Cranely Gardens – House of Decay

Allowing no hiding place, House of Decay is a tempest of psychotic noise and vicious dexterity; quite simply one of the best things to escape the extreme metal scene this year. The EP is the venomous creation of US band Cranely Gardens, an outfit which plunders the diverse landscape of metal to forge its own distinct and striking tempest now raging within one impressive encounter.

Formed in 2008, New Jersey hailing Cranely Gardens soon began weaving and honing the diversely flavoured sound which was to make debut EP Locust Valley a well-received encounter in 2015. The band has continued to nurture their individual sound and creative character, House of Decay a new plateau darker and more tempestuous yet finely crafted and a declaration that the band is ready to take on the biggest attention.

Once the sample built Muswell Hill sets the tone and atmosphere, History of a Drowning Boy seizes ears and imagination with its multi-textured tempest. It is a maelstrom of sound bred from a fusion of death and thrash metal, its imagination growing to create a cauldron of everything from nu and groove to blackened heavy metal in a forceful trespass which infests ears and psyche. Like a blend of French outfit Trepalium and UK’s Anti-Clone to give it some kind of identity, the track savages and seduces with every passing second whilst embracing an unpredictability which is not constant but brings rich surprises and twists when it breaks.

The excellent trespass features guest Will Ramos from A Wake in Providence, its successor Seven Faces sees For the Fallen Dreams vocalist Chad Ruhlig guesting. The track instantly submerges the listener in an invasive cloud of predatory noise, from the midst of which winding grooves and rampant rhythms driven by the vicious swings of Victor Figueroa break. His beats are pure venom in every touch, the bass of Alex Niszczak a predacious companion whilst the guitars of Randy Mac and Joe Fedele cast a sonic tempest built on technical and instinctive dexterity which is pure toxicity. The threat loaded throat of vocalist Chaz Macklin centres it all with an almost carnal prowess, his intensive examination just as compelling within next up Savages which has Dan Watson of Enterprise Earth and Sims Cashion additionally on board. On the surface, the song seems less adventurous than its predecessors though its grooves swiftly wind persuasively around ears but time and intent reveals the devious web at its core luring increased attention as a swarming of sonic temptation offers delicious bait.

Still it does not quite match up to those before or the following threat of Rapture where Narrow Vision frontman Josh Frazier adds his rapacious tones to the animosity unloaded by Macklin. Venturing into a more nu meets melodic metal terrain without defusing the same raw antipathy and corrosive fury of its companions, the track punishingly takes the passions.

Carry the Earth steps up next, the rhythmic ingenuity of Figueroa leading the way and not for the first or last time running with rock ‘n’ roll instincts before guitars and bass spread their cathartic animosity. The melodic hook feels a relatively familiar tempting across the EP but this certainly does not damage its impact either across the whole or in a track which scorches the senses and runs with the imagination like an unhinged predator.

The Challenger brings things to a close, its body also coaxed in by Figueroa’s tenacious invention; the subsequent highly resourceful sonic disturbance cored by a malignant cyclone driven by creative rancor. In saying that, its melancholic melodies are emotional sighs which add further drama and adventure to the concussive but gracefully primal finale. It is a volcanic close to an EP which just impresses more and more listen by listen. It is not the perfect offering but the potential sealing any cracks ensures it makes for a truly powerful and lingering incitement.

House of Decay is out now @ https://cranelygardens1.bandcamp.com/album/house-of-decay

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Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Casket Robbery – The Ascension

Last year US metallers Casket Robbery awoke national attention with the release of their acclaimed debut album Evolution of Evil and now they are poking at even broader spotlights with their latest release, The Ascension EP. Offing three ravenous cuts of their brutal and virulent groove/death metal trespass, the release invades the psyche and stirs the body with a carnal flirtation.

Though building on the individual sound of the album, The Ascension is a whole new ball game in so many ways too. It is the first encounter with the Madison hailing outfit since the addition of Megan Orvold on vocals, she having guested on the last album replacing Dustin Foesch, and bassist Derek Silloway. With the line-up completed by guitarists Cory Scheider and Troy Powell, Casket Robbery goes for the jugular from the EP’s first breath. The initial atmospheric build of Pockets Lined with Flowers is an intriguing lure which swiftly pulls the listener into the waiting turbulence of sound abound with the vocal ferocity of Orvold. Her rabid lungs descend on the senses as the raw tempest of sonic animosity simply grows around her but together it is a maelstrom of spite swinging with viral grooves and infectiously intrusive rhythms. An instant contagion, the visceral intrusion pounds and ignites the senses while the imagination is hooked by great magnetic expulsions of melodic craft and atmospheric suggestiveness.

It is a stunning start more than backed by the EP’s title track. Eagerly prowling riffs court ears first, their instinctive swagger soon infested with sonic discordance and again catchy grooves. Each aspect has a predacious air to their tone and antipathy, a hue coating the vocals and the overall character of the dark and heavy animus of sound and emotion. In saying that, a lively contagious nature easily infests body and appetite as it does in the first track, just with a more primal and fearsome breath.

That heightened malignancy fuels final track Lilith too. It is a rancorous temptress of a song taking the boisterous swing of the first and the raw malevolence of the second into its own individual jaundice. Again spirals of venomous grooving create a wiry web around melodic toxicity as the track invades the body with viral seduction, offering as the others death metal to devour and groove ingenuity to submit to.

Casket Robbery can only ignite bigger and greedier attention with their growing sound especially with the striking and fiercely impressing ability of Orvold now heading the tempest. The band and previous singer Foesch were a formidable proposition but Orvold brings something else to the table; an ingredient which sparks and draws a fresh rapacity out of the band’s music to match her own striking attributes. The Ascension is the band’s wake-up call to the world but still feels a teaser for bigger infestations ahead for which anticipation is already licking its lips.

The Ascension is out now and available @ http://casketrobbery.bandcamp.com/ and http://casketrobbery.bigcartel.com

http://facebook.com/casketrobbery

 Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Killer Refrigerator – Refrigeration Plague

Whether you heeded the warning the first time around or indeed the second, US metallers Killer Refrigerator are back to stir us again to the threat of and war with lethal appliances through new album Refrigeration Plague. This time around the rebel rousing caution comes in an even more multi-textured and flavoured technical death thrash proposal which simply has you glancing over your shoulder at those electrical menaces lurking and waiting to strike.

Refrigeration Plague sees the alert incite and rabid creative antics of vocalist/guitarist Cody Coon (UnKured) once more linking up with bassist Countess “Lia” Blender and producer Luke “Java” Sackenheim from Bum-Ass Studios who also took care of mixing and mastering the Cincinnati outfit’s latest confrontation. The album follows 2014 debut full-length When Fridges Rule This World and the moment when arguably people really took notice, The Fridge and the Power it Holds EP of the following year. Confirming the suggestion Java made when sending over the album that Refrigeration Plague is a “tighter” proposition from the band than ever before, the release equally swiftly declares itself their most unpredictable and creatively psychotic without losing any intensity in its instinctive death/thrash breeding across fourteen ferocious encounters.

It opens up with Autoerotic Refrigeration and the dancing bass of Blender before things become far more frantic as Coon in guitar and voice vents his anxiety. Ravenously infectious and rapaciously nagging, the track is a minute and a half of fevered goodness setting up album and a greedy appetite for it with ease.

From there the listener is dragged into the darker heavier grime of Vacuum Doom (Rise of the Dirt Devil), every element as eagerly skittish in the first now revealing a slower, predatory side. Prowling with a sonic glint in its eye, the squealing guitar and vocal tones of Coon again entice; their trespass darkening as the track reveals the bolder tempest of its heart and technical menace of its presence. It ebbs and flows in intensity and creative mania before Night of the Living Bed slips in with its initial corrupted innocence surrounding the introductory tones of Adolf Green who subsequently sets the release ablaze with his sax. The track itself is a sweltering pyre of blackened death and thrash metal; the sonic niggle of the guitar a wiry web as loco as it is skilful; an insanity which eventually consumes the whole irresistible and increasingly psychotic encounter.

Dryers Eve follows with its own creative dementia; a technical delirium which invades and festers like a virus in the psyche. Again the senses enjoyably squirm under the threat of voice and guitar, instincts seduced by the roaming exploits of the bass whether the track saunters or launches itself at breakneck speed. As another threat is uncovered, Killer Refrigerator shows it has really grown in all aspects, next up C.H.U.D. confirming the fact with its virulent asylum of sound and craft. As most around it, it is a slither of a track but one more active and compelling than most multi-minute offerings.

The excellent funky antics of The Revenge of Frankenstove has hips and imagination swinging next, its cross-over mania a sinister and beguiling aberration while De Maytagus Dom Samsungus is a murky yet still contagious consumption of the senses. Both tracks have body and thoughts trapped and elated with their individual enmities, the first especially addictive before the visceral stomp of Gas Station Strangulation eclipses both; bloodlust in its nostrils and sinful misdoings in its soul.

A Salad Named Elizabeth follows with the guest introduction of Kitty [Pryde]; her flirtatiously unaware of danger tones the prelude to another kitchen nightmare of demonic proportions. Its rabidity in sound and intent is a tsunami of primal discontent and skilful manipulation which fascinates and ravishes the senses. Whether its death bred body quite lives up to the excellent opening is debateable but across four plus minutes, the song has attention and pleasure engrossed, a success Spaghetti and Meatballs similarly achieves with its evil rascality.

The excellently titled It’s Not Over Toilet’s Over springs its technical helter-skelter straight after, infesting ears with sonic and rhythmic paranoia while the murderous trial of Splatterfarm is rose coloured pleasure chewing on the senses.

Refrigeration Plague finishes off with firstly its title track, a malevolent infestation of sound and enterprise becoming more violently catchy by the minute and lastly Beyond Frigid Horizons, a kaleidoscopic fury of metal which almost does not know when to depart and is all the more fun for it.

Killer Refrigerator is not a band for everyone, especially if a sense of humour is left at home, but musically is one of the most enjoyably imaginative and voraciously bold extreme metal propositions out there. So be brave and dive into Refrigeration Plague you have nothing to lose and everything to gain as all those appliances leer at you waiting.

Refrigeration Plague is available now @ https://bumass.bandcamp.com/album/refrigeration-plague

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Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Triverse Massacre – Hades

Taking the listener by the throat down the five rivers encircling its underworld, Hades is the new EP from British metallers Triverse Massacre and the hellacious outpouring of the potential first bred in their previous releases. Back in 2014, the With Bared Teeth And Truths EP suggested that the band had the wares to make a potent impact on the British metal scene; Hades is that mighty trespass but one still hinting of greater things yet to come.

Bursting from the depths of Carlisle in 2010, Triverse Massacre quickly stirred up local support and in turn within the metal underground crowd with the release of debut EP In The Jaws Of Deceit. It was a growing reputation equally fuelled by their ferocious live presence which has gone on to see the band earn strong praise and share stages since with the likes of Skindred, Raging Speedhorn, Aliases, The Sun Explodes, The Colour Line, Reign Of Fury, and Anihilated and play Bloodstock Open Air last year alongside Slayer, Behemoth, Mastodon, and Gojira. With Bared Teeth and Truths provoked more concentrated attention and awareness of the band and their ravenous fusion of death, groove, and thrash metal; an incendiary mix now truly igniting within Hades.

The release opens up with Cocytus, an instrumental of imposing grandeur and looming shadows creating the climate you would expect surrounding the domain and god of the underworld. Guitars eventually encroach on the deceitful grace of the air creating a link to waiting venomous jaws as the track flows into the predacious animosity and corrosive depths of Styx. As the guitars of James Graham and Chris Kelsall gnaw and taunt the senses with riffs and grooves, vocalist Liam Stark descends and invades with his raw and potent mix of attacks, the frontman as the sound around him openly showing a growth in snarl and dexterity since that last EP. The guitars continue to weave a web of creative deceit, lures of infectious and seductive design woven to violate while the biting beats of Mike Collins and the tenebrific lines of bassist Jason McEwan have nothing in mind except merciless trespass.

It is a mighty and increasingly gripping track still slightly outshone though by next up Acheron. With grooves swinging from its first breath and contagious irritability coating every note and raw throated expulsion, the track unleashes the most virulent strain of toxic rock ‘n’ roll. The band’s sound has fully escaped any confines of extreme metal tagging, the third track epitomising its adventure and maturity and especially its rudely addictive quality forcing full submission to its rancor.

