Desert Storm – Sentinels

Can it really be around four years since British groove monsters Desert Storm unleashed their critically-acclaimed Omniscient? It is undoubtedly true that time flies when you are having fun, the release still stirring our attention amongst the horde of new encounters submitted to us. Now the band has uncaged its successor in the bold shape of Sentinels; a dark tempest of a proposal which confirms the Oxford based sludgers as one of metal’s most compelling propositions.

Desert Storm has never been slow in pushing evolution in their sound but Sentinels marks their biggest step yet without losing the band’s trademark ear pleasing individual sound and character. Being ravenously heavy is one of their accomplished traits yet the new album manages to be a leviathan in that hue, almost oppressive at times in tandem with their darkest most tempestuousness creativity yet. Equally though, their imagination is at its most liveliest to date conjuring melodic intimation and mercurial adventures with magnetic prowess. It is fair to say that Sentinels did not quite bowl us over as immediately as the likes of predecessors Horizontal Life and Omniscient but there was no escaping its relentless persuasion and eventual captivation or the feeling that it is a compelling new step in the evolution and journey to even greater adventures with the band ahead.

The album immediately exposes its ferocity and the senses as opener Journey’s End roars into life, the distinctive snarling tones of vocalist Matt Ryan driving the skilful discord as riffs and rhythms gnaw away. Concussive yet carrying purposeful restraint, the song eventfully calms as a tantalising groove spirals through its breath, it leading ears into a waiting tempest of emotion and sound sculpted by the intimation cast by guitarists Chris White and Ryan Cole. Already there is something new and fresh about the band’s music, a sense of new adventure and exploration creating a web of contrasting textures and intensities shaping a song that made a potent first impression and only blossomed thereon in, much as the album over time.

The following Too Far Gone is swiftly into its sonic trespass, guitars again a searing intrusion and rousing incitement alongside the lumbering but tenacious beats of Elliot Cole and the dark hearted drawl of Chris Benoist’s bassline. A track tackling excessive binge drinking; a ”paradox of hard liquor being both the cause and the remedy of the sickness” according to Ryan partly inspired by the tragic tales of Bon Scott and John Bonham, it prowls and infests ears with a predatory but addictive quality taking the listener through alcoholism into death. As dark and menacing as it is, there is a certain catchiness which infests before The Brawl unleashes a tide of magnetic grooves and rapacious rhythms in the acclaimed Desert Storm manner. Emulating the title, Ryan entangles ears with his familiar ursine tones, guitars teasing with melodic fingering within the sonic winds. Its blues lining only adds to the temptation on offer, the song more expected Desert Storm rock ‘n’ roll but again with a keen fresh breath to its holler.

The melodic beckoning bringing Kingdom Of Horns into view is pure magnetism, its beauty bright yet melancholic and soon blessed with the harmonics of clean vocals as sonic winds contemplate their involvement. It is arguably the best moment within Sentinels, certainly a favourite passage which eventually breeds a raw and burly stroll still draped in melodic elegance and imagination. The song is superb, captivation at every turn and if a clue of things to come maybe the moment in hindsight the Desert Storm sound came of age which tells you it’s magnificence after all the goodness since the band emerged back in 2007.

There is a familiar classic metal lining to next up Gearhead and similarly that Desert Storm character which never takes much to tempt, the song jabbing and imposing its enjoyable personality before Drifter binds the listener in spicily searing grooves and rhythmic tenacity to incite and inspire physical and vocal participation. It too is prime Desert Storm so easy to devour for fans and heavy rockers alike as too successor The Extrovert, a bruising but magnetically grouchy stomp of riff and grooves with a matching aggressive rhythmic swagger and vocal drama. Cole simply controls the body from start to finish, his rousing beats commanding song and listener with devious prowess as the track gets under the skin.

The colder atmospherics and dark corners of Convulsion immerse and seduce next; the track looming up from its stark beginnings with an oppressive lumber and tenebrific air. That heavy suffocation though is the breeding ground for an eruption of pure metal virulence, grooves and hooks worming under the skin before new waves of heavy predation flow over the lusty enterprise. It never quite extinguishes their zeal though, instead embracing their spirit before Cole leads another highly persuasive surge of rhythmic and sonic boisterousness which teases and taunts from there on as another particular highlight of Sentinels is laid down.

