We Ghosts – Decade

WE Ghosts_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

A release of multiple charms and flavours, Decade the new album from Anglo-Swedish alternative acoustic duo We Ghosts gets its UK release this month and a tantalising treat it is. Such its distinct yet united variety, the album ebbs and flows in its strongest persuasions but from start to finish the band’s new encounter takes ears on a captivating adventure in celebration of the band’s ten years of creative life.

We Ghosts consists of the song writing team of Swedish vocalist/guitarist J.J.Woodall and English instrumentalist John Christopher, the band emerging in 2004. The years since has seen the band on a constant adventure of live shows and releases. On stage the band is expanded by the likes of Johan Persson and Richard “Rat” Westlake, both making contributions to the album too with the latter also co-producing it with the band. Record wise, We Ghosts’ blend of pop, jazz, blues, and folk has fuelled a clutch of EPs and acclaimed albums such as Things That Go Bump In The Night in 2009 and Almost Alone three years later. Now fourth studio album Decade, released as its predecessor through Deep River Records, provides the imaginative epilogue to the band’s first decade and increasingly seductive opening to the next.

A rhythmic acoustic coaxing opens up album and its first track Broken Sky; its initial lure alone pure magnetism which only increases as melodic intrigue and the instantly enticing vocals of Woodall link their tantalising lures. A spatial breeze soon immerses ears too as siren-esque harmonies float, but that early bait still provides the most direct and gripping pull for the imagination and appetite. With darker hues of bass adding to the elegance and temptation offered, the song is nothing less than a busy and warmly welcoming seducing.

cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The masterful opening continues with the summery saunter of Out Tonight, a song with a Caribbean bred canvas and flirtatious melodic scenery matched by the vocals and the more wistful but equally colourful keys. The song’s dance is an irresistible contagion, a nudge to feet and emotions to eagerly join its warm revelry before the bluesy funk pop of Death or Glory casts its emotive persuasion next. Without quite matching its predecessors, the track sways and croons with a fiery attitude aligned to similarly intense enterprise from the guitar and easily leave ears smiling.

The folkish shimmer of Too Late to Learn merges a country twang with a sultry atmosphere next, its vocal offering led by Christopher this time. Though his delivery is potent and expressive, personal tastes hanker for the lures of Woodall whilst the song itself lacks the undefined but rich spark which lit the other tracks before it. Nevertheless enjoyment is still a given before the album hits another high spot with its next two tracks. Home Is Where the Heart Is comes first and from the glorious jazzy/blues vocal roar of Woodall to start things off, the song proceeds to stroll with a southern blues spicing across a melodic and rhythmic evocation. It is pure captivation, an inescapable anthemic and spiritual tempting to bask in, though quickly outshone by the even more exceptional Final Curtain. The track is virulent pop infused folk rock with a delta blues hue to its harmonies and invention. Like a mix of My Baby and Jingo, the song is a flame to the senses and rock alchemy for the ears, and quite outstanding with its voracious contagion and imaginative enterprise.

The lively acoustic balladry of Trying to Be Faithful makes a fine and bewitching effort of matching its predecessor, its Kirsty MacColl charm and tenacity compelling from start to finish. It is a success next up Suzie cannot quite emulate, though again there is little to pull it up for outside personal tastes and our always less than eager appetite for any countrified essence. Superbly crafted and intricately woven though, and with a host of creative hues, the song as the following album title track, is a keen persuasion, the latter’s enticing of melodies and poetic vocal expression leaving a glow in the air.

We Ghosts, the song, completes the album, its sixties psyche pop toning a final infectious serenade on the senses. It makes an engrossing end to a fine album, a release which just grows in strength and seduction with every listen. Like many, we have suggested a few releases to soundtrack your upcoming summers, and there is no way we cannot add Decade to those recommendations, especially for those provocative sultry nights.

Decade is out now via Deep River Records @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/decade/id825383537

https://www.facebook.com/pages/We-Ghosts/170602999638293 http://www.weghosts.co.uk/

RingMaster 15/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Death Kindly Waits For Me – Wire Iron Blood

death kindly

Let us cut to the chase right away and suggest that Wire Iron Blood might just be the best and certainly one of the most exciting post hardcore debut in recent times. An introduction to UK quartet Death Kindly Waits For Me, the three track release is a striking and dramatically captivating protagonist for ears and imagination, and the fact that it suggests there is plenty more in the creative tank of the band yet to be explored and developed only increases its impact. Expressively provocative with a sound coming from the At The Drive In/Fall Of Troy end of an ever broadening genre, Death Kindly Waits For Me is a dramatic fresh breath in the British post hardcore scene.

Northamptonshire bred, Death Kindly Waits For Me began towards the beginning of 2014, taking inspirations from the likes of Thursday, Being As An Ocean, Finch, and Taking Back Sunday into their emerging invention. Their melody rich and aggressive sound was soon drawing potent attention locally and even further afield as their increasing live presence saw the foursome sharing stages with bands such as Decade, Light You Up, Devil Sold His Soul, Terraform, Emp!re, Our Hollow Our Home, Hey Vanity, Attention Thieves and Flood Of Red. Now a national attention is on the radar as Wire Iron Blood is uncaged, and it is fair to say that expectations are already confident in the band’s success in luring a wider spotlight.

The EP opens with the outstanding Cutting Room Floor, a sonic lure swiftly thrusting ears into the impassioned vocals of Adam Fitch, his clean and earnest tones instantly magnetic. Alongside him the guitar of Max Freeston slowly spreads a coarsely melodic lure whilst the heavy bass tones of Adam Cator, just as quickly adds dark haunting shadows. Pierced by the controlled and reserved but rapier like strikes of drummer Josh Miller, it is not a dramatic start yet thoroughly intriguing and awakening an appetite to hear more. Soon into a steady stride and still employing the creative weave which set things off, the song increasingly impresses as it expands its presence musically and vocally, Fitch superb with his distinctive angst fuelled tones whilst the DEath KIndly...more punkish offering of Freeston is a potent backing and the raw roars of Cator nicely caustic. An additional anthemic strength emerges in the song and though musically maybe it does not blaze with startling originality there is nothing but freshness and adventure to the opener.

The same strengths flows though the following Best Friends. It character is shadowed and emotionally dark yet it flames with a contagious energy and a rigorously exciting imagination. Vocally once more the track shines whilst riffs and melodies create an infectious proposal which, as the EP, becomes more addictively enjoyable over time. That Fall Of Troy feel is a bright whisper across the song, whilst other elements hint at the more experimental adventure of The Mai Shi at times, but as the song evolves from a raging stomp into a melancholic croon in its finale, the track is thrillingly individual to Death Kindly Waits For Me.

The closing Decade Of War continues the excellent temptation, its emotionally sober but energetically impassioned heart a canvas for great rhythmic enterprise and colourful guitar endeavour to wrap with craft and tenacity. Vocally of course the song continues a weighty persuasion amidst impressive sonic imagination and by its end it is hard not to sigh in disappointment that there is no more and to swiftly go back to the beginning again and ensure there is.

As mentioned at the beginning, Wire Iron Blood is a starting point for the band which shows that they have plenty to discover and push within themselves. There is little nothing to shade the potency of the release though, with no reflection on Cator, personal tastes would like to see a diminishing or loss of the aggressive vocal squalls as they often feel at odds with the rest of the vocal delivery and at times songs. It is a very minor thing of course in a potential drenched start by Death Kindly Waits For Me, a band hard not to get rather excited over.

Wire Iron Blood will be available from 2nd March through all digital stores.

https://www.facebook.com/deathkindlywaitsformeuk

RingMaster 02/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

 

Kids We Used To Be: And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP

The And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP is the debut release from Liverpool pop punk band Kids We Used To Be. Released through Like Records it offers four tracks dripping promise for a band still in evolution. With a hardcore vein bursting through their songs the band whilst not laying down deep scars of originality leaves one anticipating great things ahead once they find their true selves in their sound.

Taking their name from one of their influences Alexisonfire and their song Old Crows, Kids We Used to Be is barely a year old, being formed in the Summer of last year. Consisting of vocalists Ste McEvatt and Carl Gunning, backed by the musical prowess of guitarists James Cremor and Lewis Gardner, bassist Mike Higgins, and Lee Berrill on drums, the sextet use additional flavours from the likes of The Wonder Years, Set Your Goals, Alexisonfire, and Man Overboard, to forge their own not yet distinct but flavoursome sound, the band feeling like one still in transition. They have in their relatively short time already lit up stages alongside bands such as Polar Bear Club, Paige, Kyoto Drive, The Story so Far, Man Overboard, and Decade and set themselves as a band to certainly keep an eye on, something the EP does nothing to suggest otherwise.

30 Down opens up the release with a firm hand of striking melodic strikes and cruising riffs. Gruff brawling shouts going as vocals enter the affray and are fair if unspectacular in what seems to be a growing need for bands to employ this aspect against clean vocals which here are very agreeable and add a balance to their coarse counterpart and the track itself. The song itself is a bruising encounter without unleashing a barrage of aggression which works well with the melodic enterprise from the guitars.

The following Hey Aqualung litters the ear with feisty riffs and firm rhythms in a regular pop punk approach. Again the dual vocals dominate the song predominately though it is no reflection on the strong songwriting and sounds which without being the most imaginative easily satisfy and keep the attention fully engaged. The building crescendos throughout work well and add extra intrigue to what is a good song with an anthemic edge.

By this point the rough vocals feel in need of variety to be honest, the idea of using the twin attack in pop punk is a different aspect but someone simply screaming in the ear is at times too distracting. Against music which at the end of the day is not the most intensified and violent personal taste leaves one to hope there is a reassessment in that department, not a removal but a better definition and diversity.

The best song by far on the EP is Nothing Good Happens After 2AM, a song which alone shows why the suspicion that Kids We Used To Be has a definite strong future ahead is so strong by the end of the release. Easily infectious the song is the most inventive and imaginative track. With the punk urgency which is to an extent lacking elsewhere and a predatory air to its muscular riffs and thumping beats, it shows a band in complete unison and at the top of their current skills. Whether the song is new compared to the others or recorded at a different time we cannot say but in every aspect it is better, in creation, individual delivery, and production. This is the lead song and should be a single to really set the band off on a decisive rise.

Completed by a demo version of Man, I Hate Your Friends which again offers strong assumption the band will make a bigger mark ahead, the And We Would Have Gotten Away With It Too… EP is a more than decent introduction with one song by itself declaring Kids We Used To Be a band who will grab our attention often as they develop. Right now the EP is well worth some of your time, Nothing Good Happens After 2AM worth a persistent entertaining.

https://www.facebook.com/KidsWeUsedToBeOfficial

RingMaster 30/06/2012

copyright RingMaster: myfreecopyright

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