King Salami & The Cumberland 3 – Kiss My Ring

There are few guarantees in life but having a raucously good time with King Salami & The Cumberland 3 is a given so it is no surprise that their new album had us bouncing around like a teenager in heat. Kiss My Ring offers thirteen slices of rhythm ‘n’ blues drenched garage rock to simplify its rich flavouring, a sound as ever inimitably unique and mischievous to the London based quartet infesting limbs and spirit with rock ‘n’ roll fever.

The successor to their acclaimed album Goin’ Back To Wurstville, though it is fair to say that to date every single and album has enticed keen support and praise, Kiss My Ring is a collection of originals and covers which have only one intent, to get the listener as animated and aroused as they are. In some ways there is little new to the album in the fact you know what you are going to get in flavour and character yet such their sound’s instinctive individuality and ever eager dexterity plus the release’s richer weaves of sound it is an encounter sharing refreshing endeavour and fresh rascality.

It takes mere seconds for the album to get into feet and appetite, its title track leaping from T. Bone Sanchez’s initial guitar chords with instant relish and energy. Eric Baconstrip’s beats eagerly drive the bursting incitement of sound, flames of sax joining his enticement as the bass of Kamikaze UT Vincent resonates with every pulled string. A full-blooded carousing of ears and spirit, King Salami centre of the band’s joint vocal hollering, the track had no difficulty pulling bodies to their feet and pushing inhibitions to the side.

Don’t Make Me Mad steps forward next, its dextrous shuffle again swiftly into limbs and feet with King Salami’s distinctly frisky tones leading the devilry. Hooks and rhythms provide encouragement throughout, each flirtatious in their enterprise with Vincent’s bass a throaty pleasure before similarly roaming The Pulpo Dance with a just as compelling swing. The song holds its energy in check compared to its predecessor but cannot hide its organic spirit and lively rock ‘n’ roll bred instincts.

A surf meets rockabilly breath escapes next up Who Do They Watch?, the immediately magnetic flavouring immersing in the song’s garage rock breeding. Everything about the track from esurient rhythm to heartily enthused voice got under the skin and had the body leaping like a puppeteer, a trait which is no newcomer when coming face to face with a King Salami & The Cumberland 3 offering it is fair to say as quickly proven by the cosmic exploits of Space Spy. With a touch of French outfit The Scaners to its predominately instrumental intrigue bound, hook wired saunter, the track too tunnelled into the nervous system to insist body and imagination do it’s biding.

Through the jangle equipped rocker, The Double Switch, and Oofty Goofty (Wild Man Of Borneo) with its anthemic call and agile rhythmic flexing, there was no escaping the band’s tenacious antics, they as ever escalated by the rhythmic and melodically hooked enterprise and vocal frolic which spring their escapades. Though we suggested at the beginning that in some ways the album was not a bundle of surprises it certainly holds an eclectic adventure of sound and flavouring which both tracks alone highlight as equally does the fifties rock ‘n’ roll hued instrumental Stormy straight after them.

Discumboober in turn turned up the bounce in album and listener, the spring in its step enough to get bums off the seat with sax and guitar philandering temptation further hooking ears and appetite while Bayou Fever turned up the heat another notch with its Cajun breath and nagging urgency. Open yet sneaky hooks and boisterous rhythms again unite in contagious enterprise and cunning for two delicious minutes plus of unapologetic high spirits.

Across the fervid garage rock shenanigans of Cut A Rug and the inflamed punk funk of (She Was An) Earthquake, a breathless body and delirious ardour was effortlessly induced with The Jellybutt Of Timbuktu only increasing both with its hip swinging, mischief casting musical manoeuvres. From start to finish Kiss My Ring is perpetual incitement on the passions but maybe no more hungrily than over this trio of unbridled goodness.

The album ends with Chaputa (part 2), a track which pretty much encapsulates everything about King Salami & The Cumberland 3 and a sound which is so rousing, refreshing, and irresistible. It brings to an end the best and most addictive outing with the band yet with plenty to suggest they are teasing even greater adventures and fun ahead.

Kiss My Ring is out now via Damaged Goods Records; also available @ https://folcrecords.bandcamp.com/album/folc115-king-salami-and-the-cumberland-three-kiss-my-ring-edici-n-espa-ola

https://www.facebook.com/KingSalamiandtheCumberland3/

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Briefs – Platinum Rats

As much as we have an ever ready appetite at The RR for all things punk from across the decades it is the 77’ eruption and the DIY irreverence it sparked which gets us most excited; lustfulness now ignited once more by the new album from Seattle punksters The Briefs. Coming to the end of their second decade as one explosive and mischievous proposition, the band still breeds its antics on the inspirations of that time and as Platinum Rats proves, it only makes for the most rousing and thrilling romp.

With a lull in their escapades, the quartet within the 2000 formed Briefs were just as busy with other ear grabbing propositions. Guitarist Daniel Travanti formed Sharp Objects and drummer Chris Brief brought us Suspect Parts while guitarist Steve E. Nix and bassist Kicks created another of our major favs in The Cute Lepers but as their bio says, “In the end, it all came back around to the beginning—to The Briefs” and another quite irresistible outing with them courtesy of Platinum Rats.

It is a collection of songs unafraid to wear their influences on their sleeves but it would be wrong to think there is anything but individuality to The Briefs seventies punk meets power pop styled sound. Released via Damaged Goods Records, Platinum Rats bursts from the speakers with its lungs in full holler, never taking its foot of the throttle until its final virulent note and breath is expelled.

Bad Vibrations starts the stomp off, riffs and rhythms in mass assault spilling hooks and grooved lures from every devilish move. Unapologetically infectious from its first roar, the track revels in the angular clips of the guitars and the swinging incitement of its rhythms, vocals just as persuasive in their recruitment of listener involvement before Shopping Spree takes over body and involvement with its own severely short but hungrily catchy pop punk.

Just as animated and galvanic as they are, both songs are quickly eclipsed by next up Nazi Disko and its rawer punk trespass. Like the deformed offspring of illicit doings between The Vibrators and Slaughter And The Dogs, the song barracks and bruises the body it has bouncing from its first handful of notes, only escalating all traits as it bares its antagonism.

She’s The Rat has the same effect on limbs and energy but inspires with its own particularly inescapable lures, one being a flavouring out of The Dickies songbook, one as anywhere on the album twisted into the band’s own unique character and voice while GMO Mosquito does the same to Buzzcocks spiced hooks and riffs. With a seventies glam rock lining to its chorus reservedly audible too, the song nags ears and appetite with ease, recruiting each with increasing potency by the listen.

The feral rock ‘n’ roll of Underground Dopes adds yet another fresh and hungrily tempting flavour to the album, roaring with something akin to a fusion of The Pirates and The Saints while I Hate The World is defiance fuelled virulence recalling bands such as The Flys and Radio Stars and straight after The Thought Police are on the Bus springs a general seventies punk hue within The Briefs stubbornly individual sound and enterprise.

The contagiousness soaking the whole of Platinum Rats is at its greediest within the outstanding Dumb City, a song with a sweeping breath of The Cortinas to its pop infested punk epidemic and no less rapacious as Out of Touch uncages its dirty and irritable punk ‘n’ roll stroll. From its ear snagging hooks to tenaciously biting rhythms, the track is a seductive bully which again the body had no defences to.

The album concludes with the dual stomping of Kids Laugh at You and What’s the Use, two tracks which alone sum up the pop punk mastery and devilment of The Briefs past and present. The first is Class A addiction in the making, every hook and melodic lure devious in their success as rhythms and vocals unscrupulously manipulate. Its successor closes things up with a bold Eddie And The Hot Rods meets The Motors saunter as less openly a Devo-esque essence flirts.

If there is a single punk bone in your body it is hard not to see Platinum Rats stirring up the spirit and if the genre, especially from its first breath, is food and drink expect to heavily drool.

Platinum Rats is out now via Damaged Goods Records.

http://www.thebriefsofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/TheBriefs

 Pete RingMaster 16/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright