Drive On Mak – Babylon

Creating a magnetic mix of punkabilly with blues coated rock ‘n’ roll though that just scratches the surface, Drive On Mak is a proposition, certainly with their latest EP, which teases and tempts until you cannot resist taking attention. It is fair to say that initially Babylon pleased without making a major impression but over subsequent listens where its prowess and enterprise seemed to really blossom, the release really captured the imagination.

Texas hailing Drive On Mak is the creation of U.S. Army Vet Sean Makra who in 2011 after eleven years in the forces taking in three tours in Iraq left and began focusing on pursuing his long-time musical dreams. Three years later having linked up with his brother-in-law and drummer Scott Feigh and bassist Jason Bilderback, the beginnings of what was Drive on Mak emerged. Embracing and exploring the experiences and emotions bred by those military years in his songwriting and lyrics, Drive on Mak released the Weapon EP in 2015. Now it is Babylon luring increased attention with its individual, slightly dirty and fully tenacious rock ‘n’ roll.

Babylon opens up with its title track, its initial melodic stroking of ears the tempting lead into the song’s blues kissed reggae lined stroll. Makra’s vocals make a just as alluring invitation, his tones wearing the weight of battles and sights seen without an ounce of weariness, instead coming fuelled by a lively spirit to share and express. The song continues to carry its gentle swing through ears, epitomising the release in its quality to become more potent and compelling listen by listen.

The great start is followed by the similarly boisterous Comin’ For You. Instantly it had a firm hand on attention with the flames of Feigh’s harmonica rich enticement. Its melodic heat echoes the tenacious gait of the surrounding sounds, essences of garage rock and fifties rock ‘n’ roll aligning with blues punk adventure. It is a mix and invention which escalates the strong start of the EP before Kiss Thy Hand brings more of a seventies psych rock air to its lumbering saunter. Though the song does not ignite personal tastes as potently as its predecessors it quickly feeds an appetite already brewed, nagging away with every note and fibre of its creativity to ultimately be just as memorable.

Best track comes in the shape of the cowpunk flavoured Outlaw, a dirt clad slice of punk ‘n’ roll with dust in its climate and instinctive infection in its hooked lined character. With moody rhythms courting the defiance oozing vocals of Makra’s alongside the creative shuffle of his guitar, the track is a contagion on the ear setting up the following relaxed but manipulative swing of Player. It is another which seems to find greater heights over time though tapping feet and eager hips show its no slouch at teasing involvement from the off.

Babylon concludes with When I’m Gone, a country scented proposal with Feigh again just as skilful on harmonica as in springing catchy beats. There is no escaping a slight Rancid spicing to the track either, mostly through the Tim Armstrong textures of Makra’s tones, as it canters along with a lively attitude and infectious agility.

With its songs inspired by Biblical tales and personal observations, in the case of its title track by the Heath Ledger movie A Knight’s Tale too, Babylon has little trouble in awaking interest; it is with time and more plays though that it truly comes alive …a quality only adding to many more reasons to check out Drive On Mak.

Babylon is out now @ https://driveonmak.bandcamp.com/album/babylon

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Pete RingMaster 14/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bad Luck Gamblers – Casino Maldito

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We are not sure how big the Brazilian psychobilly scene is but if Bad Luck Gamblers are anything to go by, it is a bold and raucously creative pasture. The trio from Sao Paulo make a riotously enjoyable taster for it with their new album, Casino Maldito, a stomping proposal sure to be a constant involvement in our playlists hereon in and inciting a greedy appetite to know and hear more of the scene it is bred from.

Formed in 2004, Bad Luck Gamblers infuse their psychobilly exploits with just as potent strains of rockabilly, country, and punk rock; it all entangling into virulent slices of rock ‘n’ roll in thrilling evidence on their second album. Its predecessor Don’t Bet on Us appeared in 2008; a well-received debut chosen by their homeland’s music magazine Rockpress as one of the top 25 Brazilian underground albums of that year. Equally live the band has increasingly impressed and whipped up a fevered fan base, sharing stages with the likes of Slim Jim Phantom, Frantic Flintstones, Mad Sin, AstroZombies, and Gorilla among a great many. 2010 saw Bad Luck Gamblers make their first European tour with shows in France, Holland, Germany, and Belgium playing the Sjock festival as part of their successful venture. Casino Maldito will ensure the band is keenly welcomed back over this side of the globe and that a great many more eager ears are aware of the threesome of vocalist/guitarist Joe Marshall, who we thank for bringing his band to our attention, slap bassist/backing vocalist Maniac Biffs and drummer Renan Pigmew.

The album’s title track kicks things off, Casino Maldito an addictive liquor of spicy grooves and flirtatious rhythms prone to fiery outbursts of tempestuous mischief. Vocally and with his invasive hooks, Marshall snares ears, the rhythmic dance of his companions equally as compelling as twists and turns come with salacious enterprise. Biff’s slaps are like a puppeteer for feet, Pigmew’s tenacious beats boisterous bait whilst combined the trio seize body and spirit with their devilish stomping.

artwork_casino_RingMasterReviewFrom the contagious mayhem of the opener, the album intensifies its temptation through Like a Bat. It uncages an even more intensive nagging of body and senses, its rousing persuasion and infernal swing cored by a delicious hook swiftly infesting the imagination and passions with vampiric hunger before 8% uncages its own attitude loaded roar. Like a mix of Demented Are Go and Zombie Ghost Train, the song has the body leaping eagerly in union with its own physical prowess. A cowpunk spicing just adds to the fiercely agreeable romp, the album getting better and bolder with every passing minute.

The darker threat of Terror Train is next; its carnally visceral character equipped with toxic grooves and predatory rhythms as well as a mix of melodically nurtured ingredients carrying a Batmobile lining to their seduction. The track is a snarling beast welcomingly preying on the imagination and setting it up for the tangy gasoline fuelled Rusty T-Bucket. The band discover yet another hook to drool over, bass slaps and swinging beats courting it’s tempting as Marshall vocally romps in the midst of it all.

Thylacinus Attack provides the instrumental suggestiveness all good psychobilly releases conjure, the guitar painting a picture as rhythms bounce before the country infused Somebody Stole my Pet Possum mischievously dances in ears with a grin on its creative face and straight after Drinking with the Devil strikes it’s sinister deal with the dark one in a melodic waltz of bedlam bred rhythms and an evolving landscape of fevered melody driven revelry and sultry seduction.

The variety in the Bad Luck Gamblers sound ensures the album is a bag of pleasing diversity continued in the wiry web of enterprise that is Shoulder Mount, a punk bred encounter with imposing rockabilly seeded riffs and raw surf hued melodies. As with all tracks, there is no escaping the freely given involvement of feet and hips with the track, a submission just as eagerly shred with closing track No Chips No Chicks, another cowpunk lined romp to get breathless over. The fact that its richly enjoyable presence is the weakest moment of Casino Maldito shows the quality and might of the album, the song bringing the release to a fine, greed sparking conclusion.

Casino Maldito is a must for all psychobilly/rock ‘n’ roll fans and Bad Luck Gamblers a band deserving the luck to bring them to global attention within the genre. Meanwhile we are off to explore what other treats lay within the Brazilian scene, come join us.

Casino Maldito is available now via Hot Jail Records @ https://badluckgamblers.bandcamp.com/releases

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Pete RingMaster 28/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Los Cabrones Profanos – Ogun Vodun

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Hailing from Milan, Los Cabrones Profanos is a band creating incendiary stomps from the collusion of varied strains of country blues and garage punk. The evidence can be found on the band’s new album Ogun Vodun, thirteen tracks of illegitimate stomping and blues-blooded mischief. More we can tell you about the Italian band though is limited though they consist of guitarist Blind Frankie, drummer El Cabron, vocalist Il Reverendo, and mandolin player Pollo Braineater, and have unleashed one excellent treat with Ogun Vodun.

The album opens with the sinister lure of Intro the distress; a brief guitar cast instrumental awakening ears and thoughts before its sonic tail is joined by striding rhythms and the body of Midnight Blues. As dark and dangerously seductive as its name might suggest, the track is soon strolling with a devilish swagger equipped with spicy hues of harmonica and dour yet magnetic vocals. Its air is raw, almost predacious as the song sizzles upon the senses while heading to an explosive and irritable finale of sound and energy.

Bad Boys Boogie follows taking similar spices into its punk ‘n’ roll rioting, spilling irresistible hooks and recognisable rockabilly riffs second by second. There is a touch of US duo Into The Whale to the song, though its fifties nature is most vocal and pleasing before Il Blues è morto shares its sultry and melancholic landscape of evocative guitar melodies and vocals with the harmonica adding additional flaming to the compelling wake.

The album’s great start only continues in full charge as firstly the volatile cowpunk romp of No fun down in Nashville rumbles and grips ears alongside an already eager appetite for what is on offer and straight after Brace viciously erupts upon the senses with its Black Flag meets Powersolo like dementia. The track is glorious, a flavouring of The Cramps adding extra potency to the invasion of the senses.

Siesta is 20 seconds of raw snoring, literally, before the dark swing of Figlio del Voodoo reveals its Cajun sorcery through voice and mandolin devilment against guitar temptation. The first of the two is just what it is and soon passed over across subsequent listens but its successor is pure bewitchment which never explodes into the devilry it suggests it will but thrills and blossoms because of that restraint.

Incroci has a Latin slicing to its mandolin seducing, the rest of the song’s body providing a mariachi nurtured stomping with a touch of Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers to its infectiousness, while Il Blues dei miei peccati mixes the band’s penchant for cowpunk and country blues in another quaintly hued and inescapably catchy canter with plenty of imposing shadows and fiery temptations for appealing measure.

As expected I Stomp does exactly what it says on the tin, its incessant wave of hooks and vocal simplicity a call to hips and feet, not forgetting vocal chords to rock ‘n’ roll, all only finding rest once the enjoyable dusty balladry of Hank takes over.

Completed by the Outro in Hell, another potent instrumental persuasion, Ogun Vodun leaves thick pleasure and a just as big want for more in its wake. Without breaking wholly new ground, the album is as fresh as it is inexcusably mischievous while Los Cabrones Profanos is a band all dark blues and garage punk fans should become acquainted with.

Ogun Vodun is available now @ https://loscabronesprofanos.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/loscabronesprofanos/

Pete RingMaster 15/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Barnyard Stompers – Outlaws With Chainsaws

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After their impressive debut The Way-Gone, Wild and Rockin’ Sounds of…, anything from the Barnyard Stompers is sure to raise an eager appetite and so it was with follow-up full length Outlaws With Chainsaws. Whereas the previous album stalked the essences of rockabilly, cowpunk, and country blues stone predominantly within its mischievous sound, the Denver based duo of Casey Miller and Megan Wise have taken a deeper dip in the country side of their passion on the new release, though all essences and more have a tasty place in the mix. It is twelve songs if diverse and distinctive dark devilry brought with a fifties rawness and twenty first century devilment.

Miller and Wise have collectively played in many legendary roots music outfits including The Hillbilly Hellcats and The Bop Kings but teaming together has arguably been their finest move and certainly as evidenced by the two albums since, meant the creation of a sound which whilst merging numerous styles has evolved into something distinct and unique to them. Soon to take their Backwoods Twang across Europe and the UK this autumn, Outlaws With Chainsaws is a mighty introduction for those yet to be infected with their ‘red-neck’ power.

As with its predecessor, Outlaws With Chainsaws is rife with the band’s black and open humour as well as vintage sounds turned into 942079_603596589651616_325395941_nsomething eccentric and compelling yet true to their inspirations be that the likes of Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Carl Perkins and Hank Williams musically and also vocally. The opening title track instantly proves the point, the opening blood soaked sample replaced by a resonating rich twang from the guitar of Miller soon joined by the provocative beats of Wise. Ripe with a slow compulsive groove and throaty ambience to the sound the track lays a mix of psychobilly and cowpunk sculpting on the senses and visual evocation to the imagination. The drums of wise persistently frame the emerging red hued thoughts with accomplished incitement allowing Miller to tease discord and melodies with his guitars distinctive flavour. Though it never explodes beyond its impending dangerous breath it is an excellent start to the album and indication that we are about to have a real ride.

The following Stinkin’ Drunken S.O.B. Blues provides what its title suggests, a booze fuelled narrative wrapped in equally potent blues ‘misery’ and country bred swagger, but there are also elements of the more rockabilly aspects of say a Hasil Adkins to its engaging company. It continues the strong beginning and is soon joined in that cause by both the Cash like delivered tale of White Trash Family and Falling Down. For the first of the pair, though containing great backing vocals from Wise, it is the lyrical tale which steals the show, its story a humoured stereotypical outsider’s view of country folk whilst its successor is a slowly heated piece of emotive persuasion with hot chords and southern melodies veining a rising intensive rock embrace. It is a slow burner of a song which sounds better with each taking of its evocative breath.

For all the potency up to this point it is the tarmac rumbling Truck Drivin’ Son-Of-A-Bitch which steals the show on the album, its thumping attitude and passion guzzling energy a heavy slab of rock ‘n’ roll playing like a sixteen wheeled semi driven by The Reverend Horton Heat navigated by Carl Perkins aided by the whispers of Lux Interior. It is an excellent brute of a song finding its sinew glory in the simplicity of the drive of the duo and the dark throated tones of Miller. Its triumph is equalled immediately by the excellent Choctaw Outlaw, the flavoursome instrumental a mix of fifties craft and surf rock fire which sounds like a dessert created  by a recipe created by Johnny and the Hurricanes and The Shadows with extra spice from The Ventures and The Ghastly Ones.

The likes of the country stomping Topless Tuesday and the dark hillbilly croon Corn Liquor which features just Miller’s vocals and his old timer harmonica feed the appetite further whilst the diverse Cajun reaping pair of Snake Eyed Baby and the wonderfully sinister Shallow Grave take thoughts into more openly black-hearted adventure and mischief.

The album is completed by Seein’ Double and When Death Comes Knocking; two more appealing pieces of sultry rock ‘n’ roll borne of various aural nutrients. It has to be said before hearing the release that finding out the band had gone into their country seeded imagination more on the album left a small fear inside, that genre one we have never been able to embrace, but Barnyard Stompers employ it in their ingenious way to be another, though strong at times for sure, agreeable flavour. Outlaws With Chainsaws is a great album, one which personally just misses out on matching their outstanding debut but impressively sure gives it a good run for its money.

www.barnyardstompers.com

8/10

RingMaster 26/07/2013

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Hells Fire Sinners – Confessions Of the Damned

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As rampant and hungry as a single Katie Price (non Brits feel lucky not knowing who we mean), Confessions Of the Damned from hillbilly rioters Hells Fire Sinners is one of those bruisings you just cannot get enough of. Consisting of ten tracks which refuse to take a step back from vigorously seizing and rampaging across ear and senses, the album is a thrilling and devious instigator of and conspirator with the passions.

The Columbus based Hells Fire Sinners began in 2006 going through different members alongside the constant, vocalist and guitarist Alan Dude. Bringing together a blaze of rockabilly, punk, country rock and plenty more psychotic teased flavours, the band from a first show which according to their bio was in a ‘a piss smelled, burned out basement on the OSU campus’, have tirelessly exhausted the east coast with their energetic live show, playing for anyone who will listen. It has been a steady unrelenting ascent which finds a pinnacle with the excellent Confessions Of the Damned.

The Psycho A-Go-Go Records re-released storm begins with the outstanding Ninety Nine, a track which leaps for the throat gripping tightly whilst screaming through the ear with abrasive riffs, crisp rhythms, and the excellent expressive slightly scorched vocals of Dude, who is also not averse to throwing a great guttural squall into his assault. It is a direct and uncomplicated confrontation with a great emerging bass groove and fiery riffing all wrapped in a contagion which refuses to be told no as it takes feet and voice on a recruitment drive into its scintillating brawl. The song provides one of those starts to a release where you instantly think it is going to struggle to follow it up without slipping in standards such its impressive first engagement, but no such worries here as of A Little Gone A Little Crazy and Muddy Water Murder lay out their feisty temptation.

The first of the two is a cowpunk lilted stroll with delicious twang to the vocals and a greedy appetite to the roaming guitar enterprise both accompanied by the bass with its flavoursome prowl adding extra depth to the brief but again easily recruiting suasion, whilst the second reaps the essences of heavy metal to drive its adrenaline soaked rock ‘n’ roll for an intensive charge of high octane rockabilly. To be honest you can cast many spices as references to the song, all valid and all just showing the tasty tempest of enterprise it is.

As it continues to chew on ear and thoughts with attitude and at times middle finger raised belligerence, the release leaves stronger epidemically laced hooks in the passions to cement the need to regularly return to its raucous embrace. Every track spreads their irresistible toxin upon those barbs to ensure full subservience but of course there are some with more potency as with Psycho and Almighty Dollar. The first of the pair like the opener has an uncompromising intent to rile up the senses and take them on a dirt track ride of mischief and sinew clad devilry. With a murderous breath to its air and a sense of ruin coating its fingertips, the song stomps and swaggers to spark the fullest satisfaction and hunger for its psychobilly rustling. Following this glorious moment the second of the two puts on its country boots to open up a bottle of liquor fuelled riffs and melodic flaming which simply inspires another blaze of greed.

     Thick Of It walks the highest plateaus of the album too, it’s virulently catchy hook and searing sonic riffs a spicery of enterprise and invention which rages with veins of passion and is only surpassed by the opener and closing song Zombie Killer. The last track assaults the ear with a muscular hold whilst riffs assisted by talons of rhythmic rabidity rampage, though the song has the delicious skill of reining it all in and then unleashing the barbaric attack in spasms. It is an excellent track which perfectly ends an equally impressive album, its psychobilly core generously enhanced with some blues seeded imagination and blustery intensity for a scintillating tempest.

Hells Fire Sinners is a name which suits the band and their creative ferocity well whilst Confessions Of the Damned is the natural title for a collection of songs you can imagine the devil having a horn or two in. A must have release for all fans of rapacious rock ‘n’ roll.

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http://www.hellsfiresinners.com/

9/10

RingMaster 23/05/2013

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The Elixirs – Long Gone

elixirs

With a re-release via the excellent Texas independent Psycho A-Go-Go Records, Long Gone the debut album from Indiana cowpunk/psychobilly band The Elixirs returns to exhilarate and exhaust the world with its riots of passion driven energy fuelled rock n roll. The release is a nineteen track bonanza of contagious eager to devour slices of often bruising, occasionally provoking, and always thrilling adventure, the songs seeded in the devilry of horror, outlaw infamy, and salacious rock n roll roguishness with an impossibly infectious temptation from start to finish across the whole album.

The sound of The Elixirs brews up a 100% proof fusion of rockabilly, punk, country, and psychobilly with plenty of other rich additives such as punk and blues bringing their potent flavourings to play too. It is a sound which has marked the band out since forming with the album set to be with justice the trigger to the widest recognition and awareness. The beginnings of the band began with The Stumblers in mid-2007. Formed by vocalist and then bassist Dan Tedder (moving to guitar later in the story) with drummer Joe King and guitarist Dan Savage, the band progressed without really getting anywhere. The following year saw Tedder and King step forward with a new bassist as The Boneyard Elixirs, the trio playing as often and as hard as possible. A seemingly constant battle to find and hold on to bassists followed whilst highlights in their live events accompanying the period as well. The band by now simply The Elixirs next released the EP Gut Cuts with help from Gas City Records. This was followed by the departure of another bassist in Dewayne Hughes who had been with the band for well over a year over their most successful time to that point. 2011 saw Whitt join the band with for the first time an upright bass entering the equation. The recording and mid 2012 release of their debut album followed to strong responses and acclaim which the re-release this year will only accelerate. The story is not quite settled as since the album King left the band to be replaced with the sticks by Dave the Dudeist in the late fall of last year. Hopefully a settled period in members will allow the band to exploit and leapt forward from the might of what will be the first impressive introduction to a great many in the stirring shape of Long Gone.

The album opens up its charms with Water and Bread, a track with psychobilly sinews and melodic rock n roll endeavours speared by the delicious bass call of Whitt. Though it is not the most urgent charge to start the album, the song has a bite and prowl to its hunger which intimidates and seduces with pure primal potency. The vocals of Tedder drip expression and passion from every syllable passing his rapacious lips whilst his guitar equally sculpts an enslaving temptation proving irresistible not only here but across the album.

The following title track swaggers in with a vibrancy which awakens the senses even further whilst its catchy swing and anthemic chorus badgers a full compliance from the listener. It is an easy to ride song leading into firstly the wicked tease of the loping country punk hooked Tits Deep and the first of the highest pinnacles reached by the release in Cry For Me. The latter of the two walks into view on a Cramps like abrasive discord, the building stroll niggling mouth-wateringly on the ear whilst the beats and bass persuasion is a merciless repetitive invitation  to song and heart to which there is no defence. The core of the song would not be out of place on the classic Songs The Lord Taught Us release with the Gas City trio bringing their own unique extensions for an individual flame of excellence.

Across the likes of the country twanging Pleasure N Pain, the sixties punk spiced 17-12, and the darkened rockabilly crawl of Soul, the album ignites further fires of ardour towards its presence even if the tracks compared to others are only merely outstanding in comparison to the genius like statures of the two songs sandwiching the third of the three mentioned as an example. These tracks, Torn Rose and Sea of Lies are two more overwhelming beacons within the album, the first bursting from a gnarly confrontation into a roaming charge of biting riffs and enslaving rhythms, a near runaway train of Gene Vincent like garage punk, whilst the second is a horror punk/psychobilly blaze of raucous and coarse grained rock n roll, and both a match to the passions.

Every track deserves a mention to be honest, songs such as Dangerous Ways with its Sex Pistols riffs and Cramps squall, and the predatory death dance of Cowboy Rot feasts to devour but with the closing stretch of the album it’s most impressive, songs such as Park It On the Lawn shout for attention. The track is a carnivorous stalking of the ear with insatiably rubbing riffs and matching ravenous intent from drums and bass, its virulent groove and consuming energy illegally addictive. Its staggering presence is closely matched by the likes of the smouldering croon of Misery, a fifties seeded rockabilly siren of a song, and the brilliant Faster Than Hell, the string plucks and slaps of Whitt the bait for another full on enticement of epidemic proportions.

Long Gone is an exceptional album, a skilfully crafted seizure of the heart with nothing less than undiluted pleasure and inciting rascality in tow, as evidenced by a final boost of potency with the voracious Loser, another contender for best track, and the closing cowpunk stomp of Asshole. Thankfully we have all got a second bite at grabbing this outstanding album, only a fool would pass on or miss out on The Elixirs a second time.

http://www.theelixirs.com/

10/10

RingMaster 26/04/2013

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Barnyard Stompers: The Way-Gone, Wild and Rockin’ Sounds of …

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    We have always had a tendency here, more a mission to be honest, to stay away from barn dances but that resistance could be seriously challenged if such events offered up the same riveting heart igniting sounds which make the Barnyard Stompers album, The Way-Gone, Wild and Rockin’ Sounds of … such a magnificent dance of devilment and fun. The release is a storm of diverse and insatiably mischievous songs which leave no rockabilly, cowpunk, and country blues stone unturned and equally ensure there is no passion or form of musical seduction untouched.

Barnyard Stompers consists of Casey Miller (guitar, vocals, kazoo) and Megan Go-Go Wise (percussion and backing vocals), two musicians who over the years have brought invigorating sounds in such bands as The Hillbilly Hellcats, The Bop Kings, Vibes on Velvet, The Kozmik Kowboyz, and Buckwild. In their new venture of around a year old, the pair fuses a mix of outlaw country, Texas stomp, blues, and rockabilly into their own distinct romp of irresistibility, self-tagged as backwoods twang. Since forming the band has played in excess of one hundred shows and performed before audiences within over fourteen states as well as releasing this riotous treat, so obviously they are a duo that is unrelenting in their work ethic and desire to thrill their fans, something the album does with dirty ease.

The album instantly brawls with the senses and heart through the opening intro Let’s Go Stompers, a short call to arms for Record Coverpassions and feet through a raw and unbridled energy. From its raucous challenge the following Devil On My Shoulder lays a smouldering bluesy arm around the shoulders and serenades the ear with guitar mystique before steeping into an invigorating rockabilly stomp of firm beats, eager guitar, and inviting vocals veined with sonic flames which shimmer in the heat of the song. Across its stroll the song darkens its shadows with vocal effects and a sinister glaze to its compelling charge. It is a mighty full start to the album as it holds court over the passions steps forward as one of the major highlights, of which there are many, upon the release,.

Bad Tattoo offers up a character drenched narrative wrapped in a Waylon Jennings/The Reverend Horton Heat like glaze to further the set in satisfaction but is soon overwhelmed by the delicious blues croon of Love Long Gone, a song which plays like the love child of Elvis track That’s All Right and Say Mama from Gene Vincent. It has a familiarity about it which only endears and is brought with a craft and passion which leaves the listener mutually involved. Across the album many artists and flavours are provoked thought wise as with next up If You Want Me, a Buddy Holly/Carl Perkins spiced gem, though none settle into a recognisable stance due to the invention and devilry of the band and the songwriting.

Consisting of seventeen prime slices of varied temptation the album is a bumper crop of pleasure from start to finish which arguably in a release of this size is unexpected but wholly welcomed. Other notable moments of extended satisfaction comes in the more eclectic songs such as the version of traditional Irish song, Whiskey In The Jar, made most notable from the Thin Lizzy take on it. As with a later song on the album, Danny Boy Stomp, the Denver pair delivers the tracks with a caustic allure which is best described as Dropkick Murphys meets The Pogues, and a gravelly treat it is.

Songs such as the high octane dusty road cruiser Got Me A Trailer and the excellent garage rockabilly horror Nazi Zombies spark further riots of lustful passion for their unpolished instinctive rock n roll, whilst ’59 Black Cadillac is simply the highway to tarmac ardour with its smoking riffs and rumble strip rhythms. Other personal favourite moments where the album finds additional areas of pleasure to molest come with what can only be called mariachi ska in the song Rudeboy On The Highway, where the kazoo of Miller is impish upon the quite sizzling vaunt, and the Mexican punk fiesta El Carretero, not forgetting also the equally punk coated Question.

Every second and note of The Way-Gone, Wild and Rockin’ Sounds of … is the instigator to a hunger for much more from release and band, something which will be answered when the band release their follow-up album later this year. It is a stomp with no demands but to have fun, something which is as mentioned before is criminally easy.

www.barnyardstompers.com

8/10

RingMaster 01/03/2013

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