Something visceral this way comes: entering the wicked clutches of Skitarg

Like hell’s harlequins with dark intent entangled in pestilential rage and humour, Swedish extreme metallers SKITARG is an encounter which violates the senses at every turn and pleasures an appetite for “heavy, violent and evil metal” just as eagerly. The evidence is open in a live presence which devours the its audiences and four acclaim garnering albums; the fourth in Los Pulkerz released earlier this year. We grabbed the chance to brave the band’s blackened death bred clown metal trespass with vocalist Barnet, exploring its origins, that new album, and the Swedish language….

Hi, can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and how you all came together?

Sure, the band started waaaaaay back in 2005 when me (Barnet, which means “The Kid”) and the other singer Necrofilip (which means…er…”Necrophilip”) were checking out some porn on his balcony, as one is want to do. We were talking about starting a new band – we had been playing in a band called HEAD for the last six years but ended that band – and we wanted the name to sound super pissed off. And so it came to be, this year of the unlord 2005, that we named the band SKITARG (which literally translates to “shit angry”, but more idiomatically aptly translates to “pissed off”.  It also translates to “free sexuality”, “social security” and “Volvo”, but then again EVERY word in Swedish means that too.).

Have you been involved in any other bands before? If so how has that impacted on what you are doing now, in maybe style or direction?

You bet, I have been in about 15-20 bands and Necrofilip about the same. The other band members (who seem to change every now and then) also play in a lot of bands.

Playing with Necrofilip in HEAD was a great learning curve since we´d come to rehearsals with a new song and that song could have a musical element that we hadn´t known yet up to that point. It could be things like playing parallel thirds to a melody, or playing triplets over straight eights or stuff like that…So we´ve definitely grown up musically together.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer and do they still continue to steer the ship?

Yes, to sound pissed off. I think this might have been covered thus far.

You can only stay pissed off for so long before you need to have a laugh, and since me and Necrofilip love laughing more than we have the energy to be angry, the band soon started introducing comedic elements. I wouldn´t say we´re comedians but we definitely have a dark sense of humour and kind of need that perspective to get by in everyday life.

Since its first days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We started out pretty raw and still have that in us today, but rather than just beating the shit out of the drums and guitars, we put a little bit more finesse into it these days.

The first album was pretty direct and simple, the second album had way more harmonies and layers, the third was more melodic in the riff structure and the fourth album is a sort of return to the original simple sound with sprinkles of off-beat songs. One song sounds like Tom Waits, another like orcs raping The Prodigy and a third one is an excerpt of the tapes that Necrofilip recorded on his small tape recorder when he was nine years old. We really don´t have any kind of regard of what we put on our albums to be honest.

Has any evolving in sound and ideas been more organic movement or you deliberately wanting to try new things?

No, we´re pretty aware of what we want to do with our songs. Of course most songs start out with an inspired idea but from that we usually have a pretty clear vision of what needs to be added.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

As you say, there´s too many, but I can tell you what bands we are NOT inspired by: Slipknot and Insane Clown Posse. We sound nothing like them! (Ok, I´ll admit we kind of look like them, but hey, doesn´t every band?)

Is there a general process to the songwriting within the band?

Yes. We start out with some cabbage, add some salt, dance under the moonlight of a disco ball, choke each other until we laugh and then send the master to pressing.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Mostly it´s everyday stuff that pisses us off, like people walking too slow in front of us, dealing with jealousy, seeing animals and babies in peoples Facebook feeds and stuff like that.

Would you give us some background to your latest release, Los Pulkerz?

Our fourth album is a return to the original sound…actually, it´s just songs from when we started the band. We had been playing for 10 years when we started listening to the really old stuff that didn´t make it on to the first album. Some of the songs would probably work on a new release as long as we updated the sound and some of the riffs. I think we managed pretty well and even added some things that we haven´t had on our albums so far, like the song Sverige Facking Fosterland.

How about an insight into some of its themes and the premise behind it?

The premise is basically that the first 10 songs are songs that didn´t make it to the three first albums. The rest of the 15 songs are random tracks we recorded on our own as stand-alone songs or as in Rosmarie och Idioten where we get to hear an authentic conversation between 6-year old Necrofilip and a 5-year old girl called Rosmarie that he knew when he was little. His mom recorded the conversation on his tape recorder from another phone in the house and we found the tape years later (for all you kids: back in the day, people used to have land-line phones. That means that you could have several phones connected by lines to a socket in the wall in your house and if you picked up one of them during a phone call, you could listen in on the conversation between the person making the call from outside and the person taking the call in the house. Sneaky 😉

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Since we never hire a studio guy or rent a studio we´re creating up until the very end. We do everything on our own, so there´s never a cut-off on adding new stuff.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Oh yes. We´re dressed as black metal clowns and use dildos as our main stage prop. I think that´s a selling point as good as any.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We´ve done very well during these last 12 years in Sweden so I think we could do just as well abroad, if not better. Swedes are a pretty socially inept bunch and we (Swedes) don´t usually like to get too close to each other. So, since we manage to attract plenty of people to see us live in Sweden, we would probably do even better internationally. I mean, heck, if Rammstein made it with German lyrics, why can´t we with Swedish lyrics?

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive?

We are very much a band that owes our thanks to Facebook…it´s been imperative for us to reach our audience so the Internet has been great like that. It has, however, sucked all the money out of the business, so there are fewer venues in Sweden and fewer companies that want to risk financial backing for their band. We didn´t want to wait around for the record labels to get their money-grubbing heads out of their asses so we just went ahead and started recording, financing and promoting our albums on our own.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

There is no afterlife. Life is meaningless. Entropy will win, and your mom and dad probably had anal at one point. Sleep tight!

https://www.facebook.com/skitarg/    http://skitarg.tictail.com/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gutslit – Amputheatre

As a great many, our passion for brutal ravenous metal was given a real treat with the debut Gutslit album Skewered in the Sewer back in 2013. It was a raw and insatiable introduction to the India hailing outfit instantly stirring up global attention. We can declare now though that it was just the prelude to something bigger, bolder, and even more barbarous now savaging the senses in the shape its successor Amputheatre. Embracing the uncompromising rabidity of grind into their already distinct death metal nurtured sound, Amputheatre not only reinforces Gutslit’s presence in world metal but puts it on a whole new plateau.

From the moment the album’s title track sets the darkening scene and blood strewn atmosphere intrigue is hooked and attention grasped, than ruptured by the invasive surge of Brazen Bull. Sizing things up initially, it charges head first through ears, the incessant riffs and swinging grooves of Prateek Rajagopal leading the way closely followed by the scything attack of drummer Aaron Pinto. New member in vocalist Kaushal LS (Godless) impressively roars from the midst of the tempest, his diverse attack as riveting and stirring as the predatory sounds around him. With the heavy invasive groove of Gurdip Singh Narang’s bass completing the irresistible animus, the album swiftly hits the sweet spot as it instantly reveals a thicker and bolder adventure in the Gutslit trespass.

The following From One Ear To Another is equally as uncompromising and compelling, its ravenous assault a web of grooved invention and merciless antipathy again headed by Kaushal’s outstanding onslaught. That new found imagination in the band’s sound is swiftly exposed in its individuality as the song flips from its brutality into a surging rock ‘n’ roll charge and then a technically mesmeric tango, the cycle repeating without in any second ever losing its instinctive animosity. The track is immense almost reason enough to check out Amputheatre and soon backed in might by the belligerently savage Necktie Party. It too surges through a clutch of unpredictable and inventive twists which are maybe not as bold as in its predecessor, though its melodic detour is fascinating, but just as captivating and thrilling as the song preys on the senses.

Album artwork – Eliran Kantor

Blood Eagle is a carnivorous infestation, grooves and rhythms as toxic as they are seductive and ridden by the viral antics of vocal predation. Rajagopal’s melodic enterprise wraps this unrestrained and violently catchy malevolence, his strings equally adept at conjuring extremes and skilfully matched by the malicious yet vibrant antics of Narang’s bass. It is a tapestry which simply lights up appetite and imagination, success just as easily and mightily nurtured by the incessant quarrel of Brodequin and the ruthless animus cast by Maraschino Eyeballs. Both tracks are as bloodthirsty as they are openly infectious; their webs of wiry grooves and murderous rhythms bound in often acidic but perpetually beguiling enterprise.

Arguably the most truculent offering within Amputheatre is provided by Scaphism, a sadistic immersion of the senses but again one as ridiculously catchy as it is brutally cruel before the album is brought to a close by Death Hammer. Instantly you can sense the band are going to push their instincts and imagination further; something about its entrance and building confrontation which suggests the venturous almost schizophrenic tapestry of idea and sound eventually realised. Soaked in Gutslit’s renowned and expected brutality and accomplished craft, the closing trespass enthrals and excites whilst creating another seriously striking moment within the release.

Amputheatre is superb, a real standout treat in a year of potent ravenous metal encounters from a band deserving as much attention as possible.

Amputheatre is out now through Transcending Obscurity India and available @ https://gutslitindia.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/gutslit/

Pete RingMaster 24/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

American Wrecking Company – Everything and Nothing

Released less than a thick handful of weeks back, Everything and Nothing is one of year’s most voracious metal releases and in turn one of its most appetising. The new creative enmity from US outfit American Wrecking Company, the album is a ferocious tempest of sound bred across a broad spectrum of metal and expelled in a caustic roar individual to its creators. Everything from groove and death to nu and punk metal, with plenty more besides, is sucked up into the maelstrom and woven into one antagonistic furnace so easy to devour.

Since emerging in 2006, the Tacoma, Washington outfit has grown into a potent force and live presence across the West side of the US, sharing stages with bands such as Hatebreed, Fear Factory, Motorgrater, Act of Defiance, and Mushroomhead to great acclaim. Now they are ready to stir up broader attention with Everything and Nothing and it is hard to see the Pavement Entertainment supported release failing.

It launches at the listener with its title track, opening with an atmospheric coaxing as portentous as it is deceptive. The relative calm is stalked by apocalyptic threat, a danger from within which niggly riffs spring. Instantly, they carry an infectious lure; bait swiftly emulated in the sonic vines which wrap them before the track surges cantankerously across the senses. Vocalist TJ Cornelius stands across it all, his ire fuelled growls defiant as the guitars of Randy Bebich and Ben Reynard spin a trespass of sonic spite and nagging riffs around them, the latter persistence also matched by the groaning lines of Jeff Bloomfield’s bass. Still that catchy temptation infests song and ears in the ferociousness, teasing and tempting as the swings of drummer Dylan Hickey bite.

It is a great start more than matched by the groove netted From Grace, a slab of extreme virulent metal which gnaws on the senses and stirs the imagination. Like a mix of Cryptopsy and American Head Charge, the song grumbles and rumbles, every second a crotchety insurgent commanding attention as it savages the body to contagious effect though it is soon eclipsed in presence and harrying by the following I Won’t Listen. The guitars alone ensure irresistibility is bred for their grooves and sonic doggedness, their raw persuasion more than matched by the barbarous yet similarly enterprising rhythms as Cornelius raucously hollers to equal success.  There is no escaping a bit of Slipknot and Fear Factory spicing within the charge but mere flavours in its infernal and seriously compelling assault.

Health for Wealth churns up the senses next with its own web of waspish grooves, surly dynamics, and choleric attitude; American Wrecking Company lacing it with a belligerence caked but open melodic dexterity which just lights up appetite and imagination while its successor, The Burning lives up to its name in touch and atmosphere. It feels like a sonic witch hunt, every note and syllable a combative infestation of psyche preying on ears and the world but entwined with a flirtation of grooves and enterprise which keeps the track on a constant evolution within its fractious pyre.

As Purge swings and taunts with its thick groove metal predation and Enemy soils the senses with its crabby enticements and instincts, band continues to stretch the album’s landscape of sound. Each song is maybe a nudge into new adventures rather than a big leap but one by one they openly reveal the expanse of the American Wrecking Company sound within the constant emotional and physical storm. Beautiful Lie is no different though it does not quite have the inventive attributes of other songs around it. Nevertheless its carnal breath and sonic tenacity leaves a want for little before Mad by Design arguably courts the widest collusion of styles and imagination within the album for its mercurial and persistently captivating feud.

The release is finished off by Day of Shame, a song which springs from a great melodic coaxing with middle-eastern promise into a rip tide of rapacious grooves splintered by scything beats. The throaty tension of the bass is icing on the toxic cake and a final track to confirm American Wrecking Company as one potent and exciting force.

Everything and Nothing is a beast of a proposition which ticks all the boxes and more yet you still feel there is so much more to come from the band such the potential equally loud within the creative ferocity. Happy days!

Everything and Nothing is out now on iTunes and other stores through Pavement Entertainment.

http://www.americanwreckingcompany.com/    https://www.facebook.com/americanwreckingcompany

Pete RingMaster 27/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kinasis – Pariah

Though formed in 2010, UK metallers Kinasis maybe a proposition, like for us, which has escaped your close attention up till now. That is surely going to change with the release of their new EP, a ferociously striking and aggressive incitement loaded with hungry unpredictability and a technical prowess which simply inflames the fascination and pleasure. The four track insurgency is Pariah, a proposition which embraces an array of metal bred flavours in a cauldron of ravenous imagination and rabid dexterity.

Since emerging seven years ago and drawing strongly favourable responses with a debut demo the same year, Kinasis has grown into the British metal scene with increasing individuality and potency. Recent years their reputation earning live presence has seen the Bridgwater quintet shares stages with the likes of Sepultura, Malefice, Flayed Disciple, Sworn Amongst, Abadden, and Tacoma Narrows Bridge Disaster among many as well as venture into Italy alongside S.H.I.N.E. The release of Pariah feels like and should be the moment when Kinasis step from the shadows and stamps their creative authority and individual sound upon the extreme metal landscape.

Produced by Justin Hill (ex-Sikth) and wrapped in the artwork of Andy Pilkington of Very Metal Art, Pariah instantly goes for the jugular with opener Red Earth. Riffs surge through ears with a rapacious nagging whilst rhythms purge their animosity straight onto the senses. With every passing second the intensity rises but with a virulence and infectiousness which has the body bouncing to the ferociousness. A Korn-esque essence emerges as clean vocals invite nu-metal nuances, an industrial dexterity reminding of Static-X joining in as the track fluidly twists and turns through its inventive drama further embracing melodic and atmospheric suggestiveness. It is sheer magnetism, the track a mighty persuasion and alone the declaration of the coming of age of a new force to take notice of.

The following Black Dog creeps up and prowls the listener with predacious riffs and stabbing beats, then once sizing things up vocally and musically plundering the imagination with vocal tenacity embracing both raw and clean throated enterprise as death and technical metal tendencies dance which each other in barbarous intent.  As nu and groove metal elements get involved, things only become more precise rather than muddled, Kinasis showing their adeptness at weaving diverse and seriously enticing trespasses. For personal tastes the track never quite lives up to its three companions but certainly leaves no element of dissatisfaction in its wake.

Kindred similarly stalks ears if with a less obvious enmity as melodic strands entwine its initial proposal. Even stronger Korn like essences emerge to pleasing effect across the song and around a death/grindcore merging which has hints of Cryptopsy in its own infectious savagery. Clean vocals interchange with barbarous expulsions to further enhance the adventure, the band musically as bold and expert in switching through a kaleidoscope of styles and flavours without disturbing the song’s carnal nature and heart.

The release concludes with Incipient, an instant maelstrom of voice and sound colliding nu-and industrial metal psychosis with the harsher antagonism of variety woven extreme metal  before luring in just as appetising melodic and groove metal imagination. It is seriously arousing stuff, the type of sonic manna addiction is spawned from right here. As throughout Pariah, every twist brings a fresh incitement to chew over but mere seconds to consume before the next steals attention and increasing ardour.

It is the final throe of a quite simply stunning encounter from a band which will surely now get the attention their craft and imagination deserves. There have been a few bands coming to the fore as the British metal scene heads into new horizons and Kinasis have just made it known their intent to be there on the frontline.

Pariah is released September 29th and will be digitally available at most online stores with physical copies sold through http://kinasis.bigcartel.com/ and at shows.

https://www.facebook.com/Kinasis

Pete RingMaster 26/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cranely Gardens – House of Decay

Allowing no hiding place, House of Decay is a tempest of psychotic noise and vicious dexterity; quite simply one of the best things to escape the extreme metal scene this year. The EP is the venomous creation of US band Cranely Gardens, an outfit which plunders the diverse landscape of metal to forge its own distinct and striking tempest now raging within one impressive encounter.

Formed in 2008, New Jersey hailing Cranely Gardens soon began weaving and honing the diversely flavoured sound which was to make debut EP Locust Valley a well-received encounter in 2015. The band has continued to nurture their individual sound and creative character, House of Decay a new plateau darker and more tempestuous yet finely crafted and a declaration that the band is ready to take on the biggest attention.

Once the sample built Muswell Hill sets the tone and atmosphere, History of a Drowning Boy seizes ears and imagination with its multi-textured tempest. It is a maelstrom of sound bred from a fusion of death and thrash metal, its imagination growing to create a cauldron of everything from nu and groove to blackened heavy metal in a forceful trespass which infests ears and psyche. Like a blend of French outfit Trepalium and UK’s Anti-Clone to give it some kind of identity, the track savages and seduces with every passing second whilst embracing an unpredictability which is not constant but brings rich surprises and twists when it breaks.

The excellent trespass features guest Will Ramos from A Wake in Providence, its successor Seven Faces sees For the Fallen Dreams vocalist Chad Ruhlig guesting. The track instantly submerges the listener in an invasive cloud of predatory noise, from the midst of which winding grooves and rampant rhythms driven by the vicious swings of Victor Figueroa break. His beats are pure venom in every touch, the bass of Alex Niszczak a predacious companion whilst the guitars of Randy Mac and Joe Fedele cast a sonic tempest built on technical and instinctive dexterity which is pure toxicity. The threat loaded throat of vocalist Chaz Macklin centres it all with an almost carnal prowess, his intensive examination just as compelling within next up Savages which has Dan Watson of Enterprise Earth and Sims Cashion additionally on board. On the surface, the song seems less adventurous than its predecessors though its grooves swiftly wind persuasively around ears but time and intent reveals the devious web at its core luring increased attention as a swarming of sonic temptation offers delicious bait.

Still it does not quite match up to those before or the following threat of Rapture where Narrow Vision frontman Josh Frazier adds his rapacious tones to the animosity unloaded by Macklin. Venturing into a more nu meets melodic metal terrain without defusing the same raw antipathy and corrosive fury of its companions, the track punishingly takes the passions.

Carry the Earth steps up next, the rhythmic ingenuity of Figueroa leading the way and not for the first or last time running with rock ‘n’ roll instincts before guitars and bass spread their cathartic animosity. The melodic hook feels a relatively familiar tempting across the EP but this certainly does not damage its impact either across the whole or in a track which scorches the senses and runs with the imagination like an unhinged predator.

The Challenger brings things to a close, its body also coaxed in by Figueroa’s tenacious invention; the subsequent highly resourceful sonic disturbance cored by a malignant cyclone driven by creative rancor. In saying that, its melancholic melodies are emotional sighs which add further drama and adventure to the concussive but gracefully primal finale. It is a volcanic close to an EP which just impresses more and more listen by listen. It is not the perfect offering but the potential sealing any cracks ensures it makes for a truly powerful and lingering incitement.

House of Decay is out now @ https://cranelygardens1.bandcamp.com/album/house-of-decay

http://www.cranelygardens.com/    https://www.facebook.com/CranelyGardens/    https://twitter.com/cranelygardens

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Casket Robbery – The Ascension

Last year US metallers Casket Robbery awoke national attention with the release of their acclaimed debut album Evolution of Evil and now they are poking at even broader spotlights with their latest release, The Ascension EP. Offing three ravenous cuts of their brutal and virulent groove/death metal trespass, the release invades the psyche and stirs the body with a carnal flirtation.

Though building on the individual sound of the album, The Ascension is a whole new ball game in so many ways too. It is the first encounter with the Madison hailing outfit since the addition of Megan Orvold on vocals, she having guested on the last album replacing Dustin Foesch, and bassist Derek Silloway. With the line-up completed by guitarists Cory Scheider and Troy Powell, Casket Robbery goes for the jugular from the EP’s first breath. The initial atmospheric build of Pockets Lined with Flowers is an intriguing lure which swiftly pulls the listener into the waiting turbulence of sound abound with the vocal ferocity of Orvold. Her rabid lungs descend on the senses as the raw tempest of sonic animosity simply grows around her but together it is a maelstrom of spite swinging with viral grooves and infectiously intrusive rhythms. An instant contagion, the visceral intrusion pounds and ignites the senses while the imagination is hooked by great magnetic expulsions of melodic craft and atmospheric suggestiveness.

It is a stunning start more than backed by the EP’s title track. Eagerly prowling riffs court ears first, their instinctive swagger soon infested with sonic discordance and again catchy grooves. Each aspect has a predacious air to their tone and antipathy, a hue coating the vocals and the overall character of the dark and heavy animus of sound and emotion. In saying that, a lively contagious nature easily infests body and appetite as it does in the first track, just with a more primal and fearsome breath.

That heightened malignancy fuels final track Lilith too. It is a rancorous temptress of a song taking the boisterous swing of the first and the raw malevolence of the second into its own individual jaundice. Again spirals of venomous grooving create a wiry web around melodic toxicity as the track invades the body with viral seduction, offering as the others death metal to devour and groove ingenuity to submit to.

Casket Robbery can only ignite bigger and greedier attention with their growing sound especially with the striking and fiercely impressing ability of Orvold now heading the tempest. The band and previous singer Foesch were a formidable proposition but Orvold brings something else to the table; an ingredient which sparks and draws a fresh rapacity out of the band’s music to match her own striking attributes. The Ascension is the band’s wake-up call to the world but still feels a teaser for bigger infestations ahead for which anticipation is already licking its lips.

The Ascension is out now and available @ http://casketrobbery.bandcamp.com/ and http://casketrobbery.bigcartel.com

http://facebook.com/casketrobbery

 Pete RingMaster 22/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Killer Refrigerator – Refrigeration Plague

Whether you heeded the warning the first time around or indeed the second, US metallers Killer Refrigerator are back to stir us again to the threat of and war with lethal appliances through new album Refrigeration Plague. This time around the rebel rousing caution comes in an even more multi-textured and flavoured technical death thrash proposal which simply has you glancing over your shoulder at those electrical menaces lurking and waiting to strike.

Refrigeration Plague sees the alert incite and rabid creative antics of vocalist/guitarist Cody Coon (UnKured) once more linking up with bassist Countess “Lia” Blender and producer Luke “Java” Sackenheim from Bum-Ass Studios who also took care of mixing and mastering the Cincinnati outfit’s latest confrontation. The album follows 2014 debut full-length When Fridges Rule This World and the moment when arguably people really took notice, The Fridge and the Power it Holds EP of the following year. Confirming the suggestion Java made when sending over the album that Refrigeration Plague is a “tighter” proposition from the band than ever before, the release equally swiftly declares itself their most unpredictable and creatively psychotic without losing any intensity in its instinctive death/thrash breeding across fourteen ferocious encounters.

It opens up with Autoerotic Refrigeration and the dancing bass of Blender before things become far more frantic as Coon in guitar and voice vents his anxiety. Ravenously infectious and rapaciously nagging, the track is a minute and a half of fevered goodness setting up album and a greedy appetite for it with ease.

From there the listener is dragged into the darker heavier grime of Vacuum Doom (Rise of the Dirt Devil), every element as eagerly skittish in the first now revealing a slower, predatory side. Prowling with a sonic glint in its eye, the squealing guitar and vocal tones of Coon again entice; their trespass darkening as the track reveals the bolder tempest of its heart and technical menace of its presence. It ebbs and flows in intensity and creative mania before Night of the Living Bed slips in with its initial corrupted innocence surrounding the introductory tones of Adolf Green who subsequently sets the release ablaze with his sax. The track itself is a sweltering pyre of blackened death and thrash metal; the sonic niggle of the guitar a wiry web as loco as it is skilful; an insanity which eventually consumes the whole irresistible and increasingly psychotic encounter.

Dryers Eve follows with its own creative dementia; a technical delirium which invades and festers like a virus in the psyche. Again the senses enjoyably squirm under the threat of voice and guitar, instincts seduced by the roaming exploits of the bass whether the track saunters or launches itself at breakneck speed. As another threat is uncovered, Killer Refrigerator shows it has really grown in all aspects, next up C.H.U.D. confirming the fact with its virulent asylum of sound and craft. As most around it, it is a slither of a track but one more active and compelling than most multi-minute offerings.

The excellent funky antics of The Revenge of Frankenstove has hips and imagination swinging next, its cross-over mania a sinister and beguiling aberration while De Maytagus Dom Samsungus is a murky yet still contagious consumption of the senses. Both tracks have body and thoughts trapped and elated with their individual enmities, the first especially addictive before the visceral stomp of Gas Station Strangulation eclipses both; bloodlust in its nostrils and sinful misdoings in its soul.

A Salad Named Elizabeth follows with the guest introduction of Kitty [Pryde]; her flirtatiously unaware of danger tones the prelude to another kitchen nightmare of demonic proportions. Its rabidity in sound and intent is a tsunami of primal discontent and skilful manipulation which fascinates and ravishes the senses. Whether its death bred body quite lives up to the excellent opening is debateable but across four plus minutes, the song has attention and pleasure engrossed, a success Spaghetti and Meatballs similarly achieves with its evil rascality.

The excellently titled It’s Not Over Toilet’s Over springs its technical helter-skelter straight after, infesting ears with sonic and rhythmic paranoia while the murderous trial of Splatterfarm is rose coloured pleasure chewing on the senses.

Refrigeration Plague finishes off with firstly its title track, a malevolent infestation of sound and enterprise becoming more violently catchy by the minute and lastly Beyond Frigid Horizons, a kaleidoscopic fury of metal which almost does not know when to depart and is all the more fun for it.

Killer Refrigerator is not a band for everyone, especially if a sense of humour is left at home, but musically is one of the most enjoyably imaginative and voraciously bold extreme metal propositions out there. So be brave and dive into Refrigeration Plague you have nothing to lose and everything to gain as all those appliances leer at you waiting.

Refrigeration Plague is available now @ https://bumass.bandcamp.com/album/refrigeration-plague

https://www.facebook.com/KillerFridge/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright