Worselder – Paradigms Lost

As French metal continues to prove itself a hot bed for adventurous new bands and voraciously tempting sounds, quintet Worselder add their stock to the brew with new album Paradigms Lost. A web of flavours and styles fused into ear pleasing, imagination catching encounters, the ten track release is a quick and easy to devour proposition revelling in additional time offered to blossom into something even more impressive.

Hailing from the foothills of the Pyrénées mountains, Worselder emerged in 2008. Quickly they tempted local and in turn national attention with a sound drawing on each individual member’s influences and experiences in previous outfits alongside nineties inspired thrash and power metal; an instantly rich mix only blossoming in depth and adventure across the years and releases. Debut album Where we come from was released in 2010 to strong responses though it was the MMXIV EP four years later which especially sparked critical acclaim and led to the band sharing stages with the likes of Firewind, Dagoba, Black Bomb A, and Huntress among many. Recorded across 2016 with Elise Aranguren and mixed and mastered by Bruno Varea (Dagoba, Satyricon, Lenny Kravitz), Paradigms Lost sees the Worselder sound and invention at a new level of maturity and imagination. It is a release which as suggested makes a potent impact straight away but shows greater strength upon subsequent listens as its layers and less open complexities are increasingly revealed.

Infighting gets things going, the opener luring ears with a brooding bassline before rapacious riffs and bone rattling rhythms courted by toxic grooves erupt. Equally rapacious vocals from Guillaume Granier and the band soon join the surge before things settle down a touch with the vocalist quickly showing his potent range and dexterity. There is a whiff of industrial metal to the track initially, Society 1 coming to mind as the track jabs with spiky discontent, but soon its melodic and grooved instincts are entangling and stretching its thrash fuelled charge.

It is a great start hinting at the wealth of flavours ready to embrace ears across Paradigms Lost and its next up title track. From the crackle of fire and portentous rhythms within a similar atmosphere, the song strides forth with melodic vocals and harmonies lying keenly on more rapacious and aggressive sounds. The guitars of Yoric Oliveras and Jérémie Delattre cast another instinctive incitement, a mix of predacious trespass and sonic imagination to be hooked on whilst the scything beats of drummer Michel Marcq rousingly pierce the heavy prowl of Yannick Fernandez’s bass. The track’s twists and turns are as fluid as the array of sounds woven together within the excellent proposal but carry an unpredictability which has the imagination firmly enthralled within the first listen.

The instinctive rock ‘n’ roll prowess of next up Seeds of Rebellion has ears won just as quickly; the similarly striking and irresistible song proceeding to instil that core with anthemic dexterity and spicy grooves. All is delivered with lust but control amidst expectations spoiling imagination loaded with a bold unpredictability before Idols unveils its classic/heavy metal attributes within an aggressively tenacious air. Though the track does not quite ignite personal tastes as forcibly as its formidable predecessors, it only grows and pleases more and more with every listen.

Through the melodically calmer waters of The Sickening and the old school spiced Severed, the album has total attention. The first is a tantalising mix of warm melodic temptation and more bullish volatility as vocal and lyrical insight explores ears and thoughts. At times sultry and exotic, in other moments a more rapacious challenge, the track captivates from start to finish, giving neck muscles and hips a workout with its emerging thrash inspired grooving. Its successor similarly casts a net of ear entwining grooves this time fuelled and coloured by that power/classic metal essence with Granier’s croons and roars on melodic fire.

My Consuming Grief has a darker edge and deceitful volatility to its heart; a shadowy emotive power skirting and courting the drama and adventure of the melodic power metal seeded exploits. It too has ears and imagination swiftly gripped before Home of the Grave dances on the senses with its opening melodic flirtation. It is a glorious enticement only increasing its invitation as darker heavier hues from guitar and rhythms join in. Managing to become more primal and charming with each passing minute, the track provides another addictive highlight to the release.

Worselder toy with the imagination through The Haven next, a song exploring dark hues more akin to the likes of Dommin and Rise To Remain though its instinctive classic metal attributes shape the excellent encounter before the album closes with the shadow clouded, atmospherically apocalyptic Land of Plenty. In its imposing darkness there is hope and elegant melodies bring that light as the song rises from its solemn beginnings to challenge and inflame the senses. More of a slow burner than other tracks within Paradigms Lost, it almost festers in ears and imagination as it makes a potent impact and striking moment to eagerly point out.

Inspirations to the band apparently include the likes of Coroner, Testament, and Pantera; a trio which across the whole of an album but especially in the final song alone you can appreciate in a release which simply draws attention back time and time again as we can attest to. Paradigms Lost has all the qualities and impressiveness to push Worselder into global attention, now it is up to the world to embrace them.

Paradigms Lost is available now through Sliptrick Records on Amazon and other stores.

http://www.worselder.com/    https://www.facebook.com/worselder/    http://worselder.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 20/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Exploring the roar of The Erkonauts with Ales Campanelli

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With their recent signing with Kaotoxin Records, those of us who missed it first time around had the very welcome chance to grab the debut album from Geneva’s The Erkonauts. Quickly devoured on its first self-released outing, the world-wide re-release of I Did Something Bad has allowed those slow to the presence and roar of the band to explore their ferociously diverse and increasingly fascinating tempest of genre varied flavours and sound. The album was a rousing and invasive slab of voracious, the kind of incitement that “heavy duty recommendations swarm to.” As the quartet prepares to create their already highly anticipated follow-up, we eagerly grabbed the chance to talk with bassist/vocalist and ex-Sybreed, Ales Campanelli about the band and their first album whilst looking for clues and spoilers about their next offering.

Hello Ales and thanks for talking with us.

Before we get on to your recently re-released and rather tasty debut album, can you tell us about the beginnings of the band; its seeds and birth etc.

We started really existing in early 2014, so there isn’t much history yet. We come from different bands in Geneva, and the timing was right for us to meet around this project. Everything was very organic. The Erkonauts are a natural free flowing occurrence.

Did you have any specific intent and ideas with band and sound at the start?

I think so yeah. We really wanted this Metal blend with a punkish progish touch. Mostly, we wanted to have fun. And tour. You gotta have tours.

The Erkonauts_RingMasterReviewIt is fair to say that your sound fears no boundaries and hungrily embraces a multitude of flavours. For newcomers how would you best describe it?

Well thank you very much! I like to describe what we do as Progressive Punk. But I guess it can be confusing because we wander in the Metal genre, and all these words have various meaning in the mind of people. We have been placed in so many different categories that we lost track of it. So in the end, full circle…I go back to Progressive Punk, for the oxymoron.

As I mentioned, recently your debut album I Did Something Bad was unleashed again, this time via the outstanding Kaotoxin label. Originally released in 2014 in limited amounts, it is probably fair to say that there has been a horde of appetites waiting to get their hands upon it too. Did you sense this and was it one of the main reasons for its re-release?

We released a second batch in 2015, and this one also sold out, which is fantastic. We were convinced that the album still has a lot to offer, and would benefit greatly from a worldwide exposure, which it did. We discussed it with the indeed outstanding Kaotoxin and they agreed to insert it in their catalogue. In the long run, it keeps the album easily available, and it gives it an “official” touch. It is part of the band history as an official release instead of deluxe demo. So it’s all good things and we are truly grateful.

Tell us about its creation and the premise behind its themes.

We felt the urge to release some no bullshit rock n roll. Without going in too many details, some of our previous musical endeavours became more about complicated and uninteresting stuff than about music. It was boring and hurtful. I Did something Bad is all about tension release. It’s pure freedom. Sincere and heartfelt. The themes are mostly urban, and revolve in many occasions about the need to compare ourselves to others, to reach standards we don’t care for and to live in envy. Of course this isn’t true for all the songs. 9 is better than 8 is about nine being better than eight for instance.

Were songs and ideas all fresh since the formation of The Erkonauts or were there some things going further back which have been lying in wait within the imagination and subsequently woven into the band’s invention for I Did Something Bad?

That’s a very relevant question. The vast majority of the content was new, and created specifically for this album. There is however here and there the occasional riff that I had for a long time without finding a proper use for it. I can recall that it is the case in the beginning of Gog.

You are working on its successor I believe also to be released via Kaotoxin? How far along is the album?

You are very correct! We are currently in the writing process, which should be over soon. The recording will start around the end of spring and will take about two months. We’re going back to the Downtone studio in Geneva, since the last experience was such a pleasant one.

Any spoilers you can offer to whet the appetite further?

Well we don’t have much to say right now. We intend to keep a video journal of the recording and share the whole process. There will most likely be a music video further along the way. Of course the spirit of the band will remain unchanged.

Have you approached the album any differently to its predecessor in the writing or recording?art_RingMaster Review

I don’t think so. We have the habit of working almost every day on the songs. Rethinking and rearranging them constantly, until… we’re too late and have to record them. I joke, but we like to take time for the arrangements to shape the song in a comfortable way. So the process is, at least at the moment, the same.

How would you say your sound has evolved between those first songs and those on the forthcoming release?

I kinda think it’s too soon to tell for that. We’re too involved in it to see that clearly right now. Maybe we’ll know a lot more about that when the rehearsals will start.

What did you learn with the first album which you have employed or pushed further for the new encounter?

We know that we will record in a safe environment which will allow us the possibility to experiment on a few things and even do some last minute arrangements. This is a pure treasure to us.

Can you give any clue of a possible release date?

It’s going to be in 2017, not much else is set in stone I’m afraid.

Other than working on the album what else has The Erkonauts got in store for 2016?

Well the making of the album and rehearsals will probably take most of our summer, but after that, it’s all about touring. We have plans to travel in Europe and Russia in fall, something in Asia seems to be shaping up. And of course, we’d love to visit the US again!

My thanks to you again for sparing time to talk with us. Any last thoughts you would like to add?

Well thank you very much for the interview and the sweet sweet review!

The Erkonauts2_RingMasterReviewAnd finally, give us an insight into the records and artists which could be claimed to have most inspired your own creative life.

Well I can’t talk for the whole band on that matter. We each have our own distinct tastes. But as far as I’m concerned, it’s definitely going to be bands from the 70s. On the top of my head I can think of Uriah Heep or Queen. The album In Trance from the Scorpions is one I consider a timeless masterpiece.  On more recent acts, Suicidal Tendencies, Primus, Faith No More, New Model Army… There are so many. And of course, a Swiss, it is our sworn duty to mention Coroner and Samael 🙂 which both had a huge impact on my childhood.

Read our review of the Kaotoxin Records released I Did Something Bad @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/02/12/the-erkonauts-i-did-something-bad/

https://www.facebook.com/theerkonauts    http://www.erkonauts.com

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 25/03/2016

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Mortuary – Nothingless Than Nothingness

Mortuary-photo_RingMaster Review

Formed in 1989, Mortuary has been a potent protagonist within the French metal scene, certainly since the release of their debut album Hazards Of Creation seven years later. The well-received release followed a clutch of demos and awoke the beginnings of broader recognition for their brutal death/thrash onslaught of a sound. Now the band release their fifth album in the ferocious shape of Nothingless Than Nothingness, a beast of a record which might not turn the extreme metal world on its head but definitely gives it a rousing roar to contemplate in 2016.

Since that first full-length, Mortuary has unleashed a trio of attention whipped albums in Eradicate (1998), Agony in Red (2003), and G.O.D. (Glorify Our Destroyers) (2010)whilst live their sound has scarred stages alongside the likes of Coroner, S.U.P., Obituary, Krabathor, Agressor, Hypocrisy, Hatesphere, S-core, and Severe. As Nothingless Than Nothingness rages against ears and sparks the imagination, the album suggests Mortuary is ready to entice a whole new wealth of appetites with its accomplished and maturely honed anthemic barbarity and step into broader spotlights.

Mortuary-cover-artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe initial industrial apocalyptic scenery of brief opener Only Dead Witness grabs ears first, its portentous air soon building into a muggy and intimidating confrontation led by the vocal scowl of Patrick Germonville. Amidst raw suggestiveness spread by guitar and bass, the stirring beats of Johann Voirin provoke a more energetic bellow of riffs and intensity before the scene setter eventually drifts off into the jaws of Empty. An unbridled onslaught from its first few breaths, the second track savages and incites as thrash and death metal collude in a punk infested rampage. The bass of Jean-Noël Verbecq prowls this with zeal as the track careers over the senses, sparking an infectiousness soon taken up by a variety of vocals and the sonic enterprise of guitarist Alexis Baudin.

For all its fearsome breeding, the song is ultimately primal rock ‘n’ roll more than matched in success and prowess by both Tube and Above. The first is a hornet’s nest of grooves and nagging riffs with rhythms just as unrelenting in their cantankerously violent way whilst its successor emulates the predatory toxicity with its own exhaustive and vicious barbarism aligned to a groove loaded tempting. As all songs, the pair reveals unpredictability to the addictively infectious elements colouring their walls of hostility and a creative adventure and craft which may get a touch overwhelmed by the tsunami of intensity but leaves the imagination as enthused as ears.

Through the crusty yet refreshing air and rabidity of Pleasuffering and the hellacious ride of U-Man Slept, K-Os Crawled, the album whips up an even more mouth-watering and debilitating storm. Both tracks come thick in rage and striking flavour blending enterprise whilst Yesterdead straight after has a touch of fellow French hardcore metallers Yugal to its brawling, punk infused trespass.

Song by song, Nothingless Than Nothingness just seems to get stronger and more compelling; whether from raising the ante in invention or by the wearing down of the listener and psyche and it continues with the searing rancor and sonic ferocity of K and in turn the hardcore festering enmity of Morbid Existence. The first of the duo also explores calmer, more ambience hued ventures within its diversely textured landscape of varied metal whilst another furious onslaught of passion rousing death punk ‘n’ roll has the listener in its inescapable grip in the second before the brutalising smog of sonic and rhythmic bad blood that is Kingdom surges through ears with the infectiousness that as much as anything marks out Nothingless Than Nothingness as something to eagerly devour. Once more the band push ideas and expectation avoiding turns within the aural tirade, keeping attention and appetite as intrigued as the sheer force of the encounter feeds bloodlust.

It is a mighty end to an excellent offering from Mortuary; an album to heavily please and leave pleasure thick whilst pushing the band further to the fore of extreme metal.

Nothingless Than Nothingness is out now via Goregeous Productions @ http://goregeousproductions.bandcamp.com/album/nothingless-than-nothingness

https://www.facebook.com/mortuarynancy

Pete RingMaster 20/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Architect Of Seth – The Persistence Of Scars

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The Persistence Of Scars is an album which leaves you bruised and disorientated, mentally exhausted and at times bewildered, but mostly the debut album from French Progressive death metallers Architect Of Seth, leaves you transfixed and aggressively keen for its unrelenting unpredictability and technical magnetism. It is a demanding release which definitely needs a concentrated time to unravel its creative maelstrom, something which arguably is never wholly achieved even after a tide of visits, but it is a ‘chore’ always welcome and rewarding.

Architect Of Seth was forged in 2006 as a solo project by guitarist/vocalist Paul Rousseaux who released a pair of demos, Eldorado that same year and Pax-Labor in 2007. Subsequently guitarist Yohann Kochel linked up with the Caen project, expanding a sound and depth which takes inspirations from the likes of Death, Theory in Practice, Coroner, Pestilence, Nocturnus, Bathory, Emperor, Martyr, and Necrophagist into its technical and ravenous invention. The Persistence Of Scars is the pair’s debut album, a creative tempest exploring themes of hate, science, religion, and nature within a ferocious furnace of imagination and hostility which whether venomously cascading or rabidly savaging the senses unleashes a spellbinding intrigue. The album is often mentally corrosive and physically punishing, rarely an easy listen but always offering a lure which locks in the imagination and appetite.

The Persistence Of Scars opens up with LFDY and its gentle stroking of evocative melodies. It sets a peaceful and warm scene, the guitars casting colourful bait and coaxing skies before a lumbering rhythmic intimidation and darker shadows to all facets, cloud over the landscape. It is a portentous breath now igniting the imagination, the foreplay to a thrash driven onslaught of rapaciously intensive riffs, animosity clad rhythms, and the hoarse scowls of Rousseaux. It is a relatively straight forward assault, though already teasing as sonic and unpredictable designs begin to unveil their tenacity. Now settled into its tempestuous purpose, the guitars of the two protagonists twist and cast a maze of persistently testing enterprise through the song. It is the beginnings of a spiralling technically striking ingenuity which at times makes perfect sense and in others just loses thoughts and understanding, which is where repeat plays is essential with an album like this. There is cohesiveness and fluidity to it all though which never falters in its hold of an increasingly hungry appetite for what is developing and never derails the malevolent toxicity and ravenous brutality at the song’s core.

The first track is alone an exhaustive tsunami of predacious imagination, so with six more similarly sculpted propositions to come, a legacy of hard work is inevitable starting with Engender of Confusion. Riffs and grooves are immediate and as intensive as the rhythms alongside them, each worming under and pounding the skin respectively as the caustic spite of Rousseaux scars the air around them. With crystalline shards of keys flirting with ears within the by now merciless torrent of vicious charm and debilitating ideation, whilst orchestral tempting plays with emotions, the track sears flesh and thoughts as it seduces both ears and mind with insatiable inventive rabidity. Arguably easier on the psyche because of its relatively brief length compared to the first, the song also finds a greater clarity to its no less bedlamic ingenuity before making way for Transhumance Astrale. The third track takes little time in firing up the primal instincts with a torrent of thrash/metal suasion before warping it all with breath-taking skills and perplexing yet deliciously gripping, psyche violating creative intercourse. The track, as all, is a storm of technical mastery and constantly evolving revelations to again captivate and fluster, but most of all ruggedly enthral.

By this point already the album is wearing down the senses it has to be said, though not the hunger for more. As mentioned, in many ways it is not certainly physically an easy listen which is compounded as both Embrace of Anguish and Hybrid Consuming Flesh unleash their fiercely creative and intertwining inventory. The first of the pair brings some respite though with a mesmeric classically honed piano enticement to seduce ears and inflames thoughts initially. It is a bewitching piece which eventually drifts away for the impending storm. Thunderous rhythmic clouds and sonic strikes blow across the senses before a malevolent haunting and intensive juggernaut of provocative sound suffocates light and peace. Its instrumentation and aural narrative is mouth-watering, a tight capture of the passions which does lose some of its grip with the entering rage of vocals and manic invention with constantly unsettles in its turns and expulsions. At times the track is irresistible and in other moments pushes its boundaries beyond organic accessibility, yet still it entrances and steals the imagination for a pleasing if unsure success. Its successor is a more bestial provocation with a flank ferociously rippling with again unsettling ideas and creative incitement. It also offers a great emotive persuasion of keys at times, a beacon within the corrosive belly of the savage beast.

The album concludes with firstly the outstanding Tears Empty of Sadness, a track which finds a more balanced blend of extreme metal vindictiveness and technical exploration which is why it takes best track honours. Everything works perfectly, the invention of the band still flaming intensively but finding a more understanding fit with the toxic brutality of the song. Every song on The Persistence Of Scars impresses it is fair to say but this one shows the potential of the band most intensively as they further grow into and hone their undoubted skills and ingenuity. The song’s success is supported enjoyably by Teacher of Nocturna, another track to align the maniacal technical beauty and gut instinct severity of the band for a grievously strong and testing, but smoother to understand and relish creative onslaught.

The Persistence Of Scars is a great and demanding encounter which leaves a satisfied wake whilst suggesting that Architect Of Seth has the potential to create a classic ahead. This album is not it but holds all the pieces and keys to the potential sculpting of one.

The Persistence of Scars is available as a 7 track CD via Great Dane Records @ http://www.greatdanerecs.com/ or a 3 song download @ http://architectofseth.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/ArchitectOfSeth

8/10

RingMaster 17/07/2014

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Loudblast – Burial Ground

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Acclaimed as the first French death metal band and just acclaimed across underground metal worldwide over the years since forming in 1985, Loudblast add another magnificent coal to that fire with new album Burial Ground. It is a beast of an album creatively and brutally; an inventive and explosive provocation which continues the band’s impressive evolution of sound. Merging resistance free grooves, barbed hooks, and a greater contagion into their old school genre seeded sound, the Lille quartet have sculpted their finest slab of imagination savaging incitement yet.

The bands career has seen many notable turns in their potent ascent since those far ago beginnings. Early albums such as Disincarnate and Sublime Dementia in 1991 and 1993 respectively making the first striking marks on a wider attention as did shows with bands such as Death and Coroner. The band has continued to evolve and in some ways reinvent their sound without losing the core and base which makes Loudblast such a potent antagonist. As mentioned Burial Ground is the band’s most diverse adventure yet, certainly across the album but even more so within the songs themselves, each pushing its boundaries and investigating new tendencies in their designs. It continues the impressing elements which made predecessor Frozen Moments Between Life And Death in 2011 stand out, just to stronger, deeper, and more imaginative levels. Parading a line-up of bassist Alex Lenormand (ex-Locus, Code, Sic), lead guitarist Drakhian (Griffar, ex-Taake, Black Dementia), drummer Hervé Coquerel, and vocalist/guitarist and founding member Stéphane Buriez, Loudblast have set a new benchmark not only for themselves with Burial Ground but potentially also European death metal.

A Bloody Oath sets things off, an enticing lone guitar inviting attention before the band descend with heavy weight and patience upon 1017035_10152064896733091_3717457620419097246_nthe senses. Riffs and rhythms build a formidable threat, both casting an intimidating web of further menace driven by the dark tones of bass and predatory vocals of Buriez. It is a slow stalking which eventually finds a trigger to charge rapaciously through ears with incendiary riffery and controlling rhythms, all again under the menacing guide of the vocals. The track continues to twist and turn in gait and attack, a delicious passage of bass temptation swiped by caustic blazes of guitar and roaring vocals sharing its spoils whilst winding its tempting across the walls of the song a sonic lure makes its own enticement before once the track with greater relish returns to its striding intent.

The song is a masterful and compelling start, employing grooves and classic metal flavouring but just the appetiser for greater things ahead though initially its impressive standard is simply matched by the forceful challenge of Darkness Will Abide. The song strolls with resourceful bait from guitars and drums courted by even darker bass probing. There is a thrash element to the album and certainly on the second track it brings an infectious urgency to an even paced but volatile tempered track. The song continues to entice and lure greater appetite for the encounter, feeding a brewing hunger for the full meal of Ascending Straight In Circle. A single guitar also makes the first coaxing for the song, its emotive strains a spark awakening the imagination ready for the voracious narrative and aural confrontation to follow. Rhythms pump their muscular intent straight away whilst riffs consume ears with similar passion, both building a trapping wall. Within this incendiary exploit riffs and malevolent climates soak and seduce thoughts and emotions, they and the slowly emerging and slightly demented grooves which come either in small spats or with unbridled toxicity, infectious bait. Fusing plenty of classic and groove metal vivacity to the charge of the song’s heart, it is an irresistible slice of invention driven maliciousness.

Assumptions that this was the pinnacle of the album are soon put in their place as Soothing Torments steps forward, its predacious entrance a stalking of the senses. It never moves away from this intent but colours the subsequent ravishment with more toxic and vicious grooves driven on by crippling rhythms and an intensity which grins gleefully as it smothers and consumes the senses. The flair of the guitars inflames the track further whilst its aural drama and hungry rabidity ignites a rapturous submission to the annihilatory pressure.

The melodic caress of From Dried Bones to a military rhythmic skirting takes its big slice of appetite next, especially when it slips into a rigorous canter with contagion spilling hooks swinging from intensive riffery. It is a mouthwatering start which as you are climbing on board, pulls the floor away and brings a hellish demonic breath and atmosphere over a doom clad weight and intensity. The two gaits of the track eventually merge for a storming conclusion to the enjoyable onslaught, followed right away by the dark cavernous depths and consumptive weight of The Void which suffocates ears and emotions. It is a demanding and exhaustive stealing of light and hope, a pestilential asphyxiation which tests the listener but provides just enough lifeline of accessibility to keep them engrossed in its taxing offering.

The closing stretch of the album is its most arduous but with just as many rewards and pleasing twists as the first part of the release, both Abstract God and I Reach The Sun unleashing a virulent causticity which accentuates the spite of rhythms and the voracity of the riffs. The first of the pair also lays down a captivating and alluring passage of carnivorous riffery speared by sonic prowess and spiky grooves whilst its successor toys and manipulates senses and psyche with an onerous yet invigorating weave of sonic and melodic seduction.

Closing track The Path is a towering protagonist, it’s epically honed intentions and sound a maelstrom of ravished emotions, rhythmic vitriol, and sonic cruelty but brought with a technical and artistic skill aligned to descriptive endeavour which paints an intrusive landscape for the imagination to immerse within. It is a monstrous finale to an excellent and intensive album proving that Loudblast just seem to get better and better; experience and maturity breeding greater invention and explorations within the band and constantly forging new highlights for metal.

Burial Ground is available via Listenable Records now @ https://www.facebook.com/listenablerecs

https://www.facebook.com/Loudblast.official

9/10

RingMaster 29/04/2014

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