Figures – Chronos

Barely giving the acclaim laden dust time to settle after the release of their self-titled debut EP this past February, Australian outfit Figures have just unleashed its predecessor in the similarly striking and fiercely enjoyable shape of Chronos. Offering five more slices of the Melbourne quintet’s alternative rock/melodic metal blend, the EP also has a new fresh breath and seeming richer maturity which defies the mere four months between releases. Obviously we cannot say when the songs of either release were written but the step is maybe surprising but greedily taken as Chronos eclipses the equally outstanding first offering from the band.

Formed as 2013 turned into its successor, Figures has risen up the ranks of attention with notably increasing success in recent times due to that critically acclaimed first EP and a dynamic live presence which has already seen the band  share stages with the likes of Caligula’s Horse, Twelve Foot Ninja, and Superheist. Broader focus and support for the band has without doubt been aroused these past handful of months and is sure to escalate again as Chronos is discovered by more and more. Instantly it has ears and attention in the palms of its creative hands as opener Recoil raggedly simmers into view and proceeds to uncage a gnarly groove as primal as it is magnetic. The guitar continues to growl and tempt as the lively rhythms of drummer Josh Sforzin and Jen Fletcher’s moody bassline join the blossoming affair; vocalist Mark Tronson soon in the mix with his agitated roar. Predatory and magnetic, the track needs mere seconds to entrap the senses and imagination, sealing the deal as Tronson’s melodic prowess unites with his rawer tones as steely metal and melodic rock textures equally collude.

The stunning start is matched by the equally dramatic and even bolder exploits of Alpha. Guitarists Paul Callow and Simon Edgell spring a lure of wiry riffs and sonic temptation around the harmonic delivery of Tronson, though as the music he allows harsher textures to escape his throat to keeps things unpredictable. Virulently infectious and persistently imaginative, the song is pure captivation; its heart earnest and body a tapestry of melodic and sonic intrigue with just the right richness of volatility to keep things intensely fascinating.

Tied Around follows, winding brooding grooves around ears as Fletcher’s bass groans with matching seduction while again Tronson enthrals with his impressive vocals. There is an agitation in the riffs and beats of Sforzin which is transferred to the steely grooves but tempered by the elegant beauty of melodies and harmonies floating across the song’s inner oasis. As with the first pair, creative magnetism is at play sparking an elevated greed which Point of Doubt feeds with its cosmopolitan almost shamanic nature. Sultrily exotic melodies align with anthemic rhythms within the song’s fiery blaze, its riveting landscape tempestuously sharing warm and irritable climates.

The EP concludes with Crying Door, a mellow melancholy lined croon shaped by keys and voice and their suggestive beauty, Tronson again a magnet in its midst. Darker hues walk the song’s edge, bassy shadows lurking as skittish beats court a more portentous edge. It is an entrancing close to a second seriously striking encounter with Figures. Musically the band has been compared to the likes of Incubus, Deftones, and Karnivool, all justified but add a touch of Voyager and possibly even Porcupine Tree and you get a fuller impression of what, to be honest, is a sound distinct to one truly exciting proposition.

Chronos is out now @ https://figuresbandofficial.bandcamp.com/album/chronos and other online stores.

http://www.figuresband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/figuresbandofficial

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Voyager – Ghost Mile

There is no denying the eager grin which broke upon faces here when the new Voyager album was sent through, having been seriously tempted by the band since their second album uniVers in 2007 and lustfully hooked through their fourth and fifth in the acclaimed shapes of The Meaning of I and V. The later in 2014 set a plateau it was easy to wonder if the Australian band could eclipse thereon in. Hopes and a quiet confidence have just been realised with the release of Ghost Mile, an album which brings a truly fresh breath to progressive metal as instinctively catchy and virulent as it is technically and inventively imaginative.

The success of the Perth quintet’s last album saw the band invited to perform at major festivals such as ProgPower USA, Euroblast Festival in Germany, and the ProgPower Europe Festival in The Netherlands as well as sharing stages with the likes of Deftones, Opeth, Leprous, Protest The Hero, Nightwish, Epica, Oceans of Slumber, and Coheed and Cambria. Voyager ended last year touring Australia with Deftones and Karnivool and being further invitations to play Euroblast and Progpower EU this year, the latter as headliners. Now with Ghost Mile driving things, it is hard to imagine 2017 being anything other than a really busy adventure, one no doubt littered with praise lured by their stunning new album alone.

Mixed by Matthew Templeman and mastered by Simon Strutters, Ghost Mile opens up with Ascension. A golden melody kisses ears first with the warmth and intrigue of a dawn sun, its suggestive air tempting the imagination before bolder rhythms add their bait. Djent teased enterprise is soon joining the blossoming affair, their steely tenacity paving the way for another caress of elegance around the radiant tones of Danny Estrin. As magnetic as ever, his presence is swiftly joined by sturdier textures whilst being the ringleader to an irresistible infectiousness soon fuelling the chorus and body of the evolving encounter. With the suggestive heat of his keytar matched in craft and magnetism by the guitars of Scott Kay and Simone Dow, the song is pure captivation, only increasing its potency as breaks of predacious intent and aggression escape.

The quite stunning start is quickly continued by the equally outstanding Misery Is Only Company. From the off, it has a harder core to its presence, a latent but open intensity which lines jagged riffs and the brooding air of Alex Canion’s bass. There is no containing the instinctive catchiness within songwriting and imagination though, the swinging beats of Ashley Doodkorte inciting similar boisterousness in the resourceful and technical enterprise across the band. Deftones’ Chino Moreno recently likened Estrin’s voice to Duran Duran’s Simon LeBon, something at times easy to agree with and indeed at times the song has something of the British outfit to its pop sensibilities, infectiousness aligning with more predatory essences to masterful effect.

Next up Lifeline initially lays another sunny shimmer on the senses, its progressive aptitude soon courting metallic rapacity though as melodies radiate and vocals warmly croon. Relaxing into a gentle stroll, there is still a constant snarl to the guitars and bass which breeds alluring unpredictability and waiting volatility, the latter never truly having its moment but keeping the calm honest whilst giving the progressive/ pop rock adventuring a threat. As with its predecessors, physically involving the listener is a quick given and with increasingly lust.

The provocative nature of Fragile Serene seduces next, its climate a mix of melancholy and joy with one addictive hook at the heart of a fusion of rich temptations which almost swarm over the senses into the imagination before To The Riverside carries the same fantasy off in its evocative piano led flight towards the waiting more capricious embrace of the album’s title track. From the first second, Ghost Mile has an agitated eagerness which infects body and spirit, the carnivorously laced bass growling beautifully within the fiery but composed roar of the track. Like sonic and melodic alchemy, the song turns four minutes or so into a cauldron of heavy and light, dark and luminous adventure; contrasts uniting rather than battling for the album’s pinnacle.

What A Wonderful Day pretty much sums up the feeling during its three minutes plus, its pop nurtured rock ‘n’ roll as contagious, additive, and arresting as anything heard this year so far. Its warm dance though does have predacious overtones lurking in its shadows, their semi-vocal presence more realised in the tenebrous texture of the following Disconnected, though it is never devoid of the light and vibrancy instinctive to the Voyager imagination. With industrial breath seeping into the track’s progressively nurtured and invasive metal challenge, there is nothing to deter a quick and full submission to its rousing and often caustic incitement.

The enchanting fascinating of This Gentle Earth simply beguiles next, the union of piano and vocals alone sheer seduction and only escalated as rhythms probe and drama floods every rising texture and tendril of contagion sharing sound; an infectiousness belying the emotional reflection of disconnection.

The album finishes with the fiercely charismatic As The City Takes The Night, a track growing from an absorbing tango into a blaze of heart and intensity which smoulders, simmers, and boils across its eventful reflection without ever seemingly taking the same route twice. As the album, the song is a fascination giving more and more with every listen, rewards including pure pleasure.

Expectations of Voyager are always high because of previous triumphs but again left short by an album which will take some shifting from being one major contender for this year’s greatest moment.

Ghost Mile is out now via Nova Distribution across most stores.

http://voyager-australia.com/   https://www.facebook.com/voyageraustralia   https://twitter.com/voyagerau

Pete RingMaster 17/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Target Renegades – Gallows Humour EP

tr-band_RingMasterReview

With their previous acclaim luring Dark Sounds EP pushing the band’s sound to another level, UK rockers Target:Renegades ended 2016 with another proposition revelling in new growth in their fiery mix of alternative and hard rock loaded with punk belligerence. The Gallows Humour EP provides a quartet of songs which roar and command attention whilst showing new variety in the Warrington outfit’s writing and sound. Compared to its predecessor and its immediate explosive grip of ears and imagination, Gallows Humour is more of a smouldering tempting but one working its way to the same kind of success and persuasion .

Following their 2012 released debut EP Corruption For Beginners, Target:Renegades really courted awareness with first album [Press Start] two years later. Its impressive collection of songs eagerly pleased ears yet suggested that there was plenty left in the creative tank for the band to discover and explore. With an explosive live presence earning them further praise and support and seeing the band sharing stages with the likes of The Vibrators, Sumo Cyco, and I Am Giant among many over time, Target:Renegades realised much of that potential with Dark Sounds and have tapped into even more imagination and variety with Gallows Humour, an encounter ready to ignite a new flood of plaudits and followers.

The EP opens with the instantly compelling Jump Overboard, its initial nagging groove alone enough to grip ears and appetite as the lures of Dan Fido’s guitar squirrel themselves into the psyche. With the beats of Matt Reid just as eager as the bass of Jack Hamnett magnetically groans, the song soon hits a controlled yet fiery stride with vocalist Adam Hulse commanding further attention. Its chorus is simple but as catchy as anything the band has sculpted while its surrounding saunter is muscle and menace bound in a composed groove layered air. With hooks which drive the song further under the skin, it is a masterful and addictive start to the release.

tr_RingMasterReviewA heavy bass groan opens up the following A Curse Ensues, melodic strands from Fido soon wrapping the senses as the track grows and blossoms into a proposal distinct to the band. The second track reinforces the thought that the band has discovered a sound which roars only Target:Renegades though inspirations from the likes of Deftones and Karnivool are additional hues in its canvas of imagination. Hulse excels as he shares the song’s landscape with earnest prowls and emotional roars, both backed by Fido’s potent tones and inventive guitar spun enterprise.

I Concede steps up next, coaxing ears with a melodic caress as rhythms gather in the background before shaping the track’s subsequent melancholic stroll. Its low key gait and touch is a suggestive proposition as vocals potently share an emotion bred heart; an alluring offering ignited further by ferocious bursts of fiery sound and raw intensity. Whether guttural vocal growls work as well as they could have can be argued but the song only reinforces the potency of the release so far with strength and invention.

The EP is concluded by This Isn’t Revenge, another instantly recognisable to the band which backs the suggestion of real distinctiveness in their writing and music breached by Target:Renegades. The song maybe lacks some of the sparks of its predecessors but hones a melodic prowess and beauty which leads it to be as tempting as anything else within Gallows Humour.

The new EP is a different beast to Dark Sounds but an equal in adventure and energy with a new blossoming of maturity breeding the most rounded songs from Target:Renegades yet and inescapable evidence of a band ready to embrace bigger and more imposing spotlights.

Gallows Humour is out now across most online stores.

http://www.targetrenegades.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/TR.UKMusic   https://twitter.com/TargetRenegades

Pete RingMaster 24/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Survival Code – One

the-survival-code-pic-2_RingMasterReview

Sure to cement the attention and praise generated by recent EP Broken Strings and a title track acting as its first single, UK alternative rockers The Survival Code release new track One mid-January. Also from the three-track EP, the song is another imagination sparking, ear pleasing proposal sharing just a little more of the variety making up the band’s infectious rock ‘n’ roll.

London based, The Survival Code is fronted by Dubliner Gary McGuinness on vocals and guitar and driven by the rhythmic prowess of bassist Michael Eden and drummer Tom Cook. Formed in 2011 and inspired by the likes of Johnny Cash, Deftones, Foo Fighters, Alkaline Trio, The Cure, The Beatles, and Biffy Clyro, the band released the Everything But Today EP in 2013. Well-received it was easily surpassed in sound and success as well as acclaim by debut album MMXV two years later, a step forward replicated again by Broken Strings.

the-survival-code-one-artwork_RingMasterReviewLast year was a big and eventful year for the band, seeing them play over 40 gigs across the capital and beyond ending with a UK tour around their latest EP. It also saw The Survival Code settling down to write a new album, go through a change of bassists, and endure “a manager that ran off with months of work.” One ensures that 2017 is kicked off in fine style for the band, a year already threatening to exceed its predecessor in success and adventure.

