.acrania.net/   https://www.facebook.com/acraniaofficial

RingMaster 19/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Mucho Tapioca – Self Titled

Mucho Tapioca pic

The self-titled album from French band Mucho Tapioca is one of those treats where you are never quite sure what is going on but enjoying every thrill of the investigation and the imaginative thoughts it inspires and makes suggestive gestures with. The eight track release is a schizophrenic maze of progressive and avant-garde rock with just as vibrant and eager jazz, psyche, and experimental tendencies. It is a delicious adventure which leaves you mystified, fulfilled, and with an appetite for much more of the band’s seductive mania. Imagine a mix of Mr Bungle, or other Mike Patton exploits, with 6:33, Pryapisme, and System Of A Down, then you get an idea what is going on upon the album; add extra spice from Dog Fashion Disco or Diablo Swing Orchestra to the blend and you get closer again but still only scratch the surface of what is uniquely Mucho Tapioca.

Hailing from Toulouse/Tarbes area of France, the band hits you right away with the packaging of their CD version of the album. With nostalgic imagery and recipe providing its art on the outside wrapping and each disc containing one of the two “comic-booklets” inside with artwork from Matthieu Andro, ours contained the desperado tale of La Venganza whilst the other possibility is Scrabble au Coin du Feu Chez Baba Yaga, the first positive impressions are soon confirmed and take to higher plateaus with opening track Parano Yack. The song is an instant swagger through the ear with guitar and bass teasing coaxing the ears into its sultry dance. Voice effected vocals equally flirt at the start whilst the song shuffles itself into position before unveiling its continually twisting and evolving drama and unpredictability. Stomping with and questioning the imagination from second to second, the track is a feast of magnetic invention and psychotic mischief, a devilment which goes within a breath from caressing and kissing the senses to tearing a strip of their flesh off and chewing it boldly before their eyes.

The following Cherche le Fusil! walks in with a jazz seeded strut to its confident stroll, the vocals testing the ear from within the brewed a3282689786_2elegance with a devilry and intent to leave thoughts wrong footed. They are successful as is the sound in the same endeavour but simultaneously it all mesmerises and ignites a fire in the passions to leave a big grin on every surface of the listener from face through to heart. Undoubtedly Mucho Tapioca’s sound like those references we mentioned earlier is not for everyone but taking the previous comparisons as a marker if they appeal this album will have juices dripping.

Both Scrabble au Coin du Feu and Soirée Diapos continue the total persuasion already rampaging from within the album, the first with a throaty resonating bass croon to its sound and atmosphere which with a dark jazz character creates an intrigue of sinister provocation and dramatic shadow clad exploits. There is a bedlamic tone to its invention too which only sparks greater enjoyment and thoughts whilst its successor takes that insanity onto open territory with a kinetically fuelled bewilderment of rhythmic concussion and enchanting jazz crafted ambience speared by tempests of unbridled sonic madness. Reminding at times of eighties band Essential Logic through its brass temptation, it like the whole album feels like the crazed soundtrack to the cartoon Oggy and The Cockroaches, and provides another outstanding incitement for mind and soul.

The moody breath of Malhabile Lama makes an evocative wrap for the great clean passionate vocals opening up the song, rhythms and percussion on the brink of psychotic revelry whilst guitars and bass shape their individual claims on the ear and beyond with craft and magnetic enterprise. Increasing its intensity and pulse rate the further into its inner turmoil it ventures, the track is a slow burning joy with gets better with each encounter whilst the next up La Venganza is straight at the ear and emotions with its jazz funk twist and sultry sax sex matched by the guitar and its loose aural desires. The track is a thrilling hypnotic scat with the drums the puppeteer and ringleader to the tango of scurrying and sizzling synapse firing rodent like ingenuity, its charms and toxicity burrowing unseen into the lustful passions.

     Chez Baba Yaga is another which at first approach is pleasing if not as openly persuasive as other tracks but all the time it is working away with its noir enticing and shadows mastery to seize the listener into its frantic meshuga. It burns a stronger attraction with each taking of its emotive bughouse and makes a stirring appetiser for the final declaration of the album, Méchant Chameau. The track is also a smouldering inducement which takes time but leaves no doubt of its potency and excitingly baited trap. Arguably the most complex track on the album, though no song comes with simplicity as its driver, it completes one oddball and compulsively irresistible crossing of thoughts and imagination, a meeting which is sheer joy and the trigger to a real hunger for more from Mucho Tapioca.

https://www.facebook.com/muchotapiocafanpage

http://muchotapioca.bandcamp.com/

10/10

Upcoming shows:

Oct 30 L’Ubu, Perpignan, France

Oct 31 La Pleine Lune, Montpellier, France

Nov 02 Le Pakebot, Chadron, France

RingMaster 03/10/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Spring and Youth – Between The Irony

spring and youth pic

Schizophrenic and maniacally beautiful, Between The Irony the debut from Serbian metallers Spring and Youth is one of those releases which will have as many running and crying for their mothers as it will have those cutting off ears in the ultimate act of adoration to its psychotic charms. The album is a disorientating and scintillating investigation of avant-garde and experiment progressive metal, a dive into unpredictability and creative mayhem which only gives the richest, deepest pleasures and rewards.

Best described as a mutated pool of essences seeping from the insatiable union of Mike Patton and Mr Bungle, Dog Fashion Disco, Diablo Swing Orchestra, and Parisians 6:33, the eight track release is an exhilarating maybe even bewildering triumph which given time seduces the passions into a lustful compliant subservient. The album certainly needs numerous plays before working its insidious charms, the first encounters throwing thoughts and senses so off kilter they need a tow truck to return home, but once connected Spring and Youth emerges as a thoroughly compelling and invigorating visitation.

Comprising of vocalist Marko Stojanović, guitarist Filip Mladenović, bassist Ivan Vasić, pianist Darko Varga, and drummer Darko Đurić, coverSpring and Youth and its members came together over a few years, many from different directions and musical sources to combine for something unique. With a 2008 released demo introducing the band name and the current line-up in place from 2011, the Beograd based band stepped into a Belgrade studio last year to create their first web of sonic and aural design, some might say conspiracy. Recorded, mixed, and mastered by Goran Crevar, Between The Irony is an imaginative explosion between the ears, a tantalising and teasing test of the willingness to venture through devious asides and devilish ingenuity brought with a creative will that is warped at best and satanic in the extreme, but such an arousing and galvanic journey it emerges to be.

The brief instrumental Kidd Prelude opens up the Pandora’s Box of sonic manipulation first, the piece a short but impacting fire of merciless drum beats and technically driven riffs stalking the senses with an ever shifting and undulating pace, and time signatures coaxed by enticing keys giving just a hint of what is too come. Reaching its thickest potency the track seamlessly twists into the following Two Orangeez. Now things really get interesting. Initial contact is a charge of carnivorous riffs and punching beats which quite rapidly dance and leap about as if on a hot tin roof whilst the expressive thought exploiting keys of Varga evoke emotive teases amongst the almost duelling clean and growling vocals led by Stojanović. Littered with djent provocation and classically honed piano narratives, the song exhausts and bewitches leaving the listener enflamed with emotions, thoughts…possibly bamboozled ones, and blissful pleasure. As mentioned this is not going to be for all but if you want mystique, mystery, and madness in your aural food than this first song alone will have lust raising its head.

The following Heavy off of a great hollow bass grilling erupts into another seismic exploration of mind and limitations, the rabidity of imagination and ever twisting invention a welcome curse on the senses though the vocals are not as successful as on the previous track. Melodrama sows its seeds throughout to be reaped by the arguably over the top delivery of  Stojanović and watered by the emotion painting keys, but when the raptorial muscles and appetite of the song turns on the listener with metal nostrils flaring and jaw ripping chunks out of air and synapses the track is a lethal ingenious lunacy.

The equally extensive in length and depth Feetless next stands up to either send fear or enthrallment into the listener, the jazz lisping keys and delirious guitar bedlam as intoxicating and frenetically unbalancing as they are the bearers of irresistible fascination and adventure. Once more you feel like you are in a nightmare of rapacious beauty and voracious insanity as the song wraps its spellbinding tentacles around mind and passions but only face it with the intent to devouring all on offer.

The erratically rousing and quite brilliant Muriatic and As Fast As Possible with its kin of mesmeric gracefulness and ferocious antagonism within the continuing lyrical and underlying drama, conjure up more inventive splendour whilst the short piano instrumental Play brings some kind of a return to rationality before the closing Four And A Half spends nine minutes leading the listener into another deranged and ambrosial flight of progressive craft and metallic forcefulness brought through a rabid web of psyched imagination.

Spring and Youth with Between The Irony has brought all the evidence and promise that they will take the major stage by storm at some point. At times the songs probably exceed their time and debatably there is so much going on that the amount of visits needed to decipher things will put too many off but the bottom line on the album is that it induces euphoria that most bands can only dream of. Up for a challenge? Then this is a must!

http://www.springandyouth.com

9/10

RingMaster 16/08/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com