The album concludes with firstly the melodic croon of Capsized, another song which almost deceitfully intoxicates, seducing almost straight away if not obviously until away from the album. Its melancholic calms have a volatility which erupt further on, settling down as the process repeats with increasing magnetism in just one more highly powerful and magnetic moment. It is left for the as good as three minutes of Outro (Thought Police) to complete the album, its stoner scented grooves and sludge thick examination providing a rich and provocative finale but one which feels like it is leaving unfinished business to take up and explore ahead.

As suggested, though Sentinels made for a highly enjoyable listen it did not make the same kind of immediate striking impression as its predecessors. It made up for it though with its thought provoking enterprise and an imagination driven creative tapestry, becoming more captivating by the listen as well as hinting that there is even bigger exciting times to come with Desert Storm.

Sentinels is available now through APF Records @ https://desertstorm.bandcamp.com/ and http://apfrecords.bigcartel.com/

http://www.desertstormband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/desertstormuk    https://twitter.com/desertstormuk

Pete RingMaster 24/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Regulus – Quadralith

If you are looking to be ensnared in some new and fresh groove wired trespasses, checking out the latest album from UK blues stoners Regulus would be one wise move. Quadralith is ten tracks of eagerly infectious heavy assed enterprise; a multi-flavoured affair from a quartet of highly accomplished musicians.

The successor to their 2014 debut album Smoke and following a self-titled third EP released a year later, Quadralith sees Sheffield hailing Regulus venture into a new plateau of sound and imagination. There is new energy and maturity to its presence and songwriting compared to its predecessors which in turn breeds a bolder tapestry of flavour and enterprise as well as new potential for future success.

The album opens up with Dominion and instantly winds a dirty enticing groove around ears before the robustly swinging rhythms of drummer Joe Milburn and bassist Martyn Lucas-Bewick spring their bait. As the guitars of Thomas Osborne and Luke Jennings add their melodic enterprise and hungry riffs, the latter’s vocals backed by the former’s to complete the potent lure, the track has attention firmly held. With a touch of early Desert Storm to its body, the song grows and blossoms by the minute and listen, laying the scene for things to come with its expanding net of flavours.

The following Last Chance To Die Young makes a more instant impact as the virulent beats of Milburn stirs the instincts from within a sonic cry. There is no escaping the organic draw of the grooves swiftly dancing on the appetite, riffs and rhythms courting that temptation with their own catchy tenacity. Vocals come with a greater snarl than in the first song, a cantankerousness which suits as both guitarists combine the imagination of their electric strings. Quickly igniting ears, the song builds on the strong invitation of its predecessor to really get things firing before Seven Tales Told gets funky and sultry with Lucas-Bewick’s magnetic bass leading the way. Merging blues rock essences with heavy stoner and that keen funkiness, the song flirts and imposes from within a raw contagious stroll.

The band takes the listener into darker depths with Bones, its heavy textures almost stalking the senses but again with a natural catchiness which only entices. Even as it slips into a blues croon, there is a swing to the rhythms which demands involvement as much as that coaxed by melodies and vocals, the potent addition of contrasting female tones catching the imagination. Its heavy, lurking prowess is followed by the country rock twanged Heart of Stone and the resourceful tapestry of The Dream Reaper. The first of the two easily pleases though lacks the vital sparks of many companions within Quadralith and is quickly outshone by the grooves woven, stoner heated roar of its successor. Taking best track honours, the song spins a sonic weave of temptation and enterprise which fascinates as it manipulates ears and body.

Poor Man’s Grave is no slouch in grabbing eager attention either; its instinctive swagger, if ebbing and flowing too much at times, a constant draw on which guitars and bass skilfully and magnetically conjure while Dutch is a slab of instrumental stoner rock ‘n roll which twists and turns with persistent boisterousness and ideation to continue the new high the album has found. Milburn is especially dexterous and compelling and just as potently backed by his band mates as the song masterfully dances upon the senses.

With a scent of XII Boar to its grouchy romp, Overcome keeps the passions burning, its lure devilish and infectiousness unwavering as it nurtures another pinnacle to Quadralith, success backed by the album’s title track as it brings the release to a fine close.

Across the album you sense a tempestuousness, an intimate angst but one used to drive and colour the creative adventure and energy of all four members of Regulus individually and as one. There are times when the album does not bite and sear as it might or personal tastes wish but it has a persistent potential which draws keen attention as much as the undoubted prowess and imagination of the band with pleasure the continuing result.

Quadralith is available now through Off Yer Rocka Recordings @ https://regulusband.bandcamp.com/

http://www.regulusband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/regulus.band    https://twitter.com/RegulusBand

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Morass of Molasses – These Paths We Tread

The first album from UK trio Morass of Molasses has definitely been one encounter we have here been keenly anticipating, almost from the day the band first stepped forward with a couple of senses infesting, psyche twisting tracks. Their fusion of doom, sludge, and stoner bred textures served in a swamp of aural filth just fed all the instincts and continued to through their debut EP a few months after. Now we have These Paths We Tread to devour, an album which we will admit had us a touch unsure initially.

Instantly enjoyable, These Paths We Tread still had thoughts crowding to contemplate its new proposal of sound. Morass Of Molasses has lured their music from the filth infested depths of the swamp into a cleaner yet still aurally clinging landscape. That is not to say that it does not still come with a healthy coating of scuzz and doom lined dirt but it is a lumbering trespass of sound which is almost more celebratory than predatory. Quite simply their sound has matured, grown up even, and hindsight through listening back at certainly that last EP, So Flows Our Fate, shows it was an evolution on the cards even back then. To be honest we miss the filth but it has not stopped These Paths We Tread through time and listens blossoming into one seriously striking encounter loaded with the potential of even greater adventures ahead with the threesome of vocalist/baritone guitarist Bones ‘The Beard’ Huse, lead guitarist Phil ‘The Mountain’ Williams, and drummer Chris ‘The Beast’ West.

These Paths We Tread gets off to a mighty start with My Leviathan, its gentle caresses of melody and atmospheric waves a deceptive coaxing into the waiting jaws of colossal riffs and flirtatiously tangy grooves. Settling into a predacious crawl entwining raw causticity with salacious seduction, the song roams ears and imagination like a primal siren. Bones’ raw throaty roars share pure toxicity at times, his hostile tones matched by the punchy rhythms of West but tempered by his own calmer vocal tempting and the sonic web cast by Williams. Continually twisting through an array of perpetual incitement on ears and appetite, the track is glorious, its emerging funkiness icing on the feral cake.

Recent times has seen MOM tear into stages alongside the likes of Orange Goblin, Ohhms, Vodun, Elephant Tree, Desert Storm, Space Witch, Sea Bastard, Gurt, and Limb among many others, and there are essences of a few of these within second track So They Walk. Its grooves seep Orange Goblin/Kyuss like taunting whilst its irritable side has a Sleep like causticity, all merged into a distinct MOM recipe and a track like its predecessor which hits the spot with relish.

Continuing themes of “mythic sin and ancient archetypes”, album and next up Serpentine lyrically and musically bind the listener in evocative textures. The third track winds around ears with a dexterity and sonic adeptness emulating its title, grooves almost slithering across the imagination as rhythms bite. Bones’ warm if emotionally deceitful vocals contrast the underlying volatility of the track superbly, also erupting at times to spark a sonic wave fuelling greater weight and intensity throughout. It is a bewitching affair, not as instantly gripping as the first pair of songs but blossoming with every listen into an instinctive temptation before the brief incantation of The Ritual lures and the haunting presence of Centralia descends. A weave of stoner bred enterprise lined with provocative shadows and ghostly whispers as infectious rhythms drive a rolling canter, the second of the two is a well of suggestion coloured by the skilful adventure of Williams on guitar strings.

Next up Maenads is a psychosis of drama and sound, simultaneously enthralling and threatening with seduction and primal toning. It is fair to say, as the album, the track grows and infests deeper into the psyche with every taking of its inflamed intoxication; its melodic anaesthetic fascinating and feral instincts tantalising before things end with Wrath Of Aphrodite, a song which maybe did not quite spark the passions as richly as its companions yet has body and appetite for more bouncing to its groove woven, heavily boned rock ‘n’ roll.

Certainly for fans of the band, These Paths We Tread  will maybe need time to grow and develop on ears and thoughts though newcomers will find Morass of Molasses a quick persuasion we are sure. Yes we still miss the filth but the album blossoms into something thickly compelling and increasingly pleasurable; how stupid of us to doubt with those first thoughts.

