Starsha Lee – Post-God Metaphysics

You venture into the dark dusty corners of a previously unexplored attic and within find the predictable, almost dauntingly alluring yet sinister looking dolls house long told tales and visually evocative movies often portray. You peer through its small enticing windows and wonder what goes on within their plastic panes, what adventures play out within the surrounding walls in the darkness. The imagination conjures, thoughts tease…then as their distinct sounds search out both from speakers below, the possibility is obvious; they just might house the unique world of Starsha Lee.

Not that the sound of Starsha Lee is nursery room fit, unless it is those lurking within the distorted lines between reality and nightmares. As in evidence within the band’s debut album, Post-God Metaphysics, it is a rapacious psyche trespassing endeavour spawning songs borne of discontented snarls with characters bred in demon haunted mania. It is also one fiercely addictive treat which may find itself a challenge too far for some but fingered our passions from start to finish within an album that just demands attention.

Though undoubtedly highly individual, the Starsha Lee sound also has a side to it which is akin to a fusion of the rebellious punk rock of In Evil Hour, the noise bred catchiness of Melt Banana, and the mischievous alternative rock of Daisy Chainsaw. The latter is no surprise as they and Starsha Lee are inflamed by the distinct senses scathing, spirit rousing guitar enterprise of Crispin Gray, also formerly of Queen Adreena, and Dogbones. Beside him, the quartet consists of the rhythmic adventure of Lenny Verallis (Dumbjaw/You) and, headed by the vocal devilment and lyrical incitement of Portuguese singer/ visual artist Sofia de Oliveira Martins. Epitomising the uniqueness of the band tenfold, she can best be described as having the vocal prowess of Lene Lovich twisted and distorted through the hands of Jigsaw as the juices of KatieJane Garside (Daisy Chainsaw/Ruby Throat) and Dawn Lintern (Das Fluff) are squeezed into their high pitched results. It all adds up to anarchic beauty in a release which had us drooling with lust rather quickly.

Post-God Metaphysics opens up with Love Is Superficial and immediately Gray is teasing ears with sonic intrigue, coaxing them and the imagination with infectious rhythms in close quarters. As swiftly the richly enticing tones of Martins flirt and dance on the blossoming landscape of the song, it all as infectious as it is musically and emotionally predacious. The track is superb and just the beginning of one exhilarating creative emprise.

The punk rock throes of People Are Horrible follows, its rhythmic raps and sonic writhing spinning a web of stop go virility entangled with Martin’s vocal rascality. In its far too short a stomp, the song, as all, embraces an array of flavours in one devious recipe, all spicing up ears and an already greedy appetite here for the album’s loco lined exploits.

With the guitar again laying the first line of bait, next up Holy Hatred seduces and feverishly ignites within its opening breaths; growing from a gentle caress into a metal infused blaze of incendiary rock ‘n’ roll with venom in its voice and sounds before Life Is Suicidal shares its own sonic pyre with virulent contagion to its bold vocal blend and bounce. The nihilistic tone of word and heart floods the proposal, another constant menacing allure across the album, and bonds perfectly with the raucous bounce and captivating discord conjured.

Post Modern is an electric scowl, the guitar almost grimacing with acidity as Martin’s skilfully and heartily delivered intimation are again aligned to the harmonic breath of Gray’s backing vocals. Verallis and Zahra-Hall stamp rhythmic authority on the temptation, working on hips and neck muscles as the song serenades with open causticity while within the more hard rock nurtured Used To The Bruise, their rhythmic arousal comes wrapped in melancholic harmonics and emotive suggestion. Both tracks simply captivate with ease, the latter an inescapable lure to participation before Even God Doesn’t Know Your Name ensnares the senses with its addiction sharing punk ‘n’ roll canter. With a Cauldronated like hue to its tenacious body as Martins vocally writhes around, the song matches, at times eclipses, the temptation of its predecessors as another major highlight within the album drew further lust.

Through the scuzzy climes of Sterile Girl and the similarly raw discordance of Uncle Nietzsche, Starsha Lee just increase their grip; the first with a gentle twist and the excellent latter with a tug like one induced within an inflamed sexual endeavour. It stomps through ears with a hunger which veers on the rabid but with a controlled predatory nature matched in the following swagger lined march of Glass Diamonds. Its Marilyn Manson-esque swing underpins a senses scorching flame of sonic toxicity, an aural drug which   bewitches and bewilders with craft and imagination.

Laugh Of God and (I Am) High And Divine bring things to a close, the first a cauldron of punk, metal, and garage rock which scars and seduces by the second, Martins once again a vocal Harley Quinn centre stage. Though not quite living up to other songs, it simply grabbed eager attention but was in turn overshadowed by the closing track’s acerbic croon. A song epitomising every aspect of the Starsha Lee sound if without continuing the line of springing essential hooks on the imagination, it brings Post-God Metaphysics to a glorious conclusion.

It is fair to say that Crispin Gray has been behind and involved in numerous bands which have unerringly hit the spot and instincts of us and a horde of others, but few if any striking dead centre the same way Starsha Lee has with Post-God Metaphysics.

Post-God Metaphysics is out now on digital download, streaming, CD and vinyl via Syndicol Music; available @ https://www.syndicolmusic.com/store

http://starshalee.wixsite.com/starsha-lee    https://www.facebook.com/OFFICIALStarshaLee/

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Twindows – Valkyrie 2.0

For most, musical bliss can come in various shapes and styles; creative adventures which just connect with personal instincts and tastes. It is fair to say that for us it recently came all rolled up in one hungrily tempting proposal going by the names of The Twindows and their debut album Valkyrie 2.0.

Hailing out of Philadelphia, The Twindows breed a rapacious sound which infuses essences of everything from noise and indie rock to metal and grunge to a punk across the decades borne heart. It is a bold and boisterous web of temptation as virulently infectious as it is ferociously imaginative and led by a voice truly we could listen to all day long. Vocalist/guitarist Aster Grimm has one of the most devilishly tempting voices and just as magnetically matched by the creative antics of guitarist Kyle Anderson, bassist Caleb Banas, and drummer Oskar Daoud across Valkyrie 2.0. Together they have nurtured a release which teases, seduces, and arouses across eleven lust inducing slices of musical diablerie.

It begins with Like My Music; raw and salacious pop infested punk rock roaring from aggravation with Damned like hooks and rhythmic rapacity to the fore. Grimm blossoms in the centre, her tones stirring song and attention further as for one minute and three quarters the track provides the album with one irresistible start.

The following Mosquito / Thick Skin swings in on a blend of grunge nurtured rock ‘n’ roll upon a ska seeded bounce. Fiercer textures with metallic toning soon sizzle and sear around the tenacious attack of Grimm, the track’s noise punk instincts just as vocal before it passed thick attention and an already keen appetite over to Forgiven. Instantly it entangles ears in rhythmic espionage; boisterously coaxing beats and a glorious bass grumble getting under the skin as guitars weave a sonic web around Grimm’s similarly magnetic lures. Something akin to Throwing Muses embroiled in the punk ‘n’ roll of Spinnerette and in turn fused with devilment of Die So Fluid, the track is sheer captivation; one as seductive as it is predacious and all feral temptation.

Dig Tree comes next, the track a bewitching slice of punk pop initially, nostalgically recalling bands such as The Chefs and 4 Non Blondes. It floats across the senses but has a sonic causticity which just adds to the song’s bait again headed by Grimm’s engagingly manipulative presence. Whilst adding a new hue to the album broadening adventure, the song has feet and hips involved just as easily as rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

That variety of flavouring across the release is encouraged again by next up Ska Death (Ska Death Lounge Death Ska), an unstoppable incursion of ska/noise punk which had the body eagerly bobbing along before expelling a hellacious sonic gas of aural volatility, a tempest returning with greater dexterity after the song relaxed again into its lively bounce, and with bolder imagination as sax flames sear the riveting bedlam. Imagine Animal Alpha infused by the spirit of The Jellycats and the punk revelry of The Mo-Dettes and you come close to the song’s infectious alchemy.

The Twindows let their punk instincts run riot in Reversals next, the track an insatiable rock ‘n’ roll charge with noise bred vapours crossing a kaleidoscope of twists and turns while Pulp within a similar but even more corrosive landscape leaps around with kinetic intensity and agility. All the while though as rhythms dance, sonic spices and melodic adventure simmers and rise up to temper and challenge the tempestuous nature of the track.

The inescapably catchy punk ‘n’ roll of Instigator unerringly worms into the psyche within seconds straight after, the song like a mix of The Kut and Daisy Chainsaw but as everywhere uniquely Twindows; a trait just as potently shown by the grunge rock of The Industry. Admittedly, the song did not quite hit the spot as those tracks around it within Valkyrie 2.0 but only added to the fun before The Pixies endowed Sleepycore had us licking our lips once more. With its almost somnolent swing and Grimm’s vocal bewitchment, the outstanding track simply transfixed, even more so when it’s deceitful gait unveiled a furious if still controlled intent.

Bringing things to a close Wire Mother surrounds its energetic croon with abrasive psych and indie punk imagination, the song another as unpredictable in sound and imagination as it is irresistible in persuasion. It provides a provocative and rousing conclusion to an album which just lit the fires of personal tastes while offering something completely fresh to ponder, taste, and devour.

We have nothing more to add except go and have a nibble yourselves.

Valkyrie 2.0 is out now and available @ https://thetwindows.bandcamp.com/album/valkyrie-20

https://www.facebook.com/thetwindowsmusic/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Frau Pouch – Fairymares

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I am sure we were not alone in eagerly anticipating a first album from British no wave post-punks  Frau Pouch. They are a band which captured and ignited our imagination on our introduction to them in a split release with fellow Kent outfit Houdini back in 2012. Their sound is a sonically and creatively gurning fusion of post and garage punk with other feverish forms of wonderfully irritable and imaginatively twisted rock ‘n’ roll. Each release, since that first meeting, has seen the Medway trio stretch, twist, and inject their imagination with new creative psychoses, nurturing their most irresistible outcome yet in debut album Fairymares.

Released via Skingasm Records and recorded with Greg Webster of Houdini/ Punching Swans, Fairymares is warped manna for the ears especially if they have been nurtured on a diet of post punk seeded bands such as The Fall, Pere Ubu, and The Victorian English Gentlemens Club. The album swiftly enforces the fact that Frau Pouch has its own sound though, even with essences reminding of others, it stands boldly unique and creatively salacious to the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Joe Wise(also of Punching Swans), bassist Ollie Crook, and drummer Suzanne Freeman.

As previous tracks and the All Hail Space Chicken EP before it, Fairymares swiftly entangles ears in a web of sound and invention, opening up with the band’s lust breeding single of last year Biscuit Beard. From the glorious carnivorously natured, bestial toned growl of Crook’s bassline setting things off, the track infests body and soul. Wise’s riffs are just as carnal in touch and sound, his flowing grooves equally rapacious as Freeman’s controlled swings punch further subservience to the song’s call on an instantly lustful appetite. The track is pure addiction, its Gang Of Four soiled rhythmic tempting alone irresistible and the wiry web of sonic endeavour and vocal nagging Mekons like.

It is just the start of the album’s insane grooving and rhythmic baiting with the following Dracula Pukes revealing its own nest of creative vipers as cutting scythes of guitar and punch happy rhythms challenge and enthral for a mere fifty seven seconds; a gripping minute of cantankerous confrontation leading to the virulently infectious stroll of Ham Planet. Like Pere Ubu on steroids as Turbogeist writhes under the punk influence of The Fall, the track dances with pop infused boisterousness though every swinging movement of its creative hips comes with seductive venomous intent as Wise declares his vocal desires.

The exceptional Burn Baby keeps the lust hungrily burning next, its lo-fi canvas a tangle of steely petulant grooves, intimately flirtatious beats, and crabby bass groans as vocals install their own brand of psyche trespassing persuasion. It is aural corruption leaving a lingering touch though Witch Fingers straight after soon steals all attention. With we assume Freeman taking vocal lead, the track is like a demented fusion of Daisy Chainsaw and The Fire Engines, off kilter toxic melody and dancing vocals uniting in an adult nursery rhyme like trespass of sanity.

Ghost Fire offers its own cranky invention, stabbing riffs and sonic vining shadowing Wise’s compelling stabbing vocals as another gloriously testy and intrusive bassline sparks feverish submission across its single minute before the repetitive prowess of Erotic Clocks has ears tempted hook, line, and sinker. With a slight whiff of Spizzenergi to it, the track is another sure fire infestation of body and psyche with its rhythmic nag and caustic expulsions.

With seductive danger to its cartoonish and creative loco, Gotham Piper lures the listener in next, continuing to lay a certifiable creative hand on the senses before intermittently uncaging its inner meshuga in ferocious style. The Cardiacs comes to mind within the thrilling encounter, Mark E. Smith and co even more so in successor Cat Curfew though once more as Wise lords over his own weave of sonic wiring and the rhythmic union of Crook and Freeman, Frau Pouch imprint only their own uniqueness.

Sleepstalker completes the line-up of treats, its sombre yet vibrantly magnetic fingering of the senses the stuff of nightmares; Crooks’ grievous bassline the stalker, Freeman’s beats the trap, and Wise in voice and sonic intrusion the swamp impossible to escape from. They are all delicious ingredients in a thrilling end to not only the best thing to come from Frau Pouch but potentially 2017 as a whole.

Fairymares is released 27th January via Skingasm Records.

https://www.facebook.com/FrauPouch/    https://fraupouch.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 24/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Animal Hands – Edge Of The World

AH_RingMaster Review

Midway through recording their new album, Australian rock band Animal Hands have released new single Edge Of The World, a tantalising teaser to presumably the treats to be found on their new full-length scheduled for early 2016. It is a compelling lure of fuzzy guitar, dirtier air, and the siren-esque vice of Danielle Whalebone, resulting something little less than sonic magnetism.

Formed in 2011 by singer/songwriter/guitarist Danielle Whalebone, Animal Hands has increasingly lured loyal support and keen attention, with their self-titled debut EP of 2013 one of the first enticements alongside a successfully hungry live presence. Produced by Lindsay Gravina (Rowland.S Howard, Cosmic Psychos, Magic Dirt), the release garnered a wealth of praise and airplay across the Australian media and subsequently further field, the US and Europe included. September last year saw the release of the single Roaring Girle, also recorded, as with Edge Of The World, with Gravina. This past April, Whalebone with lead guitarist Francesco Manuse, bassist James Price, and drummer Noosh! began work on their first album, for which the band now gives us a highly flavoursome hint.

Edge of the World swiftly encases the senses in a guitar led caress of sound, relaxing its initial thrust as the distinctive tones of Whalebone serenade the ears. The track’s air gets thicker and busier again as the chorus rouses further attraction and appetite though , its catchy wind alive with scuzzy sonic enterprise and the tempering but just as fascinating dark hues of rhythms. Courted by the deeper seriously understated vocals of the band, there still no escaping that lure within the enticingly bracing roar of sound, it is the voice of Whalebone that takes centre stage without defusing the temptation and impact of the sounds around her. It is a mesmeric mix playing like a post punk fusion of Daisy Chainsaw, Belly, and Veruca Salt, and increasingly alluring over time.

To be accompanied by a film clip directed and edited by Whalebone and filmed by Damon Eames retelling the wonderland story with stop animation sourced from the 1950’s, Edge Of The World definitely gets anticipation brewing for the impending Animal Hands album, whilst right now sparking rich enjoyment.

Edge Of The World is released October 24th

http://www.animalhands.net   https://www.facebook.com/AnimalHands.net

Pete RingMaster 23/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Ghost Wolves – Man, Woman, Beast

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Rock duos have never been an absent feature of rock ‘n’ roll across the decades, the likes of The Everleys, The Carpenters, and alongside all those which spring to your mind right now The White Stripes all notable irresistible protagonists. It feels right now though that there is a real wealth and strength in depth to two-pronged innovative rock bands. The UK has the caustic garage punk/rock ‘n’ rollers The Creeping Ivies, Canada the raw and sonically insatiable might of The Black Frame Spectacle, whilst the US can offer up the country punk of The Barnyard Stompers and the blues punk fire of In The Whale. These are just four of the savagely potent enticements within the underground to which you can forcibly add The Ghost Wolves.

Hailing from Austin, TX, the duo of husband and wife Carley and Jonathan Wolf create a delta blues/garage rock inspired storm which stirs up the imagination and steals the passions like a fully loaded dose of sonic moonshine. Its raw and addictive recipe is irresistibly unleashed in a diverse mix of flavours within the band’s debut album Man, Woman, Beast. It is a rugged yet fuzzily seductive stomp of an encounter which leaves senses sore, bloated, and desperate for more.

Formed in 2011, The Ghost Wolves has spent the years since garnering more and more acclaim and support as well as a feistily growing fan base. Released on Nashville’s Plowboy Records, Man, Woman, Beast follows the success of the band’s 12” EP In Ya Neck! of 2011 and the following year the 7” single Getchya Hip Thrust, both on Pau Wau Records. The album already acclaimed in their homeland, has all the abrasing charm and enthralling enterprise, not forgetting sheer unruly beauty, to push the band into a wider world bred spotlight,

The first slice of infection is Shotgun Pistol Grip, the opening track an immediate sizzling bait to seduce ears and emotions. The heavy throaty tones of Carley’s guitar ignites ears right away to be joined within a breath or two by the tgw-620x620similarly coaxing crisp beats of Jonathan. There is an almost cantankerous swagger to the track, its rhythmic shoulders and melodic intent as feistily imposing as they are engagingly alluring. It is rapacious bait which steels its sinews to hold is tempting as the mischievously cute and flirtatiously melodic vocals of Carley caress ears, assisted as impressively by hubby. There is also an underlying surf rock breeze to the song which embraces the senses before making way for the fiery Gonna Live. Brewed in a richer distillery of blues, the track is an instinctively alluring prime rock ‘n’ roll canter. Guitars flame and groan with scuzz kissed toxicity whilst the vocals and chorus produce a rock revelry which demands attention from feet and emotions.

The ridiculously potent and thrilling start to the album is continued with Baby Fang Thang, a song which swings its melodic scuzz wrapped hips like a lap dancer from the first sway whilst beats punctuate the seduction with their own distinct potency. As with so many of the songs, verse and build ups are siren-esque especially vocally, but it is the toxicity of the chorus which sparks lustful passion, and in no greater success than on the third song. With a temptation which is like a fusion of Daisy Chainsaw and Karn8, the song licks at the senses with the salacious wickedness of a temptress and naive charm of a sultry breeze.

Both the coarse boned Grave Dollas and Ride The Wolf keep things aflame in quality and ears, the first a anthemic romp of energised rhythms and swinging vocal lures within another squalling blaze of blues lilted guitar colour. Its successor is a slow prowl of salaciously grinning vocals and sonic beckoning, the sultry seductive air of the song again reminding strongly of Karn8 whilst the heavier garage rock predation which equally crawls over the senses has a seventies psychedelic essence which also embraces flavours to be found in artists like Hasil Adkins, The Cramps, The White Stripes, and Morass of Molasses.

I Was Wrong uncages another sinew built stomp, rhythms casting a firm net for the twin vocals and smouldering guitar attack to tease ears with devilish efficiency, before the next up Itch unveils an earthy groove to lose inhibitions to. Whereas the last couple of songs richly pleased but lacked some of the lust breeding power of earlier tracks, this song is another Devil spawned seducing which wakes up the imagination and ardour fuelled passion like popping candy in the mouth, every note and beat a frenetic but fluid croon to set passions of eager edge. A welcome easily exploited by the intoxicating I’m Yo Mudda, its winding and swerving blues filtered grooves pure sonic manna.

The riveting limb enslaving Attack, Attack, Attack hits another pinnacle for the album, its veins pumped with fevered rapaciousness and hungry suasion driven by rhythmic stabs and vocal pokes. It is a sensational stomping which leaves the body breathless and hunger burning as greedily as the passions. Ensuring that the song’s glory is pushed to the final song, Dangerous Moves stands before ears with vocal enticement blazing radiantly within waves of blues toned guitar caressing, both leading to another crazily addictive and wonderfully toxic choruses. The song is a brilliant and pungent furnace of sound and anthemically evocative hues which sums up The Ghost Wolves perfectly.

Now we said these were the last songs and they are on the download version but we suggest going for the CD which comes with an extra trio of songs, tracks recorded live which you do not want to miss. The slow lumbering almost erotic beauty of Lies I Told is alone a treat but White Lily is the big prize, the song a scuzz lined dance of captivating beats and irrepressibly magnetic grooves all under the spell of the dual vocal temptation. The hypnotic rhythmic hex which opens up Mosquito is also a massive draw whilst the song once into its heart lays down a mesh of sonic bruising which ravenously grips an unrelenting appetite for the album.

Man, Woman, Beast is one of the real triumphs and pleasures of the year and The Ghost Wolves, a band to set the primal heart and beast in us all free.

Man, Woman, Beast is available now @ http://theghostwolves.bandcamp.com/album/man-woman-beast-2014 and on CD/vinyl through Plowboy Records! @ http://plowboyrecords.com/store/the-ghost-wolves/

http://www.theghostwolves.com

9/10

RingMaster 14/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Low Sea – Remote Viewing

Low Sea

    With eleven pulsating bubbles of electro pop which disperse upon the senses like a warm Technicolor monsoon of  liquid aural crystals, Remote Viewing from Low Sea is a scintillating embrace with rewards at every corner of its sultry shadows and dazzling breath. The album from the pair of Bosnian Billie and Liverpudlian Bobby D enchants and mesmerises with a temptation which is blessed by sirens and borne of the most vibrant electronic breath.

The Ireland based duo first met while living in the United States, Billie having fled to San Francisco when the war in Bosnia broke out. Finding a bond the two released a mini album on US-based Lefse Records before working with Dell’Orso Records with the view to creating ‘a narcotic pop album’, something you can say they succeeded in doing with Remote Viewing. A big chunk of the album was recorded and self-produced in a cottage overlooking a light house and harbour in the isolated fishing village on the Irish coast where they live, the other songs mixed by Stephen Hague (Pet Shop Boys, New Order, PIL), including the lead single/title track. With a sound described as “Julee Cruise on sedatives”, the duo has produced an album which washes over the senses like a seductive warm tide rippling with the rays and shine of an eager sun. It is magnetic and hypnotic, occasionally inflicted with a drifting similarity which reduces the fullest potency of some songs, but throughout it is a compelling ambient persuasion to which resistance is a missing ingredient.

Affliction Of Love is the first teasing embrace, its pulsating presence littered with growing radiance and inviting sultriness. Immediately thoughts of the likes of Altered Images, The Mouth Of Ghosts, Propaganda, and Daisy Chainsaw lift above the parapet admittedly as much for the inciting vocals of Billie as the expansive heat of sound. The energetic start makes way for the more reserved but equally as enthralling Sentimental Games. The song entwines intriguingly around the senses, its heart radiating with a golden electro sheen and the deliciously sirenesque vocals wrapping the passions around each and every syllable and emotive charm. The Cellophane Flowers like lilt to the song like the first song brings a slight familiarity to its open distinctiveness, a delightful paradox to immerse within whilst basking in its smouldering kiss.

Across the New Order inspired title track with its wonderful dark prowl within electronic flames, the sensational Starlight, and the equally impressive Cast A Cold Eye, the album brings a growing ardour for its wantonness to bear. The second of the three is a celestial sunrise of instinctive rhythmic energy and angelic harmonies which soaks every atom for immediate obedience whilst the third has the darker edges of early pre-split Human League. Its haunting warmth and niggling underlying taunt is a perfect merger of extremes and sonic devilment as well as another major highlight on the album.

Breathing In Too Fast steps forward with another irresistible stroll; the gnarly resonance of the intense bass sounds a shadow of the most addictive primal stance and again offers an impossibly compulsive fusion of extremes with the melodic electro dew and vocal beauty of Billie eager companions.

Arguably as the closing few songs make their undoubted stunning contributions there is a slight lack of surprise accompanying them, the vocals and synths playing with existing armoury explored on the album but in saying that each track like Alex and the epic touching Last Rain to name two still ignite the passions and appetite for so much more from the band. Remote Viewing is a wonderful album, a release which brings the darkest seductive shadows and evocative ambiences to the most vibrant and mischievous electro dance sunsets.

http://www.facebook.com/lowseamusic

8.5/10

RingMaster 08/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Argonaut: Self Titled

Argonaut

    From its first gentle kiss the self-titled album from UK indie band Argonaut never relinquishes its spell on thoughts and emotions not to forget holding an unbreakable grip on the ear. A shimmering sun of evocative ambiences and provocative warmth, the album immerses the listener in ethereal elegance and persuasive imagination whilst quietly enslaving the passions.

The quintet from London state influences as the likes of Sonic Youth, Garbage, Hole, The Pixies and many more, essences which whisper loudly from within the ten track release. To those you can also add the likes of Propaganda and The Sundays as a strong eighties wind blows from within their invention, as well as from the now The Mouth Of Ghosts. Argonaut holds their own distinct stance though despite the rich spices and over recent months has begun to truly catch the imagination of a widening awareness awaking to their creative sound. The band were signed up by Criminal Records for the release of their recent single and album, the band gaining interest on the London ‘toilet circuit’ whatever that means but surely nothing as seedy as imagination dares think up.

The album begins with the single Monet, a song which invites the listener into its arms with a brewing resonance with glowing bass 3517_483921028334663_2008247918_ncaresses drawing in fiery guitar sonics and the golden voice of Lorna Lyons, her voice a temptation impossible to refuse. Guitar spires light the magnetic ambience of the song whilst the infectious chorus seductively nuzzles the senses, the track itself working under the skin and submerging the emotions in a sunset of aural colour to reap the fullest ardour from its recipient.

The following Touch Electric opens up its sinews, the bass a grumbling prowl around the ear whilst electro cascades light the way for the guitars to flash and graze across the heart of the song. Occasionally a B-52s flicker winks in the pop tease of the song whilst within its scintillating coarse surface and almost childlike vocal tones the likes of Daisy Chainsaw mischievously peer out. With a grunge feistiness to its encounter the song instantly shows a depth to the songwriting and invention of the band and a continuation of their skill to enchant and enthral.

More Life and 2 Lights continue to show a variety and skilled invention from the band, the first a smouldering stroll through a weave of sonic beauty and melodic grace steered with raw energy and blistered intensity whilst the second works on the passions with a persistent bass lure and niggling guitar barbs. The vocals scorch the heart with their lush allure and all combined with creeping shadows skirting the finesse of the song, there is a Breeders/Belly enticement.

The latter part of the album immerses into an even deeper dreaminess with enveloping sounds which arguably elude reaching earlier set heights on the album or sparking raging fires inside but the likes of the delicious They Can Bury You, the haunting Spectres where Lyons is at her most Clare Grogan-esque, and the alluring Chemistry never fail to leave an eager thirst for more quenched.

Amongst these songs there awaits the further triumphs of Vintage Dress and the closing track Sleep Tight. The first is an entrancing sway which takes no time in offering influences of The Cure through the bassline which has cheekily been cloned from A Forest but is just irresistible so all is forgiven. The song itself saunters with beacons of melodic grandeur pervaded by encroaching shadows, the result a pulsating bewitching that holds the listener lovingly whilst gently passing over dark emotive tinges. The final song is also a darker companion but one which fuses shaded emotions with a compelling luminance. Like the most rewarding enchanting dusk that any day could offer the song allows the album to leave on a warm breeze which beckons an immediate return.

Argonaut with their album confirms that the buzz around them is more than justified whilst suggesting the band will reach greater more impressive heights over the near horizon. This is simply an album not to be missed.

https://www.facebook.com/argonautband

http://argonaut.info/

8/20

RingMaster 14/03/2013

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