Sharone and The Wind – Enchiridion of Nightmares

Like a series of dark fairy tales, Enchiridion of Nightmares the new album from dark rockers Sharone and The Wind captivates, seduces, and haunts. Each of its notes, let alone songs, comes with a shadow to their beauty, melancholy to their light, and intimacy to their grandeur  with it all colluding in an adventure which just steals the imagination from everyday reality.

Hailing from Denver and emerging from the solo project of vocalist/songwriter Sharone (Borick), Sharone and The Wind is one of those propositions impossible to ignore or forget however their similarly striking songs appeal to personal tastes. Enchiridion of Nightmares is the successor to their well-received 2017 album Storm but sees an almost completely new line-up alongside Sharone. It was an emotionally traumatic time for the songwriter; the departure of her band inspiration within the new album fuelled by the emotions she became embroiled in; Sharone admitting “Writing this album was therapeutic to say the least. Before I began writing, I had just gone through one of the most difficult changes of my life and I felt more alone than ever. I felt angry, scared, and hurt, and I took everything I could from the experience as a lesson that allowed me to grow as a person as well as a songwriter.

There is a rich cinematic and theatre-esque feel to Enchiridion of Nightmares which equally adds to its captivation; indeed its songs entwine an influence of horror movies, vintage and modern, into their personal nightmares. With just as richly layered and dramatic sounds to its exploration, the album is a persistent unveiling of new twists and shadows listen by listen. On our first meeting intrigue soaked the pleasure, through a couple more captivation, each subsequent listen leading to the inescapable bewitchment these words spring from.

The album’s piano nurtured atmospherically chilling Intro sets the tone alongside Sharone’s painting of words; its poetic scene setting the portal into the dark charms and cold breath of the following Graveyard. Once more the piano of Michelle Bailey captures ears and imagination as richly as the powerful and imposingly graceful tones of Sharone, both aligned to the infectious rhythmic manipulation of bassist Zach Barerra and drummer Anthony Hester. With sonic flames from the strings of guitarist Alex Goldsmith adding to the captivation, the outstanding track immerses the listener in dark magnetic theatre where whether calm and seductive or aroused and burning the senses, it engulfs the senses and imagination.

It is a rich success repeated across the release the following Haunted House instantly transporting ears and thoughts into its foreboding setting, anticipation looking through its piano built windows to find the melodic and infectious weaving of the band dancing to the song’s rhythmic swing. Again fluid passages of energy and emotional intensity flow through ears, the band’s multi-flavoured rock simultaneously gothic, symphonic, and melodic woven into another entrapment of creative suggestion and emotional release.

The initially punchier presence of Demons lures the listener into even darker depths and self-exploration, to places we have all felt in degrees. It is an intimate proposal with broad arms, an invasive entrapment of seduction and agitation brought with real craft and creative animation before managing to still be eclipsed by the gorgeous Music Box. An innocence lined melody caresses ears first with unsurprisingly intimation lining its charm before piano and guitar set their individual threads to the song’s vocal and musical reflection.

Elegant smoulders and fiery flames arouse the haunting might of Mirror Ghost next, emotive intensity and melodic drama soaking successor Zombie, both songs creatively and emotionally enveloping body and mind masterfully while Fire twists and bursts like its namesake within its dark carousel of temptation and seduction. The track is like a mercurial lover, coaxing and seducing before igniting in primal intensity and quite superb as it provides the inimitable pinnacle of Enchiridion of Nightmares.

Throughout the album the whole band simply impresses, spinning a web of dark fantasy and close to home intimation with the dexterous fingers of Bailey and the vocal prowess and majesty of Sharone steering the creative emprise, the power ballad Cursed another basking in the songwriting imagination and the quintet’s invention.

The final pair of Exorcist and Death of a Clown brings their own cabaret of invention; the first, featuring guest vocals by Hannah Maddox, an instinctively catchy yet thickly dramatic maze of shadow woven enterprise and macabre kissed seduction, its successor a melancholy spun serenade with beguiles as it haunts. Both leave ears captivated and the imagination engrossed and as the album just getting further under the skin by the play.

A unique tapestry of varied shadow bred rock, Enchiridion of Nightmares is a one of a kind adventure and tempting awash with emotional turbulence turned into cathartic beauty as compelling as it is magnificent.