These Paths We Tread is out now through HeviSike Records in various formats @ https://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com and http://www.hevisike.com/product/morass-of-molasseslp

https://www.facebook.com/MorassOfMolasses

Pete RingMaster 24/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Desert Storm/ Suns of Thunder Split 7”

 

DS_Sot Split art_RingMasterReview

As well as releasing the Raging Speedhorn/Monster Magnet ( TheDesertFest London vol. 2) Split this coming April, H42 Records will be uncaging another union of mighty sounds in the shape of the Desert Storm/Suns of Thunder Split. Featuring two of the UK’s most compelling riff and groove exponents, the 7” will be launched at DesertFest Berlin where Desert Storm will be playing, with a special edition of the release in store for the event.

desert storm_RingMasterReview

Desert Storm

Still riding the acclaim of last album Omniscient, released at the beginning of 2015, Oxford hailing Desert Storm offer up brand new song Signals From Beyond for the upcoming split. Formed in 2007, the quintet of vocalist Matt Ryan, guitarists Chris White and Ryan Cole, bassist Chris Benoist, and drummer Elliot Cole have increasingly whipped up attention and support across their thunderous live presence and a quartet of albums. As their ferocious and contagious blues metal sound has grown, matured, and evolved so their reputation has intensified, something Signals From Beyond will only back up in all aspects.

From its first touch, a winy groove wraps ears as beats taps attention with open zeal; the song soon expanding as riffs and muscular rhythms collude with the familiar growling tones of Ryan. Like an irritable bear, vocals and sounds badger and intimidatingly entice but are tempered by the sizzling flavour and character of the addictive enterprise of guitars and their flaming grooves. The track is prime Desert Storm; a slab of the band’s familiar rock ‘n’ roll and inescapably addictively compelling.

Suns of Thunder_RingMasterReview

Suns of Thunder

Their conspirators in rousing the spirit on the 7” are equally as magnetic. The Swansea bred Suns of Thunder offer up the mean and moody Earn Your Stripes, a track from their latest album Start As You Mean To Get Down, released last November. It too is a web of grooves and hungry riffs bound in melodic tendrils. Fuelled further by the twin anthemic vocal attack of guitarists Greg Bombroffe and Matt Williams, the song soon bristles with tenaciously fiery textures as the robust rhythms of bassist Chris James and drummer Sam Loring drive its seemingly familiar, if without any obvious reason, but ultimately individual persuasion.

Rumbling and grumbling with a virulent infectiousness to its swinging body and tempting creative voice, the track is a sinew spun slice of heavy rock ‘n’ roll to get flirtatious with, and alone a potent reason to check out the 1999 formed quartet’s recent album and highly praised live presence.

Bottom-line is that the Desert Storm/ Suns of Thunder Split 7” is another meaty and irresistible split from the German label showcasing two of Britain’s most voracious rock ‘n’ rollers.

The Desert Storm/ Suns of Thunder Split 7” is released by H42 Records at DesertFest Berlin 28th-30th April with presales available from March 29th at http://www.h42records.8merch.com/services/store and available across four vinyl colours.

Upcoming Desert Storm/ Suns of Thunder shows to launch the split in the UK:

Fri 6th May – Swansea, The Scene,  w/ Suns of Thunder

Sat 7th May – Oxford, The Bullingdon, w/ Suns of Thunder

Sun 8th May – London, The Unicorn, w/ Suns of Thunder

https://www.facebook.com/desertstormuk/   http://www.desertstormband.com/

https://www.facebook.com/sunsofthunder   https://sunsofthunder.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 28/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Incendiary Arousals: Twenty one Metal/Noise/Rock releases which lit up The RingMaster Review in 2015

2015 was a year of creative savagery and rousing, anthemic glories within metal, rock, and noise driven genres. The RingMaster Review picks out those EPs/albums covered by the site which especially sparked ears and passions.

 

OMNISCIENT_FC_RingMaster Review

Desert Storm – Omniscient
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/desert-storm-omniscient/

Skindred – Volume
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/29/skindred-volume/

William English – Basic Human Error
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/07/01/william-english-basic-human-error/

Arcade Messiah – II
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/23/arcade-messiah-ii/

Arcade-Messiah-II-Cover_RingMaster Review

Tirades – Lifetime of Wars
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/01/08/tirades-lifetime-of-wars/

Raketkanon – Rktkn#2
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/raketkanon-rktkn2/

Show of Bedlam – Roont
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/show-of-bedlam-roont/

XII Boar – Pitworthy
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/xii-boar-pitworthy/

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Jess & The Ancient Ones – Second Psychedelic Coming: The Aquarius Tapes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/jess-the-ancient-ones-second-psychedelic-coming-the-aquarius-tapes/

Shevils – The White Sea
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/11/04/shevils-the-white-sea/

Shattered Skies – The World We Used To Know
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/shattered-skies-the-world-we-used-to-know/

Possessor – Stay Dead
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/02/possessor-stay-dead/

cover_RingMaster Review

Grumpynators – Wonderland
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/05/21/grumpynators-wonderland/

Shaving The Werewolf – The Pissing Link
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/09/shaving-the-werewolf-the-pissing-link/

Sofy Major – Waste
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/10/14/sofy-major-waste/

6:33 – Deadly Scenes
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/633-deadly-scenes/

art6:33_RingMaster Review

Murdock – Dead Lung
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/17/murdock-dead-lung/

Grenouer – Unwanted Today
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/grenouer-unwanted-today/

Markradonn – The Serpentine Deception
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/markradonn-the-serpentine-deception/

We’ll Go Machete – Smile Club
https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/well-go-machete-smile-club/

 

cover_RingMaster Review

TesseracT – Polaris

https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/tesseract-polaris/

The RingMaster Review 01/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

MORASS OF MOLASSES RELEASE ‘SO FLOWS OUR FATE’ EP ON VINYL

Morass_Of_Molasses_Pressshot_RingMasterReview

MORASS OF MOLASSES RELEASE ‘SO FLOWS OUR FATE’ EP ON VINYL on Thursday 27th August!

Morass Of Molasses have emerged from the Swamp (More commonly know as Reading) to create the kind of monumentally heavy blues riffs, which give rise to a deep stirring in the loins. Effortlessly establishing themselves as a force to be reckoned with. Their short life so far has also seen them sharing stages with luminaries such as Ohhms, Desert Storm, XII Boar, Sea Bastard, Mother Corona, Limb, Gurt and many more.

Fresh off the back of their gutsy Jagermiester stage performance at Bloodstock. They are set to released the self-funded vinyl version of their debut EP ‘So Flows Our Fate’. Which has already garnered a tidal wave of critical acclaim.

‘Essential, Contemporary and Classic at the same time’
– Metal Imperium Magazine

‘Monolithic riffing, a great fuzz tone and, at its heart, solid groove.’
– Ghost Cult Magazine

‘Evocative melodies, distinguished statements, and swampy sludge’
– Doomed & Stoned

MoM-New-Vinyl_RingMasterReview

Pressed onto deliciously Red Vinyl; this limited edition run of 200, marks the unsigned band’s ‘biggest achievement to date’ according to frontman Bones. Who adds ‘to spite that we still feel like this is just the beginning for us.’

The vinyl is available at shows or online from here:
Bandcamp: https://morassofmolasses.bandcamp.com

The release will be backed up by a short tour:
27/08/15 – The Wheatsheaf, Oxford
28/08/15 – Sludgefest, Reading
29/08/15 – GI Airsoft Fest, Great Westwood
30/08/15 – Hubfest, Cardiff

Find more details about Morass Of Molasses here:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MorassOfMolasses
Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/MorassOfMolasses
Twitter: https://twitter.com/morassmolasses
Instagram: https://instagram.com/morassofmolasses/

MoM_logo_large_RingMasterReview

Helligators – Road Roller Machine

Hell_RingMaster Review

It is fair to say that Road Roller Machine lives up to its name, the new album from Italian heavy rockers Helligators an unrelenting juggernaut of ravenous riff driven rock ‘n’ roll. Immersing strains of blues and stoner bred colour into a raw and uncompromising tempest of power and intensity, the release is a thumping treat of bruising and invigorating sound; not the most unique you are likely to come across this year but without doubt one of the most exhaustingly enjoyable.

Hailing from Rome, the 2009 formed Helligators self-released their debut album Against All Odds two years later, it and a video for the track Tattooed Killer, enticing keen attention the way of the band. The varied flavouring in their imposing sound sparked increasingly eager appetites from that point on, with the release of 2012 single Snake Oil Jesus only reinforcing their emerging presence and potent musical persuasion. The song was a strong teaser to things to come too, pleasures to be found and grown further in the 2014 recorded and recently released Road Roller Machine. Alongside all of this the band’s live presence has equally drawn acclaim, the sharing of stages with the likes of Orange Goblin, Nashville Pussy, Doomraiser, Strana Officina, Bad Bones and many more persistently impressing over time. Now it is with their second album released on Sliptrick Records, to whom the band signed this past spring, that Helligators are looking to stir up rock ‘n’ roll ‘trouble’, and such its rigorously persuasion it is hard to see them not becoming a loud household name.

copertina_road_roller_machine_RingMaster Review     Recorded with Luciano Chessa, Road Roller Machine bursts into rugged life with Nomad, a lone invigorating groove straight away gripping ears and appetite before rhythms and heavily robust riffs join the deliciously intensive early bait of the song. Thoughts of Motorhead quickly take hold, hints joining just as pungent ones of Danish band Grumpynators spicing up the deluge of spiky rhythms and ravenous riffery. It is a thrilling onslaught only accentuated by the growling tones of vocalist Hellvis, his bear like delivery a thick incitement within the increasingly tenacious enterprise surrounding him. Guitarists El Santo and Kamo bring stoner and blues lined hues to entwine with insatiable charge of riffs, both also providing good vocal backing to Hellvis, with everything involved adding up to the most hellacious and thrilling start to the album; maybe to any heavy rock album this year.

The Doomstroyer holds court next, its opening sonic coaxing over swiftly addictive enticing from drummer Alex, again an immediate grab of the listener. Heftily anthemic from the first instant, the track continues to incite imagination and body with the descriptive expression of Hellvis against slightly restrained rhythms and riffs but lures still pulling at the leash of intimidation. There is a Desert Storm like air to the track, a dirty and tempestuous climate which is as volatile as it is infectious, especially as guitar cast melodic tendrils wrap around rhythmic pistons and the song’s raw ferocity.

A ‘lighter’ air springs forth with Scream next; its blues rock breeding spicy veining to a landscape as rugged as that of its predecessor. The bass of Goblin stalks the song from its first second, a dark and predacious spine the guitars entwine with their constantly evolving and enthralling ideation. The individual craft and passion of each member is an equally roaring essence in each album track, and here uniting in a furnace of virulent adventure and instinctive tempting for a success more or less matched by both She Laughs and Snake Oil Jesus. The first of the two tempers its rabid aggressiveness with mellower melodic rock resourcefulness, both guitars and even the vocals infusing a relative calm to proceedings though the gripping snarl of the bass and the ever wickedly jabbing beats of Alex ensures there is no lack of the bands intimidating edge. Its successor is a groove machine all on its own, an incessant scorcher which spills adrenaline fuelled intensity and rebellious attitude with every caustic syllable and acidic chord. Once more the band twists in strong variety to the design and persuasion of the song; never going into the unknown but only leaving ears and appetite urgently wanting more.

More is what you get with Truckdriver, a track with little in the way of major surprises but a tank load of inventive enterprise in its southern honed rumble. There is no escape from the pure contagion of the song or that of the sultry and sinister dark majesty of Swamp Man Voodoo. Every groove and predatory hook oozes menace, backed by the rapacious nature of rhythms and the ever hungry riffs though each element also leaks rich seduction that never lets go. The outstanding song is pure theatre, a satanic dance and fiercely vociferous trespass for the soul.

No surprises for guessing the character of a song called Bad Ass from Helligators, its air instant belligerence and sound swift confrontation with of course plenty which just invites full involvement before Stone Crusher takes over with its Metallica meets AC/DC like blaze. There is no denying that the song did not find the same depth of appetite as those before it, or to be fairer as consistently as those as there are moments when the band again shows they can rival any one in unleashing a torrent of rock ‘n’ roll brilliance with thick rigorous invention.

Road Roller Machine is brought to an end by the acoustically crafted Black Sun and its blues kissed melodic smoulder. The song fuses stoner and southern rock hues with classic rock ingredients to sculpt another song which maybe does not quite match those earlier within the album but is impossible to tear one away from whilst providing a fine end to one mighty slab of heavy duty rock ‘n’ roll. Helligators have no interest in re-inventing rock music but certainly they want to give everyone a riotously good time and that they do big style with Road Roller Machine.

Road Roller Machine is out on Sliptrick Records now!

RingMaster 12/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright