High Down – Moving On

Suggesting they might be the ones to give the British pop punk scene an invigorating new breath, Portsmouth hailing High Down have just released their first EP. Moving On offers five slices of ear pleasing infection carrying punk rock, each bearing a sound with a spikiness which alone commands attention and further investigation.

Emerging last year, High Down made a potent mark with debut single Family & Fiends, the track recorded with producer Matt O’Grady (You Me At Six/Deaf Havana). Its impact was followed by the band playing slots at the likes of Seasick Fest, Butserfest, and Teddy Rocks Festival as well as share stages with bands such as WSTR, Roam, and Like Pacific. It is fair to say that things are beginning to stir for the quartet, a motion sure to gain momentum through Moving On.

The EP opens up with new single Life Lessons, guitars instantly luring ears with their catchy invitation. It is an infectiousness which is as instinctive in the vocal prowess of Luke Smithson and the rhythmic stroll of bassist Tim Hoolahan and drummer James Grinter who it appears has since left the band. The energy of the song is bold but with an enterprising restraint, it constantly pulling on the reins throughout but blossoming from that same reflective control. Feet and ears are soon lost to its temptation, appetite to its mix of harmonic warmth and again reserved but open irritability.

Making History backs up the fine start with its own line in melodic suggestion and rhythmic persuasion, it too keeping a hold on its boisterousness but giving enough of a rein to stir the spirit especially within another rousing chorus. The guitars of Darrell Ellis and Joe Soar weave a captivating web of sonic adventure with the former’s vocals potently backing the lead tones and expression of Luke Smithson. There are no big surprises yet each moment of accomplished endeavour increases the song’s draw, a quality just as inescapable in next up All On You. High Down has been given comparisons to artists such as Blink 182 and New Found Glory, the third track with its high kicking beats and nagging riffs a contagious example of why. There is a greater fire in its belly than in its predecessors and similarly an even more imposing catchiness that commands attention and response as smart hooks and harmonic dexterity relentlessly tempt.

The acoustic seduction of Rescue Me follows with vocals and guitar crooning knowingly with thought and emotion. The song features the guest tones of Nottinghamshire singer Christina Rotondo, her vocal beauty a striking essence in the union with the similarly impressing presence of Smithson. With a rawer edge to its gritty finale, the track grows in intensity and emotion to truly hit the spot before making way for the pinnacle of the release. The best track on offer for these ears, Against The Tide instantly winds wiry tendrils of guitar around ears, their steely touch alone a keen lure but only tightening their invitation with their niggling prowess, one matched in dexterity and persuasive trespass by the muscular swings of Grinter and the growling bass of Hoolahan. It is a dynamic and imposing yet again seriously infectious proposal to bring the highly enjoyable encounter to a fierce close.

In many ways there is nothing overly remarkable about Moving On yet every moment it shares is rich in enterprise and energy whilst being backed by a potential which suggests High Down can have a big presence on the UK if not European pop punk theatre.

Moving On is out now and available @ http://highdownuk.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/highdownuk    https://twitter.com/highdownuk

Pete RingMaster 05/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

First Signs Of Frost – The Shape Of Things To Come

Pic Ben Ashton

The Shape Of Things To Come is the first EP since British rock band First Signs Of Frost emerged from a hiatus a couple of years back; its title as much a declaration of the fresh blossoming sound and creative chapter within the band as the themes it explores across five absorbing tracks.

Formed in 2004, the quartet of guitarist/vocalist Owen Hughes-Holland, guitarist Adam Mason, drummer Will Gates, and bassist Dan Oehlman grabbed keen attention with their debut EP, In Our Final Chapter. 2007 saw Daniel Tompkins join up as lead vocalist before the acclaimed release of first album Atlantic and a period see the band play alongside the likes of Deaf Havana, Enter Shikari, Architects, You Me At Six, We Are The Ocean, Senses Fail, Devil Sold His Soul and many more. Before the fuss had settled around the release, Tompkins left to join TesseracT. His departure left a gap the band struggled to fill; thus their hiatus until Hughes-Holland resurrected the band in 2015. Linking up with Mason again as well as bassist Andy C Saxton (ex-Cry For Silence), vocalist Daniel Lawrence (ex-Kenai / All Forgotten), and drummer Alex Harford, the London quintet immediately sought to explore and push their sound to new imaginative heights with The Shape Of Things To Come the first glimpse of their success.

Immersing inspirations from the likes of Deftones, Tool, Further Seems Forever, and Glassjaw into their invention, First Signs Of Frost swiftly lures ears with opener Meat Week. Its atmospheric calm is a quick enticement, the gentle caress of guitar a matching lure before the brooding air also there sparks a bolder expulsion of sound. Lawrence’s vocals immediately impress, his melodic expression matched by the colluding warm and wiry textures of the sounds around him. An infectious energy is equally as persuasive within the song, every element bold without being forceful but making a strongly emotive and technically alluring temptation on ears and imagination.

The following White Flag potently backs up the great start; its enterprise similarly resourceful and ear catching without making over aggressive trespasses upon the senses. There is elegance to the First Signs Of Frost sound which charms as the craft of the individuals captivates; again making for a gentle almost smouldering seduction carried in a contagious and skilfully conjured proposal.

Latest single Look Alive Sunshine is next up with its own individual melodic rock venture veined by djent scented progressive metal intricacies. There is jaggedness which bites as the vocals and melodies hug the senses; a union which grips and lingers even if the song just fails to touch the plateau of its predecessors before the evocative climate and atmospheric ambience of Atlantis drifts in with the superb vocals of Lawrence and keys to the fore. An instinctive emotional intensity rises within the song, simmering down again before repeating its cycle within the graceful serenade.

The EP closes with Sharks; it too an initially serene coaxing but one soon revealing its djent nurtured teeth and creative volatility within a subsequent sea of melodic and technical but emotionally inflamed tranquillity. It is a fine end to a fascinating and thoroughly enjoyable release. The Shape Of Things To Come feels like the first step towards something bigger and bolder but is a full pleasure in its own right; a mix which makes First Signs Of Frost a band which just has to be followed closely.

The Shape Of Things To Come is out now via Basick Records and available @ https://basick.supplies/collections/first-signs-of-frost or http://music.basickrecords.com/album/the-shape-of-things-to-come

https://www.facebook.com/FSOFofficial/

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hello Bear – I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It?

hello-bear-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

A trap waiting to grab your imagination and energy, I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? more than lives up to its title with its bouncy persona and rousing spirit. The new EP from British quartet Hello Bear, the four-track stomp is a sparkling burst of power/punk pop which may not carry major surprises but is as fresh and vibrant as anything escaping the year so far.

Formed in 2010, the Norwich bred band take inspiration found in the likes of Weezer, Pavement, Los Campesinos!, Refused, The Bronx, Presidents of the USA, McFly, Johnny Foreigner, and Dananananaykroyd into their own highly flavoursome exploits. Invigorating as a live presence which has seen Hello Bear play with bands such as Los Campesinos, Coasts, Darwin Deez, The Futureheads, and The King Blues, their sound is an ear grabber which now refuses to be ignored within the band’s new offering. The press release accompanying the EP suggests it carries “their most exciting material to date.” Being our introduction to Hello Bear it is hard to confirm or argue, but exciting the Lee Batiuk (Deaf Havana, Trash Boat, Hopeless Records) produced release is and relentlessly enjoyable.

I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? opens up with new single We Held Hands Once, But Then She Got Embarrassed, the collective energy and enterprise of Luke Bear (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Mary Bear (guitar), Tom Bear (bass), and Daryl Bear (drums) hitting the floor running. A lone strum entices first being quickly joined by the potent tones of Luke before the song jumps on ears with eager riffs and canny rhythms. In no time it is into an infectious stroll with hooks and melodies uniting to charm attention before brewing and finally expelling a virulent contagion through its irresistible chorus. There is no escaping joining those offering Blink 182 meets Weezer as a reference for the tenaciously lively sound of song and band; add a touch of Super Happy Fun Club and The All-American Rejects though and the mix is even closer to the rousing incitement.

hello-bear-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThe following Mmm Cheque Please! makes a just as striking entrance, another single strain of guitar bait making the first lure, rampant beats and Luke’s inviting vocals the next  before it all blooms into another infectious canter. Daryl’s beats resonate as they land and Tom’s basslines grumble as much as they seduce while Mary and Luke share a tapestry of hooks and melodic endeavour which only leads to a greater appetite for song and release. Admittedly the track lacks the final spark which ignites its predecessor but leaves pleasure bubbling eagerly as does Dirty Weekend with its more restrained but wholly magnetic presence. Repeating a prowess which confirms Hello Bear masterful at creating big choruses and ripe hooks which simply infest the psyche, the song lays lustfully upon the senses.

The EP ends as its starts with a track which just whips up the passions. Attack Hug Influences is addiction for the ears, a slice of rock pop which seizes hold of body and spirit in a breathless romp complete with spicy hooks, tenacious rhythms, and a vocal coaxing which virtually forces listener involvement.

It is a boisterous end to a release which demands a party is woven around its presence each and every time. No moments of major uniqueness, all irresistible fun fuelled ingenuity; that is I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It?, one of the most enjoyable adventures this year.

I Don’t Know… It’s Fun Though, Isn’t It? is released November 11th

http://www.hellobear.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/hellobear/    https://twitter.com/hellobearband

Pete RingMaster 08/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Delayed Departure – Consequences

Delayed Departure_RingMaster Review

Consequences is a release which teases and flirts with ears and thoughts, all the time laying down potent bait until you find yourself humming hooks when alone and increasingly wanting to share news of its vibrant presence. The EP is the new encounter from UK melodic/alternative rock band Delayed Departure, and a collection of highly flavoursome songs which may not be about to turn the British rock scene on its head but will certainly offer it a fresh and tasty proposition to get teeth into.

Hailing from Hampshire towns, Delayed Departure was formed in 2013 by old school friends and guitarists Charlie Bluck and Jamie Hooks. Its line-up quickly doubled with the addition of vocalist Mike Harland and drummer Steven Kedge, growing by another before the year’s end with bassist Ollie Drapper. With particular fondness for the likes of You Me At Six, Paramore, and Don Broco, the quintet spent 2014 working on their sound and honing their live craft across a host of shows throughout the South of the UK. Now national awareness is being targeted by Consequences, with success easy to expect.

Delayed Departure Cover_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with the brief melodic suggestiveness of Opus, its sonic touch a resonating shimmer aligned to a just as pulsating bass throb. It is a reserved proposal but one building in intensity and drama for a roaring climax, led by the voice of Harland, which drifts off into the waiting adventure of Ocean. Guitars and bass immediately collude to create a weave of fiery enticement courted by thick melancholic shadows, their enterprising union speared by the swinging beats of Kedge and hugged by the already impressing tones of Harland. It is a strong and engaging big step into the heart of the EP with things only blossoming to new and gripping heights song by song.

Let’s Catch Fire is the first sign of that trait, its initial spicy groove immediately lighting ears and appetite before band vocal roars and rousing rhythms spearhead the robustly infectious stroll and character of the song. Hooks are laid as imaginatively as harmonies, the wiry tendrils of melodic flirtation as catchy as its anthemic rhythms as the track whips up listener involvement with its heavy rock ‘n’ roll enticement.

A calmer invitation follows with Captive; poetic melodies caressing the magnetic delivery of Harland as Drapper’s bass lurks with darker intent in the surrounding emotive shadows. Here alone, it is easy to see why bands such as Deaf Havana and Don Broco are given as hints to the Delayed Departure sound but personal thoughts are also nudged towards Able Archer and for less obvious reasons eighties band The Sound by the excellent encounter.

The underlying volatility of the latter part of the song is a bolder tempting within Synopsis next, the track almost stalking ears with its rapacious rhythms as vocals and guitars cast a hazily thick and forcibly provocative tapestry of craft and sonic suggestiveness. Tenacious twists, so often sparked by the dexterity of Drapper and Kedge, again litter a song which avoids expectations whilst making an adventurous but easily accessible and contagious proposal.

The same quality and skill applies to closing song Choices, the pinnacle of the release with its rousing crescendos and tempestuously fascinating landscape of sound and resourceful exploits. As strong and impacting as the EP is throughout, the closer is a step above all before, taking feet and bodies in hand with its boisterously infectious exploits as potently as it tantalises ears and thoughts with its evocative calms and emotive reflections. There is a brewing ferocity to the track too which ensures a powerful departure of song and EP leads to the quick return of ears.

Consequences makes for an impressive introduction to Delayed Departure with thick enjoyment for ears. As the band grows and their sound explores its own unique character, the five-piece can only get bolder and stronger too, that another pleasing thought coming out of one fine encounter.

The Consequences EP will be available through all stores and platforms from Friday 22nd January.

https://www.facebook.com/OfficialDelayedDeparture   https://twitter.com/dlayeddparture

Pete RingMaster 22/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Speaking in Shadows – The Anchor EP

SIS 4_RingMaster Review

In describing their new EP The Anchor, UK alternative rock quintet Speaking in Shadows said “This EP has taken us back to our roots – no agendas, no concepts, no gimmicks. We’re writing music that excites and inspires us, and hope that our songs will not only engage and entertain our listeners, but also empower and encourage them to find inspiration of their own.” What they forgot to mention was that they have also bred a new oomph in sound and delivery which whilst indeed offering essences which at times seem closer to 2011 debut album Standing at the Edge than previous EP The Lies We Lead, comes with a core maturity and power fuelling a whole new freshness to get close and personal with.

Hailing from Nuneaton, Speaking in Shadows have been building up a potent following and praise for their sound and live presence since emerging. Comparisons to bands such as Funeral for a Friend, Deaf Havana, and Mallory Knox have come their way whilst Standing at the Edge and the single Sweet Gemini began the flow of acclaim presenting itself to their releases. Last year’s The Lies We Lead EP pushed things on again with its gripping single Technicolour Trainwreck included on Keep A Breast UK’s Check Your Selfie album, with the likes of Four Year Strong, Finch and Man Overboard. Now the band has stepped up with a new collection of tracks which feel stronger, sound bolder, and persuade with the most accomplished craft from Speaking in Shadows yet.

SIS - The Anchor_RingMaster Review     The Anchor opens up with new single Capsized and a rousing blaze of guitar and rhythms to seize the attention of ears and imagination. A slight breath is taken as the instantly impressive tones of vocalist Adam Smith join the flirtatiously groaning bass of Sam Powell, their tempting soon aligned to more melodic flames cast by the guitars of Ali Carvell and Lewis Sketchley. With a resourceful and eventful adventure shaping its body and gait, the song as it grows, becomes gets more contagious with very passing twist to a fluid vocal and musical roar.

It is a great start backed just as enjoyably by Scatter. Led in by the magnetic beats and swings of Grant Sketchley, the song is soon unveiling its own emotive and hearty bellow loaded with soaring harmonies around the core delivery of Smith. Again the bass is a rich lure and companion to the fiery textures bred by the guitars, they only adding rich hues to the irresistible anthemic drama and tenacity boiling within the track. It is an emotively volcanic property which similarly veins Figure of Eighty, a more reserved but no less melodically and creatively pungent proposal than its predecessors. As it engages ears, the song bares its creative heart and emotion with increasingly intensity and prowess, that earlier talked of new spark and power in the band’s sound as ripe and forceful as anywhere upon The Anchor.

Bite growls and swings in ears next, barbed hooks as open as melodic temptation and the ever inviting tone and mix of vocals. Rhythms align more to the song’s grouchy side whilst sonic enterprise fans the melody honed fire burning brightly within an encounter which maybe took a couple more plays than other songs within the EP to ignite the same kind of reactions but certainly gets there in the end. The same can be said of And Grit which also is a more of a smoulder than instant incitement on welcoming emotions but grows into a lusty furnace of heated persuasion shaped by technical imagination and striking individual craft.

The Anchor closes with Easy for You, a track swiftly laying down a spicily tempting hook around which melodic elegance and rhythmic restraint sparks an evocative air leading to tenacious crescendos. The ‘weakest’ song on the EP, yet one that only lingers after departure whilst leaving emotions broadly smiling with satisfaction through a dynamic weave of sound and creative colour, it emphasizes the core strength of The Anchor and the new step in the Speaking In Shadows invention.

Speaking In Shadows impressed with their earlier releases but without doubt have hit a new peak with The Anchor. They are still not a band which you would suggest has come of age yet though which makes their potential and future even more exciting based on the strength of this impressive EP.

The Anchor EP is released October 19th.

https://www.facebook.com/speakinginshadows     http://www.speakinginshadows.co.uk/

Pete RingMaster 19/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Endeavour – Voyage EP

The Endeavour Online Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

In a year of rich debuts, another strong and potential loaded introduction comes courtesy of UK rockers The Endeavour and their Voyage EP. Bulging with four tracks of dynamic and feisty alternative rock fuelled by impassioned energy and fiery melodies, the Peterborough quintet’s first offering has the potency and power to nudge national awareness of their already attention grabbing sound and presence. Voyage is not an explosion to alter any aspect of the landscape of British rock ‘n’ roll but it is a refreshing and accomplished roar from a band easy to see springing to greater heights from this highly enjoyable base.

The Endeavour began in 2013 and consists of four brothers, Shawn (vocals), Brandon (guitar), Shane (guitar), and Garren Radley (bass), and close friend Matthew Meadows (drums). They took little time in stirring up local support and successfully hitting the live scene, finding themselves sharing stages with the likes of Fort Hope, Anavue, Enter Shikari, Deaf Havana, and Funeral For A Friend over time. With Voyage, the five-piece is looking to emulate existing success on the broader canvas of countrywide recognition, and you can only imagine it will ensure at the very least that The Endeavour is a name a great many more will be very aware of.

The Endeavour Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The EP starts with a bang in the boisterous shape of Take It All. From its first lure of spicy riffs the song has ears and imagination alert, engrossed soon after as thumping beats join the provocative guitar bait. Swiftly followed by just as enticing hooks, it is a thrilling opening which never slips a gear as the song expands into a dramatic stroll equipped with still virulent rhythms, a wonderfully predatory bassline, and tangy guitar enterprise. Across this the excellent vocals of Shawn command attention as they spill the narrative over the track’s magnetic web of ideation. The song is unafraid to change its intensity, gait, and weight of textures across is enthralling body too but always it returns to that irresistible combination of sound and invention which set its thrilling presence in motion.

The following Open Heart reveals a more relaxed presence in energy and intensity yet also comes with sparkling melodies and striking hooks within a thick rhythmic lure. The bass again is almost bestial in tone, its barracuda voice perfect contrast to the warm smoulder wrapping the hearty enterprise alongside. Initially, as in the first song, there is a whiff of Manic Street Preachers in the air but eventually it slips into a sound more akin to a Young Guns or Taking Back Sunday. The opening track owns ears and appetite whilst the second is more an asking of attention as is No One Else To Blame, though both songs only find success. The third proposal has a catchy spine of tenacious riffs and spicy guitar adventure which shines even brighter in a mellower passage pierced by the military precision of Matthew’s sticks. As its predecessor, the track grows in potency and persuasion over time, emerging as another big, promise filled, declaration of the adventure and brewing depths in The Endeavour sound and songwriting.

Voyage is brought to an end by After The Storm, an emotive croon with lively rhythms and a slightly volatile landscape of melodic and sonic resourcefulness. The vocals and harmonies steal the show but every element of the band is a tantalising and riveting aspect as the song grows bolder and more tempestuous with every passing minute. It is a fine end to an impressive first listen to The Endeavour, Voyage showing that the band have the makings and more of something able to make a strong impact on the UK rock scene; we will be waiting like so many from now on in, with keen anticipation.

The Voyage EP is available from July 27th through all stores and @ http://www.theendeavouruk.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/theendeavourband https://twitter.com/theendeavouruk

Ringmaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Of Allies – Fragments EP

FragmentsPromoShot

Last year UK rockers Of Allies made their entrance with the excellent and ultimately acclaimed Tempers EP, a release riddled with impacting flavours and the potential of major things ahead. Now the Hull based quartet return with its successor Fragments, an encounter releasing much of the promise offered previously, breeding even more seeds for loftier ventures, and confirming the band as one of Britain’s most exciting emerging alternative/melodic rock propositions.

The band’s first EP for the main lit up ears and the imagination with its vivacious energy and skilled enterprise, revealing the early prowess and invention of songwriting and sound. Fragments leaps on from there whilst embracing all the qualities which made Tempers shine. The melodies and dramatic intensity are still flourishing but now woven into tracks which pulsate with new maturity and greater creative colour. The release also explores a wider expanse of sound whilst whipping up an even greater anthemic and fiery, not forgetting irresistible proposal. Inspirations come from bands such as Deaf Havana and Deftones but Fragments declares Of Allies as having their own unique presence now.

Fragments opens with its title track first and is instantly filling ears with thumping rhythms and a full, bold tempest of riffs and sonic persuasion. The guitars of Rich Nichols and Tom Hewson swallow the senses with imposing yet warm endeavour, invigorating the appetite whilst the song establishes a foot hold in the imagination. It relaxes into a less intensive stroll soon after, the dark tones of bass from Nick Tyldsley a potent temper and compliment to the expressive melodies and impressive vocals of Nichols. Bursts of muscular energy and sound driven by the precise and heavily impacting beats of Danny Barrick erupt as a chorus to gripping effect whilst the drummer’s restrained rhythms only enhance the mellower caresses between stormier moments. There is plenty more to the song though, a fascinating if sometimes understated invention flirting with attention throughout the song, their little twists and sparks of unpredictability adding to the creative theatre of the excellent starter.

FragmentsDigitalCoverFINAL     As impressive though the song is though, it is quickly outshine by its outstanding successor ONE19. The band’s new single, the irresistible incitement launches from a forceful caress into a prowling and anthemic, heavy stride of vocal temptation amidst a rousing tenacity of sound and energy. Reminding of the now demised Always The Quiet Ones, band and song create a rugged and invigorating tirade of riffs and rampantly rolling rhythms but equally explores explosive melodic enticement and vocal crusading. If anyone is looking for a doorway in EP and Of Allies, there is definitely no finer compelling way than through this blistering invitation.

The following Old Bones has a similarly climatic atmosphere to its more restrained presence, the song spilling powerful and pungent surges of passion and skilful endeavour alongside just as superbly crafted and magnetic melodies and flowing harmonies from across the band. Another strong aspect to all songs is their length, all barely exceeding three minutes, the final track being the only exception, but within that relatively short period creating a busy and unrelenting exploration of imagination and craft which borders on finishing too soon but leaves the band exploiting the old adage, “leave them wanting more”, beautifully.

Fourth track Tempers is a snarling encounter from its first breath, a sonic breeze sparking agile riffs and barbarous rhythms, though all converges for an inviting rather than hostile bait which continues to excite and coax within the subsequent croon of impassioned vocals and seducing melodies. The song is a maelstrom of diverse and riveting exploits though, at times a gentle evocative smooch and in others a raging torrent of boisterous and passion riling intensity. Once more everything from the predatory bass sounds to the slightly psychotic adventure of the guitars, the reserved and concussive might of drums to the ever captivating vocals, comes together superbly for another thrilling provocation.

The EP ends with the bewitching Call It Home, an entrancing flight of melodic rock which has an essence of bands like Heights and Shattered Skies to it whilst painting its own unique canvas of ingenuity. The passion in the heart of the song sees it eventually brewing up an intensive and explosive finale, thoughts and emotions left breathless and by the final note wishing the release was longer.

The Fragments EP is the coming of age Of Allies in songwriting and musically, whilst also suggesting this is still only the beginning of their rise, which is seriously exciting such the excellence on offer here.

The Fragments EP is available now through most online stores

http://ofallies.com/   https://www.facebook.com/OfAllies

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net