Enchiridion of Nightmares is released via Syndicol Music on April 13th, pre-ordering now available @

https://sharoneandthewind.bandcamp.com/album/enchiridion-of-nightmares

https://sharoneandthewind.com/    https://www.facebook.com/sharoneandthewind/    https://twitter.com/sharone_thewind/

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The World State – Traced Through Dust and Time

photo by LARS HUR

photo by LARS HUR

Some bands have something extra about them, something instinctively unique which may not be majorly realised in the now but you can only anticipate will blossom to great success for its creators and ears at some point. Danish band The World State is one such proposition, though it is fair to say that its extra ingredient is already showing its face within the bands dark epic rock, as fascinatingly revealed by new album Traced Through Dust and Time. The band’s eight track debut album is an enthralling adventure; a drama in sound and narrative which almost plays like a stage play, luring ears and imagination into individual yet linked episodes of creative and imagination theatre.

In sound you might say that the Aarhus quintet is not exactly breaking into new landscapes yet with the unique structuring of songs and indeed the release itself alone, everything about Traced Through Dust and Time feels fresh and new. The band began in 2009, created by Leifur (bass, vocals, grand piano, harmonium, synths, accordion) who linked up Andreas Schubert (guitar) early on. Over time a number of line-up changes eventually led to the line-up today of Bina Rosenvinge (lead vocals), Jesper Kragh (guitar), and Danny Woe (drums) alongside the other pair. Debut EP Flier made a potent impression with its release in 2013 but it is with Traced Through Dust and Time that we are already expecting far broader and keener attention being enticed the way of The World State.

Written by Leifur and recorded during various stages and places between 2009-2015 with guest contributions from Lone Amtoft, Tenna Duch Schaldemose, Christian Dalmar, and Thomas Faurby, Traced Through Dust and Time opens its tempting with Fading Leaves. A cold wind lures the imagination first, guitars and keys with melodic hums for company soon emerging to offer a quaint yet haunting invitation. Its air is unpredictable, an imposing breeze ebbing and flowing within a warmer lure as a stormy atmosphere rumbles overhead. Already the dramatic potency of the album is at play, the song casting an evocative landscape upon which the theatre to come will weave its tales through elements like the portentous caress of strings provided by Who Killed Bambi.

Traced-Cover_RingMasterReviewA Castle for the Battles that I Fight flows on from the departing breeze of its predecessor and quickly strolls through ears with its infectious rock ‘n’ roll as Rosenvinge’s captivating voice unveils the narrative. The steely addictiveness of the bass soon lays down a gripping strand of temptation to add to that of the winy tendrils of guitar amidst anthemic rhythms whilst across its six plus minutes, band and song explore and evolve new twists and blends of magnetic textures; symphonic and gothic strains uniting with melodic and folkish imagination for example.

The calm shanty like entrance of The Strangest of Places soon glides into a darkly shadowed passage breeding portentous drums within a matching ambience lit with vocal flames. This alone has a web of flavours and styles which simply fascinates, the subsequent burst into a feisty gallop raising energy of song and listener as things become even more compelling and eventful. This song alone shows it is hard to make comparisons to other artists, another quality which sets The World State apart from the crowd.

The album’s title track comes next to seduce and mesmerise, the latter predominantly through the siren lure of Rosenvinge’s increasingly impressing voice. Jazz endeavour from the guitar mixes with progressive enterprise and a funk seeded bassline as the song grows and expands its charms minute by minute, expressive keys and celestial harmonies only adding to the s tantalising of ears and imagination.

A Celtic tinged, melancholy laced melodic sigh cups ears between the last and next track, From Oblivion to Live Again which wears the same solemn elegance and reflective shadows as the brief piece. As keys and Rosenvinge’s hug the imagination whilst a subsequent serenade of strings rises around them, the track provides a highly provocative passage which unexpectedly opens the way for bold and menacing beats to court a dark threatening atmosphere with its own dangers and hidden depths. Predominantly an instrumental, the track is manna for the imagination. All songs come under that in varying degrees, but the song is a mouth-watering almost cinematic involvement, which is emulated by Faith, Hope and the End of The World. Vocals across the band transfix as once more a gentle but creatively engrossing spectacle of imagination grows and eventually erupts around ears. When it does break its emotive cover, the song unveils a gothic rock/post punk like bassline and a virulence of aggressive rock ‘n’ roll which swiftly has body and spirit eagerly involved. As all tracks, it proceeds to twist and evolve with zeal, the violin of Laura Emilie Beck just one slither of rich persuasion keeping body and mind gripped as things build towards a seriously rousing finale as imposing and dynamic as a moment its title suggests.

The outstanding track makes way for another in Unlikely, the song a jungle of spice thick grooves and tenacious rhythms rounded up and held in check by the strong yet smouldering vocals; though that aggressive energy is given its head to run free throughout the galvanic slice of melodic rock. As absorbing and ingenious as its predecessor, the track simply ignites further an already greedy appetite before Everything Changes draws the listener into its own atmospheric play of sound and emotion encased in a web of highly imaginative and creatively incendiary sounds and textures.

Traced Through Dust and Time is just irresistible, and a release which only impresses more as every listen reveals something new in the depths of the songwriting and music. There will be few better or certainly as enjoyable debuts released this year we suspect with the thought that the band will only get stronger and bolder in all areas only adding to the excitement felt.

Traced Through Dust and Time is released March 3rd through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/TheWorldState   http://www.theworldstate.com   https://twitter.com/TheWorldStateHQ

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Dropper’s Neck – Nineteen|Sixteen

The Droppers Neck Promo shot_RingMaster Review

To date there has always been a licking of lips in anticipation of any new encounter with The Dropper’s Neck and each time so far they have rewarded with dark rock ’n’ roll which simply infests body and imagination. True to form the UK quintet has done it again with their Nineteen|Sixteen EP, the dirtiest, sludgiest, most aggressively provocative offering from the band yet, an aural proposal perfectly suited to and reflective of its lyrical theme. The EP is inspired by The Great War and takes the listener along with its protagonist into the initial ‘glamour’ and lure of conflict, through its fierce pestilence before leaving them in the stark aftermath which follows. This all comes with the familiar but ever evolving fusion of psych and noise rock, punk and psychobilly brewed by the band, and quite simply it is another ravishing treat from The Dropper’s Neck.

Formed in 2011, The Essex band quickly pricked attention and appetites with early songs and releases but it was debut album Second Coming which lit an acclaiming and hungry spotlight. Drawing on influences such as Gallows, Blood Brothers, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, Cancer Bats, Every Time I Die, and Dead Kennedys, band and album unleashed something familiar yet powerfully unique, a distinctiveness which has festered and blossomed through the incendiary single Line Me Up For The Firing Squad and now to stronger depths with Nineteen|Sixteen. The single was certainly a potent teaser for the EP, though in hindsight just one glimpse of the dark throes and adventures now uncaged.

The Dropper's neck Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The release opens with the scene setting 57,470, an intro thrusting ears and imagination right into the landscape of rifle fire, thunderous artillery, and fear soaked horses. It’s violently portentous hue leads into King & Country, a sonic bridge to the incoming bruising beats and ravenous riffs entangled in an invitingly spicy groove. Rousing and anthemic, the track is a sign up of ears and emotions as potent as the bait enticing the young men of the narrative. Already though there is a snarl and corrosive edge to the music, expulsions of vocal hostility from Lloyd Mathews aligning with his expected and great monotone laced delivery. Hard rock ‘n roll stirring up air and body, the track is a forceful incitement setting things in compelling motion.

Somme comes next, the rhythmic and anthemic overtones of its predecessor veining its initial coaxing whilst hooks and grooves are soaked in even sharper, almost venomous incitement. Striding with an Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster meets Engerica like warped swing and brawling with a caustic Cancer Bats/KEN mode like ferocity, the latter becoming more intensive in ears as the reality of the horror of war is opened up, the track is little less than deranged bestial contagion.

Its increasing hellacious presence makes way for the even more psychotic Line Me Up For The Firing Squad, the track a maelstrom of rabid sounds, scarring vocals, and blistering viciousness. Within its raw and merciless tempest though, grooves and rhythms create the addictive shuffle of bait and infectiousness renowned from the band, the bass of Jack Turner especially seductive at times within the muddy and humid atmosphere of the unforgiving blaze. Production across the release is raw and very often as cold as the soundscape being explored; an aspect some have offered as a slight flaw but it only adds to and represents the physical effect and filthy ambience of the ground the EP’s context is inspired by.

The thumping beats of drummer Jamie Abela trap and push ears into the scuzzy punk ‘n’ roll of 200 Volts next, the guitars of Chris Blake and George Barrows creating a creative antagonism of defiant riffs and provocative grooves respectively. The predatory spine of the song is a virulent enticing which sends searing flames of sonic fire and expels hardcore spawned vocal hostility from its sobering bait with increasing tenacity and rage. It is an abrasive storm exciting and scarring already bruised and tender senses, no respite coming with the outstanding contagiously toxic and inventively addictive Monster. The track swarms through ears and over the psyche with its rhythmic emprise and sonic nagging, its body as the previous encounter, a garage punk spawned dynamo of bracing angst and violent intoxication, and the best track on the release, though there are so many rivals such as the closing Stutter which rampages straight after. Everything about the song, from jabbing and military seeded beats to erosive riffs, vocal diversity to scything grooves, is sheer inventive and hostile virulence, rock ‘n’ roll to honour the dead and incite the darkness of horrors past.

With a bugle announcing the end of hostilities in hidden track The Eleventh Hour, the Nineteen | Sixteen EP comes to a haunting close leaving thoughts rife and satisfaction full. The release is not a history lesson but certainly it makes a provocative and striking proposal with its pungent theme whilst musically revealing another thrilling exploit from one of the UK’s most exciting bands.

The Nineteen | Sixteen EP is available from 13th July @ https://thedroppersneck.bandcamp.com/album/nineteen-sixteen

https://www.facebook.com/thedroppersneck

RingMaster 10/07/205

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Helfir – Still Bleeding

Helfir _RingMaster Review

Dark and atmospherically emotive, imposing yet seductively immersive, Still Bleeding the debut album from Helfir, is a haunting and at times chilling embrace radiating an inescapable and persistent persuasion. It is a fascinating and more often than not bewitching proposition providing escape from the mundane of life but ironically explores just as solemnly reflective and emotionally melancholic climes. The contrast between the two though is as rich as the sounds fuelling the temptation, the album soaked in noir brewed beauty transporting ears and imagination into sublime and sorrowful realms.

Helfir is the solo project of Italian multi-instrumentalist Luca Mazzotta, the co-founder and guitarist of Silvered and guitarist of neofolk band NID. 2013 saw Mazzotta begin working on his solo project, subsequently performing alongside Antimatter, a band it is easy to suggest is an influence to Helfir alongside the likes of Anathema and Porcupine Tree,. Apart from additional drum parts from Antonio Fanizza and Francesco Politi on a few tracks, Monza hailing Mazzotta provides everything upon Still Bleeding, enveloping ears and tantalising the imagination from its very first breath.

The initial cold caress of Oracle starts off the dark flight of sound and emotion, keys with a funereal air coaxing thoughts before a spoken narrative and warm guitar enticement add to the captivating start. Apart from that early brief passage of narrative, the track is primarily an instrumental reflecting the dark words spoken with haunting elegance and poetic melodies.

Helfir cover_RingMaster Review     My Blood slips in as its predecessor departs, a similarly bred but individually mournful embrace of sound and emotion smothering and igniting the senses. The expressive voice of Mazzotta is as downcast as the melodic beauty around him and as compelling, his tones alluring and emotive within the web of samples, prowling rhythms, and incendiary guitar invention, and all within a tempestuous atmosphere. The track is spellbinding, sparking deep thoughts and feelings which as the whole album, inspires the imagination to run with its own dark tales alongside those of the proposition.

An even darker and disquieting hug follows in the shape of In The Circle, its initial gently shadowed kiss evolving into a rich tapestry of flavours and textures. There is a volatile heart and landscape to the track too, its blaze of progressive and alternative rock one of the flames forging the dramatic incitement. As its predecessor, it grips with immediate strength and prowess but as Still Bleeding itself and most tracks within, blossoms into an increasingly powerful and emotional impact over time.

Alone is further proof of the thick creative theatre and engrossing prowess of songs and sound, its crestfallen heart and shadow fuelled radiance as invigorating as its disconsolate smog is light sapping whilst Dresses Of Pain exposes its own grander and bolder but no less melancholically intimate and emotive depths. There is a fiery ambience and energy to the song which ebbs and flows so that personal aspect can unveil its raw palette within the more explosive textures. Both songs seduce the dark corners of thoughts and feelings to console with those of the song; a persuasion which Black Flame equally sculpts into its pungently expressive and doleful touching beauty. Again a common factor across the album, the vocal and lyrical prowess of Mazzotta is as enthralling as the almost maelstrom like weave of skilfully crafted sounds.

Arguably the darkest emotional anguish and suffocation loaded shadows on the album are revealed by Portrait Of A Son, its dour yet beaming charm fuelling one invasive trespass and mesmeric kiss. The song is gripping setting up the listener for the brief instrumental led haunting of Where Are You Now? and finally the climactic tempest of Night And Deceit, a conflagrant roar of invention, craft, and blackened emotion.

At times a proposition which could push already darkened hearts into inescapable turmoil through its open and beauteous melancholy, Still Bleeding is a feast of imagination and emotional intensity. Luca Mazzotta as Helfir might not have created the most immediately welcoming listens but as an impacting and persistently alluring incitement, he has unveiled a haunting success.

Still Bleeding is available now via My Kingdom Music @ http://mykingdommusic.bigcartel.com/product/helfir-still-bleeding-digicd

http://www.lucamazzotta.net/   https://www.facebook.com/helfirofficial

RingMaster 10/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Welcome The Howling Tones – Green & Blues

Welcome The Howling Tones_RingMaster Review

Around two years ago, UK rockers Welcome The Howling Tones offered a thrilling introduction with their first release, a two track single that suggested it was merely the “appetiser for greater incendiary things to come”. It has been a fair time coming but now the Farnborough quartet are poised to release their debut album Green & Blues, and prove all hints and subsequent expectations from that point were right on the money. The eleven track stomp of spicy rock ‘n’ roll is a blaze of that early potential woven into even more crucial and exhilarating blues/stoner bred exploits. Imaginative and impassioned, it is a fiery party for the senses and rebellion for the feet, and proof that Welcome The Howling Tones is indeed an incitement fit to majorly arouse British rock ‘n’ roll.

Welcome The Howling Tones cover_RingMaster ReviewFormed in 2012, the foursome of guitarists Pauly T and Chris Gilday, drummer Lawrence Arnold, and vocalist/bassist Iain Turner quickly drew strong local attention with their tenacious classic rock bred sound infused with flavoursome strains of blues and alternative rock alongside funk infested grooves and more aggressive textures, a blend impressively fuelling the thick persuasion of Green & Blues. Soon spreading their reputation and music further afield, the band released that earlier mentioned double A-sided pairing of Eyes to Hypnotise and Broken Man, earning broader and acclaiming attention in return whilst live they proceeded over time to shared stages with the likes of Godsized, The Jamie Lenman Band, Nick Oliveri, The Icarus Line, Breed 77 and many more, again to regular high praise.

Green & Blues looks to stir up ears and emotions from the off, taking little time to leap into its feistiest persuasion with opener Deep River Blues. From its first breath the guitars are spinning a tasty web of grooves, their strong coaxing aided by the just as potent and impressing vocal tones of Turner. As it slowly broadens its shoulders and expands its landscape, the song is still teasing with its early enticement, its slim but thickly tempting invitation helping to restrain excess energy even as rhythms and a cloudy atmosphere joins the revelry. Classically toned and spiced with a delta blues hue which only intensifies as the song’s drama brews, the thrilling encounter leaves on a rousing finale of stoner sculpted flames, meaty rhythms, and acidic grooving.

It is a mighty start to the album but quickly eclipsed by both Eyes to Hypnotise and Broken Man. The first of the pair virtually drizzles its initial guitar lure over ears, swiftly awakening attention and appetite in turn. It is a gripping start quickly tightening with the addition of a throaty growl from Turner’s bass and the heady swipes of Arnold’s beats, which subsequently become a mosaic of creative animation as the song grows. The grooves and riffs spilling from the fingers and strings of Pauly T and Gilday are toxic in their addictive nature and tempting, inflaming further a track which in a matter of seconds is as irresistible as it is voraciously creative. The instrumental swagger of the song alone enslaves and with the expressive tones of Turner’s voice powerfully riding their compelling enterprise, it leaves a licking of lips and hunger for more which is easily satisfied by its successor, which also from its first moments has ears and pleasure in a spin. From the first clicking of drum sticks to the tangy grooves, sandy vocals to pulsating beats, the encounter is an inescapable trap which welcomingly imposes further with a siren-esque lure of spice fuelled melodies and stoner grooves. With thrilling spurts of discord and noise seeded imagination for good measure, the rousing stomp is the kind of thing lust was invented for.

     There is no let-up of quality and success with Never Said Forever and its drama spilling alternative rock resourcefulness. Amongst many traits which stand out in the band’s sound and songwriting, unpredictability is a potent asset and in full bloom here as the track twists and turns rhythmically and sonically, every move lined with bold adventure and mouth-watering imagination. Carrying a delicious solo for extra flavour, the album’s pinnacle is set down, though rivalled throughout with Burn my Bones a swift contender next. A blues shuffle emerges with Arnold again creating a commanding frame within which a great vocal mix and the most citric flavoured sonic exploit yet on the release plays. It is an enthralling hex swinging and growling with a vintage toning courting modern dark rock prowess.

Honey I Want You NOT Your Money keeps things rocking like a dog in heat, its raucous energy and melodic flames as bracing and incendiary as standing in a lightning storm on a cliff top whilst Fresh Flesh straight after explores a sultry embrace with prowling riffs and thumping rhythms bound in evocative vocals and great sonic tartness. It does not quite have the bite of previous songs but still leaves thoughts and emotions alive especially with its increasingly volatile assets.

The southern rock brewed Dip Me in Mud is another which initially seems to lack the heat of other encounters within the album but over time emerges as a need to return to as often as possible tempting of craft and passion. It is a potency applying to the whole of Green & Blues to be honest and certainly She’s My Kind of Woman with its sweltering climate of blues expression woven in to a nest of grooves recalling the charm of the sixties, mischief of the seventies, and the snarl of the now.

Though not a hell for leather assault on the senses, Green & Blues is a highly charged encounter which never gives the body a rest, its rowdy bouts of balls swinging rock ‘n’ roll through to steamier strolls all providing a constant adrenaline shock to the system. Green God Envy is one of the saltier seductions, it’s swaying body and humid nature temptress like, and just as persuasive and intensive as such a siren before making way for the closing I Can Go Bad. As hoped and expected, the song is a stonking rocker of a proposal to end things up but also as should be assumed, loaded with alternative rock imagination and sparkling creative diversity.

The first Welcome The Howling Tones encounter certainly suggested the band was capable of something as glorious and exciting as Green & Blues but over two years you never know. Well now we do and with one of the most enjoyable propositions anywhere this year, the band confirms themselves as potentially another of those destined to pungently shape the future of the UK rock scene.

Green & Blues is available from on 13th July @ http://welcomethehowlingtones.bandcamp.com/

http://www.welcomethehowlingtones.com/   https://www.facebook.com/WelcometheHowlingTones

RingMaster 08/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Kobadelta – Open Visions

Photo by Daniel Robson

Photo by Daniel Robson

Blending the rousing elements of their second EP and the mesmeric seducing of their last, UK psyche rockers Kobadelta unleash their finest moment yet in the hauntingly irresistible shape of Open Visions. The EP provides a feast for ears and imagination to contemplate and devour in their individual ways, its clutch of songs almost hex like in their immersion and seduction of both. Within its arcane charm the band also reveals a greater maturity and inventive lust in songwriting and sonic explorations, Open Visions the simply irresistible dark side of the band’s creativity and the listener’s psyche.

Newcastle bred and formed in 2010, Kobadelta did not take long to arouse a potent following and local clamour for their sonic swelter of a sound and matching live presence. 2013 Debut EP Ritual (Time Flies) lit more than a few fires in ears and thoughts, which the following year its successors Hidden Door and Remain Distracted, took to stronger and broader levels with their compelling sounds. It is fair to say that 2014 was a big year for the band in general. The release of the two EPs surrounded by further successes with Kobadelta being invited to perform a live session for BBC Introducing, headlining the Tanners stage at Evolution Emerging Festival in Newcastle, and playing events like Stockton Weekender alongside artists such as Peter Hook, Public Enemy, and the Happy Mondays as well as the Split Festival with the likes of The Cribs, Maximo Park, and Dizzee Rascal. Support slots for bands such as Temples, Allusondrugs, We Were Promised Jetpacks, Demob Happy, Splashh, The Temperance Movement, The Weeks, Lola Colt, and The Voyeurs, amongst many more has only increased their reputation and stature too. Now it is the turn of the Open Visions EP to push the Kobadelta cause and as we say, it is irresistible.

a0352850419_10   Even The Odds (They Mean You No Harm) is the first track on the release and immediately brings a raw and fiery proposition to bear on ears and thoughts. Guitars and rhythms make a formidable invitation which is easily accepted, even more so when an underlying melodic lure is given clarity as the initial tempest relaxes and the expressive tones of Dom Noble come in. There is still a muggy air to the song, and a siren-esque shadowing to the track which with the exotic enterprise arising from the guitar of Alex Malliris and the keys of Jordan Robson, entices like The Doors meets The Birthday Party. The song continues to immerse and swallow the senses with its sultry almost erosive beauty, increasing its glamour as it heads towards the moment it slips seamlessly into the following Blame It All On Me.

The second track is simple bewitchment from its first caress, smouldering melodies flirting with ears whilst being stalked by the throaty bassline of Jon Marley. The ticking percussive framing and rhythmic probing of drummer Chris Malliris adds intimidation to the dark premise of the song but it is the flowing melodic seducing of the keys and more unsettling designs cast by the guitars which shape the compelling drama emotively coloured by the distinct tones of Noble. There is a touch of Bauhaus to the post punk essences swimming within the psyche rock contagion whilst the gothic rock shading again springs hints of Nick Cave and co.

A fresh shimmer flows across Maskirovka next, keys and guitars a floating haze of sonic suggestiveness whilst bass and drums create a more formidable incitement which erupts with greater intensity around the climatic crescendos posing as choruses. There is something occult like in the dark rock toxicity oozing from the walls of the song and imagination of the band, an essence breeding encroaching shadows which infest and linger in ears and psyche.

The infectiousness kicks up another level with Watch What You’re Doing, its open caress of guitar the seeds for another compelling bassline and crisply landed beats to work their addictiveness as vocals and keys bring a haunting colour. Once into its magnetic stroll, the song shows itself to be as much pop rock as it is dark rock ‘n’ roll, its catchiness as captivatingly accessible as its soaring sonic enterprise is celestially provocative and darkly fascinating.

Ithaca ventures into an even heavier soundscape but swiftly tempers some of its daunting air with an echoing effect on the ever alluring vocals and backing harmonies, whilst guitars and keys sway and smother the rhythmic spine of the song with the dance of a sonic temptress. The song is pure mesmerism but with an underlying danger which seems to incite richer flames and piercing textures to emerge in the invention of Alex Malliris and Robson.

Final track Black Pyramid, like the first, accosts ears with a slightly caustic and hazy roar of sound but is soon casting an invasive exotic atmosphere through guitars and keys. Eruptions of energy and intensity only add to the sweltering air and impact of the song, whilst melodically and vocally, there is again no escaping a reference to the Jim Morrison’s led band.

If like us you fell in love with Kobadelta’s last EPs, then lust is the outcome with Open Visions, the pinnacle of the band’s sound and invention to date. If new to the transfixing world of the band, then a wealth of dark sultry treats await.

Open Visions is released on May 1st and available via http://kobadelta.bandcamp.com/album/open-visions-ep

Upcoming Kobadelta shows, including EP launch…

Friday 1st May – Think Tank? Newcastle (‘Open Visions’ EP Launch)

Saturday 30th May – ‘Sonic Union #2’ at The Sun Inn, Stockton (with TOY)

Saturday 11th July – Corbridge Festival 2015 (Acoustic Stage)

Friday 24th July – ‘Double Denim Live’ at Verve Bar, Leeds

https://www.facebook.com/Kobadelta

RingMaster 27/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Sinezamia: La Fuga

Foto di P.Rubini

Foto di P.Rubini

Despite one frustration arising from it, La Fuga (The Escape) the debut album from Italian gothic rock band Sinezamia is a rather tasty shadowed delight. Fusing dark rock with new wave and post punk, the Mantova quintet has created an album which is perpetually enthralling with its often nostalgia inspiring sounds and emotive breath. From an initially absorbing first impression it also grows into a presence which is hard to tear oneself from though once you do it is arguably not as memorable in hindsight as you expect. In its company though it is a thoroughly pleasing and exciting release.

That frustration mentioned at the start is actually surprising. Usually there is never an issue with bands singing in their native tongue, in fact very often it adds something extra emotively, but on La Fuga it left one feeling out in the cold a little, like missing out on the secret you are meant to support without knowing its content. Despite that the album leaves only satisfaction and welcomed intrigue amongst thoughts and emotions.

Formed in 2004, Sinezamia began finding a shape and stronger response to their well-received dark wave/rock sounds from 2006 which elevated with the release of their debut EP Fronde the following year. Media and fans took to the release with eagerness and the band began pulling in more to their fan base through touring. With a new line-up in 2009 the band recorded their second EP Sacralità which was released to strong success and interest from the print media and radio not forgetting an ever increasing legion of fans. As a foretaste of what was to come from La Fuga, the single off of it Ombra came out in 2011 to fire up anticipation for what has emerged as a very impressive debut full length.

The album has a grip on the passions immediately with opener Ghiaccio Nero (translated as Black Ice), the breath of synths and sinezamia-la-fugathe pulsating velvet clad bassline an instant infectious lure. Within seconds one is reminded of The Cure around their second and third albums with the contagious melodic hooks of Leitmotiv. The bass of Marco Beccari is irresistible within the weaves of sonic elegance from the keys of Charles Henry Scaietta and the teasing guitar play of Federico Bonazzoli. Into its stride with the great vocals of Marco Grazzi at their expressive might the track shifts into the darker aural shadows of Bauhaus to leave one even more magnetically drawn to the track. It is an excellent start instigating memories and pleasures from a few decades ago with a fresh touch.

The title track is a harder straight forward encounter of rock n roll with the rhythms of drummer Stephen Morbini leading the muscular passage with skill and tight control. The song still leads the ear into beckoning dark corners but lacks the mesmeric charm of the first though instead offers a bite which not only shows a good diversity to the music of the band but entraps a willing attention with ease.

     Nella Distanza opens on a slow haunting bass resonance before expanding into a sultry presence with a tight irresistible serpentine hook. The track took time to get to terms with, musically it is a smouldering wash of elegance and energetic passion but accosted by the initial distraction of the vocals of Grazzi. It is obviously down to personal taste but his slow almost spoken delivery send the song slightly awry and startlingly out of place compared to what came before. Thankfully it is only until he surges into his full singing range where you can only be impressed, his heart driven tones as powerful and thrilling as the constant musical imagination. Being selfish one only hopes he avoids this slow walking delivery in the future, but that is just one lone view of course.

The album continues to excite but when the aforementioned single arrives it just sends shards of rapture through the senses.  Ombra (Shadow) is sensational, a song which is like a beacon for the heart, especially if the likes of Leitmotiv and Play Dead hold a place in the emotions from times past. With a persistent sonic tease and boisterous energy around the ever inciting caresses of the keys, the track commands body, thoughts, and emotions like a sonic temptress. It is the best track on the album though matched by the closing triumph Nebbia di Guerra (Fog of War). It too is an insatiable wash of melodic elegance and almost raptorial energy from guitars and rhythms section speared by contagious carnivalesque teasing and sultry wantonness. Like a cross between Sex Gang Children and the poppier touches of The Danse Society it is a final act of magnificence from a simply stunning release.

If the heady times of the older bands mentioned do things to your little blood pumping organ than Sinezamia and La Fuga are a must.

https://www.facebook.com/sinezamia

RingMaster 19/12/2012

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