Lethe is simply bestial; a vicious harrying of the senses. Every element of its twisted body and intent is delicious harassment, grooves swarming through ears as rhythms advance with horde like barbarity. Within the tempest though, as across all tracks, there is a melodic prowess which accentuates rather than tempers the pernicious infestation but equally spotlights the instinctive craft breeding the envenomed imagination and onslaught on offer.

The EP closes with Phelegethon, arguably the biggest intrusive nagging of the senses of them all and quite possibly our favourite though that honour is consistently shared with its two predecessors. It is a stirring end though with the guitars a viperish incursion and rhythms a bold and numbing incitement as Stark crawls and lurches over the senses and psyche with vocal glands spilling malevolence in varying shades.

With Hades, Triverse Massacre has presented itself to the main table of extreme metal but as the EP thrills you still get the sense that the band is nowhere close to depleting its creative depths. That suggests very potent horizons for the quintet and for our beleaguered ears alongside them.

The Hades EP is released May 26th @ https://triversemassacre.bandcamp.com/ or http://triversemassacre.bigcartel.com/

http://www.triversemassacre.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TriverseMassacre%20/    https://twitter.com/TriverseM

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Codex Alimentarius – The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II)

June 1st sees the re-release of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources, the debut EP from British metallers Codex Alimentarius. Going a big way, alongside their imposingly potent live presence, in earning them an immediately loyal fan base, the band’s introduction has been “re-fired and re-forged” in such a way that it not only commands but simply demands fresh attention. Like a great many we are sure, Codex Alimentarius evaded our radar first time around and indeed with its successor The Hand Of Apophis. Listening to the MK II version of The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources though, it feels more like destiny than annoyance that the Exeter outfit has taken to now to grab ears and an immediate appetite for their melodic death metal nurtured roar, the EP a searing wake-up call to the world of one fiercely exiting proposition.

Formed in 2009 by the quartet of vocalist Stephen Bending, guitarists Stan Kemble and Tim Wright, and bassist Andrew Dicker, Codex Alimentarius were soon making a strong imprint on the local live scene in their first year before expanding the line-up with the addition of third guitarist Elliott Alderman-Broom and drummer Frank Dennis in 2011. The Infinite Growth Paradigm Vs Finite Resources in 2010 only added to their growing reputation and appeal, its release followed by the band going on to tour with the likes of Vader, Krisiun, and Furyborn as well as share stages with bands such as Sonic Syndicate, Malefice, Evile, Revolker, Ted Maul, Demonic Ressurection and many more over the next handful of years. The well-received release of The Hand Of Apophis in 2014 followed the recruitment of Ray Arrell as the band’s new vocalist and the From Hell To Oblivion UK Tour with Enemy Reign the previous year. Despite all that, Codex Alimentarius was still a passing name for many but it is hard to see that remaining the situation as the revamped The Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources resets and re-energises the inevitable emergence of the sextet to the fore of the European metal scene.

Mixed and mastered by Alderman-Broom and wrapped in the artwork of Dicker. Mk II opens up with Baptised and swiftly gets down to catching the imagination with nagging riffs and suggestive melodies within an electronic mist. It is an enticing start which does not force attention but teases and seduces it, coaxing intrigue into the venomously lined tones of Arrell and richly toned grooves just waiting to make their impact. Becoming bolder and in many ways even more toxically attractive, the song blossoms in presence and adventure with Arrell the source of animosity and rhythms the seed of imposing trespass; all bound in the simultaneously seductive and predatory adventure of the guitars.

It is a potent and quickly enjoyable start but one soon eclipsed by the mighty proposal of Collapse. It too harries the senses with riffs and flying beats, their rapacious intent matched by the brooding antipathy of bass. Yet there is a swing and hunger to it all driven by almost rabid grooves and gutturally celebratory vocals which simply enslave ears and imagination. With tinges of thrash and folk metal in its dynamic assault, the track is glorious; only growing to greater heights with reserved passages of melodic endeavour and craft woven into a web of senses entangling temptation.

Good Slaves swaps the boisterousness of its predecessor with a more controlled state but still with a heady drama of energy and portentous suggestion. Sweeping melodies add to its dark edge and cinematic climate, grooves and riffs colluding to provide a heart as rousing as it is invasive as the song ignites body and thoughts with ease before passing its success over to the infectious almost envenomed charm of No Return. It feels calmer and physically kinder than those before it yet makes up for it with a tonal animus which infests vocals, melody, and imagination alike. If missing the extra spark of the previous pair of songs, it is a compelling journey through impressing craft and aural discontent; a merger of light and dark, melody and antagonism which heightens an already keen appetite for band and sound.

There is a bait of real catchiness within the quickly persuasive Symbiosis which follows, a devilish grooving which has swift control of body and attitude as the track grows in virulent contagion and emotional jaundice. It is a beast of a tension strapped, malignant stomp providing another major moment within Mk II, a peak matched by the closing mystique cloaked Arise. With Middle Eastern hues flirting with ears and thoughts from within its feudal proposal, the song breeds and widens its tapestry of creative and physical dexterity; guitars weaving a net of emotional and expressive suggestion around plundering rhythms and vocal causticity. It is a gripping affair which though a slow burner compared to earlier tracks leaves the listener provoked in thought and greed to hear and explore more.

With hindsight now available, Codex Alimentarius have not only given their first EP a new lease of life but released and developed its true character as indeed that of their keenly adventurous and eventful sound. Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) feels like the moment that the band will truly step out from the shadows or certainly stoke a fire of awareness and attention; the former most likely such the striking presence and also potential found within the release.

Infinite Growth Paradigm vs Finite Resources (Mk II) is released June 1st.

http://www.codexthemasses.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/codexalimentariusband/    https://twitter.com/codexthemasses

Pete RingMaster 23/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mordant – Demonic Satanic

cover_RingMasterReview

Released towards the rear of last year, Demonic Satanic the new album from Swedish black metallers Mordant just has to be looked at and recommended no matter the length of time since it’s unleashing. Fusing black, thrash, and death metal into one corrosively virulent proposition, the band’s sound and in turn album is a tempest of fearsome rock ‘n’ roll which welcomingly infests and devours the senses.

Formed in 1997, Mordant has released two previous albums in Momento Mori (2004) and Black Evil Master (2008), a trio of demos, and a split with Sabbat in 2013. Each has increasingly nurtured the band’s unique style of black metal fuelled pestilence now raising the cancerous infectiousness of Demonic Satanic out of the sole confines of its source genre. As suggested, the album is pure rock ‘n’ roll without losing any of the Swedish black/metal traits it has its seeds in.

Vengeance from the Dark is the album’s first trespass, the track swiftly luring ears with rhythmic bait and stabbing riffs before driving headlong into a scourge of raw rapacious riffs and toxic grooves. As the throat bleeding tones of vocalist Bitchfire scowl, the thrashier instincts of the band collude with melodic and sonic flirtation but are never allowed off the leash as the track confronts ears like a venomous celebratory waltz. It is a constantly enjoyable nag on the senses with hooks sharing character with old school rock ‘n’ roll, even at times rockabilly.

The excellent start continues as Devastating Storm… Evil Holocaust bounds in with its own incessancy of riffs and rapier like rhythms, the scything swings of drummer Necrophiliac managing to simultaneously bludgeon and be precise in their touch as the bass of Carnage growls with mercurial intent. As the intrusive assault of rhythm guitarist Soulmolester harries ears the grooves of Angelreaper wind themselves around the psyche, venom lining their every twist; masterful assets repeated in the album’s title track straight after. The track is as much psychobilly as it is extreme metal in many ways, that host of elements making up the Mordant sound diverse and expansive not only release by release to date but song by song upon Demonic Satanic. It is still blackened death metal at heart but as catchy as you could wish for; an epidemic of spiteful temptation.

Evil Impalers is another scourge easily taking limbs and appetite in its grip, its thrash sparked charge the drive for insidious suggestion and endeavour to seduce whilst courting the track’s bestial side before the Dals långed based quintet infest the Sabbat track Blacking Metal with their own creative curse. Both tracks leave nothing left to desire with the former pure incitement for pleasure, a potency tapped into by the hellacious outpouring of Desecration from Hell, a tempest of sonic poison also with an embrace of melodic adventure with persuasive toxins of its very own.

Through the pair of Infernal Curse of Evil and Screaming Souls, the senses are tormented and instincts aroused, the first as much a slab of salacious rock ‘n’ roll as it is emotional malignancy and its successor a web of injurious enterprise woven from varied strands of metal. Each leaves a greed for more with the former another peak in the album’s landscape.

Count Lucifer brings the album to a close, its tempest raw yet majestic and surrounded by a web of invasive imagination and magnetic craft. Again you can only describe the enmity as carnal rock ‘n’ roll and one hard to evade becoming enslaved by.

With thanks to Kunal at Transcending Obscurity who personally recommended the album, we may be late to it but have not missed out on something which may happily share its genre inspirations but is, as the Mordant sound, a fresh creative rancor to be in turn inspired by.

Demonic Satanic is out now through To The Death Records and available @ https://tothedeathrecords.bandcamp.com/album/demonic-satanic

https://www.facebook.com/mordantblackmetal

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raptor King – Dinocalypse

raptor_king_2016-23_RingMasterReview

As a new threat looms to trespass his domain Raptor V and his cohorts have risen again to take on the trespass. Raptor King are back with new EP Dinocalypse, a compelling successor to the well-received Dinocracy EP, to take on the new trespasser of their apocalyptic landscaped world.

Dinocalypse sees Raptor V, a dino king from the cretaceous era which ended up in 2015 via a temporal gate, once again linking up with his acolytes in guitarist Nightsmoke and drummer Don Coco to thwart new protagonist Pelletor. The Boulogne-Billancourt hailing outfit have also enlisted the guest help of bassist Strange Kid Armageddon and guitarist Indian Shredder for their second outing, a release showing a broader web of diversity in sound and bolder uniqueness in its character compared to its predecessor. As impressive and highly enjoyable as the first release form the band was, Dinocalypse easily and swiftly eclipses it in all departments.

The EP opens with its title track, Dinocalypse rising from its ‘sleep’ with a dawning of textures and essences, all entwining each other in a heated embrace until from its midst a thrash fuelled fury escapes. With the three pronged vocals as confrontational and belligerent as the riffs and rhythms surrounding them, things are soon a tempestuous assault challenging the listener as readily as the hunger of those in its tale to take on the invader of civilisation. Infectious grooves and brassy toxic flames add to the volatile and increasingly compelling mix of flavours and styles now colluding with bedlamic potency within the excellent starter.

pochette-raptor-king-dinocalyspe_RingMasterReviewThe dark lures of The Witch comes next, a web of sinister grooves and heavily swung beats gripping ears as a sludgy swamp of sound in a mutually thick climate envelops the senses. It is an alternatively rapacious seduction and invasive proposal veering further into the jaws of the latter as vocal and sonic antipathy boil up with a blackened edge to their intrusive attributes. Equally though, melody woven calm aligned to deception carrying elegance lures with siren-esque intent, a mercurial web of suggestiveness heading towards a devouring concluding tempest of extreme metal and grievous rock ‘n’ roll.

The Long Way To Rock (Pom Pom Pom Pom Pom) reveals its own infectious hand at spinning addiction sparking grooves and raw contagion next. A blend of melodic metal and rock with grungier tendencies in its intent, the song dances flirtatiously in the ears with vocals as varied and contrasting as the sounds alongside them. Whereas the first album was a collusion of truly familiar flavours and elements, the third song and the EP as a whole quickly reveals that exclusive nature and enterprise suggested earlier whilst still making for a proposition which roars like an old friend.

The stand-off between Raptor V and Pelletor is a raucous rumble in Fight’n’Roll, the track a riot of destructive and fiercely catchy rock ‘n’ roll embroiled in combative agitation. Corrosive and anthemic, the song simply hits the spot with hungry endeavour before leaving Lonesome Raptor to bring things to an excellent close. A melodic embrace around the reflective croon of Raptor V, it is a noir lit bluesy smoulder of seduction and another side to the imagination incited escapades with the release showing the striking growth of the Raptor King writing and sound.

Dinocracy majorly pleased last time around but Dinocalypse breaches a whole new landscape of craft and fun and as the closing seconds of its final track suggests is just the beginning of a new rousing conflict of bruising adventure to come and eagerly anticipate.

Dinocalypse is out now @ http://raptorking.bigcartel.com/product/dinocalypse-ep

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Pete RingMaster 28/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright