Nale – Death, Skulls, Satan

Driven by infection loaded scowls, hungrily rousing sounds, and rock ‘n’ roll roars, Death, Skulls, Satan is one of those encounters you not only want but need to set the day swinging. The second album from Swedish outfit Nale, it is a rowdily explosive, physically manipulative stomp echoing by all accounts the band’s renowned live energy and prowess.

Formed in 2007, Stockholm hailing Nale released their self-titled debut EP that first year with its successor, From Shit to Salvation uncaged two years later. Critical acclaim met the band’s first album in 2012, Ghost Road Blues recorded with producer Lawrence Mackrory (F.K.Ü, Darkane). The Zombieland EP since has only pushed their growing reputation as too a potent live presence which has seen the band playing the likes of the Getaway Rock Festival, Sabaton Open Air Festival, and Wacken Open Air as well as headlining their own tour in India. Death, Skulls, Satan is Nale’s fusion of rock and metal in full holler and at a whole new level of adventure and persuasion, one of those encounters you just cannot tuck away and move away from.

Slither kicks things off, immediately gnawing and inflaming the senses with its instinctive swing and prowl. Voracious rock and grooved metal unite, riffs harrying and rhythms biting as the track rips through ears. There is a great Static X essence to the Pantera meets King Hiss like song, more so from the vocal contagion of Mathias Blom and a flavouring which pursues the appetite across the multi-hued release. The track continued to writhe and trespass, quickly getting under the skin and thereon worming itself deeper by the second.

The excellent start is forcibly backed by the raw and concussive antics of Filth, the track a predacious confrontation crawling across the senses with ill-intent in its devilry. A touch of Devildriver lines the beast, the song almost leering and drooling over the listener with its nagging riffs and salacious grooves; guitarist Tomas Åkvik laying down sonic pheromones. Its primal temptation moves over for the blues lilted, stoner dusted Dead Man’s Song. As its predecessors, it is a web of grooved and rhythmic tenacity merging the familiar with wholly fresh imagination and invention. It did feel the least original proposition within the album yet it certainly emerged as one of the most captivating.

The album’s title track is contagion, feral rock ‘n’ roll as irritable as it is virulent with Blom a rascal ringleader to the inescapable rhythmic swing of drummer Anders Ljung and the snarling mischievous bassline of Johan Risberg. With Åkvik similarly whipping up spirit and imagination, the track is superb leaving the body breathless and spirit elevated ready for the heavy weighted arousal cast by Exit. Ljung pounds the senses like there is no tomorrow but with purpose and craft whilst Risberg’s bass growls with carnivorous intent. Riffs in turn match its antipathy as Blom crawls over the damage caused; the united proposition another fiercely catchy intrusion with a tinge of Powerman 5000.

Blues and muscle strung hard rock colour the following No Escape, it another adrenaline driven, inventively woven escapade while for fifty odd seconds Drive power drills into the senses with punk discontent and grooved metal toxicity. It is a glorious assault just far too short though its lack of length is more than compensated by the ear entangling, groove twisting seduction of The Black. Dark and sinister, the track writhes over the listener fingering every weak spot until submission like a flirtatious grim reaper.

Hell’s Wrath has the body back bouncing within seconds after, rhythms and grooves alone enough to spark eager participation with Smasher after leading the imagination into dark contemplation. The first just barrels through ears with its voracious rock ‘n’ roll whilst the second takes a more considered attack weaving an array of flavours into its tapestry of temptation.

Final track Pigs mixes both assaults, flying at the senses at times and stalking ears in between but all the time teasing and inflaming an appetite for bruising rock ‘n’ roll. It is a fiery conclusion to an album which ok maybe lacks true uniqueness at times but excites ears and ignites the spirit from start to finish.

Death, Skulls, Satan is out now via Black Lodge.

http://www.naleband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/naleofficial/   https://twitter.com/naleofficial/

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hampered – Asylum

Formed in 2013, French metallers Hampered have just uncaged their debut album and one attention grabbing beast it is. Maybe not the most unique in sound Asylum more than makes up for any familiarity with creative imagination and suggestive drama, attributes blossoming into one richly alluring and enjoyable proposal.

The Toulon quintet consists of vocalist Germinal “Germi” Leullier, guitarists Romain Sanchez and Guillaume Frendo, bassist Fares “Fafa” Petit, and drummer Stephane “Stef” Kokot, though upon Asylum Satanus is listed as swinging the rhythmic sticks. Nurtured in metalcore, their sound embraces an array of other flavours and metal bred textures in its roar and a first full length which takes a firm hold from its first breath.

Asylum is inspired by movies such as One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Shutter Island and relating a complex tale of a disillusioned hero finding himself plunged into the den of a psychiatric hospital, looking at “the grip of man by man, the mind on the body, for the conscience of our own freedom” where “the only “barriers” are the choices we make that make us believe we don’t have any

Opening with its French language spoken, scene setting Intro, the album soon has ears and appetite aroused as the following I’m Alive teases both with its opening initial sonic lure; rich bait soon spawning a rousing incitement of richly enticing grooves and rhythmic predation. Germi is soon in its midst with his similarly potent growls, captivation brewing by the second. The track mellows a touch as a great blend of his and Frendo’s calmer backing vocals collude but still retains its threatening character in sound and tone. Every hook and groove intensified the power and addictiveness of the track, each rhythmic swipe and grumble increasing its sonic paranoia superbly.

The excellent start only continues as The Project follows, its electronically hued entrance easily stirring keen attention before opening up into a rapacious almost carnivorous prowl. Metalcore meets groove metal as things intensify, many more strains of sound adding to the menace and imagination seizing trespass. Something akin to a fusion of Poison The Well, As I Lay Dying and Devildriver, the track gnaws and increasingly pleasures the senses, a success only escalating as the funkier throes of In My Jail tease and invade next. A beguiling web of styles and flavours, the track alone reveals the bold invention at the heart of Hampered and the expansive hunger in their sound which does not always get the chance to blossom as it might across the release. Here it is in full bloom, plaintive vocals and hungry sounds uniting in a ravenous assault of irritable yet severely infectious and predatory enterprise.

Stop That follows with a raw and cantankerous proposal but one just as adept at embracing melodic and harmonic twists as it questions and challenges while successor Conspiracy Theory launches a similarly choleric confrontation infused with citric melodic veins and driven by rhythmic rock ‘n’ roll. Both tracks hit the spot, the second especially sparking tenacious responses as the album continued to impress.

Through the bullish defiance of Each Other, where grooves just infest the psyche, and the raw emotional blaze of Avenge Your Memory, Hampered continue to explore their invention. Neither song quite matched the potency of those before them yet each created a tapestry of lyrical and musical drama which firmly held attention and richly satisfied before Blast (Bridge Refrain) entangled some tinges of heavy metal and strains of Avenged Sevenfold-esque catchiness into its lively swing. Again personal tastes were not quite as ignited as by the albums earlier tracks but were thickly involved in satisfaction from start to finish and especially in its great bedlamic finale.

Asylum concludes with The End, a track featuring Maxime Keller, vocalist with fellow countrymen Smash Hit Combo and Boars. The track is superb, a jungle of metal bred punk infused antagonism with tantalising melodic scenery bringing the album to a mighty close matching its tremendous start.

Asylum is a proposition which will inflame the passions of many and lure the attention of hordes more as it announces Hampered as another very promising and already rather striking proposition on the metal landscape.

Asylum is out now @ http://hampered.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/hampered.official/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Devildriver – Trust No One

pic by ben hoffmann

pic by ben hoffmann

There is no mistaking Trust No One as a Devildriver incitement. From the recognisable throat scarring vocals squalls of Dez Fafara to the anthemic rhythmic antagonism of bassist Diego Ibarra and drummer Austin D’Amond, through the grooved and sonically caustic imagination of guitarists Mike Spreitzer and Neal Tiemann to the pure carnivorous roar of the groove metaller’s sound, the Californian’s seventh album is familiar Devildriver animosity. Yet there is something different to the beast; its body slimmer, almost stripped back to the core elements of the band’s sound whilst its contagion of venomous grooves has become even more creatively vocal and more virulently compelling. Whether Trust No One in this state is the band’s best proposal to date is under debate but it is fair to say that the album might just be the most physically and emotionally enjoyable encounter with Devildriver yet.

Linking up with producer Mark Lewis again at the Audio Hammer Studios, Devildriver show their intent from the first seconds of opener Testimony Of Truth, the want to savage the senses with hellacious rock ‘n’ roll. An inviting groove winds around the initial hefty jabs of D’Amond first with already the climate of the song a fiery challenge which only imposes further as the song evolves and Fafara’s raw tones further fire up the spirit of the song. It is prime Devildriver incitement but already devilish designs of melody and grooving is gripping the imagination, bringing individual character to each twist and turn here and in due course, to each subsequent proposal within Trust No One.

The thick and potent start is quickly surpassed by the barbarous exploits of Bad Deeds. The torrential assault of the invasive beats and the ear accosting rapping nature of the vocals aligns perfectly with a sultry melodic weave spun by the guitars within their own corrosive tide of predacious riffs. It is gripping stuff, irresistible hostility fuelled by a drama and imagination individual to that of the band’s previous outings. The track’s impressive success is soon matched by that of the even more grievous My Night Sky, though its own animus of emotion and intensity is tempered by the equally potent magnetism colouring the web of sonic invention and suggestiveness.

Devildriver_CMYK_RingMasterReviewThree tracks in and already the senses are numbing and energies breathless such the force and creative weight of the tempests. No respite is given though as This Deception, from a waspish coaxing round melancholic keys, tears into the listener with nostrils flared over a rabid rhythmically jagged ire spewing jaw and in turn, Above It All crawls all over the senses and into the psyche with what can be best described as a swarming surge of ravenous belligerence and aural irritability. Both tracks are not short on their own array of expectations defusing and imagination sparking essences either, the first through seductively flirtatious grooves and the latter with exotically hued strings and melodies which entice and bewitch even within the raging storm of the outstanding ravishment.

Daybreak spins some bluesy grooves into its maelstrom next, they colluding with addictively heavier cousins as riffs and vocals unite for some savaging with the backing of infectiously mercurial rhythms. Spreitzer and Tiemann simply shine throughout Trust No One, here especially as they conjure a landscape as unpredictable and fascinating as it is blistering, while in the album’s title track, they help shape a tempest as sonically elegant as it is uncomfortably threatening.

Arguably the nastiest and most uncomfortable track on the release is Feeling Ungodly, though it too is unafraid to spring some of the catchiest grooves and hooks across the whole of Trust No One while devouring the senses in body and emotion. Again, it is hard not to be swept up by the spiteful air and invasively infectious nature of the excellent track before Retribution grows from a melodically alluring proposal into one which nags and growls like a rabid dog infested with the inescapable irritancy of niggly grooves and the biting incessancy of beats and riffs. It is an irresistible incursion followed with equal ferocity and compelling adventure by For What Its Worth and an adversarial and merciless sonic malefaction which might not quite live up to many of its predecessors but leaves only a craving for more.

As we said at the start, whether Trust No One is Devildriver’s final hour we cannot say yet, even after a dozen listens, but it is hard to remember many encounters with them bringing as much raw enjoyment and the same kind of urge to go straight back into the turbulence as their new album.

Trust No One is out now via Napalm Records on CD @ http://devildrivertrustnoone.com/  and digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/trust-no-one/id1091651702?app=music&ign-mpt=uo%3D4

http://www.devildriver.com/   https://www.facebook.com/devildriver

Pete Ringmaster 13/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Moth’s Circle Flight – My Entropy

mcf_RingMasterReview

They may have a name which intrigues and lures a look, but it is their sound which ensures Moth’s Circle Flight really grabs attention, especially upon latest album My Entropy. Merging fiery groove metal with the hellacious predation of various extreme metal flavours, the Italian metallers show themselves a formidable and aggressively magnetic proposal. Their music is a rousing incitement which warrants attention and now with My Entropy to the fore, it demands it.

Hailing from Parma, Moth’s Circle Flight began in 2003 though it is probably fair to say that the band hit its stride and now firmly established potency when the line-up of vocalists Gabriele “Gabbo” Rosi and Simone “Pancio” Panciroli, rhythm guitarist Francesco “Baldo” Baldi, and lead guitarist Luca “Pellach” Alzapiedi linked up with bassist “Giupy” and drummer “Simo” around 2012. Since forming though, the band has certainly been a potent live proposition and have played with the likes of Sepultura, Extrema, Exilia, and Goddass over time while releasing an early EP before their well-received debut album Born to Burn in 2009. Recently with bassist Marco “Satir” Reggiani and drummer Fabio “Bersa” Bersani making up the rhythm section, Moth’s Circle Flight released My Entropy, a ravenous assault which sees the band hit a new plateau which could and should put the band on the global metal map.

It erupts into life with Man On The Peak, a distant sonic wind bringing the track towards ears as antagonistic vocals roar. Upon arrival it uncages a host of ear entwining grooves which alone ignite the appetite such their irresistible bait backed by thumping rhythms and the already impressing and enjoyable dual vocal assault. The song relaxes a little as it slips into its accomplished stride, jabbing and confronting the senses with an array of spiky twists and subsequently barbarous turns.   It is a fiercely rousing start to the album, like a seductive fury built on the animosity of Sepultura, the ire of DevilDriver, and the swing of Five Finger Death Punch.

Art_RingMasterReviewThings only get more compelling and furious with the following Ends Of A Shadow, its initial riffs a thickly alluring bait of invasive resonance. Swiftly southern hues seep from the track’s rabid pores too, a Pantera/Down like flavouring spicing up an already greedy appetite for the encounter. The great mix of vocal delivery from Gabbo and Pancio is a magnetic pull on its own; their tones embracing every shade of clean, guttural, and psychotic even occasionally encroaching on a Burton C. Bell toning. There is a touch of Fear Factory to the music at times too within, with both guitarists weaving a masterful challenge and seduction, a more melodic/nu metal-esque hue.

Raise Your Head rouses ears and emotions next; its body a bruising turbulence of craft and sonic dispute bound in melodic tempting. Again the pair of vocalists capture the imagination, backed as resourcefully in voice by the band and their musical web of unpredictability and multi-flavoured invention. The track is another simply whipping up more greed for the band’s proposal and quickly matched in success by the outstanding Late Promises and its tide of carnivorous riffs and rhythms. Bass groans and sonic whines accentuate the fiery character and intent of the song, though again, it all comes perfectly tempered by melodic and harmonic vocal imagination as well as some great off-kilter twists and turns.

The embrace of melody and clean vocal charm opening up An Old Chant takes mere seconds to seduce and impress before its brutality and creative trespass is unleashed to harry and prey upon the senses. As its predecessor, the track is glorious, a busily resourceful and adventurous invasion built on the keenest grooves and sonic scythes aligned to another great drama of voice and sound. It is a web of persuasion soon emulated in its individual way by Write My Name. The song is almost carnal in its inventive assault and irresistible, though it does lose its potency just a touch when it slips into more melodic passages throughout its otherwise gripping prowl. Managing to weave in some hardcore, blues, and glam metal too, the track still feeds a by now seriously hungry want for more, a need equally satisfied by both With Love, With Flames and Bursting Into Existence. The first of the pair is a relentless fusion of diverse flavours and styles, all honed into a bullish involvement and enslavement of ears and emotions whilst its successor is another instinctive predator. Its thrash and death metal scented infestation of ears is inescapable slavery whilst the net of melodic and sonic mystique which colours the songs’ scenery at times, is the inviting lead to some more richly satisfying vocal and guitar crafted enterprise.

My Entropy closes as powerfully and dynamically as it began; Madball making the first voracious assault to whip up spirit and energies, with plenty of that already established unpredictable imagination involved, before Ray Of Ira brings things to a volcanic fusion of nu, alternative, and death metal with the band’s instinctive groove sculpted emprise of sound.

Though there is plenty about My Entropy which is somewhat familiar, everything is either boldly fresh or twisted into an adventure distinct to Moth’s Circle Flight; a band as suggested earlier, worthy of the closest attention.

My Entropy is out now via Logic(il)Logic Records via most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Mothscircleflight/

Pete RingMaster 04/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Blackwork – Impasse EP

Blackwork_RingMasterReview

There has been an increasingly loud whisper in recent times casting good things about Scottish metallers Blackwork and now with the release of their debut EP, you can expect it to become a more forceful roar. Impasse uncages five tracks of ferocious multi-flavoured metal which maybe falls slightly short of a dramatic startling of ears but easily sparks the imagination and incites a lingering appetite to hear more of the band’s inventive sound.

The Glasgow bred Blackwork was formed in 2014 and quickly lured local attention with a three-track demo and an uncompromising and invigorating live presence which over time has seen the quintet play with the likes of Xerath, Bloodshot Dawn, and Exist Immortal among many. Last year saw the band begin work on the writing and creation of the Impasse EP and its certainly memorable fusion of everything from groove, progressive, and varied strains of extreme metal to hardcore and other equally fierce flavourings. The result of the band’s intensive time crafting and honing their release and sound provides, from start to finish, a commanding and attention grabbing wide spread introduction to their mouth-watering potential and imagination fuelled exploits.

art_RingMasterReviewAlias opens up the EP, emerging on a melodic breeze within a warm atmospheric coaxing. In no time imposing rhythms and strands of wiry guitar badger and wrap ears as the track’s aggressive and intensive nature takes over. The growling tones of Josh Graham swiftly add their expressive weight to the proposal, whilst simultaneously a swinging swagger, led by the captivating bassline sprung by Tony Dunn, unveils its infectiousness as magnetic grooves and hooks inventively sculpted by guitarists Greig Cunningham and Chris Dunn align with their own caustic riffery. There is a touch of Lamb Of God to the track, maybe a whiff of Devildriver at times too, yet every twist and turn revels something if not majorly unique certainly individual to the writing and imagination of Blackwork

It is a great start matched by latest single Filthist, a similarly structured but instantly more volatile and antagonistic incitement for ears and appetite. There is a venomous toxicity to the grooves and melodic suggestiveness of the song; a belligerence as open in vocals and the barbarous nature of the rhythms too. Equally there is a punkish element to the track; that hardcore essence pleasing ears as it gets woven to the adventurous maelstrom of diverse sounds and intrusive textures.

Unguided needs barely a second to take its hold of ears and imagination; the initial hard rap of Chris Vezza’s beats breeding a predacious collection of hungry riffs and prowling grooves quickly straddled by the vocal animus of Graham, he in turn backed as potently by the band. With slithers of progressive and folkish resourcefulness within its rousing and cantankerous onslaught, the song is an irresistible tempest taking best track honours. Mellow emotive passages bound in poetic melodies only add to the fascination and intriguing nature of the track; merging perfectly with a tempestuous heart and the song’s vicious ferocity and touch.

The EP is completed by firstly the aggressively flirtatious Rust with its again great mix of metal styles and the releases’ title track which maybe made the least dramatic impression on personal tastes yet never allowed a moment to pass where ears and imagination were not fully involved in its creative blaze. The final pair were equally slow burners on ears compared to their successfully more instant predecessors but each only rose to captivate and reinforce the EP’s impressive persuasion.

Impasse is a powerful and increasingly enjoyable first look at Blackwork; a release stocked with the potential to stir up greater and broader attention the way of the band and set them off to greater creative heights.

The Impasse EP is out now @ http://blackworkband.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/blackworkband   https://twitter.com/blackworkband

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Demons Of Old Metal – Dominion

DOOM 2_RingMaster Review

We all know rock ‘n’ roll is spawned in hell and eager through hordes of bands to spread its glory, an infestation proven over the decades to only thrill especially in the hands of bands like Demons Of Old Metal. Theirs is a forcibly vocal and thrilling stomp consuming the senses which is in full roar within the glorious shape of new album Dominion. The UK band has been around a little while, working away at trying to “win back the souls of those that have turned their back on sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll!” From the fact that their new release is our and a great many others introduction to them suggests it has been a slow battle to date but things are about to get hot and dirty we suggest once their outstanding album uncages its contagion.

Formed around the time 2010 turned into its successor, Demons of Old Metal emerged as four veterans of the UK metal scene united to play “what got them into music in the first place – classic metal.” Casting a sound, presence, and stage show coloured by schlock horror inspiration, the band released their debut offering on the Halloween of 2012, in the riot of mini-album, The Demonic Chronicles Vol. I. It as a well-received and praised proposal followed by the band creating metal havoc across the country live and the subsequent releases of Vol. 2 and 3 of The Demonic Chronicles over the next couple of years.

The Torbay hailing band’s sound is mutant rock ‘n’ roll rising with creative bloodlust from a twisted blend of Pantera, Them County Bastardz, Hell Yeah, Steel Panther, and Machine Head, to give its hellacious voice some description. And as Dominion swiftly reveals, it is an infestation of ears and imagination refusing to take no for an answer with its virulent hostility.

Dominion Artwork -_RingMaster Review   The album announces itself with the brief theatrical Domintroduction before launching itself at the senses, with nostrils flared, through the outstanding Fakeskin. Riffs and rhythms quickly build a wall of spite and enticement, already badgering and welcoming a just as instant appetite for the provocation. As the expressive punkish tones of vocalist Tombstone Cowboy leap into the brewing tempest, electronic slithers and teases play, a side-helping of temptation to the full meal of a voracious onslaught luring away as the guitars of Tombstone Cowboy and Psycho Wing continue to rampage and flirt with the throaty toxicity spread by bassist Babyface Stephens s. With the scything violence of drummer Dr Doom simply nasty and gripping, a rich Slipknot essence can be added to the suggested breeding of song and album, but all flavours here and ahead stretched and mutated into a web of metal distinct to the demons.

You Version 2.0 leaps on the listener next, its physical and emotional agitated an open toxicity within another storm of merciless rhythms and riffs bound in nagging grooves and confronting vocals. The electronic sparks of the first song is replaced by a more industrial metal predation, thoughts of Pitchshifter teasing throughout whilst heavy and more classically honed spices venomously soak the pores of the track and senses. It’s addictive quality is emulated by both Dance of the Damned and Open wide and Scream, the first stalking its victim with rugged textures and the electronic toxins woven by Digital Death whilst growing into its spite with an increasing weave of flavours and inhospitable but gripping enterprise. The successor to this Devildriver like animus of a song, stomps with a dirty rock ‘n’ roll swing and theatrical snarl, its lure smothered by a sonic climate of intensity and rancor. The band seamlessly fuses the contrasting yet similarly belligerent winds of that invention, creating a hellish primal nursery rhyme as catchy as it is intimidating.

There is a ‘mellower’ trespass next with The Quiet Ones, its southern rock flames and dirt lined grooves locked into a thick turbulence of riffs and rhythms, neither outweighing the other but mutually leading to a moment of groove heaven and an increasingly explosive and vicious outpouring of sonic rabidity. A borrowing of a Rage Against The Machine tempting only adds to the fun, and as much as the album bruises and devours it also offers a rich tongue in cheek layer through lyrics and mischief.

Grind was a little ‘disappointing’, though only in the fact with its title hopes were it would burrow into flesh and psyche like a drill bit. Instead it spun a wiry web of grooves and sonic tenacity amongst a threat of rhythms and riffs; the result being another inescapably persuasive and seriously enjoyable intrusion before making way for the writhing and relentless nagging of Behind the Mask. With a ripple of rap metal to its persistent niggle of riffs, the song demands attention, evolving new strains of melodic and cantankerous imagination in return. Longer to hit the same rapturous reactions as most of its predecessors, the song easily succeeds in leaving satisfaction full before being over shadowed by the excellent The Star of your Nightmare. Its electronic coaxing amidst prowling riffs is almost Marilyn Mansion like but in no time a cancerous violation unique to Demons Of Old Metal with the track emerging as a theatre of cinematic mayhem and sonic ingenuity.

Cast around a fiery acidic groove, See How They Die seduces and menaces before overpowering its initial rich flame to dominate through bearish riffs and ill-tempered rhythms, the vocals bridging both emotions with open relish. Like The Union Underground with anger problems, the song is a grizzly treat leaving Get Outa Dodge to provide one last growl of insatiable and uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll, and ending the album on another big high.

British metal/rock ‘n’ roll is building towards a new heyday going by releases over the past few months, and when it erupts in full voice, there is no way Demons Of Old Metal will not be there leading the thrilling riot.

Dominion is out December 1st with pre-ordering available now @ http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/-/221931265158

http://www.demonsofoldmetal.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/demonsofoldmetal  https://twitter.com/demonsofficial

Pete RingMaster 05/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Black Oil – Resist To Exist

Black Oil_RingMaster Review

I think we can all agree it is seriously hard to be truly original in the music scene now and just as difficult to be noticeably unique against the hordes of other bands tempting time and attention. A few though do instinctively stand out through sound or presence to stand many steps from the masses, and one such proposal is US based groove metallers Black Oil. Their sound is a furious maelstrom of various strands of metal, Latin and worldly invention, and a defiant passion which binds it all for one, as shown by their new album, blistering and rousing confrontation. Resist To Exist is a riot in the imagination, a tempest in the ears, and an anthemic incitement just leaving the body alive.

Calling LA home, Black Oil originally emerged from Brazil with a sound crafted and honed with a unique blend of cultures and years of experiences gained by founder Addasi Addasi, whose travels have taken in the life and flavours of over thirty countries. Since forming the band has earned a big reputation and following through a previous pair of acclaimed albums, including the predecessor to their new encounter, the Logan Mader (Machinehead, Soulfly, DevilDriver, Gojira, FFDP) produced the Not Under My Name, as well as a live presence which has seen them play with the likes Megadeth, Fear Factory, All Shall Perish, Soulfly, Otep, Cavalera Conspiracy, Arch Enemy, Anthrax, Cattle Decapitation and many more. Their renowned metal-samba sound and hard hitting politically charged lyrics has made Black Oil a hungrily devoured proposition already, and now with Resist To Exist it is easy to expect even greater reactions and spotlights on the band, the album simply one of the most exhilarating incitements of the year.

cover_RingMaster Review     Produced by Cristian Machado of Ill Nino, with many other contributions, Resist To Exist sees the quartet of guitarist/vocalist Addasi, vocalist Mike Black, bassist /vocalist Drew Petropoulos, and drummer Michael Gomez joined by a host of guest contributions including Fear Factory/Archaea’s Raymond Herrera and ex-Static X/Soulfly and now Fear Factory bassist Tony Campos amongst them. This and the unbridled imagination and ideation soaking songs all goes to create incendiary tapestries of sound and energy which from the opening track makes Resist To Exist one feverish conquest of body and emotions.

It all starts with Rise Up, a song with its intent in its title and success in a character which just will not accept anything less than full involvement from the listener. From its first breath, riffs and rhythms are a cauldron of enticing intensity, a tenacious prelude to swiftly joining and just as quickly virulent grooves. Aligned to the guttural roar of Black, the track is in full violent swing in seconds, its rhythmic hips casting a commanding swagger as guitars and bass cast an inescapable web of searing grooving and infectious riffery. Like Five Finger Death Punch meeting Powerman 5000, but so much more, the track is an incendiary device of invigorating and exhausting metal contagion, raw alchemy to get the blood and energy rushing through anyone’s veins.

The ferocious start continues with the just as explosive Justified where malevolently swung beats and a carnivorous bass tone add their great grouchiness to a wind storm of sonic hostility, and that is just the initial impact on the senses. Soon Middle Eastern hints stir within a spicy expulsion of guitar before the track puts its head back down for another hellacious and rabid stomp. As much death and industrial like as it is a grooved fury, the encounter continues to ignite and incite ears and thoughts before passing the senses over to Callate. The third track, which features Campos on bass and vocals, is a predator of emotional bedlam and creative unpredictability, its sound as diverse and ravenous as the vocals fuelling its inner corrosive rage, and as irresistible.

Exoskeleton savages ears with its vocal and rhythmic hostility next, whilst simultaneously seducing the imagination with a tangy web of melodic grooving and feistily flavoured enterprise. The result is something which roars like a blend of Fear Factory and Devildriver yet equally only has its own distinct animus of sound and intent. It is a flesh searing bellow leaving the body shell shocked and ready to be taken on a fiery ride by the following Combustion. From its initial fierce caress of sound, Latin bred percussion and melodic hues are enriching the song’s rhythmic and sonic tempting, elements of bands like (Hed) PE and Bang Data joining the muscular rebellion and expelling even greater influence as the track springs its bruising anthemic shuffle. Joined by guest Silverio Pessoa on vocals, Black is the ringleader of one addiction forging, body igniting tempest. The guitars alone create an enslaving persuasion with their relentless and evocatively creative twists whilst the percussive aspect of the song aided by Mario Pallais, is simply a puppeteer on the listener.

One brilliant encounter makes way for another in the insatiable shape of Revolution. Featuring and driven by the ravenous rhythmic swings of Herrera, the track is a bestial onslaught but one littered with infectious grooves and sonic devilment. The track is psychotic, never allowing the listener to make assumptions on its direction and with more guests involved, evolving character. The same can be said about Stand Against Everything which comes straight after, the song akin to the last and taking certain aspects of its persuasion into its own persistently evolving and fiery samba.

Resist To Exist closes with Paper Slave, a final aggressive and venomously inflamed uprising of creative hostility and impassioned defiance. It comes shaped with cantankerous riffs, merciless rhythms, and mesmeric invention, bone breaking hostility merging with worldly and emotive resourcefulness. Stuck Mojo and Ill Nino come to mind as it ravages air and ears but again the song in reality is something else again, and though maybe not matching earlier heights, it leaves the listener only wanting more upon departure.

Black Oil brings something different and relentlessly exciting to the metal table with Resist To Exist. Some tracks soar above others in creative adventure and sheer compelling power but all leave a greedy hunger and thick pleasure behind them. Who can want much more than that?

Resist To Exist is available now via Sliptrick Records through most digital stores.

http://www.blackoil1.com/   https://www.facebook.com/blackoilofficial

RingMaster 22/07/2015

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