The Tuesday Club – Art Is Magic

Trials and turbulences are no strangers to most bands but few as acute as that which impacted on British outfit The Tuesday Club and almost brought it to an end. Now though they are poised to release “unlikely album 3” in the shape of Art Is Magic, a slab of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which certainly gets under the skin in no time but an itch which just gets more delicious and addictive by the listen. It is their finest moment built across ten bold devilish tracks embracing old and new sounds with a unique imagination and their inimitable touch.

Formed in 2011 in Walmington-on-Sea, the renowned setting for British legendary comedy Dad’s Army, The Tuesday Club was an eight piece extravaganza of sound and creative revelry embracing the sights and mischief of their home town’s TV heritage. Their sound blossomed with the punk nurtured DIY attitude and inspiring sounds of the late seventies yet from day one cast its own aural image as proven by debut album See You Next Tuesday in 2013. It was a proposition though which was evolving from that first release and in open exploration by the band’s second album which was released as a quadrilogy of four EPs.

Devastation hit after the release of the first EP when drummer Terry Super Cockell tragically died. Though the band completed the album’s unveiling it was obviously without zeal; as they say the following EPs released in a ‘daze’, with the band falling to its knees and closing in on demise as members subsequently left. It was a challenging, life questioning and changing time which was not so obvious to the outside world at the time such the quality of those releases but maybe now best understood by checking out Reverse Family’s current project 365 days of songwriting, the band the solo project of TTC’s founding member Andreas Vanderbraindrain though he goes by Dermot Illogical for it. It is a still on-going colossal collection of tracks written across those times released as an EP a week for a year, many of its songs spawned from the darkness he personally fell into through those times.

TTC did survive though, its remaining members regrouping and finding a new breath and energy, stripping away “much of the old ‘glamour’ replacing it with a new urgency and directness.” Alongside vocalist Vanderbraindrain, the band now consists of guitarist Dave Worm, bassist/keyboardist Rogerio Marauder, and drummer Blairdrick Sharpely. As they suggested, the quartet has stripped back the TTC sound and brought forward its raw breath and instinctive imagination whilst broadening yet honing its creative flavourings and adventure.

Art is Magic opens with its title track, slipping in on a rhythmic coaxing until a lash of sound sparks a post punk lined stroll led by Vanderbraindrain’s distinctive tones. The song prowls the senses, keys simultaneously providing a melancholic yet mystique lined caress; it all uniting in an infectious swing and call to join its arcane devilry. Captivation was swift and only escalated as the track tempted and teased with its seventies lent enterprise.

It is a thickly potent start to the album keenly backed by the poppier rock exploits of Always taking things too far. It bounces around like a mix of Athletico Spizz 80 and Mammal Hum, a fusion of new wave and art rock which poked the appetite initially, whetted its lips further before thereon in fully teasing eager greed by the listen. It is a trait of the album as a whole, making an attention grabbing first impression but spawning lustier reactions by the play though some songs like Soulless City Syndrome had us instantly drooling. Its opening noir tinted intimation simply nurtured intrigue, the following electronic and tenacious punk ‘n’ roll of the song sparking the passions as it cantered lustfully through ears. The best track on Art is Magic, it twists and lures like an Adicts meets Zanti Misfits inspired dervish wearing a cape woven with threads of The Monochrome Set for one unique and gorgeous encounter.

It is a hard task to follow such a pinnacle yet Fruit Salad Girl with its spiky pop rock makes relatively light work of it, the infection loaded romp a nagging rock ‘n’ roll roar which had the body bouncing and vocal chords blaring in no time before Drowning My Sorrows allowed a breath to be taken with its folk pop saunter. Not that it is a dormant on the catchiness, its easy going but boisterous swing leading feet and hips away like a collusion of The Farmer Boys and Swell Maps.

Put your Faith in what you can control similarly has a laid back but tenaciously catchy gait and demeanour, again the band’s lo-fi instincts breeding a richly appetising temptation as rhythmically persuasive as it is melodically and lyrically sharp. Thus eager involvement was swift and as forcibly recruited by the bolder rousing punk ‘n’ roll of We are the Team, a song which is the band announcing they are undefeated and returning with new vigour and invention whilst creating a personal declaration for all to embrace.

It would be a shock not to have the scent of early Adam and The Ants somewhere within a TTC encounter, Let the kids run the country the irresistible moment within Art Is Magic as the band source their own earlier traits and another influences’ for a greed brewing slice of aural virulence before the darker tone and shadows of Rock and Roll’s not a science infests ears and psyche like a viral infection you cannot shake off, or in this case want to. The song reminded of short lived Welsh punks The Table at times but again TTC spin a web of sound and addiction all their own.

The album concludes with Who and youz army, a rhythmically tenacious and infectiously barbed slice of punk rock which would have aroused air punching crowds back in the day just as now. Its hooks are familiar yet inescapable and its character old school with the irritability of today; ingredients ensuring Art Is Magic goes out on a major high.

Listening to their album just hits home what we would be missing without The Tuesday Club and how lucky newcomers will be now discovering them through such a glorious romp.

Art Is Magic is released May 6th with its launch party the same night @ The Lower Red Lion in St. Albans pre-ordering available now @ https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/album/art-is-magic

http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub/   https://twitter.com/thetuesdayclub1    https://twitter.com/Vnderbraindrain

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Tuesday Club – See You Next Tuesday

ttc

As Christmas approached fast and the tail of 2012 was making its last flurry of wags, UK punk n rollers The Tuesday Club unleashed their single Ain’t Got No Class, our introduction to the miscreants of mischievous and irresistible rock n roll. From the release alone they became engrained in our passions further cemented with a retrospective dive into their earlier 3P EP and tracks. This made the eagerness to hear their debut album See You Next Tuesday as urgent and insatiable as a dog diving upon a bitch in heat. It had a lot to live up to as anticipation had already decided the bar it had to contend with. The eight piece carnival of fun and rioting sounds easily took control of hopes and expectations, turning them into their personal playthings with a release which quite simply leaps ahead of the game whilst igniting sheer devilment within themselves and the listener.

The roll call for the 2011 formed mysterious knavish octet consists of Andreas Vanderbraindrain, The Minx, The Beautiful Wolf, Dave Worm, Fabulous Glaborous, J Rod, Jerry Berry, and Titti Bartelski, a collection of rockers who span the years with birth dates between 1957 & 1984, a fact which seems to be proudly mentioned in all promos and bios we come across, and why not, it certainly offers a wealth of musical pedigree and experience which ensures the tongue in cheek aspect of the band and songs is equipped with superbly crafted and contagious sounds. Hailing from Warmington-On-Sea, the seaside town famed for the setting of UK comedy Dads Army, the band has been tagged as ‘the Dads Army of spacerock’ , but there is nothing old or devoid of energy and youthful devilry with this terrific album.

See You Next Tuesday steps up to the ear with opener Dolly Dynamite and is soon seducing with a fiery brew of hard rock and 10215blues punk, and one suggests the inspiration to the description placed upon the sound of the band, “If Roxy Music were doing the Rocky Horror Show, they’d sound like this”. As it romps with curvy blues whispers from the guitars and show tune like roundness to its breath you can just imagine Tim Curry with his full armour of fishnets and corsets parading the infectious work to the world. The vocals of Andreas Vanderbraindrain aided by the delicious devilry soaked tones of The Minx bring an individual rascality to proceedings, and cross the album they mix things up for a delivery as varied as the great sounds surrounding them.

As great as the song is, it has to be said it pales within the strength of the rest of the album but certainly makes a lead into the release which cannot be refused or left alone. Ain’t Got No Class steps up next to ignite the passions even further, the punk taunt of mischief is a conspirator for reckless engagement from voice and limbs to its cause with a lure of a rolling bassline, teasing honky-tonk lilted keys, and compelling flames of guitar enterprise irresistible. Rife with addictive hooks and syrupy melodic grooves, it is vocally and musically a wanton orgy which brings again those Rocky Horror thoughts as well as those of the likes of Alberto Y Los Trios Paranoias and The Tubes.

Two songs in and the familiarity of the release, certainly for existing fans is great but makes you think ok the passions are hungry but now impress me further, which the band does with ease through Money Means Nothing  and Nanananana. The first song slowly emerges with niggling guitars taunts and droning whispers, beats and bass a resonating post punk seduction with similarly gaited straight faced vocals transfixing attention. All the while the song builds up its suggestive intrigue to then break into a chorus of lighter but no less potent melodic energy. The intertwining of both elements continues throughout for a thrilling ride of light and shadow, both with a feisty ready to quarrel intent in tow. The second of the pair is a pop punk/rock n roller with again impossible to leave alone choruses and simple raw verses and vocals which reminds of TV Personalities.

The variety of the album is in full flow now with the excellent She Splayed My Teeth, a dirty rocker of enveloping keys and boisterous energy guided by the equally punk loaded delivery of the vocals, the slow swing version of New Regime, and the outstanding Replication and Montage, bringing their diverse and unique diablerie to the fore. The second of the trio is a favourite song with the version on the album a hilarious encounter which though certainly not a filler or interlude, makes a break in the riot with its live improv like cheek, though for persona tastes the punked styled version on the previous single is better. The latter of the trio is a Spizz Energi like joy with the finely crafted temptation of Dirk Wear Whites Sox era Adam & The Ants, and simply one irrepressible treat.

The gems keep coming with firstly All You Do Is Wow, another song offering a Spizz inspired repetitive bass persuasion locked to an indie punk depth which is like a cross between Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster and Engerica, whilst the keys bring a Stranglers flavoured heat and air to the thumping prime choice track. The next up New Glamour again is ripe early Adam Ant glory with its own distinctive stance, the song a predatory prowl around the ear with a blaze of addictive virulence at its core and is matched all the way by Wish My Slate Was Cleaner, its swagger a blatant bait to the again epidemic like infectiousness and inducement to partake of the song.

More gems crowd the ear through the likes of the brilliant slowly burning Vinyl As A Manifesto whose Bolanesque charm and stringed driven tempo accelerates with increasing greed and the smouldering Little Miss Attitude, but truthfully every track is a passion feeding pleasure. All really that is left to say is we love See You Next Tuesday and we are sure you will too.

http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub

9/10

RingMaster 19/04/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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