Chronic Xorn – For These Sins Who Must Die

As the metal year comes to a close, Indian outfit Chronic Xorn give it one final ravenous tempest of sound and craft in the shape of their new album For These Sins Who Must Die. 2017 has been a rather eventful affair with some majorly striking encounters along its way but has saved one of its finest moments until its last few breaths for a release which should thrust the Kolkata hailing quintet towards major awareness and attention.

Formed in 2007, Chronic Xorn has nurtured and become a portent presence within their national metal scene, previous releases in debut EP Death.Destruction.Sermon of 2010 and first album From Mercy two years later reinforcing the raw power and craft of their death metal/ deathcore blend and pushing their emerging stature. The time is ripe for the band to stir up broader recognition and it is hard to suggest or expect For These Sins Who Must Die will not to be the incendiary spark. Dedicated to the band’s deceased close friend Abhishek Bhattacharya who penned all the album’s lyrics, the band’s self-released proposition looks at the oppressed in life; vocalist Saptadip Chakrabarty explaining more with “History reveals that in every religion, community and caste, there has always been a major race of common people, those who suffer and rot under the reign of a corrupted helm. Unwillingly their blood spills as the ever deceitful leader smiles away to glory. This album speaks about all those commoners, who are helplessly handcuffed by societal pressure. Their voices choke under the smoke of fraudulence.”

The scene is set through the album’s intro, Doctrine Of Hate a beguiling melodic lure with thick shadows to its beauty and portentous clouds to its atmosphere. As ears, the imagination is drawn and consumed by its creative and suggestive drama, the track growing resourcefully into the album’s title track. For These Sins Who Must Die instantly grips the appetite, its nagging senses winding grooves and rapacious rhythms  instinctive incitement as the venomously toned vocal squalls of Chakrabarty, backed as potently by those of guitarist Suvam Moitra, crawl through the tempest. The guitars of Moitra and Biswarup Bardhan continue to manipulate the song’s evolving landscape with inventive dexterity, the song almost kaleidoscopic in its adventure and nature.

It is a tremendous start to the album which is only continued by the following Necropolis Iii. The crisp rhythmic bait of drummer Dipayan Chakraborty draws the listener into the waiting fire of sound and vocals, the bass of Soumyadeep Das providing a gnarly growl to the blaze as grooves twang and groan as melodies sear and entice. There are certainly familiar elements flaming away within the song and indeed album but all seared with a character and tone belonging to Chronic Xorn to add to the ingredients already individual to them.

Next up Justice By The Act Of Violence is a savage fury careering through ears with nostrils flared but just as adept at shifting through the gears and surrounding the senses in memorable enterprise. Saptadip Chakrabarty again simply magnetises with the similarly tempting cauldron of sound and imagination getting under the skin like a relentless itch. It is a one of the major qualities of Chronic Xorn’s music, a niggly attribute which you cannot avoid or ignore, nor want to, which constant scratching through listens only makes things more compelling.

Vox Populi is unsurprisingly no different, its traits and features an appetite harrying trespass within a bullish roar led by Saptadip Chakrabarty’s raw throat and emotion. Grooves cast a web of deceit, as invasive as they are deliciously seductive and more than backed by the rapier swings of Dipayan Chakraborty and Das’ deep bass trespasses. Moments of melodic calm and elegance only add to the temptation; eventful breakdowns and rapacious twists creating an imposing clamour as severely ferocious as it is inescapably captivating.

The track’s final sonic sigh is the trigger for the hellacious onslaught of closing track, The Last Stand. Tension seeps from every note and syllable spawned within four minutes of predacious intent, the band’s imagination with riffs, grooves, and rhythms stalking and hunting down the senses within a theatre of melodic endeavour. As individual and united flair scorches ears, band and song simply bully the body and ignite the imagination, encouraging a lust for much more by the album’s close.

As for us, For These Sins Who Must Die is likely to be an introduction to Chronic Xorn for a great and increasing many and hopefully the real awakening to one rather impressive proposition within the metal world.

For These Sins Who Must Die is available now @ https://chronicxorn.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/chronicxorn/    https://www.instagram.com/chronicxorn/

Pete RingMaster 19/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Triverse Massacre – Hades

Taking the listener by the throat down the five rivers encircling its underworld, Hades is the new EP from British metallers Triverse Massacre and the hellacious outpouring of the potential first bred in their previous releases. Back in 2014, the With Bared Teeth And Truths EP suggested that the band had the wares to make a potent impact on the British metal scene; Hades is that mighty trespass but one still hinting of greater things yet to come.

Bursting from the depths of Carlisle in 2010, Triverse Massacre quickly stirred up local support and in turn within the metal underground crowd with the release of debut EP In The Jaws Of Deceit. It was a growing reputation equally fuelled by their ferocious live presence which has gone on to see the band earn strong praise and share stages since with the likes of Skindred, Raging Speedhorn, Aliases, The Sun Explodes, The Colour Line, Reign Of Fury, and Anihilated and play Bloodstock Open Air last year alongside Slayer, Behemoth, Mastodon, and Gojira. With Bared Teeth and Truths provoked more concentrated attention and awareness of the band and their ravenous fusion of death, groove, and thrash metal; an incendiary mix now truly igniting within Hades.

The release opens up with Cocytus, an instrumental of imposing grandeur and looming shadows creating the climate you would expect surrounding the domain and god of the underworld. Guitars eventually encroach on the deceitful grace of the air creating a link to waiting venomous jaws as the track flows into the predacious animosity and corrosive depths of Styx. As the guitars of James Graham and Chris Kelsall gnaw and taunt the senses with riffs and grooves, vocalist Liam Stark descends and invades with his raw and potent mix of attacks, the frontman as the sound around him openly showing a growth in snarl and dexterity since that last EP. The guitars continue to weave a web of creative deceit, lures of infectious and seductive design woven to violate while the biting beats of Mike Collins and the tenebrific lines of bassist Jason McEwan have nothing in mind except merciless trespass.

It is a mighty and increasingly gripping track still slightly outshone though by next up Acheron. With grooves swinging from its first breath and contagious irritability coating every note and raw throated expulsion, the track unleashes the most virulent strain of toxic rock ‘n’ roll. The band’s sound has fully escaped any confines of extreme metal tagging, the third track epitomising its adventure and maturity and especially its rudely addictive quality forcing full submission to its rancor.

Lethe is simply bestial; a vicious harrying of the senses. Every element of its twisted body and intent is delicious harassment, grooves swarming through ears as rhythms advance with horde like barbarity. Within the tempest though, as across all tracks, there is a melodic prowess which accentuates rather than tempers the pernicious infestation but equally spotlights the instinctive craft breeding the envenomed imagination and onslaught on offer.

The EP closes with Phelegethon, arguably the biggest intrusive nagging of the senses of them all and quite possibly our favourite though that honour is consistently shared with its two predecessors. It is a stirring end though with the guitars a viperish incursion and rhythms a bold and numbing incitement as Stark crawls and lurches over the senses and psyche with vocal glands spilling malevolence in varying shades.

With Hades, Triverse Massacre has presented itself to the main table of extreme metal but as the EP thrills you still get the sense that the band is nowhere close to depleting its creative depths. That suggests very potent horizons for the quintet and for our beleaguered ears alongside them.

The Hades EP is released May 26th @ https://triversemassacre.bandcamp.com/ or http://triversemassacre.bigcartel.com/

http://www.triversemassacre.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TriverseMassacre%20/    https://twitter.com/TriverseM

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

FRCTRD – Fractured

 

As so many others who missed it first time around, the recent re-release of debut EP Fractured has been a wake-up call to a band in FRCTRD who truly have exciting potential and already impressive attributes to their music. The release is a six track savaging of the senses and sparking of the imagination offering invasive deathcore with a technical and progressive bent. It is a mix which feels simultaneously familiar and new, its nature increasingly carnal and rewarding to quickly stand out from the crowd.

The Paris hailing quintet weave inspirations from the likes of Structures, Reflections, and Breakdown of Sanity into their own invention and instantly hooked attention within the French underground with debut single Burden. Its success and their aggressive prowess on their country’s live scene subsequently saw FRCTRD booked to play UK Tech-Fest, this within their first year of existence. Originally released last year, the rebooting of the Fractured EP through We Are Triumphant is already drawing ears and attention beyond their strong reputation on the French deathcore scene; no surprise once it’s raw and imposing virulence takes hold in a single listen alone.

The EP opens with instrumental Act. Zero, a piece which slowly rises from dark depths with apocalyptic hues to spin melodic suggestion and industrial espionage before the band fully uncages its arsenal of bone splitting beats, fearsomely nagging riffs, and crystalline beauty. It all colludes in a ravaging trespass full of instinctive threats and technical clues to what is to follow, realisation of its hints starting with the immediate involvement of Negative.

The second track instantly ensnares ears in a web of acidic sonic bait, its spicy textures soon evolving into a heavier predatory persistence as guitarists Filip Stanic and Clément Barea unite to infest and devour the senses. That weight of touch and intensity is further accentuated and driven by the carnivorous tones of Maxime Rodrigues’ bass and the violently swinging rhythm of drummer Manu DLB. It is a raw breath-taking assault given extra venomous bite by the varied cancerous tones of vocalist Vincent Hanulak, his words not always intelligible but their spite and emotion inescapable. Within all this, melodic enterprise blossoms and electronic captivation shimmers as technical imagination flourishes without ever defusing the force of the tempest or its primal intent.

The band’s latest single Crow is next, the song written after and inspired by the terrorist attacks at Bataclan, Paris in 2015. It makes a slightly kinder approach than its predecessor but still has the listener engulfed in a cyclone of invasive rhythms and sonic dexterity as riffs again burrow into the psyche while invasive grooves taunt. Its climate is a blend of warm encouragement and rousing defiance translated into the magnet melodies and synth seduction glowing within the compelling senses scavenging musical and physical brutality. The track is mercurial and eventful, a template working just as potently behind the imposing and rousing tapestry of Fortress and the virulent causticity of Breathless. The first of the two incites and stalks the senses, its tenacious and boisterous energy never kind but constantly invigorating while its slow lumbering moments are like staring in the eyes and jaws of a bestial invader. As in all songs, melodic beauty is just as ripe, suggestive, and skilfully brought to the corrosive surface. Its successor is possibly the most addictive and crippling thing of the EP, and one of the most irresistible moments with its violent sonic rapacity and technical rancor simply bewitching and scarring the senses.

Closing track Cloud is no lightweight in all aspects either, its malignant physical barbarity and bloodthirsty craft striking and its melodic oasis beguiling, the latter sublimely prowled by Rodrigues’ mutable bass before being woven into the inclement fabric of the track.

It is a powerful end to a truly stirring introduction to FRCTRD. As they develop and their sound evolves, and given the strength and potential of Fractures, it is easy to anticipate the band turning into something as unique in the deathcore scene as anything out there today. Only time will tell but the adventure will definitely be enjoyably challenging on the journey.

The Fractures EP is out now through We Are Triumphant across most online stores and @ http://frctrd.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/wearefrctrd/     https://twitter.com/wearefrctrd   https://frctrd.bandcamp.com/releases

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Life’s December – Colder

Lifes-December_RingMasterReview

It is probably apt with it being called Colder, that ears feel like they are amidst an unstoppable sonic avalanche listening to the new album from Swiss metallers Life’s December. It is a proposal which devours and obliterates the senses, leaving them bare to the emotional trespass and creative enmity which fuels the band’s raw deathcore tempest. It is a punishing proposal even more intimidating with the band’s embracing of djent bred animosity within their sonic savaging but equally a release which given time makes an increasingly compelling persuasion on the imagination.

Hailing from St. Gallen, Life’s December consists of vocalist Rico Bamert, guitarists Dave Mühlethaler and Valens Wullschleger, drummer Jérémie Gonzalez, and bassist Simon Mäder, a quintet which quickly has the imagination involved with album opener Final Speech. It is a scene setting, sonic landscape laying introduction with a portentous narrative being embraced by sonic mist before breeding a moment of predatory ferocity in vocal and sound. Instantly showing the band’s penchant for djent and down-tempo trespasses within a deathcore shaped animus, the track leads the listener into the initially subdued but soon ravenous jaws of Lest I Forget. Quickly in full venomous prowl, the track entwines corrosive riffs and toxic grooves, immersing them in a death charged tempest of sound and emotion driven by guttural vocals and a web of guitar and bass hostility. All the while though, an underlying sonic intrigue and adventure lurks, never quite breaking from the storm but persistently flirting and coaxing closer attention to match the lure of the vocal variety which also emerges.

Lifes-December-Colder_RingMasterReviewIt is hard to say that Life’s December is yet offering anything boldly new in sound but from this song alone there is plenty of fresh resourcefulness to get the teeth and appetite seriously into; a potent and dynamic persuasion which continues with Memories and World Of Blame. The first gets right under the skin in no time with its steely grooves and grouchy riffs. Once in control it then uncages a rapacious torrent of melodic intrusions and rhythmic rancor which in turn is soon involved in a net of more welcoming and emotively lively exploits. Across the song, the band seamlessly slips into mellower or more cancerous endeavours, contrasts and extremes skilfully woven together to create one of the more dramatically unique and memorable passages within the album. In comparison, its successor is a carnal tempest of noise and spite; a fall into sonic causticity and vocal ire which without matching up to its predecessors still has ears fully engaged especially as it expands its stark and increasingly cancerous landscape of sound and emotion.

The brief melodic seducing of Interludium allows a moment to reflect and engage with calmer essences within the band’s imagination before Snow Falls Silently envelops the listener in sonic and emotional confrontation. Once more, there is no major moment of uniqueness involved with the track but its virulent tide of riffs and invasive grooves grip attention, success whipped up further by the throat shredding vocals and their pungent intent and variety.

The austere yet intimately melancholic landscape of My Existence is revealed next, a passage of sound and emotion littered with melodic lures and primal eruptions within a chilled and ravaged ambience. From there, the album’s title track explores similarly evocative scenery of thought and tone but within a far more grievous soul sucking doom soaked climate equipped with rabid assaults of raw guitar and biting rhythms perpetually accentuated by the bone shuddering resonance of the bass. With mouth-watering spirals of sonic toxicity veining its body too, the song hits the spot whilst numbing the senses before the instrumental Hero Missing brings the album to a sombre close with, in many ways, its most disturbing emotional moment, certainly its most haunting.

There are moments within Colder that truly ignite a greedy appetite and other times where fascination takes over; successes which together ensures Life’s December, a band with striking potential, is worthy of proper attention as equally its re-release through Dark Wings.

Colder is out now via Dark Wings across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/LifesDecember

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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It Came From Beneath – The Last Sun EP

 pic by Ad Rien

pic by Ad Rien

Formed in 2010, It Came From Beneath is a French band which sparked eager attention with their debut album in 2013. Fuelled with violent yet rousing strains of deathcore, the release quickly incited broader recognition of the Lyon quintet, success backed by the band taking their ferocious live presence further across Europe. Now the band cements their place to the fore of the extreme metal scene with latest EP, and finest moment to date, The Last Sun. It is a five track tempest of swinging virulence and ravenous hostility; a brutal savaging of the senses built on raw power but shaped with imaginative twists and deft touches of infectious invention.

It Came From Beneath showed early signs of the beast within their sound and creativity with their self-titled debut EP that first year but it was the album When No Light Remains which took the band from the eager support of French fans and the country’s underground scene into European pastures. The album was an impressive leap forward from its predecessor as The Last Sun is to it; their third release honing its adventure and sonic dexterity into one contagious assault on the senses and imagination.

The EP opens with its title track, casting a sonic mist which persistently envelopes ears as raw vocal growls add their menace. Subsequently, the track becomes a raging roar in ears with rhythms nagging and biting as riffs snarl around the now fully fledged guttural fury of vocalist Léo Muller. The guitars of Alexis Merle and Etn Lpz create a potent tempest of sonic aggravation and melodic tempting; their every design singularly or in union seeming to incite increasingly hellacious rhythms and the unforgiving heart of the track. It is compelling stuff with, as proven again and again across the release, new twists and layers being found with every subsequent listen; their unveiling only increasing the intensity and pleasure felt.

ART_RingMaster ReviewThe Burden comes in next on the first breeze of a bracing sonic wind; that initial climate alone making the song a formidable proposition though it is only the forerunner to the insatiable ravaging that follows the cocking of a gun. The scything swings of Julien Ropert literally make the body shudder whilst bassist Nico Colère unleashes predatory bait as invasive and seductive as the bedlamic tempest quickly conjured by guitars and vocals. It is nastily delicious to the ear, an intimidating persuasion that grips body and appetite with its thick catchiness and scars the imagination with its psychotic tone.

An unexpected but admittedly highly agreeable cover of the Iggy Azalea song Work is the next to devour ears. Employing engaging melodies, the band soon disarms doubts before uncaging the kind of mercurial provocation now expected of them, entwining both striking textures across an epidemic of stabbing riffs, bestial rhythms, and infectious revelry. The song only leaves rich satisfaction behind though the band’s own compositions are where the might of the EP lies as shown by the final pair of reworked songs.

Originally found on the band’s first EP, Broken End is reassessed and re-ignited with the obvious maturity and craft that has blossomed in the band, the track breaching new ferocious heights and revelling in the sure hands now shaping its mercurial prowess. Still retaining the muggy mayhem of its first outing, it has grown into a predator of a proposal, an unbridled stalking and devouring of the senses demanding lusty attention; a quality also nurtured in the updated rancor of The Answer Remains Unknown. From the band’s album, it too has been twisted into a leaner but keener edged trespass on body and psyche as grooves collude with searing sonic spite and rhythmic barbarity, it all coaxed and inflamed by the excellent vocal assault of Muller and band.

The Last Sun is not re-inventing or reshaping the deathcore wheel but it is more proof, even with a cover and two re-workings of old songs alongside new incitements, that It Came From Beneath is one of the fresh breaths and gripping propositions that lie within extreme metal and deserving of proper attention.

The Last Sun EP is out now @ https://itcamefrombeneath.bandcamp.com/album/the-last-sun-ep

https://www.facebook.com/icfbtheband   https://twitter.com/icfbtheband

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Name Means Nothing – N.M.N

NMN_RingMaster Review

Making an agreeably grouchy introduction to themselves through debut EP N.M.N, is Italian metallers Name Means Nothing, a sextet which may not startle with their first clutch of metalcore/deathcore fuelled songs but will certainly lure plenty of eager attention. The four track encounter is a raging assault of bitter rhythms, voracious riffs, and vocals that ravage the senses. It is a potent base to expand their tempest of sonic spite and irritable temptation ahead, so strong that already we are impatiently anticipating their next outing.

cover_RingMaster Review   Formed at the beginning of 2014, Name Means Nothing consists of the dual vocal attack of Manuel Scarabaggio and Tomas Gerbec, guitarists Matteo Bucciol and Samuel Tinunin, bassist Luca Piras, and drummer Marko Zotti. Though not boundary stretching, it is fair to say that the band means business with their sound, EP opener In True, swift evidence. Its thirty second length is a stalking of riffs, barging rhythms, and a trespass of vocal hostility, all delivered in a Slipknot meets Suicide Silence like tempest. There is obviously not a lot to its brief body but it sets ears and attention up nicely for the sonic rabidity of Disease Of Men. Again riffs and rhythms harass and savage as the twin vocal trespass grips and sears the senses; it all quickly aligned to tendrils of sonic acidity and an ill-tempered virulence. There are no ground-breaking moments of originality to the song and indeed EP, but it does not stop either igniting the imagination and a greedy appetite as it rattles bones.

Unforgettable End springs it’s ravaging from an initial southern laced groove next; ire spewing out in sound and voice as the track drills deeper into the psyche with every predatory torrent of riffs and rhythmic battering. That initial bait continues to wind around the elements of the turbulence though, spicing up the fury of the track and ensuring that its metal/death core canvas has plenty more in shape and character to tempt and growl with.

N.M.N is completed by Pictures Of Reality, a similarly sculpted and honed brutality also keen to embrace a contagious toxicity to its ruinous intent and sonic carnality. It perfectly epitomises the EP, its body and touch familiar yet bred with a fresh and unruly scent of creative infection which worms under the skin to leave Name Means Nothing as a band a great many like us will want to know and hear more of.

Bottom-line is that the EP is an impressive start by the Italian scourge, one easy to expect only growing bigger and better, and probably more destructive, over time.

The N.M.N EP is out now as a name your price download @ http://namemeansnothing.bandcamp.com/album/n-m-n

https://www.facebook.com/nnmntv

Pete RingMaster 12/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Insane Therapy – The Decline Of The Human Race

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There is nothing more invigorating than a good breath-taking aural savaging and that is easily what you get from The Decline Of The Human Race, the latest album from Italian metallers Insane Therapy. The nine-track predator is a gripping and inventive slab of deathcore violation, one not appearing to have an interest in rewriting the genre’s rules but certainly with plenty of imagination and skilled craft to excite and leave satisfaction overflowing.

Insane Therapy began in 2009, the brainchild of guitarists Emilio Ciavucco and Moreno Federico. The Pescara outfit soon grew to a quintet with the addition of drummer Emanuele Sulli, vocalist Simone Evangelista, and bassist Daniele. The bass department was soon taken over by Marco with the band recording the well-received Veil of Silence demo in 2010. A three way spilt with Persuaded and Bleeding Surface followed a year later, whilst live the band showed a relentless hunger. 2012 saw the current line-up in place as Andrea Giordano took over bass duties from Marco who left the band the previous year. It was a time which also saw the band concentrate on their songwriting and return to ‘active duty’ with a new maturity and ferocity as impressively evidenced upon The Decline Of The Human Race. Signing with Sliptrick Records last year, Insane Therapy are now roaring at the broadest spotlight with the worldwide release of their debut album, and though it might take time for others to catch on, it is hard to imagine band and release not awakening keen attention.

COVER   The album opens with the brief but ear grabbing The Beginning of the End. Samples and a web of distant but looming sonic intimidation sets things off, its sudden stop the key to an immediate challenge of riffs and rhythms escorted by raw antagonistic vocals. There is plenty for the imagination to consider in the track’s one minute 15 seconds or so, but no time to settle on it as Masochistic Act rears its hostile head out of the sonic breath of its predecessor. Again riffs and rhythms accost and tenderise the senses with unbridled but controlled hostility whilst guitars bind their aggression with toxic strands of sonic enterprise. Like a mix of Meshuggah and Whitechapel, the track assaults and captivates; the great vocal variation from Evangelista just as magnetic as the skilful dance of melodies and psyche spearing viciousness cast around them. As suggested earlier arguably the band is not venturing into new areas with their sound and songs but hell it is a riveting and contagiously addictive enjoyment all the same.

The End of the Lies reveals more of the melodic invention within the band’s music at its start, an inviting landscape straight away offered but of course in no time a raw and vicious turbulence felt. Whether a full pelt violation with nostrils flared or a predatory prowling of ears, the track never lets the listener off the hook. Every beat crackles with intimidation, every bassline growls with rancor, whilst the vocals are simply a furnace of discontent and defiance. Within this though Ciavucco and Federico, as well as adding sonic abuse weave a fascinating enticement of melodic and imagination fuelled temptation. At times it is understated in the surrounding maelstrom and in others stealing ears and thoughts with open invention, but constantly an intrigue sparking tempering and compliment to the raging tempest.

Here We Are brawls with and incites the senses next, again providing a fierce cauldron of vocal diversity and technical excellence to devour and fear before the outstanding Fuck You All sweet talks the passions with its hardcore meets deathcore corruption. Featuring The Juliet Massacre, the toxic animus of sound and presence is a startling onslaught and pure contagion. Seemingly entwining every style of extreme metal vocal delivery imaginable, in a similarly intensive bedlam of sound and violence, the song reveals a precisely scripted and applied design which is as skilled as it is irresistible.

Album and band continue to only impress and ignite ears through Never Live to Regret and The Human Decay, both tracks continuing the strong individualism of songs within a constant barrage of physical and emotional intensity. Credit must be given to the production for the clarity given to every element of songs and band without ever compromising the sonic tirades and blistering weight of the release. The pair keeps a greedy appetite inflamed before making way for the corrosive presence of I Only Answer to Myself, the song a primal entangling of jagged riffs, knee buckling breakdowns, and vocal animosity, and that is only scratching the first layer. Lyrically too, songs come as compromising and hard hitting as the sounds, the penultimate track a merciless threat in all departments.

The Decline Of The Human Race closes with Hatred, the song as you can imagine not exactly a lullaby, though to be fair its opening is the most restrained and calm on the album but still a tempestuous lure before evolving into another exacting adversarial trespass. It is an enthralling exhausting end to a relentlessly thrilling encounter. Though The Decline Of The Human Race stalks recognisable boundaries there is no predictability about the release or the songs within. Each offers a fresh adventure from another and though their sound is not bordering on unique, Insane Therapy is certainly not part of the crowd.

The Decline Of The Human Race is available via Sliptrick Records now @

https://www.facebook.com/insanetherapy   https://twitter.com/insanetherapy

RingMaster 09/05/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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