Mordant – Demonic Satanic

cover_RingMasterReview

Released towards the rear of last year, Demonic Satanic the new album from Swedish black metallers Mordant just has to be looked at and recommended no matter the length of time since it’s unleashing. Fusing black, thrash, and death metal into one corrosively virulent proposition, the band’s sound and in turn album is a tempest of fearsome rock ‘n’ roll which welcomingly infests and devours the senses.

Formed in 1997, Mordant has released two previous albums in Momento Mori (2004) and Black Evil Master (2008), a trio of demos, and a split with Sabbat in 2013. Each has increasingly nurtured the band’s unique style of black metal fuelled pestilence now raising the cancerous infectiousness of Demonic Satanic out of the sole confines of its source genre. As suggested, the album is pure rock ‘n’ roll without losing any of the Swedish black/metal traits it has its seeds in.

Vengeance from the Dark is the album’s first trespass, the track swiftly luring ears with rhythmic bait and stabbing riffs before driving headlong into a scourge of raw rapacious riffs and toxic grooves. As the throat bleeding tones of vocalist Bitchfire scowl, the thrashier instincts of the band collude with melodic and sonic flirtation but are never allowed off the leash as the track confronts ears like a venomous celebratory waltz. It is a constantly enjoyable nag on the senses with hooks sharing character with old school rock ‘n’ roll, even at times rockabilly.

The excellent start continues as Devastating Storm… Evil Holocaust bounds in with its own incessancy of riffs and rapier like rhythms, the scything swings of drummer Necrophiliac managing to simultaneously bludgeon and be precise in their touch as the bass of Carnage growls with mercurial intent. As the intrusive assault of rhythm guitarist Soulmolester harries ears the grooves of Angelreaper wind themselves around the psyche, venom lining their every twist; masterful assets repeated in the album’s title track straight after. The track is as much psychobilly as it is extreme metal in many ways, that host of elements making up the Mordant sound diverse and expansive not only release by release to date but song by song upon Demonic Satanic. It is still blackened death metal at heart but as catchy as you could wish for; an epidemic of spiteful temptation.

Evil Impalers is another scourge easily taking limbs and appetite in its grip, its thrash sparked charge the drive for insidious suggestion and endeavour to seduce whilst courting the track’s bestial side before the Dals långed based quintet infest the Sabbat track Blacking Metal with their own creative curse. Both tracks leave nothing left to desire with the former pure incitement for pleasure, a potency tapped into by the hellacious outpouring of Desecration from Hell, a tempest of sonic poison also with an embrace of melodic adventure with persuasive toxins of its very own.

Through the pair of Infernal Curse of Evil and Screaming Souls, the senses are tormented and instincts aroused, the first as much a slab of salacious rock ‘n’ roll as it is emotional malignancy and its successor a web of injurious enterprise woven from varied strands of metal. Each leaves a greed for more with the former another peak in the album’s landscape.

Count Lucifer brings the album to a close, its tempest raw yet majestic and surrounded by a web of invasive imagination and magnetic craft. Again you can only describe the enmity as carnal rock ‘n’ roll and one hard to evade becoming enslaved by.

With thanks to Kunal at Transcending Obscurity who personally recommended the album, we may be late to it but have not missed out on something which may happily share its genre inspirations but is, as the Mordant sound, a fresh creative rancor to be in turn inspired by.

Demonic Satanic is out now through To The Death Records and available @ https://tothedeathrecords.bandcamp.com/album/demonic-satanic

https://www.facebook.com/mordantblackmetal

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raptor King – Dinocalypse

raptor_king_2016-23_RingMasterReview

As a new threat looms to trespass his domain Raptor V and his cohorts have risen again to take on the trespass. Raptor King are back with new EP Dinocalypse, a compelling successor to the well-received Dinocracy EP, to take on the new trespasser of their apocalyptic landscaped world.

Dinocalypse sees Raptor V, a dino king from the cretaceous era which ended up in 2015 via a temporal gate, once again linking up with his acolytes in guitarist Nightsmoke and drummer Don Coco to thwart new protagonist Pelletor. The Boulogne-Billancourt hailing outfit have also enlisted the guest help of bassist Strange Kid Armageddon and guitarist Indian Shredder for their second outing, a release showing a broader web of diversity in sound and bolder uniqueness in its character compared to its predecessor. As impressive and highly enjoyable as the first release form the band was, Dinocalypse easily and swiftly eclipses it in all departments.

The EP opens with its title track, Dinocalypse rising from its ‘sleep’ with a dawning of textures and essences, all entwining each other in a heated embrace until from its midst a thrash fuelled fury escapes. With the three pronged vocals as confrontational and belligerent as the riffs and rhythms surrounding them, things are soon a tempestuous assault challenging the listener as readily as the hunger of those in its tale to take on the invader of civilisation. Infectious grooves and brassy toxic flames add to the volatile and increasingly compelling mix of flavours and styles now colluding with bedlamic potency within the excellent starter.

pochette-raptor-king-dinocalyspe_RingMasterReviewThe dark lures of The Witch comes next, a web of sinister grooves and heavily swung beats gripping ears as a sludgy swamp of sound in a mutually thick climate envelops the senses. It is an alternatively rapacious seduction and invasive proposal veering further into the jaws of the latter as vocal and sonic antipathy boil up with a blackened edge to their intrusive attributes. Equally though, melody woven calm aligned to deception carrying elegance lures with siren-esque intent, a mercurial web of suggestiveness heading towards a devouring concluding tempest of extreme metal and grievous rock ‘n’ roll.

The Long Way To Rock (Pom Pom Pom Pom Pom) reveals its own infectious hand at spinning addiction sparking grooves and raw contagion next. A blend of melodic metal and rock with grungier tendencies in its intent, the song dances flirtatiously in the ears with vocals as varied and contrasting as the sounds alongside them. Whereas the first album was a collusion of truly familiar flavours and elements, the third song and the EP as a whole quickly reveals that exclusive nature and enterprise suggested earlier whilst still making for a proposition which roars like an old friend.

The stand-off between Raptor V and Pelletor is a raucous rumble in Fight’n’Roll, the track a riot of destructive and fiercely catchy rock ‘n’ roll embroiled in combative agitation. Corrosive and anthemic, the song simply hits the spot with hungry endeavour before leaving Lonesome Raptor to bring things to an excellent close. A melodic embrace around the reflective croon of Raptor V, it is a noir lit bluesy smoulder of seduction and another side to the imagination incited escapades with the release showing the striking growth of the Raptor King writing and sound.

Dinocracy majorly pleased last time around but Dinocalypse breaches a whole new landscape of craft and fun and as the closing seconds of its final track suggests is just the beginning of a new rousing conflict of bruising adventure to come and eagerly anticipate.

Dinocalypse is out now @ http://raptorking.bigcartel.com/product/dinocalypse-ep

http://www.raptorkingrocks.com/    https://www.facebook.com/raptorkingrocks    https://twitter.com/raptorkingrocks

Pete RingMaster 28/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mean Messiah – Hell

mm_RingMasterReview

As January shared its last days, Hell was unleashed in the form of the debut Mean Messiah album. It was the re-release of an invasion of the senses which left only one question in its furious wake. Just how did we like so many others, miss it first time around.

The release is an ear withering, pleasure igniting storm of industrial death/thrash metal with much more to its irritable heart and searing blaze of sound. To simplify things it is a tempest resembling a raging tapestry of Revocation, Strapping Young Lad, and Fear Factory woven with strands of the likes of Cryptopsy, Blood Simple, and Static X yet stands as something distinctly individual to the imagination and roar of Mean Messiah.

The Czech Republic hailing band started out as the one man project of multi-instrumentalist and producer Dan Friml, formerly of Sebastian, Apostasy and many other projects. The winter of 2005 saw him begin work on his first album, its release intended for the following year but delayed and delayed by numerous problems and complications before being completed in 2013. Since then its line-up has expanded, bassist Veronika Smetanová and drummer Honza Šebek joining Friml as he took Mean Messiah live, proceeding to play the biggest festivals in the Czech Republic such as Masters Of Rock, Czech Death Fest, Agressive Fest, Basinfirefest, and Gothoom.

With the band working on a second album for release later this year to follow 2016 EP Let Us Pray, Mean Messiah and Via Nocturna has uncaged Hell again for a formidable and compelling reminder and wake up call for fans and newcomers alike. With its concept themed by people´s varied complicated journeys and destinies inevitably leading to hell, the album makes a calm, welcoming entrance though dark clouds and portentous sounds are soon looming over and invading the imagination as opener Temple of Hell grows in ears. Melodies are enticing yet sinister, rhythms predatory but restrained until throwing off their deceit and storming the barricades. From there grooves and hooks seduce as riffs and beats persist in their invasive intent as Friml’s potent tones snarl. That earlier descriptive comparison is in full swing as the track shares its dangerous and captivating virulence.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe track is superb, using familiar textures in a new and fresh design before being matched in might and success by King Pathetic. The strong unpredictability underlining its predecessor is potent again, and across the whole album to be fair, prowling the vicious rhythmic tenacity and intoxicatingly venomous melodic and sonic web covering the song. Bracing and intrusive, things are punishingly catchy as thrash and death metal enterprise roar with angry rapacity as industrial essences beckon further involvement in the progressively toned fury.

As the second built on and eclipsed the first, Spiritual Resolution breaches a new plateau of persuasion next, scavenging and thrilling the senses with its nagging choleric character while The Death Song with matching toxic dispute stalks and savages the listener with raw infectious enterprise. The first of the two weaves progressively honed melodic suggestiveness while the second lets its bestial ferocity drive the thrilling show.

Hell is the perfect name for sound and theme within the album, the first echoing and fuelling the latter as found in The Last Ride which follows. In many ways the outstanding song is the least corrosive on the album, its swinging rhythms and magnetic grooves rousing infection but there is no escaping its instinctive animosity and barb littered acrimony. With orchestral beauty and atmospheric harmonies colluding with warm melodies, it is sheer magnetism, only intriguing and griping tighter as its growing imagination borders schizophrenic.

The Game gnaws on the senses next, its riffs and beats an enjoyably persistent abrasion colluding with lust igniting electronics. Its irresistible stomp provides another appetite inflaming highlight within Hell, one more to the growing list joined by the dark instrumental climate and dance of Saltatio Mortis and the fiercely catchy caustic devouring of ears and soul cast by The End. Folk bred hues unite with extreme and groove spawn endeavour in the first with its successor a brawl of truculent rock ‘n’ roll, both as imaginative and expectations defeating as they are, certainly in the case of the second, emotionally primal.

Completed by bonus track Remedy, another ridiculously tempting slab of thrash nurtured, creatively evocative music which needs no vocal side to excite and inspire the imagination, Hell grabs the listener by the throat and takes them on one brutally thrilling ride from start to finish. It also lays down a mighty benchmark its successor will be judged by but it is hard to imagine Mean Messiah failing to live up to the challenge with their now keenly anticipated second full-length.

Hell is out now through Via Nocturna across most online stores digitally and on CD.

http://www.meanmessiah.com   http://www.facebook.com/meanmessiah   http://twitter.com/MeanMessiah

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Ethmebb – La Quête du Saint Grind

ethmebbok_RingMasterReview

The band’s Facebook profile tags their sound as epicleptic power death / progressive metal; a description which pretty much does sum up the anarchic fun of the Ethmebb if still leaving their imagination short changed. Their music is crazed, it is drunk on almost schizophrenic adventure, and at times it certainly leaves the imagination intoxicated but as shown by new album La Quête du Saint Grind, it is also a myriad of flavours, skilfully sculpted, and downright fun.

Apart from emerging in 2012, apparently from “the still-smouldering ashes of Grindcore band Ethmeb”, there is little more we can tell you about the Paris hailing quartet but then again their debut album does all the talking. Wrapped in the fine artwork of Nicolas Dubuisson, the release swiftly makes a potent impression, first track Tathor, l’Echalote de ses Morts soon feeding and adding to the intrigue already sparked by its cover.

Opening up a tale of a mighty warrior and his adventures as he tries to get back his Grind stolen from him “so he can get laid again”, the starter is an atmospherically suggestive, melody caressed instrumental. It is ‘similar’ to many imagination stroking starts that metal and progressive releases seem to hold but a vibrantly pleasing one, its more straight forward body a deception to the mania to follow.

ethmebb-album-artwork_RingMasterReviewrvbThat creative ‘insanity’ is uncaged through Lost my Grind. Riffs rifle the senses immediately, their enjoyable invasion soon joined by the dawning of melodies and floating harmonies as wiry grooves entangle the progressively nurtured blossoming of the track. A tenacious blend of power and death metal with that progressive nature envelops ears though it is only part of the picture as symphonic elements merge with grouchily aggressive and subsequently blackened essences, not forgetting various other unpredictable twists of fun. The vocals of guitarist Rémi Molette are a guttural trespass enjoyably tempering and complimenting the melodic quest of his and Victor Tunidjah’s guitars, their sonic web radiant and evocative within the epic nature of the song.

It is an excellent start soon eclipsed by next up Orlango Blum. From caressing harmonies it surges through ears with cantankerous riffs and majestically flourishing keys. The bass of François Santenoff throbs provocatively in the midst of the enticing tempest as the rapier like swings of drummer Damien Baissile pierce the folkish lined melodic death canvas. There is a touch of Trepalium to the song, 6:33 too, but quickly it stretches its already riveting tapestry of sound and imagination into something irresistibly unique and compelling. Melody soaked passages are oases in the storm yet every imposing second is a conjuring of raw aggression, creative ferocity, and seductively bedlamic enterprise.

The warrior’s quest continues through GPS: Gobelin Par Satellite and A la recherche de la découverte de la quête pour trouver le Saint Grind, the first a thrilling mix of the raw folk ‘n’ roll of Ensiferum and the creative psychosis of Carnival in Coal involved with plenty of other strains of imagination while getting involved with a great array of clean and dirtier vocals. Its successor is just as eclectic, from an acoustic stroll weaving a colourful intrusion of extreme and melodic endeavour all bound in an unhinged devilry.

It is fair to say that the Ethmebb sound is not going to connect with those only hankering for straightforward metal but for an appetite for creative boldness bordering on the meshuga; it is manna for the ears as proven yet again by next up Pirates of the Caribou. Concussive in its touch, promiscuous in its flavours, the folk/power metal fusion roars with drama and prowls with venomous intent, guitars spinning another inventive web as vocals anthemically unite and melodies swagger with boozy spicing. Its ebb and flows in intensity are just as masterful and alluring, as too its aggressive invention and multifarious nature.

Bruce Lee mena l’Amour brings the release to a close, the track probably the most loco of the lot though smouldering in persuasion initially before growing into its inventive skin with every passing minute to heartily convince. With a growing theatre of sound it is a fine end, though listen out for the Pryapisme like hidden track, to a thoroughly enjoyable and impressive debut album from Ethmebb and the beginning here to a greedy appetite for their insanity kissed world.

La Quête du Saint Grind is out now and available through https://ethmebb.bandcamp.com/album/la-qu-te-du-saint-grind

https://www.facebook.com/ethmebb

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

 

Threatpoint – R.I.P.

threatpoint_RingMasterReview

Inescapably enjoying their second album Careful What You Wish For when being introduced to it and the band last year, we suggested that it was easy to see US groove metallers Threatpoint “making their presence a global one if not now certainly on a near horizon.” That album evaded the luck to make the bridge but now expectations of such success are rising again with its successor R.I.P., a release which eclipses the last in every department.

Formed in 2012, the Scranton, Pennsylvania hailing quartet quickly showed themselves a formidable and exciting proposition through debut album Dead to Rise in 2013 and a live presence eagerly devoured locally and further afield. Taking inspirations from an array of metal and heavy rock borne flavours for their groove metal seeded sound, Threatpoint merged familiar and increasingly inventively fresh essences in the following Careful What You Wish and it is fair to say that the latter side has grown yet again within R.I.P., that alongside imagination and sheer creative ferocity.

With newest member and bassist Matthew Van Fleet alongside founding members in vocalist Chris James, guitarist Alex Olivetti, and drummer CJ Krukowski, Threatpoint immediately absorb ears with the portentous lure of the album’s title track. Its initial coaxing is a dark harmonic drone courted by drama carrying atmospherics. From within the evocative draw, riffs and rhythms gather and surge hungrily through ears, quickly finding their assault bound in just as rapacious grooves. Death and thrash nurtured textures are soon fuelling the rousing starter, the raw ire loaded tones of James orchestrating the anthemic prowess of the chorus whilst Olivetti’s enterprise only blossoms across each invasive groove and melodic flame.

It is an invasively potent beginning to the release reinforced by next up Deadend Machineland. It too needs a mere handful of second before settling into a predatory confrontation equipped with its own senses stirring confrontation. Like a gunslinger, it stands sizing up the listener as James’ prowls the imagination, subsequently uncaging a blast of multi-flavoured metal with a good sense of restraint to emphasize its invention before Tombstones of my Enemies presents a riveting trespass of scowling riffs, intrusive rhythms, and a sonic web woven with melodic dexterity, all emerging from a great initial melodic haunting. As each song before it, the track reveals a new character to the Threatpoint sound, R.I.P. already outshining its predecessor in diversity while matching its raw intensity.

art_RingMasterReviewThy Will Be Done is a grievous groove fest littered with invasive hooks and sonic irritability around the equally fuelled growls of James while Light Bleeds Through the Black straight after is a sinister at times almost darkly lecherous protagonist of ears and imagination interrupted by predatory bursts of volcanic ferocity. Both crowd around barbarous basslines from Van Fleet and the wickedly swung beats of Krukowski, a union of dexterity as addictive as the ravenous enterprise around them. The fade out of the first is annoying but a minor gripe in one of the album’s major highlights, a height matched by its successor and the demonian seduction of Bury the Wicked where again lava-esque enterprise meets provocative malevolence.

Through the classic and thrash metal spiced theatre of Laugh Now…Cry Later and the carnivorous canter of Writings on the Wall, the band continues to enthral an eager appetite for the magnetic adventure of the album even if neither quite stirs personal tastes to the same lusty responses as those before them or  the outstanding One in the Chamber…One in the Chest which follows. Its grouchy growl alone whips up unbridled attention, its predacious bassline and similarly natured grooves just as masterful in enslaving the passions as the song twists and turns with inventive rabidity.

The murderous swing of Face Your Fear is the foundation to another pinnacle within R.I.P., a track which courts a host of varied metallic styles as it venomously struts around body and thoughts before making way for the equally gripping theatre of Angels with Broken Wings which features the striking vocal presence of Lauren Balogh, vocalist for DramaScream and SuperRadical; her union with James a major reason for the track sparking another wave of lust.

Completed by the thunderous charge and choleric tempest of Death Rides Again, the album hits a whole new plateau in its second half following a nothing but impressive and thoroughly enjoyable first. It is the spark for expectations that Threatpoint will finally find worldwide awareness for their ever growing and increasingly inventive sound. R.I.P. may be its name but the album is the birth of greater things and success for the band.

R.I.P. is out now across most online stores.

http://www.threatpointofficial.com    https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint

Pete RingMaster 24/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Replicate – A Selfish Dream

artwork_RingMasterReview

A riveting mix of progressive and technical death metal, A Selfish Dream is one of those releases which may not have you falling back in love with the genres breeding it but certainly inspires a new appetite to go exploring them and the inspirations to the project such as Death, Cynic, Atheist, and Carcass. The new EP from LA based band The Replicate, it is a brief imagination stroking, ear striking proposal as unpredictable as it is highly enjoyable.

The Replicate is the brainchild of Sandesh Nagaraj whose CV includes being part of nineties Indian death metallers Myndsnare, Extinct Reflections, and Stranglehold. Uniting with a host of friends for his project, guitarist/bassist Nagaraj needs little time to grab the imagination and keen attention with A Selfish Dream, its opening track casting a web of sonic and technical temptation.

thereplicate-artwork_RingMasterReviewChainsaw Of God instantly wraps a spicy groove around ears, a persistent lure soon joined by a canter of robust rhythms and the raw throated rasps of guest vocalist/lyricist Morgan Wells. His irritable yet compelling tones stand astride the driving beats of Ray Rojo and Nagaraj’s nagging riffs. It is a tenaciously magnetic affair especially when grooves with clinging spice entwine the impassioned ire of the track and a solo from William Von Arx which brings an almost sinister cosmic shade to the outstanding track.

The following Eugenicide has its own suggestive drama in sound and presence, grooves again evocatively wrapping the senses with an almost picturesque quality as the predacious gravelly tones of vocalist Jordan Nalley trespass ears with his rich words. Also featuring the dark alluring basslines of Kaitie Sly, the track is an absorbing, haunting assault as different in nature and captivating enterprise to its predecessor as it is similar in compelling invention.

A rawer edge and climate descends through The Saline next, its initial sonic intrusion the spark to another virulent canter twisted into a passage of varying energies and unpredictable imagination. Arun Natrajan takes on vocals and lyrics for the EP’s third song; he also providing a rapacious growl within a controlled yet tempestuous surge of enmity and corrosive yet inviting sound.

Completed by the short instrumental of its title track, a shimmering piece of emotional starkness, A Selfish Dream is as gripping as it is imposingly intrusive. Its briefness of length is the only niggle, each song successfully never pushing its stay but combined providing a mere ten minutes of excellence; a moment in time admittedly very easy to replay and en joy time and time again.

A Selfish Dream is out now @ https://thereplicate.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/thereplicateband

Pete RingMaster 18/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chronos – Pallid Reflection

chronos-pic duncan everton

chronos-pic duncan everton

Coming from the combined areas of Bath and Bristol, UK metallers Chronos recently released their debut album Pallid Reflection. It is a seriously intriguing encounter unleashing an imaginative blend of death and progressive metal with plenty more flavours, many inspired by influences such as Metallica, Trivium, Opeth, Iron Maiden, and In Flames, embroiled in its imposing and resourceful challenge.

Formed in 2014, the quartet of vocalist/guitarist James Rideout, guitarist Joshua Boniface, bassist Tom Chapman, and drummer Jack Camp swiftly made a potent impact on their local and the south of England metal scene. First EP Hour Atonement was released in 2015 to eager reactions, whilst live the band soon found itself playing with the likes of Biohazard and Abhorrent Decimation. Pallid Reflection is the next step in the band’s emergence within the national metal landscape, an encounter which will certainly put their name on the map.

Produced and mixed by Ben Turner and mastered by Joe Caithness, the album opens up with Blood River and a sonic strand of guitar luring ears into the waiting predacious jaws of the track. In no time sturdy rhythms and hungry riffs collude before the quickly impressing skills of the band’s guitarists weave a captivating web of melodic enterprise. It is a feature which lights up the album throughout, as too the contrasts of clean and guttural vocals which give further colour and temptation to the song, especially the former. Though uniqueness is less open there is a great unpredictability to the track which just grips and impresses.

It is a strong and increasingly potent start to the release soon outshone by the following Sea Of Guilt, a hungry tempest of nagging grooves and rapier like rhythms in between passages of stalking riffs bound in restrained energy as clean vocals paint the creative canvas of the song. Again moments of unexpected imagination thrill, helping turn a great song into something even more striking and enjoyable, all offered with instinctively flowing coherency.

art_RingMasterReviewThe epic Thuribles Veil Part 1 is next, ten minutes of carnivorous riffs and grooves courted by just as predacious rhythms as throat raw vocals merge with harmonic beauty and melodic suggestiveness. The track is a cauldron of perpetual intensity, mercurial aggression, and compelling imagination, a playground for ears and thoughts even without the direction of lyric and voice. To be honest, that pretty much sums up the whole of Pallid Reflection and though familiar elements still emerge it would be fair to say they  are treated with an invention and flair which defuses familiarity.

Through the snarling ravenously nagging exploits of Lobotomised and the glorious melodically haunting Shiver, the album continues its trend of each track building on its predecessor and impressing just that little bit more while Awake displaces the elegance of the last track with a bestial swamp of waspish grooves and irritable riffs around more of the predatory rhythms which Chapman and Camp so effortlessly engineer. Arguably the least adventurous track of the album it still leaves the appetite greedy and ensures praise is easily given before Emerald Soul cradles the senses in its melodic arms, they additionally caressed by Rideout’s clean delivery and accompanying harmonies. There is a feel of KingBathmat to the outstanding track, its progressive nature given a clear climate to entrance within.

Crossover is a brutally feral encounter but again one prone to melodic radiance within its primal trespass, superbly crafted switches within a perpetually volatile atmosphere and grievous sonic intent shared with an ability and invention that constantly rises throughout Pallid Reflection and the calmer but no less sonically carnal of the song’s resourceful successor Shadow Of The Sun.

The album is concluded by almost twelve minutes of creative drama and volcanic ferocity courtesy of Thuribles Veil Part 2, a stormy incitement equipped with fiery melodies and scorching grooves around pungent contrasts musically and vocally. It is a fine rousing end to a release which reveals and offers more to greedily devour with every listen. Pallid Reflection is a mighty first step by Chronos and one of the best debuts heard this year with the potential and suggestion in its imagination of bigger and bolder things to come.

Pallid Reflection is out now though https://chronos1.bandcamp.com/releases or http://chronosofficial.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ChronosOfficial   https://twitter.com/OfficialChronos

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright