Altitudes and Attitude – Get It Out

Just the thought of two of metal’s finest most influential bassists linking up whets the appetite; indeed a potential pleasure which pretty much inflamed said optimism with the release of an EP five years back. That teaser though has just become a full on feast of hard rock ’n’ roll pleasure with the release of Get It Out the debut album from Altitudes & Attitude.

For those yet to discover the outfit, Altitudes & Attitude is the creative union of Anthrax’s Frank Bello and Megadeth’s David Ellefson. It was a partnership sparked when the pair started touring together to lead bass clinics for the amp manufacturer Hartke in 2010.To provide backing tracks to support their demonstrations the pair began writing songs, this leading four years later to the unveiling of a three track EP. Now the link-up has brought us Get It Out and thirteen tracks which pretty much rock the life of the majority of hard rock offerings of recent times. You might say that the album is not the most unique, it openly embracing assumedly some of the hues of the pair’s own musical likes and pleasures over time, yet it has a freshness and individual character which uses such flavours rather than relies on them. At times it has a definite John Bush led Anthrax meets Foo Fighters roar but from start to finish stomps with its own voice and gait to relentlessly thrill.

Produced by Jay Ruston (Anthrax, Steel Panther, Stone Sour) and with drummer Jeff Friedl (A Perfect Circle, Ashes Divide, Filter) unleashing the driving rhythms throughout, Get It Out sees a host of guitarists guesting alongside the bass and rhythm guitar sharing of Ellefson and Bello, the latter providing the vocals and lyrical prowess. Among them is the familiar craft of Ace Frehley, Gus G (Firewind), Jon Donais (Shadows Fall/Anthrax) and Christian Martucci (Stone Sour); with all musicians involved adding to its magnetic lure.

The album opens with its title track and swiftly and easily had attention gripped as guitar bred wires entangled ears; their nagging increasingly compelling before riffs and rhythms add their persistence to the baiting of the senses. Bello’s vocals are just as potent as the track erupts into that Foo Fighters tinged roar which sweeps across the album at times. It is an outstanding track and start quickly matched by the similarly stirring and vigorous Late. The second track is less forceful in its initial tempting, almost teasing ears before hitting its muscular stride with Friedl’s beats a crisp trespass alongside the melodic caress of guitar. With a Verni like hue to its infectiousness and controlled holler, the song also effortlessly hit the spot with its multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll.

Lyrically, the album sees Bello open up to personal experiences and the intimate turbulence which have been part of his life; explorations just as intriguing as the sounds around them and fuelling further quick success in the likes of Out Here and Part Of Me. The first shares a delicious groove aligned to mountainous rhythms, their captivating unity matched by the harmonic call of vocals and guitar while the second is pure incitement from its gnarly bassline to thumping beats and hook springing virulence. Both tracks leave little to be desired but the latter with its imposing but galvanic trespasses was rock ‘n’ roll manna to personal tastes with a guitar solo to lap up.

The irresistible Slip ventures into a more indie rock lined hard rock stroll, vocals and melodies as infectious and manipulative as a virus while next up Talk To Me provides a relatively calmer but no less persuasive canter draped with a great Julian Cope-esque feel in voice and sound. Both tracks add to the already lofty heights of the release with creative and hearty relish before Leviathan shares more classic and heavy/progressive metal strains of enterprise. The instrumental is a magnetic detour from the thrust of the album so far adding another aspect to its increasingly varied landscape.

Cold shares some of its predecessor’s colouring within its own heavily satisfying melodic rock ‘n’ rumble with Another Day returning to shades of Dave Grohl and co with its controlled yet fiery saunter.    It was a song which maybe did not have us bouncing as lustfully as others but its magnetism was inescapable as too its hungry hooks and lures; coaxing just as thick and even more compelling within the emotively atmospheric and revealing All There Is where melodic droning and vocal intimacy blossoms.

The album concludes with bonus cuts of the songs which made up that first EP; all three remixed and re-mastered. Booze And Cigarettes has a great feral edge to its rock clamour, Tell The World a melodic almost poppy instinct to its catchiness, while Here Again is as much punk as it is heavy and hard rock bred; all three showing why Altitudes & Attitude had so many excited a few years back and anticipation for the album, they now thrillingly end, so keen.

A record which will appeal to a vast array of metal and rock fans, Get It Out is rock ‘n’ roll at its hearty best, so no more words needed just your soon to be hungrily happy ears.

Get It Out is out now through Megaforce Records.

https://www.facebook.com/altitudesandattitude/   http://www.altitudesandattitude.com/

Pete RingMaster 12/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Johnny Wore Black – Ultra Violent Light

Pretty much enamoured with the Johnny Wore Black sound and creative adventure since its first couple of singles way back in 2012, the past two to three years have been seemingly rather quiet for the band. It has as ever been a busy time for the project’s creator and vocalist/writer Jay Coen though, the man throwing his stuntman body and audacity around in a number of features you may have heard of which include Game Of Thrones, Ready Player One, Spectre, Hitman’s Bodyguard, Rogue One, Spiderman-Far From Home and more. Now the band has returned with new album Ultra Violent Light, a simply compelling release which shows that Coen has also been rather busy these past months growing, honing, and exploring his project’s already established musical prowess.

Released in two parts over the course of 2014, Johnny Wore Black’s debut album, Walking Underwater, deservedly drew acclaim and a major flood of fans the way of the band. It was a tapestry of melody wired metal and rapacious rock as contagious as it was imaginative and emotively provocative. Ultra Violent Light is more of the same yet a whole new realm of craft and invention across every aspect making its predecessor so captivating.

Coen’s continuing link up with Megadeth bassist David Ellefson is as alive and potent as it has ever been within Ultra Violent Light too, for which he has also enlisted the creative courage of Earthtone 9 members in drummer Simon Hutchby and guitarist Gez Walton, the latter also producing the album alongside David Bottrill (Tool, Stone Sour, Dream Theater), to realise his new collection of songs.  Additional enterprise from keyboardist Cameron Daniel William Hill, cellist Kate Shortt, vocalist Adam Sedgewick, and bassist/vocalist George Donahue only adds to the bold and imaginative canvas of the release.

Ultra Violent Light opens up with latest single Gun True Love and instantly had attention wrapped up as Coen’s vocals come entangled in the evocative wires cast by the guitar. It is a coaxing which respectfully nags but with an intimation of darkness which expands as the track erupts with muscular dexterity. The tone of Ellefson’s bassline is growling manna to these ears but just as magnetic is the web of melodic enticement and vocal harmonics which tempts from within the more volatile climate of sound and emotion.

Straight away there is a richer depth and feel to songwriting and music in comparison to previous releases, a realisation compounded by next up One Sexy Scar. Carrying drama from its very first note, the song breaks from its slightly tempestuous entrance into a composed stroll with warm keys and melodic caresses. Even so there is a perpetual lining of volatility which simmers and boils up as the mercurial character and air of the track persistently enthrals before the following Plastic Ocean creates its own tantalising yet stormy captivation of sound and character. It is a moment of seduction as threatening and imposing as it is flirtatious, in so many ways a predator and relentlessly alluring.

Honey Club is similar in nature with the big swings of Hutchby an instinctive incitement even when adding restraint to their trespass and the wiry intimation of Walton’s guitar as provocative as the grizzled voice of Ellefson’s bass. Another track bewitchingly capricious, Coen’s ever individual tones croon and richly lures the listener into the heart of the song, a contender for best track with its unapologetically resourceful touch and darkly brooding imagination.

Through the likes of the arguably less bold but just as infectious and dark RIP Mr Man and Boy Soldier with its melancholic grace, emotive intimacy, and turbulence corrupted tranquillity, band continues to expand the emotion fuelled storytelling and creative emprise of the release. It is an adventure which reveals more by the listen, the deeper into its heart you venture the more it expresses its richness and agility as proven yet again by the similarly composed Southern Storm, a song with a seemingly intensely personal heart amidst a military rhythmic bearing. It has echoes of Big Country to its inventive scenery and an Americana/folk whisper to its breeze in a proposition becoming more powerful and compelling with each listen.

Broken uncages an anthemic tempest of metal infested rock ‘n’ roll next, the track an robustly eventful and muscular affair with a virulent catchiness and evocative twists of thoughtful calm to its armoury while the album’s following title track borders on the carnivorous with its rhythmic spine and senses prowling riffs, but a predatory stalking aligned to vocal and melodic charisma lined with emotional angst.

The album closes with Ultimate Fighter which deceptively opens with Coen’s magnetic tones alongside Hutchby’s spirited beats under a sonic sigh aligned to a shadow courting grumble of bass. It subsequently ignites in a chained tempest with beats exploring even greater tenacity as guitars flame and vocals roar. It never explodes into the beast expected but becomes a just as dynamic and imposing anthem with invention in its enterprise and zeal in its release of that adventure.

It is truly an outstanding finale to a release which thrilled from the off but really came to life and magnificence by the subsequent ventures into its imaginative lair, becoming a seriously must explore encounter along the way.

Ultra Violent Light is out now via EMP Label Group across most stores.

http://www.johnnyworeblack.com/   https://www.facebook.com/johnnyworeblack   https://twitter.com/johnnyworeblack

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Doll Skin – Manic Pixie Dream Girl

As they grab a breath after successfully being part of the 2017 Vans Warped Tour, Arizona pop punk rockers Doll Skin continue to grab attention with their recently released sophomore album, Manic Pixie Dream Girl. The successor to their acclaimed 2016 debut, In Your Face (Again), the new album uncages more of the Phoenix hailing quartet’s aggressive punk fuelled infection and hard rock tenacity to continue the ear grabbing potency of its predecessor.

Meeting at the Phoenix School of Rock in 2013, Doll Skin have only flourished from the attention of Megadeth bassist David Ellefson who subsequently produced In Your Face (Again), and its acclaim garnering success which escalated the initial well received release of the outfits first EP, In Your Face on Ellefson’s own imprint Emp Label Group. Last year not only saw Doll Skin’s first album greedily received but the band hit the road and shows alongside the likes of Otep, Lacey Sturm, Fire From The Gods, Hellyeah, Dead Kennedys, Escape The Fate, September Mourning, Through Fire, and numerous more. It was a busy time continuing through this year and sure to intensify with the release of Manic Pixie Dream Girl.

Produced and Mixed by Evan Rodaniche from Cage9, the album opens up with Shut Up (You Miss Me) and instantly has ears bound in a hip stealing hook; that potent lure continuing through Nicole Rich’s bass as things calm and the alluring tones of vocalist Sydney Dolezal jump in. Soon the busy and energetic heart of the track rises again, jabbing beats and catchy vocal delivery lining its swinging infection loaded melodic punk gait. There are no major surprises within the song but everything about it has body and spirit involved before Daughter up the ante with its hard rock inspired declaration. Defiant in soul and adventurous in character, the song flows from calm reflection to anthemic ferocity with sublime ease; the guitar of Alex Snowden suggestive and inventive as Meghan Herring’s rhythms pure rock ‘n’ roll behind more irresistible vocal boisterousness, singular and across the band.

Its impressive incitement is matched by that of Road Killa, a track which straight away is prowling the senses with a predatory edge. With Dolezal equally as imposing yet richly endearing in tone and presence, things only escalate in quality and rapacity as spiky hooks and wiry melodies collude with emotionally aroused vocals and the rhythmic tenacity of Herring and Rich. A rock/punk trespass, the track hits the sweet spot before Boy Band exposes its instinctive rock ‘n roll heart with relish and energy. Familiarity and fresh traits unite within the contagion of the track, its recognisable presence bolstered by its ear gripping resourcefulness as the album continues to richly tempt.

The sultry hues of Rubi entice and please next, its rhythmic grumble adding extra intrigue to a warm often fiery nature while Sunflower has an equally agitated underbelly to its more irritable and lively stomp. Though neither track quite matches up to those before them, each confirms that Doll Skin know how to sculpt the most flavoursome of hooks and twists in their songs as well as brew some seriously infectious strains within their music.

Both songs have a hint of Australian band Valentiine to them as too the beguiling Sweet Pea which follows though its melodic shimmer and elegant smoulder quickly shows originality all of its own as it lays a best track hand on attention. It is a treat of an encounter swiftly rivalled by the punk moulded stroll of Baby’s Breath but a song embracing an array of flavours within its harmonic temptation and volatile undercurrent. Again imagination and body are taken on an eventful and highly enjoyable ride but then turned on even more by the outstanding roar of Persephone. Carrying an eighties pop punk feel reminding of bands like The Photos and a modern rock ‘n’ roll ferocity akin to the likes of Courtesans, the song stalks and seduces with equal invention and boldness.

From one major highlight to another as the pure punk grouchiness of Puncha Nazi consumes ears and attention; the track a spirit stirring, rebel rousing surge of sound and intensity which actually misses out on delivering the donkey punch killer blow it hints at but still makes for another pinnacle within Manic Pixie Dream Girl before the emotionally haunted and melodically bewitching Uninvited brings things to a magnetic close. Adding just one more new turn to the imagination of the album’s body and Doll Skin songwriting as it boils to an inferno of a climax, the song provides a momentous finale to another seriously compelling outing with the band.

Over the first couple of listens, it was hard to say that Manic Pixie Dream Girl majorly built upon that first triumphant album but it was a deception as from there the release only blossoms with time to reveal a new depth to the Doll Skin sound and pretty much match the former’s impressive presence and by giving that time another 2017 highlight is the reward.

Manic Pixie Dream Girl is out now via EMP Label Group through most online stores.

http://www.facebook.com/dollskinband    http://www.dollskinband.com

Pete RingMaster 28/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Johnny Wore Black – Comfy Slippers

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Taken from the breath-taking album Walking Underwater Pt. 2 which gave British melodic/alternative rock an inspiring and thrilling fresh breath last year, the new video/single from Johnny Wore Black whilst making another potent nudge at newcomers to the band’s stirring release, reminds the rest of us just how provocatively powerful the band’s sound is. Comfy Slippers also confirms just how creative and exciting it is too and why Johnny Wore Black has been stirring up fans and media alike around the world these past couple of years.

The band is the brainchild of London based songwriter/producer and stuntman (Les Miserables, The Dark Knight Rises, Fast and Furious 6, Fury) Jay, and a vehicle for his invention and imagination which has been no stranger to acclaim thanks to the previously mentioned album and its predecessor, Walking Underwater Pt. 1 the previous year. With a wealth of attention grabbing and appetite igniting singles around both releases too, some of those and a few within both albums co-written with Megadeth bassist David Ellefson as well as also featuring his renowned musical talent, Johnny Wore Black has been an emerging force awakening not only the British music scene but also a far wider and attentive global spotlight. Comfy Slippers quickly reveals why, its anthemic and equally intimate resources inescapable evidence to their increasing success.

Awakening in a thick flaming of melodic guitar around welcoming riffs and crisp beats, the song soon settles into a magnetic enticement led by the smooth and emotive vocal tones of Jay. His voice is a gentle caress but with a steely edge which perfectly reflects the emotional drama and clarity of the lyrical narrative. Musically the song holds check allowing voice and words to paint the stirring picture but all the time it is also building an equally potent and tempestuous air. This only reinforces the strength of the song’s heart whilst creating its own captivating tapestry of sonic enterprise and striking adventure.

Comfy Slippers is an irresistible slice of Johnny Wore Black for fans and a masterful doorway into the creatively incendiary world of the band for newcomers. If you are yet to take that step then the band’s new single is the perfect and thrilling opportunity with its outstanding video, which we will leave for you all to explore without spoilers, an equally great starting place.

Comfy Slippers is unveiled June 15th with additional track and video Firefly also available.

http://www.johnnyworeblack.com   https://www.facebook.com/johnnyworeblack

RingMaster 15/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Casting reflections and dispersing shadows: talking Johnny Wore Black with band founder Jay

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  2014 has been a big and flavoursome year for British melodic and alternative rock, and in no small part thanks to UK band Johnny Wore Black. The brainchild of London based songwriter/producer and stuntman (Les Miserables, The Dark Knight Rises, Fast and Furious 6, Fury ) Jay, the project on the back of a host of attention grabbing singles and videos over the past eighteen months or so, has released two acclaimed and enthralling albums this year. Walking Underwater Pt 1 and 2, the second released barely two week ago, encounters which and immerses ears and imagination in an evocative embrace, thought provoking propositions which infuse passionate creative roars with poetic melodies and fiery textures. Both albums reinforce the emerging stature and recognition of Johnny Wore Black as one of Europe’s most exciting and innovative songwriters and rock artists. With the kind sharing of Jay’s time, we delved into the heart of the man, band, and particularly the fresh majesty of Walking Underwater Pt 2.

Hi Jay, thanks for sharing time to speak with us.

My pleasure…thank you for listening.

You have just released second album, Walking Underwater Pt 2; how were feelings as the unveiling swiftly approached?

It’s always a strange time around release, in a way exciting and in a way a test of patience as in reality it’s about waiting to see how the product is received. As an artist, the reviews are important to gauge how good a job you have done!

Are there different emotions and expectations this time around after the acclaim and success of Walking Underwater Pt 1 earlier this year?

Walking Underwater Pt.1 was an opening, a beginning if you like so it will be interesting to see how Walking Underwater Pt.2 is received and how the journey develops in other people’s jwbnew1-hires2eyes and ears. It’s important to make music for yourself first and yet in reality, once released its journey becomes a public experience. My expectations are for people to enjoy it and find the right environment to use the music.

How should people look at the two releases, as two parts of one whole entity or the new release as an evolution and unique exploration from the themes and narrative fuelling the first album?

It is a new release of course, and yet a journey too. Honestly people will make of it what they want. Personally there is a journey there, a cleansing and an exorcism of past demons…to make way for new ones maybe?!

Before we look deeper in to the new album, can we ask about your history musically and other aspects before Johnny Wore Black?

Childhood poems then set to music when learning to play the Spanish guitar, pretending it was electric! Onwards, days in studios as birthday presents from my dad when I was fifteen and sixteen. Johnny Wore Black is the conclusion of life experience, being a singer songwriter, being in bands, and generally loving music.

What was the spark bringing the band to life?

The spark was a need to express my songs in a new way, to attempt to get closer to the music that turns me on and lights my fire!

The band name inescapably brings thoughts of Johnny Cash, is there a meaning behind the title?

I like the analogy of why Johnny Cash wore black, to identify with those less fortunate than himself. My dad called me Johnny and my grandmother Evelyn bought me a black suit, which I wore at my Dads funeral when I was seventeen. So, you see, life and all its shards of dark and light.

What would you say are your major inspirations?

A Perfect Circle, Karnivool, Tool, Depeche Mode, Metallica, Stone Sour, Johnny Cash…to name but a few.

jwb walkingunderwaterpt2Because of the success and potency of your first album anticipation and expectations of Part 2 are probably over demanding. Has this added any pressure for its creation?

In a way yes, but to be honest most of the pressure is self-inflicted. My goal is to make great music, who can say when that has happened? Really, I see it as a never ending journey.

With the close proximity to the release of the two albums, it is easy to assume both sets of songs or certainly many over both albums have been bred from around the same time. What is the time frame in that area and if they were written around the same period how did you decide which song went on which release?

I tried to put together songs that felt good together in order to create the story. There are songs here spanning a ten year period, hence why they needed to be cleared in order to move on.

Did you learn anything on Part 1 which you took into its successor to help its emergence or give it something different recording wise?

The process included working with guitarist James Coppolaro and drummer Simon Hutchby whilst David Ellefson and I also collaborated in more depth than before so that was a rewarding experience.

Listening to Part 2 we felt there was even greater personal intimacy to certain tracks than on the last; how close are the seeds of your songs to your life and experiences?

Some songs are closer personally than others but it’s interesting which songs individuals feel are intimate.

The album as you mentioned again sees you collaborating with David Ellefson, of course of Megadeth, in writing and playing. How did you guys meet and when did the link up musically begin?

We met backstage at Download in the UK some years ago. We started chatting music and immediately kind of bonded. I then began sending David songs in progress and he agreed to play on the first Johnny Wore Black single, All The Rage.

When you come to songwriting together, is it an even contribution or does David look towards the rhythmic side more?

It does vary per track. So far, on some David has sent riff ideas, like Firefly and on Gift of Desperation he sent a lyric, which I then developed. Writing is a very fluid process with no rules.jwbnew2-3-lo-res

There often seems to be a different kind of spark to songs you too have created together, not bigger or lesser than on other tracks, just strikingly different. What would you put that down to?

I suppose that’s just two minds rather than being the dominant decision maker however I’d be interested to ask you that question back and see what you feel is strikingly different about those tunes?

Tell us about the new album; is there a specific underlying theme to its lyrical explorations?

Each track has a different theme so really would need to answer this on a track-by-track basis. My lyrics explore people, the world and our continued need to understand.

How did the recording go; was it an all meet up situation or more technology driven coming together of the band for the album?

Some of the album was musicians in a studio, old skool style, and some via Skype and Dropbox. This was an international project via the USA, UK, Canada and Croatia.

Walking Underwater Pt 2 also features Croatian singer Sara Renar on the track Shine On and Loretta Heywood on a cover of her own track Winter in July. How did those guest appearances come about, especially with Loretta. Was she instantly open to you taking on her song?

Sara and I met on the set of Game of Thrones in Croatia some years back. We stayed in touch and I have followed her musical career. She has a unique quality to her voice I felt complimented Shine On, on the album. She was happy to contribute once she heard the song, and recorded her parts in a studio in Split, Croatia.

Now Walking Underwater Pt 2 is out there wooing the world, what is next in store for Johnny Wore Black, alter ego ha-ha, and band?

There is work to do, releasing singles and creating more music videos. We are having discussions about hitting the stage and seeking to break the back of the USA. Oh and by the way, another album is due next year, totally new material and bigger than Texas!

jwbnew2-hiresA big thank you for chatting with us again, any last thoughts you would like to share?

Just that I am truly grateful for your time and interest in Johnny Wore Black and thank you for providing a platform to help spread the gospel according to Johnny Wore Black.

And lastly I cannot go without asking about the film samples which graced the first album. Can you tell us about them and why you did not use them for the new release too?

The first ones were from a documentary my late father directed back in 1967 called The London Nobody Knows. The samples fitted the music, the songs and were a tribute to him. I will say, we are currently in discussion about producing The London Nobody Knows Revisited to mark its anniversary. I liked the idea of samples a-la-Floyd to be part of Walking Underwater Pt2 but decided to just focus on the songs.

Read the review of Walking Underwater Pt2 @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/11/13/johnny-wore-black-walking-underwater-pt-2/

http://www.johnnyworeblack.com

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 05/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Johnny Wore Black – Walking Underwater Pt 2

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Anticipation for the second part of his absorbing album has been as excited as it has been impatient, but Johnny Wore Black has rewarded the wait with another proposition which stops you in your tracks and immerses ears and imagination in an evocative embrace. The hunger for Walking Underwater Pt 2 comes from the strikingly impressive Part 1, an emotional canvas drenched in poetic melodies and fiery textures. Its release came in March of this year but such the appetite it bred the months between seemed like years. Its successor is here now, released on November 26th, and with even closer intimacy and impassioned imagination re-confirms the band as one of the UK’s premier melodic rock provocateurs.

Johnny Wore Black is the brainchild of London based songwriter/producer and stuntman (Les Miserables, The Dark Knight Rises, Fast and Furious 6, Fury ) who prefers to just be known as Jay. As renowned for his collaborations as well as his own work, Jay released a host of attention grabbing and riveting singles as the band before the first part of this debut album. Many of the songs were bred from a gripping collaboration with Megadeth bassist David Ellefson, and as on Part 1, the pair has linked up again on Walking Underwater Pt 2 with Ellefson co-writing a trio of tracks for it and playing bass across the bulk of the release. The band line-up is completed by drummer Simon Hutchby alongside guitarists Pete Mathers and James Coppolaro, the latter mixing much of the album with other tracks mixed by Grammy Award winning producer David Bottrill. Produced by Jay, the release takes little time in re-igniting the pleasure and emotions which were stoked by its predecessor, leading them into rich emotion fuelled reflections and sonically coloured atmospheres.

Opener Firefly sets things in motion and from the first electro influenced moment has the imagination engaged and then fired up as rich hooks and rugged riffs embrace ears. There is an immediate infectiousness which transfers to the potent vocals of Jay and the crisp rhythmic persuasion which guides the inventively spicy song. The song’s delicious throaty bassline aligns to sonic scythes and persistent grooves from the guitars as the song expands whilst the vocals smoulder harmonically and expressively as they colour the provocative narrative of the song. It all combines to provide a thick and potent stroll of anthemic rock ‘n’ roll coated in creative drama and emotive intrigue.

It is a potent and impressive start continued by recent single A Cut Above. From a charming melodic coaxing the song unveils its rhythmic muscles and raw riff led provocation. It is an walkingunderwaterpt2imposing presence tempered though by the increasingly mesmeric tones of Jay and the weave of sonic enterprise which wraps the brewing unrest in the belly of the song. Again Ellefson lures a heavily shadowed voice from his bass to menace and enthral whilst elsewhere everything merges in a portentous tempest which threatens more than assaults but leaves thoughts rampant and satisfaction basking. Again the track is an anthem, not one which charges with nostrils flared but an incitement which rouses the passions as it explores dark intense scenery.

Both Comfy Slippers and Fallen Angel explore different shades and depths, the album just as the previous full-length, a web of distinctly unique and imaginative explorations in sound and premise. The first of the two swiftly presents a pungent almost stadium rock texture to its emerging temptation, beats and hooks thick yet rapier like in the less condensed climate of the song. There is a warm radiance to the rock pop spawned encounter too which transfixes as it envelops and helps spark further hunger in an already greedy appetite for the album. The song pulsates in its melodic glow before making way for the scintillating drama of its successor. Every note and syllable has a sinister air and touch here, a haunted feel which is simultaneously sultry and alluring. As already proven Jay has the knack and skill at making dark and intense situations musically and lyrically seduce like a unashamedly flirtatious temptress, at making loud and subtle extreme collude for an inescapable web of aural theatre and no example any finer than right here.

Gift of Desperation steps up next and takes little time in absorbing ears and thoughts with its pulsing electronic courting which itself is soon wrapped in emotive resonance as vocals and slender but striking melodies entwine the sinew sculpted heart of the song. It has a dark and imposing presence which never drifts too far away from predacious heaviness and a destructive emotional theming, but it also expels blazes of sonic and harmonic passion courted by tempestuous tenacity and intensity. The outstanding track is unrelenting as it flares and traps the passions with stormy beauty, creating a consuming shadowed majesty which I Do Dissolve has to follow. It does in fine style, its vivaciously shimmering electro flooded entrance equipped with another irresistible vocal bassline and the grippingly expressive tones of Jay. It is just the initial lure though as a funky swagger infests the song to inspire a sturdy bounce which in turn seems to ignite the richness and theatrical elements of all corners of the song. For some reason the track at times reminds of Ugly Kid Joe, though it is a fleeting thought in the expansive enterprise of the fun.

The brilliant Noise carves another pinnacle, of which admittedly there are many, in the album, again dramatic suggestiveness coating every sway of notes and swing of strings. Challenging modern social habits online and beyond, the song is virtually smooching with ears and emotions from its first melancholic kiss and caress. To this tempting, crescendos of raw expression and ferocious sonic endeavour bursts in, hooks and riffs as antagonistic as the melodic heart of the track is tenacious. Seriously anthemic and the heaviest encounter on the album, the track is rock at its most instinctive and incendiary.

Featuring Croatian singer Sara Renar alongside Jay, Shine On glides in next to cup ears in enchanting melody seducing balladry. As expected there is still a dark edge to the song, a shadow which watches as the beauty colours senses and imagination. Though a slow burning persuasion in relation to other tracks, it soars into the emotions and memory with ease, its sonic flair and emotive tempting a lingering affair even after making way for the outstanding Whose Children. This is another song where hooks and grooves entrench in the listener with swift efficiency before flavoursome diversity in voice and sonic invention tango together in a compelling and ingenious design of suasion.

From that highlight the album leaves on another in the engrossing shape of Winter in July. A cover of the Loretta Heywood song, it also features the soul singer alongside Jay and as it soars and glides over the senses with a haunting elegance and harmonic grace, there will be few duets as powerful and thrilling as the album’s final track.

There were obviously high hopes and expectations for Walking Underwater Pt 2 because of its predecessor but also a wonder and maybe doubt whether lightning can strike twice in the same place in such a short time. Not only can it but it proves to be with greater scintillating success. The UK has numerous potential soaked melodic rock bands emerging, but with their promise realised and pushed on again, Johnny Wore Black is leading the way.

Walking Underwater Pt 2 is available digitally and on CD from November 26th via Dark Cherry.

For more info check out http://www.johnnyworeblack.com

RingMaster 13/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Johnny Wore Black – A Cut Above

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Earlier this year, UK band Johnny Wore Black released the exceptional album Walking Underwater Pt. 1, a fiery slab of melodic rock drawing on numerous other vital musical essences to present a thoroughly provocative and thrilling adventure. With second album Walking Underwater Pt. 2 on the near horizon, the solo project of London based songwriter/producer Johnny Jay has chosen September 1st to unveil the first single and teaser from the upcoming encounter. A Cut Above is another compelling exploration of sound and emotive textures by the former Hollywood stuntman, one easily suggesting that the new album will be more than a match for its predecessor and another irresistibly exciting proposition for us all. A-Cut-Above-temp

     A Cut Above sees Jay recruit the bass skills and creative presence of Megadeth bassist David Ellefson once again whilst the song, as the previous album and other releases, is produced by Grammy Award winning producer David Bottrill. There is a certain emotive intensity which seems to brew when the three come together, as shown of the first part of Walking Underwater and the new single is no different. Themed by and taking thoughts into ‘an internal war torn journey of lost love and betrayal’, the single embraces the imagination as potently as it does ears to provide a rigorously captivating incitement.

The song opens with an emotive melody as a guitar gently entices attention to its instantly intriguing narrative. Around it a climate of unrest and intensity is brewing which in league with the equally growing richness of the opening coaxing, leads into an incendiary eruption of almost predatory riffs and punchy beats courted by the throaty weight and texture of Ellefson’s bass. Swiftly joined by the melodic tones of Jay’s always impressive vocals and developing a contagious stride to its persuasion, the song is a dramatic tempest of anthemic resourcefulness around the constant impassioned emotion and angst of the track. As evidenced by previous singles and songs, Jay has a skilled prowess in merging rousing riffs and hooks with intense and dramatic landscapes musically and atmospherically. A Cut Above is another stirring example and arguably his most potent fusion yet, the track from its first immersive note right to its evocative last, an emotionally dark yet vivacious emprise.

If the single is an example of what to expect from Walking Underwater Pt. 2, then it cannot come soon enough and British melodic rock is in for another stirring shot in the arm.

A Cut Above is available on September 1st

For more info hit the Johnny Wore Black official website @ http://www.johnnyworeblack.com/

9/10

RingMaster 29/08/2014

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