From its first breath One uncages a tide of jabbing beats and imposing riffs but with a creative restraint which allows all aspects within to express and tempt around the potent vocals of McGuinness. Raw in air yet finely woven, the track also casts harmonic roars and melodic sighs within its rousing body, essences of bands like Feeder and Skyscraper hinted at as the song blossoms in imagination and infectious energy.

From start to finish, it is a relentless persuasion which has body and spirit involved. It might not prove to be the most unique encounter found this year but few will be more enjoyable so if you are looking for new meaty rock ‘n’ roll to feed a hungry appetite The Survival Code might just be the One.

One is released January 20th through Independent Records Limited (IRL).

January 14 – Proud Camden – Camden Rocks all day festival

March 16 – Brighton – The Hope and Run

http://www.thesurvivalcode.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thesurvivalcode    https://twitter.com/thesurvivalcode

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Finding Kate – If I Fall

finding-kate-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

With eager praise surrounding debut EP Inside Out, British melodic rockers Finding Kate are now pushing for wider recognition with their first album and fair to say that If I Fall is twelve tracks of melancholy soaked and emotionally powerful rock which just demands attention.

The brainchild and creative outlet of alt-rock vocalist/lyricist Kate Pavli, her London hailing project has earned a potent reputation for its live presence to match that earned by that first EP. Linking up with pianist Chris Charalambides who wrote all the music for the album and a host of additional contributors to If I Fall, Kate is ready to tap into bigger spotlights with a release which ripples with skilful songwriting and strongly enterprising sounds.

Influences listed include Deftones, Flyleaf, Avril Lavigne, Karnivool, The Pretty Reckless, and Evanescence and there is no escaping a comparison to certainly the latter for the Finding Kate sound though you can add Forever Still like essences also helping shape the band’s potent first full-length. If I Fall opens up with the swiftly impressive Drowning, a track soon luring ears and appetite into its imaginative landscape. Little time is needed either to embrace the emotional fuelled voice of Kate, her presence and qualities catching eager attention  within seconds of her opening melodic cries. As often common to the album’s character, the song is a fiery simmering of intensity, an emotional cauldron which ignites from time to time but seduces rather than blazes within ears as guitars and keys especially echo the drama of Kate’s vocals.

White Lies follows the strong start, opening up with a rhythmically feistier coaxing which shapes its subsequent infectious character and energy. As with the first, there is something familiar about the song drawing those comparisons earlier mentioned yet both tracks develop a personality of sound and invention built on the potential of uniqueness.

finding-kate-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewNew single, Forever is next, its sombre breath and emotional intimacy bred from the alluring voice of Kate and the plaintively shadowed melodies of Chris’ piano alone; their potency backed by the expansive suggestiveness of guitars and strings as rhythms court a darker climate. It is equally a template behind the emotive theatre of next up Don’t Let Go which is taken to even more intimate depths as Kate’s voice flames across another enticing tapestry of flavours and textures. As strong as its predecessor was, the track easily eclipses it.

Both Get Over You and Inside Out leave ears richly satisfied, the first creating another fiery landscape of sound and heart felt declaration matched by the second in its imagination seducing web of sounds and invention. Strings again add a sublime texture and presence to both songs, especially the former while its successor enthrals through that unpredictable and mouth-watering array of invention. It makes a great claim for best song honours within the album though quickly rivalled by Did It Again with its cinematic stringed beauty and the melancholic union of keys and voice.

Through the album’s dynamic yet tender title track and the magnetically sorrowful yet hope lit I’ll Save You, band and release only cement their hold on attention while Semper Fi explores arguably the album’s most adventurous creative scenery in its impassioned roar. It is fair to say there is a bit of a surface similarity which wraps many of the songs within If I Fall, though digging deeper frequently reveals a kaleidoscope of real individual imagination, but this track is an openly unique proposal to stir ears and enjoyment.

The dark vocal/piano romance building It’s Over captivates from its first breath and note straight after; a beguiling ballad hard to be anything but taken with before Gone brings the album to a fine and memorable close with its emotion soaked roar which pleasures with ease.

If I Fall shows that Finding Kate may have yet to find a truly distinct voice in their sound but the potential is a loud promise within their first album and its enjoyment rather easy to find.

If You Fall is released November 18th with pre-orders now taken @ https://findingkate.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.findingkatemusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/FindingKate    https://twitter.com/FindingKate_

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Big Jesus – Oneiric

Pic cred: Chris Sullivan

Pic cred: Chris Sullivan

Imposingly dreamy, Oneiric is a proposal which simply infests, seduces, and lingers with increasing potency listen by listen. The new album from Atlanta bred outfit Big Jesus, the transfixing Oneiric is a warm serenade of the senses but equally has a predacious side to its shadows and rhythmic weight which hooks eager attention. Mellow and raw, seductive and fiery, the band’s sound sits somewhere between My Bloody Valentine and Deftones, Smashing Pumpkins and Palms but is all the time weaving its own distinct adventures now collected on one gripping album.

According to vocalist/bassist Spencer Ussery, the Big Jesus sound was bred on inspirations found in nineties rock;  everything from metal, psychedelic pop, shoegaze, hip hop, and classical piano music impacting on the ideas and music of the band. It is a mix which lured potent interest in the band with the release of their debut album One, and is set to escalate as the Matt Hyde (Deftones, Slayer, Monster Magnet, Sum 41, Alkaline Trio) produced Oneiric swarms over more and more ears.

Bringing four tracks from their earlier release with six new encounters, Oneiric quickly grabs ears and imagination with opener SP, the song instantly a writhing mix of fuzzy melodies and hungry grouchy riffs. It is imposing yet inviting, especially as the warm tones of Ussery float across the feisty landscape of the song. Guitarists CJ Ridings and Thomas Gonzalez cast a great web of warm and aggressive enterprise too, riffs and grooves a conflicting yet beautifully united adventure which with the ethereal nature of Ussery’s voice offers a House Of Love meets Smashing Pumpkins enticing.

art_RingMasterReviewThe snarling air of Ussery’s bass and the intensively swinging beats of Joe Sweat make a matching powerful lure, their driving energy and dark nature as virulent in the following pair of Always and Lock & Key. The first of the two is a ridiculously catchy affair, it’s relentlessly twisting grooves and rhythms a feistily contagious invitation wrapped in magnificent psychedelia/ shoegaze spiced vocals while its successor musically ventures down the same creative avenue to create its own tempting while caressing the senses with romantic melodies as sonic suggestiveness warms with celestial hues. Again there is heaviness and intensity involved which sublimely tempers the bright air and only increases the potency on ears and imagination.

Through the rapacious directness and melodic meanderings of Floating Past You and the gentle yet intrusive and slightly melancholic croon of Fader, the album transfixes with ease while their successors, the sonically incendiary Shards and the heavy metal hued Oneirica only tighten the pull of one increasingly engaging encounter. The latter is another song which fizzes with infectious vitality and a rhythmic boisterousness which seems to inspire all the other elements making up the outstanding and seriously enjoyable multi-flavoured track.

Shrimp caresses the senses with its melodic and vocal gossamer next; a golden kiss on ears with a fiercer underbelly. it is an irresistible calling on appetite and emotions before Felt In Reverse coaxes the senses with magnetic reverberation into another sonically flaming and vocally seductive fire of sound and imagination. As at times across the album, surface elements of the song seem a touch similar to that of other tracks but with closer focus and each subsequent play, the song reveals its own mesmeric and often wonderfully volatile character of craft and invention.

Concluded by Heaviest Heart and its mix of irritable predatory riffs and airy almost diaphanous melodies and harmonies, Oneiric is pure temptation in your speakers. As suggested, the album simply grows and further entangles the listener with every listen, unveiling plenty to satisfy fans of rock music from psych and melodic rock to shoegaze and grunge.

Oneiric is out now via Mascot Label Group / Mascot Records and available across most online stores and @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/big-jesus/

http://bigjesus.net/   https://www.facebook.com/bigassjesus/   https://twitter.com/bigassjesus

Pete RingMaster 07/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

This Dying Hour – Resting Where No Shadows Fall

this-dying-hour-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

In many ways you could say that Resting Where No Shadows Fall, the eagerly anticipated debut album from British metallers This Dying Hour has been ten years in the making. Formed at the beginning of 2006 and swiftly impressing with their debut EP, the High Wycombe outfit has endured a decade littered with setbacks “that were just too great to overcome; everything from death and marriage to money came between the band and its members.” Now they are back and with a release which feels like it carries all the emotions and frustrations felt over that time; an album which ignites ears and imaginations with invention and passion.

That first year of the band produced the Longest Memory From The Shortest Life EP, a well-received and often praised introduction. It was accompanied by tours throughout the UK and Europe as well as shows with the likes of Young Guns, Sylosis, Bury Tomorrow, Malefice, and Exit Ten. The years since, as mentioned, brought This Dying Hour to a standstill until this year when vocalist Dave Pickup and guitarist Ash Whitelock decided to spark the band into life again with the help of “rotating members to fill the void.” Now they have made the wait for the next instalment of This Dying Hour adventure a forgotten moment as Resting Where No Shadows Fall seriously impresses ears and thoughts.

The album opens with its brief title track, an atmospheric instrumental which draws the imagination, leading it into the waiting jaws of War Drums. The second track instantly makes its point with scything riffs and beats, their imposing swipes aligned to a nagging raw melody before things all comes together in a predacious stalking of the senses. The snarling tones of Pickup are soaked in raw emotion and ire, a potency matched by Whitelock’s irritable guitar and the rhythmic antagonism of the track. It not may be the most unique proposal, references to the likes of Lamb Of God and Killswitch Engage valid, yet the song has a freshness which roars in ears and only blossoms further as a cleaner touch invades the vocal incitement.

The impressive start continues as Asleep springs its wiry grooves and vocal hostility next. Swiftly the song shows its distinct and individual character to be a diversity of intensity and energy, all soaked in venom as it seizes attention and a growing appetite for the release. Clean vocals and great dirty harmonies bring stronger drama and quality, as too the enterprising craft of Whitelock as the song bellows and challenges in equal enjoyable measure.

this-dying-hour-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewPath Of Unknown opens with a melodic atmosphere similar to the opening intro, sunken vocals courting the initial lure before the song opens up into a striking and thrilling encounter. The mellower tones of Pickup predominantly stir the song this time around, luring with the listener alongside spicy melodies into one ridiculously infectious chorus and subsequently a great passage of calm reflection with a touch of Palms to it. One of the biggest highlights among many, the outstanding proposal is followed by the far more hostile climate and sound of Time To Die, though it too is unafraid to cast warm melodies and catchy clean vocals. A rival for best track to match its predecessor, the song completes a first half of Resting Where No Shadows Fall which simply blows most other emerging melodic/groove metallers away.

There is little loosening of attention and pleasure either as first the darker sinister realm of Underworld encloses and encroaches on the senses. Certainly the track is a touch hit and miss, moments which stir the blood and others which lie a touch flat on thoughts but arguably it is the most inventive proposition on the album as it ensnares the imagination while Alive is as accomplished as anything within Resting Where No Shadows Fall at blending the calmer and fiercer emotional and physical exploits of band and songwriting. Though both are lacking the spark of earlier songs, each leaves a real want for more which Priapism feeds with its melody rich charm and fiery temperament.

The album closes on the same kind of explosive sound and impact as it started, Room 108 a volatile and often corrosive encounter with sparkling moments of vocal invention and melodic imagination seemingly inspired by a mix of System Of A Down, Deftones, and In Flames.

It is a great end to an excellent first album from a band making up for lost time in passion and invention. With the potential of bigger and bolder to come, it is very easy to push Resting Where No Shadows Fall as something all should make an acquaintance with.

Resting Where No Shadows Fall is out in stores from Friday 30th September.

https://www.facebook.com/thisdyinghouruk/

Pete RingMaster 28/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright