Pig – Prey & Obey

If there is a more potent manipulator of body, imagination, and spirit than Raymond Watts it is hard to think of them especially as the latest <PÎG> EP is infesting the psyche with virulent ease. The mastermind behind <PÎG> and a founding member of KMFDM, Watts has infested the senses and passions with frequent regularity since the eighties whether in his projects or in collusion with numerous others, a long list we will leave you to explore, the Prey & Obey EP now adding to that tide of irresistible industrial rock bred temptations and trespasses.

Consisting of three new psyche trespassing incitements with drama fuelled remixes of each backing them up, Prey & Obey embeds itself in ears and appetite straight away with its title track. Guitars instantly rub themselves upon the senses, their raw intensive strokes almost flirtatious as thicker brooding textures come with rhythms and vocals. With Marc Heal and Phil Barry of Cubanate in league with Watts, the track prowls and preys on the senses, Watts like a dark conjuror as hooks and grooves crowd and litter washes of industrial toxicity. It is a glorious web of intrigue and danger, subservience coaxed and demanded by the track’s rampant rhythmic muscle as well as its virulent sonic and electronic dexterity.

The robustly stirring encounter is followed by The Revelation, an even more imposingly catchy enticement body and vocal chords alone fall before in swift time. Co-written with Ben Christo, long-serving guitarist with The Sisters of Mercy, the track roams with a predacious intent, its creative indoctrination built on waves of persistence honed into thought provoking, body twisting primal seduction. With an additional Ministry-esque nagging around glimpses of cinematic theatre, the song is pure devil spawn scheming, Watts the insidious engineer.

The Cult of Chaos ventures across a calmer landscape of persuasion though the song written with former Combichrist member Z.Marr shares its own individual and challenging shadows. Their dark edges court the mellower presence of vocals and melodic suggestion, the song’s infection carrying eighties industrial flavourings merging with harsher textures reflecting the world today. Transfixing in its throbbing repetition, magnetic in its harmonic and melodic tapestry, the track beguiles and intrudes with equal ingenuity; addiction the guaranteed response.

Completing the release is firstly a psychotic remix of the track Prey & Obey by Leaether Strip, the track given a make-over resembling the bastard result of Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meeting Celldweller. Its inescapable stomp is followed by the Z.Marr Revelectrix Mix of The Revelation; a version which simultaneously feel heroic and serial killer like in its tone and physical intent.

Completed by the En Esch Remix of the opener, a subdued but enticing take, the Prey & Obey EP is pure industrial corruption bred with the finest creative toxins. Each of its three tracks is a rabidly tempting and resonating anthem backed by highly evocative alternative aspects; what more would you want?

Prey & Obey is out now through Metropolis Records @ https://metropolisrecords.bandcamp.com/album/prey-obey

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Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Open Eyed Dreamer – Free Your Own Mind

free your own mind_RingMasterReview

The Open Eyed Dreamer is the solo project of Bracknell hailing Steve Fearon, the former frontman of the strongly missed British industrial rockers Ghost In the Static. The Free Your Own Mind is the debut EP from that project which was in many ways an idea and presence predating Fearon’s previous band. In the words of the man himself though, “For a long time, The Open Eyed Dreamer was nothing more than a persona, a mask worn on stage, someone sung about in Ghost In the Static Songs.” With the striking Free Your Own Mind the first ‘words’, The Open Eyed Dreamer is now Fearon’s voice against a world where “power is misused and misappropriated by those who hold all the card.”, and a release for his inner anger.

Fusing electronic incitements with raw rock and melodic pop textures, Fearon’s sound and EP is an attention grabbing blend of extremes and differing textures. It roars in defiance, snarls with antagonism, both lyrically and musically, but equally seduces while inflaming body and imagination with vibrant melodies and tenaciously infectious hooks. The heart and thoughts of Fearon and songs are unmistakable, their bite and contempt at the injustices running and ruining the world forceful but bound in music and imagination which forcibly but contagiously suggests and highlights without ever breaking into the realms of preaching.

Free Your Own Mind opens up with Press Enter To Continue and the line, “This is a bed time story but not for the innocent; you know what you’ve done and what it meant.” As big portentous beats accentuate the moment and the gentle but open inescapable challenge of that simple line, synths begin to rise and bring their intimidating sizzle to the brewing provocative drama of the brief opener.

The attention and imagination seizing start leads to the magnetic lures of Simple People where instantly it too is wrapped in dark shadows and an oppressively evocative ambience. Simultaneously Fearon’s vocals unveil the track’s narrative and emotion with rich expression and the enjoyably familiar style that helped make his previous band a potent proposition. Warm flowing melodies align to catchy beats as hooks just as magnetically blossom within the darker climate of the song, all seducing and igniting body and spirit as firmly as its tone and words spark the imagination and emotions.

Inspirations drawn upon by Fearon include, among many, the likes of The Prodigy, Gary Numan, NIN, Cease2exist, KMFDM, Infected Mushroom, and Combichrist. They are essences which in varying degrees you can sense across Free Your Own Mind. Third track Waiting though, has a hint of fellow UK band MiXE1 to it, something after investigation unsurprising when learning the song, the only one not solely written by Fearon, was created with Michael Evans of MiXE1 and Defeat’s Gary Walker. The pair also physically feature in the song; Evans’ vocals easy to spot within moments as they provide an excellent companion and foil to the equally impressing and darker tones of Fearon. The song is superb, a swiftly captivating persuasion with also a touch of the Walker Brothers to its melodic and emotional atmosphere. Synths paint a just as potent and dramatic picture as the vocals and lyrics, a combination which infests and lingers in appetite and memory.

It surely has to be the lead track to draw newcomers into the project, though The Last Revolution provides a just as commanding and gripping proposal next. Its shadows are far darker than its predecessor and in some way, especially rhythmically, its drama even bigger and bolder as the song envelopes ears and thoughts. There is also a great predacious nature to a track which at times feels like it is stalking the senses; nudging and imposing on them as an instinctive volatility inspires scything strikes of beats and keys for another resonating incitement.

The EP is brought to a close by The Final Photograph, a smouldering electronic caress with sonically blistered skin veined by melodic and vocal coaxing. The gentler wash of synths and sonic suggestiveness also has an inbred irritability which subsequently erupts and fuels the track’s volcanic and galvanic climax.

It is a fine end to a great, I guess, introduction to The Open Eyed Dreamer. Fearon calls Free Your Own Mind his “call to arms” and indeed it is an arousing of the listener in many irresistible ways.

The Free Your Own Mind is out now @ https://theopeneyeddreamer.bandcamp.com/album/free-your-own-mind


Pete RingMaster 12/05/2016

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Projekt F – The Butterfly Effect

Picture taken by Chantal Levesque

Picture taken by Chantal Levesque

Since emerging in 2006, Canadian industrial outfit Projekt F has grown in sound and adventure release by release. Their music and themes have openly become darker and more imposing, now reaching a new pinnacle with latest EP, The Butterfly Effect. The seven track provocation is the band at its emotionally rawest and aggressively boldest, a fusion of industrial bred metal and rock which has all the qualities and adventure to push the band to much broader attention.

Formed by vocalist/keyboardist Jonh M. Miller upon inspirations gained from nineties bred industrial rock/metal sounds, Projekt F soon made their mark and became an eagerly followed proposition within the Montreal underground scene. Live the band has earned a potent reputation for their intensive stage presence and has added, over time, playing alongside Combichrist at Canada’s Kinetik Festival and shows with the likes of Motionless In White, Revolting Cocks, Angelspit, Nachtmar, Left Spine Down, Slaves on Dope, For Today, and Ice Nine Kills to their CV. Debut EP, 0000 was a swiftly devoured proposition with its release in 2009, surpassed in praise and success by the band’s first album Skins in 2013 and the Under The Skin EP a year later. Continuing the themes explored in those previous two releases, and looking at the torrid relationship between man and God, The Butterfly Effect is the band’s most accomplished and striking offering yet, and potentially the wake up call to global ears.

PF_TBE_Cover_RingMasterReviewThe Butterfly Effect opens with its title track, a short but evocative instrumental spawned from the dark incitement of shadows and carrying the portentous lure of anthemic rhythms. Wrapped in atmospheric chills and a haunting synth spawned ambience, the piece swiftly grips ears and imagination, accentuating it’s tempting with a subsequent veining of enticing guitar. It is a potent introduction quickly taken to new heights by Tongue which leaps from the invasive sonic mist of its predecessor. The second track descends on the senses like a tsunami, smothering and disturbing their previous relative calm with a wall of carnivorous riffs and barbarous rhythms guided by raw antipathy. As the song settles though, that intensive assault merges with mellower essences of voice and flirtatious enterprise, all the time though building up to further predacious crescendos. The track devours and excites with every twist and turn of its imagination fuelled tempest, evolving its musical and physical grudge with an invasive seduction for something akin to a volatile mix of Society 1, Korn, and Combichrist.

The dramatic and tenacious craft of drummer Fred Linx is one irresistible and galvanic element which continues to masterfully stir up emotions in Cut Your Wings; his swings and dexterity a call to arms for instincts backed by the maelstrom of predatory riffs and scything grooves cast by guitarist Simon Sayz. The track is another thunderous protagonist which stalks and infests ears and psyche with every essence at its disposal. William Hicks’ bass deceptively prowls the persistently changing trespass upon the senses; at times offering a welcoming hand into the cauldron of sound and energy, in other moments becoming a lead assassin of peace and emotional security. With Miller’s tones equally adventurous in their expression and touch, the track is a caustically virulent blaze.

Unbegun opens up in similar style, scathing vocals and scarring sonic vengefulness pressing ears as rhythms offer a more restrained though no less potent bait. In time creative agitation grabs them, breeding skittish moments as melodic twists break the early sonic voracity which in turn returns with more adventurous intent as the band leans towards a Muse like flame of melodic and harmonic resourcefulness. The overall aggression and ill will of the track is emphasized by next up 03:47:09:08:1945. A fiercely melancholic and seriously haunting acoustic led melodic ‘drone’, it is a provocative echo to the hours before the US dropped their bomb on the city of Nagasaki on the title’s date.

The full intensity and savagery of the moment is uncaged in Fatman, the track an industrial metal fuelled furnace of again raw emotion and debilitating intensity around a simple but forcibly addictive bassline. The track is a blistering incitement cast with the searing hooks and rapacious grooves which Projekt F has honed to impressive and exhilarating effect over their last releases. As vocals and synth spread ambience provide a hostile wind, the excellent intrusion ignites thought and emotion which the closing When the Angel Fell From the Sky embraces further with its sombre fall out and emotive poetry of piano and melancholic keys.

The Butterfly Effect is a fascinating and rousing encounter from a band settling into their creative skin and reaping the rewards. The EP is Projekt F on a new level with hopefully a deserving attention to match to come.

The Butterfly Effect is out now @ http://projektf.bandcamp.com/album/the-butterfly-effect

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Pete RingMaster 09/03/2016

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The Silverblack – The Grand Turmoil

TheSilverblack_RingMaster Review

Starting with a core blaze of industrial metal and twisting and stretching it thereon in by infusing a horde of rampant flavours, styles, and waves of imagination into its roar, Italian rockers The Silverblack have come up with one thoroughly enjoyable trespass of the senses in The Grand Turmoil. The band’s new album is a physical and creative holler of sounds, new and familiar, that captures the imagination and exhausts the breath across a volatile landscape, and though it might be pushing it to say that The Grand Turmoil is the best industrial metal incitement this year, it is firmly amongst the leaders in pure enjoyment.

The Torino hailing band is the brainchild of multi-instrumentalist and producer Alessio Nero Argento (NeroArgento, The Stranded) and vocalist Claudio Ravinale (Disarmonia Mundi, The Stranded, 5 Star Grave), the pair forming The Silverblack in the opening weeks of 2014. Live the band becomes a quintet with the addition of bassist Ivan King, drummer Rob Gaia, and keyboardist Nisha Sara, but for the album it is the founding duo exploring ears and their own invention alone with just a couple of guest solos for extra spice.

It opens with its title track, a stomping beast of a proposal with a sonically fetid atmosphere and pulsating electronic scenery crowding a stalking gait. It is immediately intensive and busy on the senses as the band springs a trap of agitated rhythms and great fiery and openly varied vocals, the raw emotive roars of Ravinale balanced skilfully by cleaner tones courting their confrontation from the background. With keys and guitars jostling for attention, each getting equal share as the track casts its maelstrom of adventure, the song makes a dramatic and heftily alluring start to The Grand Turmoil, though bigger and bolder things are on the horizon.

cover_RingMaster Review   The following Anymore with its vibrantly lighter breath and shadowy presence follows and if not one of the bolder tracks certainly whips up ears and appetite with its Dope meets Celldweller parade of electronic enterprise and vocal magnetism. It is not a song stretching the imagination or finding major originality but it does leave an energetic satisfaction and hunger behind which the outstanding King-Size Vandalism pounces on with virulent and ravenous prowess. Bursting in with robust rhythms and a joyfully warm melody, the song becomes a boisterous romp sizzling with the energetic tenacity of a Pendulum and grouchier lilt of a Combichrist, whilst vocally variety reaps a slight scent of Marilyn Mansion at times. The track quickly infects feet and emotions; it’s an electro rock anthem soon having the body bouncing as high as its own.

Retaliation comes next, its immediate heavy predacious gait a thick intent that defies the effort of the keys to lighten the ambience and mood. Nevertheless they shimmer and tempt engagingly as the song prowls through an early Rammstein leering towards an electro pop chorus. The band’s eagerness to venture into unpredictable turns and styles is a stirring quality in the album but for personal tastes not as potently impacting here with the track’s ‘nice’ pop essences, though it does not stop ears being more than content overall and ready to leap on the kaleidoscope of sound and light that is Make It Worth The Grime. Dirty and melodically glowing, the song is a great fusion of dark and light that loosely comes over like a meet up of Hanzel und Gretyl and KMFDM yet sculpts its own identity along its compelling length.

The fiercer tempest of As Good As Dead raises the levels of addictiveness next; its blended contrasts of emotive rapacity and antagonistic sounds with vocal harmonies and warm infection a perfectly crafted union whilst Attic Hime straight after quickly eclipses it. With a great vocal weave within a climate which at times is like a still warm melodic day and in other moments a blustery sonic wind that ebbs and flows to distort and enhance the drama of the song, it provides an ever evolving and constantly gripping parade of diverse sound. The track leaves ears on a lofty high; a plateau extended by the blistering examination of Pyromanservant, a track drawing on as broad a canvas of metal as it does electronic invention. Like Die Krupps, Powerman 5000, and Skinny Puppy blended, the song incites and engrosses as it takes top song honours within The Grand Turmoil.

The initial gentle shimmer of Great Expectations allows a catching of breath before it too uncages a dark and contagious theatre of emotion and enterprise, an angrier and bitter version of Gravity Kills coming to mind as yet another excellent and lingering encounter within the album exciting ears.

The release is brought to an end by firstly the pleasingly sonically thick and physically volatile Might Get Worse Before It Gets Better, a song brawling with the senses as it lays down its ultimately successful persuasion, and lastly Fragmentary Blue, the darkest, most melancholic offering on The Grand Turmoil and one of the most forcibly compelling even as its departure leaves a sense of unfinished business. It is a fine end to a richly enjoyable offering which as suggested has all the invention and adventure to be, for a great many, deeply entrenched amongst their favourite 2015 industrial releases.

The Grand Turmoil is out now via Sliptrick Records.

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Pete RingMaster 29/10/2105

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Type V Blood – Beastkiller


As virulently contagious and destructively merciless as you could wish for, Beastkiller the new album from Russian industrial metallers Type V Blood is a confrontation which ignites and accelerates the heart of the dancefloor before turning it into an apocalyptic wasteland of sonically drenched carnage and delicious rhythmic mayhem. The release is an insatiable thumping on the heart of industrial seeded imagination, its power thrusting a fresh pulse and life into a greedy expectant genre. At times unique and in other moments wearing well used electronic armour, the album is a feast which is impossible to resist, a provocateur that leaves a breathless and rapturous satisfaction in its feisty wake.

Formed in 1999, the Konigsberg duo of Star (vocals) and Smith (guitar, programming, backing vocals) merged a core of industrial metal with black and death essences whilst infusing that with a flush of varied electronic incitement. Their sound took little time in awakening local support and ardour whilst debut album Dead Generation 77 successfully built upon the strong responses from earlier tracks and demos. Second album V.E.G.A. World Top 8 followed in 2004 but soon after the band came to an end, or as it turns out with its return four years later a hiatus of sorts. A trio of albums in Astra (2009), Warld (2011), and Penta (2012) followed as the band came back in strength and began evolving their intent and sound across the releases. The new, like its predecessor, Artificial Sun released Beastkiller sees the band moving away from the electronic core of previous records to explore and bring to the fore their metal flavoured roots. The result is an album which churns up and gnaws on the senses whilst leading the passions and imagination on a strength sapping dance of cantankerous electro animosity and seduction.

The deceptive opening teases of Eber Zzombie starts things off gently, cascades of electronic kisses sprinkling across the ear. It is a deceit as behind them lays in wait the carnivorous jaws of the guitars and a rhythmic lashing, all with a patience and predaciousness which is as intimidating as it is compelling. A mellow shift tempers the attack midway and even in its brief presence it almost throws things off balance but once the predatory instinct and intent is back the track again resumes its impressive introduction. After falling beneath the potent assault of the whole album the song in hindsight is a strong start but soon left in the shade of the rest of the release.

Rock The Dancefloor does exactly what it says on the tin though the title does not reveal the infectious brutality of rhythms used nor the hunger dripping from every enterprising note and thrust of sound. The track merges infectious melodic taunts and electro hooks into its swamp like thick atmosphere and overwhelming intensity which leads to the senses not knowing which way to turn but loving the hunt as explorer and prey. Its glory is soon lost in the haze as Shocksong marches militantly into view, its big heavy rhythmic boots stomping submission from the senses alone whilst the snarling vocal squalls and mutually venomous guitar riffs bring already awakened passions to their feet. Bestial at heart, the track pounds its beat across imagination and thoughts on the way to fully seducing the heart.

Both From The Heart To The Sun and Resistance tear off their chunk of the emotions next, the first with a voracious snarl to guitar and assault which is like being ravaged by 300 Spartans with sonic spears and industrially honed malevolence. Like its predecessor it stomps and prowls rather than going for the jugular but with the sapping aggrotech energy and intensive invention the result is the same, full submission. Its successor arguably has a lighter touch though it feels just as smothering and commanding whilst standing in front of its extremely busy and greedy presence. Like a maniacal puppeteer the track has limbs and passions indefensible before what is electro metal alchemy.

There is no let up from the album as first Awake storms the barricades with a tide of electro temptation split by blackened vitriol provided by shadow clasped sounds and serpentine vocals. Once again Type V Blood fuse extremes, light and dark forged into an epidemic of irresistibility which chews on the ear whilst stroking it into orgasmic bliss. Veined by catchy guitar hooks and melodic bait the song like so many on the release is the master of body and heart. Its triumph is thrust aside instantly by the rapacious Zero Tolerance, another song which twists and deceives throughout, its opening carnally wanting sonic narrative diving into a jazz funk swagger and enterprise with ease and then back again to continue the ravenous feasting upon the senses.

The diversity of the album continues in the brilliant wanton waltz of Sexyberia, a song with sultry flames and lascivious melodies which wrap tantalisingly around the listener as a blackened folk metal tasting romp runs up and down the temptation with eager rabidity and magnetic repetition. Like the album which leaves its strongest suasion to the second half of its bulk, the track is scintillating and breath stealing, open proof of the ever increasing strength of the release soon backed up by the final two songs. Right To Anger is a crunching weighty expanse of metal spawned corrosion whilst the outstanding closer New Nuclear World is electro punk at its most adversarial and inhospitable, a brilliant finale to a glorious tsunami of industrial metal and electro provocation.

Certain to please fans of the likes of Combichrist, KMFDM, Pitchshifter, Fear Factory, and Godflesh whilst simultaneously offering something unlike them all, Type V Blood and Beastkiller give industrial metal and music an addictive shot to the balls.



RingMaster 03/10/2013

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System:FX – Twentyfirst Century

   Front Cover

     Twentyfirst Century, the third EP from UK industrial antagonists System:FX, is one of those releases which as it ravages and enthrals the ear feels like it is standing astride the senses with a sledgehammer of sound and wash of melodic animosity. It is a collection of colossal songs which seem to come at the body and those beleaguered senses from every angle and through every pore whilst treating the bruising with invigorating and refreshing radiance. Already used to strong acclaim upon their steady and rapidly ascending rise the London duo have taken their sound and stature to another level with the new EP, giving it a spite and anger that provokes from start to finish whilst unleashing the most potent rewards.

Formed in 2011, System:FX has already set stages alight alongside the likes of Panzer AG, 32Crash, DAF, Client, Implant, Grendel, Assemblage 23, Nitzer Ebb, Combichrist, Leaether Strip, Uberbyte, Inertia, Deviant UK, Cybercide, Crash Symptom and many more, each performance adding to their increasing reputation. Last year saw the band playing Resistanz 2012 as Phil Barry’s (Be My Enemy, Cubanate) live band whilst this year at the same event their new EP felt the hunger of fans as they clamoured for its purchase, something which is going to be emulated one suspects as the release works its way into the passions and psyche of not only the UK industrial scene but the world. Consisting of Steve Alton (vocals/guitar/programming), who recently also linked up with Fredrik Croona in the latter’s project Cynical Existence, and Debs (drums/backing vocals), with the band expanding to a trio for live performances, System:FX go for the jugular with Twentyfirst Century, its sinew driven body of sound and the lyrical/sonic intensity inspired by the disappointment of adult hood and seemingly seeded in the memories of the London Riots, clenching its jaws around the throat of the senses and thoughts never relinquishing the grip until the last note has seared its imprint into place. No mercy is given, or wanted when a release sounds and feels this good.

Surrounded by the dissident calls of the populace opener Vengeance courts the ear with scratchy guitar and equally blister electronic lures before exploding into a storm of thumping hungry rhythms awash with deliciously fiery melodic bait. It is an instantly hypnotic temptation, its touch a barracking intensity on the senses but accompanied by a colour fuelled seduction which ensures any discomfort is a prize worth taking. Just as passions and thoughts have no resistance to the intensity and empowering provocation of the song, limbs are mere pawns to the heavy trodden dance beats and the epidemically compelling sonically sculpted enticement. It is a maniacal puppeteer leaving a breathless and fully satiated victim in its undertow.

The following Fire, skirts around the ear initially with a scattering of sonic steps punctured by muscular strokes before letting the intensity off of its rein to prowl and intimidate. With samples adding further menace and intrigue the track is a rapacious journey through the shadows and blackest corners of society, its Prodigy like urgency and punk toxin aided by the snarling vocals, a belligerent poison to the seemingly warm electronic embrace. Though not as impossibly addictive as its predecessor the track is a thoughtful imagination spiking treat which evokes and narrates its intent superbly.

The title track like the first brings the sound of streets in turmoil to the ear to compliment the rigorously persistent start of worrisome electronics and riffs framed in unbreakable rhythmic caging. Danger and unrest stroll hand in hand with the pulse bursting stomp of the song whilst the sonic heat rinses the air of the song in impacting and emotively inspired imagery, helped by the continuing samples of sirens. An intensive imposition on apathy and assumptions, the track is another weighty tempest to capture the appetite before handing over to the closing red alert of Stay In Your Homes. With samples of martial law declarations punctuating the thrilling start, the track pulls to its loftiest heights on the EP and proceeds to oversee a nation in self-destruct with a rain of sonic mercury and melodic acidity falling upon a web of rhythmic and bass toned predation. It is a stunning finale of corrosive imagination and commentary leaving the body and mind exhausted but fulfilled.

Twentyfirst Century is a devastatingly outstanding release which only gives a ‘complaint’ to its briefness of just four songs, but episodes which confirms System:FX as one of the most exhilarating bands in the UK. Roll on an album is all that is left to say.



RingMaster 14/08/2013

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Krebs – Cellophane

Krebs 2

    Krebs is a new electronic/ebm project to recently emerge and on the evidence of its debut EP Cellophane, will be one we will be hearing a lot more of across future horizons. Just signed to excellent independent label Bluntface Records, the Philadelphia, PA band mark their next step with a release which is potent and evocative, and though in some ways it manages to miss providing the sting which listening to its five tracks you sense is within its heart, there is nothing but unadulterated and exciting promise left in its wake.

Started in 2012, Krebs is the creation of Mike Haggerty, the vehicle for his merger of ebm synth sounds of the 80’s and 90’s with industrial and electro snarls. There is also a metal apocalyptic breath to the shadows which permeate the sounds for a resulting cross genre adventure. Influences come from the likes of Front Line Assembly and KMFDM with further whispers of others such as Skinny Puppy, Combichrist, and Virus Cycle all making suggestions within the imagination capturing invention. Honing the sound through a full range of industrial exploration Haggerty, since joined by Chris Mattioni on backing vocals for live shows, has sculpted and unleashed a debut which seduces and excites with a freshness and enterprise that suggests 2013 will see Krebs making an immediate impact.

The June 29th released Cellophane stares directly at the ear with opening track Humanity Drained, its sinister toned Krebs-cover-600atmosphere and brewing rhythmic dust hazing the skies before a dark melodic hook prowls and intimidates with a compelling voice. It is a suggestive and provocative lure which mesmerises to leave senses open for the following industrial metal cast of energy to pervade and thrill. As the vocals of Haggerty enter with the shadowed narrative the track takes a step back, his tones given space and assistance to bring a rich expressive dark caress to bear upon the ear. At this point the track reminds only of Fad Gadget, the vocals with a Frank Tovey gait and the sound heavy in suggestive ambience but with an electro temptation which is never far from lighting passions. The coarser presence of the air surrounding the chorus presses into further adventure whilst the song itself twists and turns across varied industrial pastures for a captivating encounter.

The great start is followed by Chisel (Guitar Mix), a track which expels a venomous rabidity to its electro wash and intensive energy. It is an oppressive light smothering test but equally creates its own acidic radiance with addiction making melodic taunting and electro venture. Like the first, the track does not settle into a straight forward passage but shifts and turns in on itself to ensure intrigue and eager attention. It does not quite match the opener for contagion and strength but still leaves the strongest satisfaction in its wake and hunger for more.

The song also is one with fails to deliver the bite it suggests is waiting to break out, something which can be applied to the whole release. Across its excellent invention the wish it would go for the jugular especially with its more industrial metal escapades, is a strong feeling which is never quite satisfied, though as the only aspect lacking within Cellophane it does not defuse the enjoyment and quality skilfully played out.

     The Corner opens with a Visage like beckoning, that eighties pull wonderfully potent again especially as once the vocals join the stance and the sound spreads its arms further thoughts of Fad Gadget again make their irresistible persuasion. The track is an emotive slow stroll across weaves of shadows and through a kaleidoscope of electro imagination, its enveloping tone and impacting textures hugging thoughts and emotions tightly with a hint of menace though without an element of danger. The track makes way for the first single from the release, Peace Injection. With bold and heightened rhythms and hot electro stomping, the track is a full contrast to its predecessor with a swagger and hungry enterprise which enflames the air. At times it looks like the song will unleash its predatory hounds but restraint wins the day and from start to finish the excellent temptation eagerly taunts and teases with impressive craft.

Closing song Rings is a pleasing riot from combined shafts of harsh ebm, rapacious ambiences, industrial malevolence, and rhythmic intensity. It is forceful and highly infectious, a song like the album which enrols varied flavours and spices into a gripping and fascinating confrontation. At its conclusion the proof that Cellophane is an excellent debut is open evidence, proof that only sparks a greedy appetite to hear more from Krebs. Accompanied by the first single Peace Injection, which itself comes in a full package containing remixes alongside the song from new label mates Virus Cycle, Otto Kinzel, and Varicella, and released as a free download, Cellophane is the arrival of one of the more inspiring and exciting bands within industrial. Are you ready for the shadowed temptation of Krebs is the only question left to be asked.




RingMaster 27/05/2013

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