Cave Mouth – Deep Water

cavemouth_RingMaster Review

Devon is not renowned for its swamps but they must be there as only that kind of landscape could have bred the deliciously sinister and addictively magnetic hues soaking the new single from UK band Cave Mouth. Quite simply Deep Water is a glorious slice of dark rock ‘n’ roll; swamp meets delta blues in the arms of instinctive funk swing and knowledgeable seduction of century old sirens.

cover_RingMaster Review   Influences to Cave Mouth (or CaveMouth, both used by band and all) come from the likes of Prince, ESG, Busta Rhymes, Leadbelly, Jack White, Queens Of The Stone Age, and Jethro Tull, with lyrical inspirations found in the world around the band from politics and religion to nature, and we would suggest the darkest delights to be found anywhere. There are so many potent attributes to the almost primal air and spellbinding invention of the band’s sound, from the bewitching dual vocal union of guitarist Sketchy Lex and bassist Ms. Mo to the primal rhythms stomped down by she and drummer Wreckless Richie, and equally the psyche twisting web of salacious coaxing cast by the flaming saxophone of Mr. Duncan ‘The Hook’ Hook and Lex’s guitar, everything smoulders with temptation. Deep Water is the darkest and most thrilling proposal from the band to date, but one in a line of simply spellbinding traps laid by the band’s mix of blues, funk, and African music infused adventures which includes last year’s excellent Pagan Blues EP.

Bass and beats instantly grab ears, as too the smoky breath of guitar and sultry caress of sax with their almost immediate evocation of the senses. The slight snarl to the voice of Lex perfectly colludes with the rich texture of Ms. Mo’s, whilst in the irresistible chorus a gnarly additional voice evokes dark bordering on demonic mischief from the heart of the song. Like My Baby meets Kobadelta in a coven lorded over by Old House Playground, the song swaggers from chord to thick chord and beat to wicked beat with the instinctive knowledge that it will have the listener enslaved and in rapture from its first touch, and fair to say it does with its melodic tonic and darkly hued resourcefulness, and especially that incendiary chorus and vocal union.

We have many lusts going on at The RR, and Cave Mouth has just become the cause of another.

Deep Water is available from August 19th

RingMaster 19/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

My Baby – Shamanaid

Pic Bart Heemskerk

Pic Bart Heemskerk

A few weeks back, preparing to be stirred up by the ever compelling dishevelled gentleman of blues, Seasick Steve at London Apollo Hammersmith, a majestic and fiery blues hex descended on ears and emotions in the shape of My Baby. Hailing from the Netherlands, the trio of Cato van Dyck, Joost (Sheik) van Dyck, and Daniel (Da Freez) Johnston were the announced support but unexpected intoxication infesting body and imagination with their delta blues seeded, rousing funk fuelled prowess. Fair to say My Baby rocked the walls and all between that night and sparked hungry attention on their just as recently released second album, Shamanaid. It has proven to be a proposition which more than lives up to the promise and anticipation bred through the forty minutes or so of their company that evening whilst revealing much more of the depth and adventure in the My Baby sound.

With its members bred in a Dutch and New Zealand climate, My Baby came together with a mutual lust for “fingerpickin’ guitars, voodoo, roots, funk, gospel and Southern swampy blues”. 2013 saw the release of debut album My Baby Loves Voodoo! via Embrace Recordings, its emergence greedily received and devoured and the spark to a global tour and shows from Texas to Tokyo, London to Lichtenvoorde, and Vienna to Wellington. My Baby also found itself embraced by radio stations and invited to support Henny Vrienten, as well as play on his latest release. The recent tour with Seasick Steve has enveloped the unveiling of Shamanaid, My Baby nudging the broadest fevered attention yet for their psyche inciting sound through said live adventure and even more potently with the provocative shamanic lures of the album.

The exceptional Seeing Red sets the spellbinding experience in motion, its first touch enslaving bait alone as dulled but pungent beats escort a spicy strum of guitar. Their combined lure embraces the magnetic tones of Cato next; her delivery and syllables dancing on the strands of rhythmic and acoustic coaxing like a temptress. The repetitious core of the song proceeds to bounce like a metronome inside ears and head, trapping both as melodies flirt with thoughts through their picturesque craft. The Louisiana air of the band’s sound is just as spicy as the enterprise if breeds, the song increasingly binding the listener in inescapable charm and seduction whilst it’s infectious shuffle, well that has the body enthralled from its first moment.

01_front_digipack_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The thrilling start is matched by the calmer but sultrier melodic waters of Meet Me At The Wishing Well. From the first moment a bewitching hook shines from within another minimalistic but pungent rhythmic and riffs lined stroll. Whereas live the band roared like a lioness, the record sees My Baby explore more their acoustic imagination and skills, the second song a radiant affair for ears and emotions. The shimmer of sound and richness of vocals make for a reflective hug which has body swerves and foot taps as eager as ears and thoughts are at the hands of the lyrical and vocal painting.

Variety and potency is kept ablaze by Uprising next, its blues flaming and dub infused tenacity an incendiary proposal which whether the song swims on a melodic breeze or erupts in an impassioned furnace, only intensifies and incites with blues alchemy. The track has been a thick lure into the album, an easy to see success such the unstoppable and fierce mesmerism on ears and emotions fuelling every aspect and twist of its triumph.

A mellower but no less tempting kiss comes next with The Doors Of Your Mind, its smouldering air and reflective blend of words and vocals a tantalising croon which simply slips under the skin. Offering more evidence that My Baby is as skilled and poetic laying a gentle evocative hand on ears as they are stirring up blood and energy, the song makes way for the similarly delicate Mary Morgan. There is a livelier vivacity to the richly hued encounter but matches its predecessor in vocal adventure as well as brewing a melodic tonic as colourful as the lyrical tale exposed by Cato.

Remedy flirts with an initial spatial coaxing next, rhythms adding alluring shadows as Cato’s harmonies inflame the air. Eventually a slight but definite tribalistic tenacity merges with a fascinating web of blues expression created by guitars; the slide version a lip smacking tangy seducing against the darker hues of bass and the ever anthemic rhythms. There is an intensive varying of styles and persuasion across the album, far more than found in the band’s first full-length; all songs making fascinating and empowering propositions, and especially here providing an unrelenting lifting of spirit and energy for the listener before the poetic elegance of Hidden From Time lies down beside ears and envelops them in its beauty.

The rhythmic saunter and sonic temptation of 6X2 slips in next, voice and guitar entwining with a blend of gospel and blues rooted serenading. As ever there is an edge to it all though, a raw and uncorrupted essence taken from the roots of all flavours woven into song and album. Once again musical hypnotism is at work as, like all songs within Shamanaid, it removes the listener from the real world for an instant or two before handing them over to the just as potent escape of Marching. With a relaxed but inescapable swing and an anthemic might to its seductive chorus, the track is a puppeteer to body and soul, only releasing its lingering grip when the closing Panggajo brings its worldly mystique and spirit to arrest ears and imagination.

The song is an enchanting end to a treat of an encounter more than living up to hopes seeded seeing My Baby live. Shamanaid does not have the fierce roar and volatile energy of their live show but ventures into a just as thrilling and gripping acoustic/melody exploration. It also shows a big leap in sound and imagination from its highly pleasing predecessor. My Baby is aural voodoo indeed with the sweetest toxicity.

Shamanaid is out now via Embrace Recordings @ https://mybaby.bandcamp.com/album/shamanaid

http://www.mybabywashere.com https://www.facebook.com/MYBABYMUSIC

RingMaster 11/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkXLLpT2OSY&feature=youtu.be&a

The Ghost Wolves – Man, Woman, Beast

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Rock duos have never been an absent feature of rock ‘n’ roll across the decades, the likes of The Everleys, The Carpenters, and alongside all those which spring to your mind right now The White Stripes all notable irresistible protagonists. It feels right now though that there is a real wealth and strength in depth to two-pronged innovative rock bands. The UK has the caustic garage punk/rock ‘n’ rollers The Creeping Ivies, Canada the raw and sonically insatiable might of The Black Frame Spectacle, whilst the US can offer up the country punk of The Barnyard Stompers and the blues punk fire of In The Whale. These are just four of the savagely potent enticements within the underground to which you can forcibly add The Ghost Wolves.

Hailing from Austin, TX, the duo of husband and wife Carley and Jonathan Wolf create a delta blues/garage rock inspired storm which stirs up the imagination and steals the passions like a fully loaded dose of sonic moonshine. Its raw and addictive recipe is irresistibly unleashed in a diverse mix of flavours within the band’s debut album Man, Woman, Beast. It is a rugged yet fuzzily seductive stomp of an encounter which leaves senses sore, bloated, and desperate for more.

Formed in 2011, The Ghost Wolves has spent the years since garnering more and more acclaim and support as well as a feistily growing fan base. Released on Nashville’s Plowboy Records, Man, Woman, Beast follows the success of the band’s 12” EP In Ya Neck! of 2011 and the following year the 7” single Getchya Hip Thrust, both on Pau Wau Records. The album already acclaimed in their homeland, has all the abrasing charm and enthralling enterprise, not forgetting sheer unruly beauty, to push the band into a wider world bred spotlight,

The first slice of infection is Shotgun Pistol Grip, the opening track an immediate sizzling bait to seduce ears and emotions. The heavy throaty tones of Carley’s guitar ignites ears right away to be joined within a breath or two by the tgw-620x620similarly coaxing crisp beats of Jonathan. There is an almost cantankerous swagger to the track, its rhythmic shoulders and melodic intent as feistily imposing as they are engagingly alluring. It is rapacious bait which steels its sinews to hold is tempting as the mischievously cute and flirtatiously melodic vocals of Carley caress ears, assisted as impressively by hubby. There is also an underlying surf rock breeze to the song which embraces the senses before making way for the fiery Gonna Live. Brewed in a richer distillery of blues, the track is an instinctively alluring prime rock ‘n’ roll canter. Guitars flame and groan with scuzz kissed toxicity whilst the vocals and chorus produce a rock revelry which demands attention from feet and emotions.

The ridiculously potent and thrilling start to the album is continued with Baby Fang Thang, a song which swings its melodic scuzz wrapped hips like a lap dancer from the first sway whilst beats punctuate the seduction with their own distinct potency. As with so many of the songs, verse and build ups are siren-esque especially vocally, but it is the toxicity of the chorus which sparks lustful passion, and in no greater success than on the third song. With a temptation which is like a fusion of Daisy Chainsaw and Karn8, the song licks at the senses with the salacious wickedness of a temptress and naive charm of a sultry breeze.

Both the coarse boned Grave Dollas and Ride The Wolf keep things aflame in quality and ears, the first a anthemic romp of energised rhythms and swinging vocal lures within another squalling blaze of blues lilted guitar colour. Its successor is a slow prowl of salaciously grinning vocals and sonic beckoning, the sultry seductive air of the song again reminding strongly of Karn8 whilst the heavier garage rock predation which equally crawls over the senses has a seventies psychedelic essence which also embraces flavours to be found in artists like Hasil Adkins, The Cramps, The White Stripes, and Morass of Molasses.

I Was Wrong uncages another sinew built stomp, rhythms casting a firm net for the twin vocals and smouldering guitar attack to tease ears with devilish efficiency, before the next up Itch unveils an earthy groove to lose inhibitions to. Whereas the last couple of songs richly pleased but lacked some of the lust breeding power of earlier tracks, this song is another Devil spawned seducing which wakes up the imagination and ardour fuelled passion like popping candy in the mouth, every note and beat a frenetic but fluid croon to set passions of eager edge. A welcome easily exploited by the intoxicating I’m Yo Mudda, its winding and swerving blues filtered grooves pure sonic manna.

The riveting limb enslaving Attack, Attack, Attack hits another pinnacle for the album, its veins pumped with fevered rapaciousness and hungry suasion driven by rhythmic stabs and vocal pokes. It is a sensational stomping which leaves the body breathless and hunger burning as greedily as the passions. Ensuring that the song’s glory is pushed to the final song, Dangerous Moves stands before ears with vocal enticement blazing radiantly within waves of blues toned guitar caressing, both leading to another crazily addictive and wonderfully toxic choruses. The song is a brilliant and pungent furnace of sound and anthemically evocative hues which sums up The Ghost Wolves perfectly.

Now we said these were the last songs and they are on the download version but we suggest going for the CD which comes with an extra trio of songs, tracks recorded live which you do not want to miss. The slow lumbering almost erotic beauty of Lies I Told is alone a treat but White Lily is the big prize, the song a scuzz lined dance of captivating beats and irrepressibly magnetic grooves all under the spell of the dual vocal temptation. The hypnotic rhythmic hex which opens up Mosquito is also a massive draw whilst the song once into its heart lays down a mesh of sonic bruising which ravenously grips an unrelenting appetite for the album.

Man, Woman, Beast is one of the real triumphs and pleasures of the year and The Ghost Wolves, a band to set the primal heart and beast in us all free.

Man, Woman, Beast is available now @ http://theghostwolves.bandcamp.com/album/man-woman-beast-2014 and on CD/vinyl through Plowboy Records! @ http://plowboyrecords.com/store/the-ghost-wolves/

http://www.theghostwolves.com

9/10

RingMaster 14/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Atlanter – Vidde

atlanter pic

Norwegian band Atlanter creates a brew of rock which in the words of the accompanying promo is ‘inspired by desert blues, by German krautrock and by old delta blues. All this is done with a Norwegian twist and point of view, and is perhaps best described as Norwegian mountainblues.’ This may be so but the most important and accurate description you need is that their sound is a warm and vibrate dance on the senses and imagination which is at ease with either a muscular or melodically seductive gait, and even more so at combining the two in a blaze of inventive and inspiring enterprise.

Atlanter was formed by vocalist/guitarist Jens Carelius and guitarist Arild Hammerø, two artists not strangers to acclaim and success with their solo work; Caerlius with his albums The First Songs (2008), The Beat Of The Travel (2009), and The Architect (2011), and folk singer Hammerø through his releases Dagen Som Gryr of 2008, Flåte of 2012 which saw him alongside Daniel Herskedal under the name Hammer & Hersk, and as part of the electronica duo Ost & Kjex. Joined by drummer Jonas Barsten Johnsen (CCTV, Frøy Aagre, Disaster in the Universe) and bassist Morten Kvam (Jens Carelius, Siri Nilsen and a number of jazz ensembles), the Oslo quartet has in new album Vidde created a sultry fire of folk rock and progressive seduction which transports the listener into the arms of a blues and desert rock expanse. It is a powerfully persuasive release which lays down a landscape also employing a wind of American country rock which shows how varied and full it is, especially when you add in the darker tones of shadows found in Helldorado and the spiritually psychedelic whispers of Spirits Of The Dead which also place a rich caress on the impressive release.

From the opener Tree Song there feels a freedom and loose spirit to the release which makes each encounter a new venture and one 485978_323451297764154_1100044288_nassumes live a continually evolving proposition. From its undefined intro a guitar begins coaxing the ear though soon joined by a moody and vibrant bass call and instantly exciting drum temptation. Vocal harmonies reservedly add to the ambience soon after to charm out full attention which is then rewarded by the catchy imaginative shuffle, drums and bass remaining in their already hypnotic stance, and the joint delivery of Carelius and Hammerø making for a richly pleasing combination vocally and musically. There is constantly little and larger things going on in the song, every second an adventure within an adventure which intrigues and captivates from start to finish. It is a scintillating beginning which leaves a flavour enriched appetite fully awoken.

Both Aye and Kaktos continue to feed that emerged hunger with ease, the first another different but near riotous folk clad boogie through the ear with an energy and passion that fidgets magnetically throughout driven by the again outstanding rhythmic temptation of Barsten Johnsen. With the guitars teasing notes into picturesque descriptions to paint thoughts and the vocals equally as potent, the track is an immense imaginative lure to which full involvement is inevitable. Its successor then wraps a shimmering rich western tone to its body, that Helldorado reference coming into play as the tale unfolding engulfs thoughts into a sultry picture of emotive and reflective intensity. As its predecessors the track is a glorious creative and infectious fire to dive often for an ever expanding experience.

After the brief acoustic call of Air, an ok track but pale compared to what came before, the album re-grips full attention with the excellent guitar twanged and sculpted mystique of More Juice Than Zeus and the exotic almost Eastern climes of Pike. Both tracks steer emotions to the door of the place the opening trio of songs forged, if without crossing the threshold, whilst the pulsating melodic and sonic kisses of Waking push emotions that little further into rapture.

Completed by the elegantly shaped instrumental Ling and the rawer countryesque Desert, the album is a thrilling companion to ear and thoughts. Admittedly its first half outweighs its second in irresistibility but from the opening poke of the ear to the last expressive note of Vidde, Atlanter immerse the listener in spellbinding enjoyment. Hopefully the Jansen Plateproduksjon released album is just the start for the band as it could be very easy to get used to this type of aural escapade.

https://www.facebook.com/atlanternorway

8.5/10

RingMaster 26/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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