Kneel – Interstice

Open mouthed, bewitched and gasping for breath is not a regular occurrence despite having the honour to hear so many impressive and thrilling encounters at The RR but that is exactly how Interstice from Kneel left us. It is an album which devoured attention as it engulfed the senses, a cauldron of sound and craft which preys on ears and imagination like few others.

Kneel is the solo project of Pedro Mau (ex-Kneeldown, Wells Valley) and Interstice a collection of creative traps written between 2011 and 2013 and now re-released in 2019 through Pulmonary Records. Offering nine maelstroms of hardcore, mathcore, and thrash metal, though that truly only suggests at the full body and diversity of the album, Interstice is as fresh, adventurous, and unique as anything heard in recent times or is likely to be embraced this year. Upon the release, Mau is joined by vocalist Filipe Correia (Wells Valley, Concealment) but everything else about the album is all its Portuguese creator; an artist leaving no stone of unpredictability unturned and layer of creative risk unexplored.

As the album’s opening track swiftly reveals, Mau’s songs are as virulently infectious as they are almost barbarously bold and unconcerned with expected structures and boundaries. Murmurs immediately exploded on the senses, rhythms plundering their welcome with almost toxic prowess as guitars uncaged their own caustic squall. Already though there is an instinctive swing to it all, an inviting lure which only blossoms further as nagging grooves and prowling beats greet the calmer twist of the track just as Correia’s feral tones erupt. Magnetism lines every moment, attention and appetite soon gripped by the drama and enterprise making up the track’s numerous and connected snares. Equally quickly it proves hard to offer up a reference to give a clear clue to the sounds conjured by Mau, but in some ways the likes of Meshuggah, Converge, Daughters, The Dillinger Escape Plan, and Coilguns make good hints to the fascination of Kneel.

The outstanding start is easily backed by Amend, its initial surge hardcore shaped but again soon the kaleidoscopic prowess of the project’s sound unravels as too the senses before its inspiring trespass. Wires of guitar swarm around rhythmic predation and already subservient ears; the track only increasing its slavery as its body writhes with fresh and unique spirals of textures and sound, a sonic vortex just as vibrant and viral within the barbarous assault of Occlusion. Straightaway it violently ravages, never diluting its marauding as it breaks through new nagging enterprise and imagination harassing ideation; Correia equally as uncompromising and compelling within the vicious tempest.

Lessening stalks and ransacks the senses next, Mau’s infernal grooves proving irresistible and melodic dissonance corrosive around rabidly biting rhythms while the two minutes of Absence simply haunts the imagination from its increasingly darkening void. The track allows a long needed breath to be taken, at least for its first half as it subsequently erupts with its own sonic cancer before Cloak dances on expectations with its quick footed dynamics and rapier like incursions. As within every track though, nothing can be taken for granted, its body an edacious helix of imagination and craft.

Both Debris with its flesh snagging jaw and jagged textures and the creative tyranny of Thrall simply gripped and squeezed greater eager attention upon Interstice, each an inescapable maze of skill and nonconformity which if we admit they did not quite match up to their predecessors tells how stunning those earlier tracks.

The album closes up with Sovereignty, a slab of cacophonous rock ‘n’ roll cast upon another hungrily engrossing emprise of convulsing textures, lustful craft, and rapturous imagination. Interstice is a rhapsody of sound, certainly one as vicious and fearsome as it is enthralling but a challenge which takes the listener to new brave and exciting places.

Interstice is out now via Pulmonary Records @ https://pulmonaryrecords.bandcamp.com/album/interstice

https://www.facebook.com/seekinsideyourself

Pete RingMaster 01/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raketkanon – RKTKN#3

Four years or so back with a single track Belgium outfit Raketkanon had us hooked. Florent was one of those lust fuelled moments we all have from time to time; an inescapable connection which their subsequent second album reinforced with a longer to work but just as persuasive temptation. Now the Flemish band has returned with its successor and an even more ridiculously compelling and creatively maniacal proposition.

In many ways RKTKN#3 is the obvious continuation of the Ghent hailing quartet’s unique sound and inimitable endeavour but swiftly proves itself a whole new escapade of raw imagination and manipulative noise. The years between releases has seen a bold new maturity rise in songwriting and craft as well as creative babble, every moment of their new trespass angling to and effortlessly succeeding in getting under the skin while again vocally frontman Pieter-Paul Devos fingers the imagination and raucously roars in his own perpetually intelligible language, one which constantly teases recognition and understanding with every squall and seduction escaping his fevered throat for another layer of texture and intimation to devour and play with. RKTKN#3 rears up from a dark place, its breath at times as dystopian as it is invigorating and each spread of its suggestive soundscapes a beguiling intrusion on the assumed safety and composure of mind and senses.

The album springs into life with Ricky sauntering on the wiry lures of Lode Vlaeminck’s synth. Inherently infectious rhythms are soon cast by drummer Pieter De Wilde, his swings becoming more rapacious as the raw senses squirrelling throes of Jef Verbeeck’s guitar burst forth. Devos’ restless tones quickly add to the increasingly virulent incitement; intrigue and mayhem coating every colluding texture even as warm calms emerge to subsequently share their own growing paranoia.

It is a riveting start to the album swiftly matched by the even more asylum like Fons. Vocal gabble leads sonic stalking, the guitar offering initial glimpses of the track’s predacious heart before both ignite with the fiery blaze of the synth’s unpredictable melodic causticity. As everywhere, ever ready unpredictability soaks every twist and turn; steering the imagination and an increasingly greedier appetite for the song’s crazed composure and seductive ferocity.

Mélody matches the instinctive catchiness of its predecessor with its own melodic coaxing; vocal seduction and gentle caresses of guitar teasing forth the ever fertile and varied enterprise of Vlaeminck’s synth. There is a mordant lining to its tempting though which openly simmers but never truly ignites as the track continued to enthral before Hannibal breaks its borders. Atmospheric inkling seeds the threatening pulse of a rhythmic and electronic march, a further sinister repose the base for an even greater ravening file of sonic trespass. The track is superb, fiercely manipulative and soon had this body instinctively stomping to the feral quality to the Raketkanon sound.

Even the melancholic yet vibrant serenade of Robin wears this untamed edge on its sleeve, a suggestion of wild instincts almost taunting from within its hypnotic post punk siren calling while Lou immediately after scents its own alluring disquiet with individual melodic alchemy, every gathering thread and layer of sound portentous in its radiance. It is a predictive tone eventually given corrosive voice as the track embroils the senses in its ravenous dissonance. A fusion of progressive and noise rock with any carnivorous flavour you can imagine, the song lures and seduces with a slower proving compared to its fellow protagonists but no less successfully persuasive prowess.

The senses stabbing eruption of next up Harry instantly had ears and senses on board, De Wilde sheer rabid coercion before synth and guitar entangle their own adventurous cajolery which is more than matched by that of Devos’ ever fecund antics. Creative haywire bred on organised deviancy, it is simultaneously dance-floor rabid and imagination provocative, the latter trait tauntingly exploited by the following Ernest with its wonderfully nagging qualities within another captivating sonic kaleidoscope.

The album is closed up by Mido, an anomalously harmonious serenade as disturbingly haunting as it is infectively engaging which simply seduced from start to finish. As all tracks, it is a lure of individual uniqueness which echoes the idiosyncratic character of the Raketkanon sound

At a push the Belgian Rocketcannon is kind of akin to an entanglement of Melvins, Devo, Powersolo and Coilguns yet still pretty distant from what that hints at but as RKTKN#3 proves it is something rather special which is all you need to know.

RKTKN#3 is out now via Alcopop! Records @ http://ilovealcopop.awesomedistro.com/products/636359-raketkanon-rktkn3-12-cd and also available on cassette @ https://bethshalomrecords.bandcamp.com/album/rktkn-3

http://www.raketkanon.com   https://www.facebook.com/Raketkanon/

 Pete RingMaster 30/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The RingMaster Review picks its favourite metal, rock and noise releases of 2018

Across its busy year 2018 unleashed a horde of gripping and rousing metal, rock, and noise driven releases. Here we pluck out those covered by The RingMaster Review which had the juices flowing most lustfully of all…

1. Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 2

2. Coilguns – Millennials

3. KEN mode – Loved

4. VNDTA – Pale Glow

5. Mammüth – Outlander

6. Black Space Riders – Amoretum Vol. 1

7. Eryn Non Dae. – Abandon Of The Self 

8. The Great Sabatini – Goodbye Audio

9. U-Foes – No More No More

10. Dead Register – Captive

11. Naberus – Hollow

12. Bailer – Self Titled

13. Hostile Array – Self Titled 

14. In Vain – Currents

15. Vantablack Warship – Abrasive Pulmonic Speak

16. Skulk, The Hulking – Afterbirth Of A Nation

17. The Ugly Kings – Darkness Is My Home

18. Spookshow Inc. – Visions Of The Blinded World pt I & II

19. The Castor Troys – Legends Never Die

20. Owl Company – Iris

21. Deville – Pigs with Gods

22. Arcaeon – Balance EP

23. Maudlin – Sassuma Arnaa

24. The Senton Bombs – Outsiders

25. Verni – Barricade 

KEN mode – Loved

We cannot say that the artwork surrounding releases particularly guides or influences our thoughts going into a new encounter but it has to be admitted that the art wrapping the new KEN mode album made a striking impression whilst sparking intrigue and imagination long before a note was heard. Created by the band’s long-time collaborator Randy Ortiz, it is a piece which also inspired the band itself in regards to Loved, their seventh full-length. Vocalist/guitarist Jesse Matthewson ahead of its release revealed that “We entered writing for this album with one goal in mind – to please the smile” referring to the cover’s protagonist.

He also said “We wanted to make an album that represented a thinking person’s reaction to the political/technological climate we are existing in today. We wanted to make the perfect album to put on repeat while pushing your physical limits to their maximum, if only to silence the noise that is constantly whirring around inside of your own head, even for a brief moment.” Listening to Loved, it is not hard to feel they succeeded in both, certainly in satisfying the smile and though whether you can create perfection can be debated but it is a release which stands on the frontline of their most stirring and striking proposals yet.

From the grungier and expansive indie rock inspired endeavour of its highly enjoyable predecessor, Success, KEN mode has in many ways returned to the sonic viscera and noise punk/hardcore toxicity of the likes of Venerable (2011) and Entrench (2013) for Loved. In saying that, the album equally pushes the bold adventure hinted at in Success to far more magnetic, feral, and maybe for some divisive heights. It is unapologetically invasive, a cauldron of sonic violence, and their most invasively dark offering yet and for us more than possibly their finest moment yet.

Doesn’t Feel Pain Like He Should is the first venomous treat from Loved, the track instantly lancing the senses with a sonic incision before the fierce rapier swings of drummer Shane Matthewson descend closely aligned to the ravenous grumble of Scott Hamilton’s bass. The caustic wires cast from Jesse’s guitar equally infest song and listener making a nagging cradle for the raw throated squall of his vocals all the time rhythms breeding greater virulence in their trespass. It is a glorious nagging of sound taking swipes and bites with every elevation of animosity and twist of enterprise resulting in a deliciously corrosive start to the release.

The Illusion Of Dignity teases with its initial lure before swinging on rapacious rhythms next, Shane’s hits a bone shuddering impact matched in carnal attraction by the resonance of Scott’s bass. Post punk hues add to the noise rock antics bred within the cavernous yet threateningly intimate breath of the track, vocals a toxic animus across the revolving spiral and searing flare up of guitar. As with its predecessor, new intensities fuel and fresh ideation inspires the course of the irresistible intrusion before Feathers & Lips steps forward to prey on senses and psyche. From its first breath it is a challenging threat but quickly springing its own infectious violation as seductively flirtatious as it is menacingly inhospitable. With a web of sonic dissonance and enticement at its heart, it is another which easily got under the skin and infringed upon the senses for rich pleasure.

It there was vague concord in the last track, Learning To Be Too Cold is sheer ill-will and needs a mere breath to invade and suffocate the senses in its corrosive wash and vocal feud as beats again barely labour to punish and incite attention. The vile lure of bass is a treat whilst the sonic scathing from the guitar is a mercilessly nagging breach as magnetic as everything piercing its scarring waves. It is not a song with the same instinctive contagion of those before it but one as memorable while Not Soulmates sets another unforgettable marker with its untamed but skilfully bred cacophony led by vocal discontent.

Very Small Men rears up to share its unique character and proposal swiftly after, dancing in on nimble dynamics driven by Shane’s inimitable rhythmic dexterity. It is soon though blowing a storm of aural animation hell-bent on igniting muscles and addictiveness to flex their instincts as the song’s holler enslaves. It is a thrill of an infestation, discord increasing by every turn of sonic entanglement and emotive dissonance.

From one of the album’s momentous moments to another as the calm swing of This Is A Love Test brings its own array of creative altercation. A jazz nurtured intimating caress is brought by the sax of Kathryn Kerr, its emotive and mellow seducing aligned to vocal reflection but both soon inspiring and joining a rancorous expulsion of frictious inharmony in a schism of enterprise which further inflames ears and thoughts as rhythms permeate the body.

The final pair of Fractures In Adults and No Gentle Art are equally as riveting and argumentative. The first is a senses hassling, evolving drone of disharmony which fingers and violates psyche and self-peace, each wave of creative quarrel intensifying in weight, ferocity, and conflict to disarm and inhumanely seduce while its successor rises up from a connecting rhythmic pulsation, emerging through shadow thick, portentously drenched serenity into almost salacious sonic warfare It stalks the listener from the off, every note and breath bringing a slight elevation in threat and intensity leading to crescendos of visceral expulsions and ravenous corrosion laden discordance again with Kerr’s breath casting creative arson within the gorgeous enmity.

The track is a bewitching, at times bewildering and relentlessly breath-taking conclusion to an album proving so hard to escape and move on to new adventure from. If you are looking for life affirming calm and beauty, Loved is not for you yet in many ways it does feed those desires whilst focusing the senses and thoughts on the reality of the world we are inescapably part of. Self-harm has never been more fun and invigorating than with KEN mode’s latest monster of a gem.

Loved is available now via Season of Mist and @ https://kenmode.bandcamp.com/album/loved

Check out their website for news and dates of their Canadian dates with Shallow in September, US/Canadian tour alongside Birds In Row in October, and European tour with Coilguns and Birds In Row this Nov/Dec.

http://www.ken-mode.com    http://www.facebook.com/kenmode    http://www.twitter.com/kenmodenoise

Pete RingMaster 31/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cancel – Dark Reveries

Dark Reveries is the new album from Swiss hardcore fury Cancel; a release which echoes its titles with tracks which savagely grab you from reality to immerse in rousingly, often carnally raucous dissonance. It makes no compromises in its assault and attitude loaded irritability but tempers the compelling causticity with flirtatious imagination whilst declaring the Luzern quintet ready to seize global attention.

Founded in 2011, Cancel has released a host of ear grabbing proposals around a richly received debut album in Circle of 2015. Their sound has evolved across each encounter and ventures a whole new plateau of enterprise and devilry within second full-length Dark Reveries. It is tagged as hardcore but freely ventures across the landscapes of noise, punk, metalcore, and post hardcore with each individual song.

It opens up with Mind Burial, instantly expressing raw vocals and sound upon the senses as rhythms closely prowl. Stalking the listener, the track soon hits a more urgent stride without losing all its restraints; captivating attention with every passing second of its Coilguns meets Red Tape like assault. An instinctive groove seizes its moment to enslave as rhythms continue to prey, all the while the band’s imagination brewing and taking a thicker hold on the album’s thrilling start.

The following Hysteria surges through ears with punk ‘n’ roll rancor, beats thumping with flirtatious violence as group shouts and urges accompany individual temptation. It is a seriously enjoyable and insatiable trespass emulated in its own way by successor Golden Rats but given a whole new web of twists and turns to become scorched by and addicted too. Both tracks reveal more of the bolder hunger and adventure in the band’s sound; exploration further stretched and exploited within the invasively mercurial Death Cab. As its punk heart bellows and ensnares like a malicious Shevils, the band’s rock ‘n’ roll instincts gains momentum, the great blend of vocals following the imaginative endeavour. Wiry grooves and the brooding growl of the bass only add to the unbridled magnetism brewed and devoured.

Poor Man’s Sermon is pure seduction from its first breath, the song slowly unwinding its unpredictable body note by note, clean syllable by alluring word until strolling through post punk/rock terrain courted by throat raw vocal toxicity. It is a fascinating affair and mix which only intensified its ire and hold by the second before the punk hostility of Chased Feelings ripped through ears. It too though embraced a mix of flavours and urgencies within its brief tenure, making way for the anthemic roar and challenging antipathy of Freedom On A Cross. As its predecessor, the track swiftly got under the skin with its predacious swing and inescapable curse of hooks and grooves.

The following minute and a half sees You`re Everything I`m Not ravage the senses, its Converge-esque punk feud colluding with rock ‘n’ roll arousal to manipulate and enslave while Human Machinery straight after sees Cancel spark the imagination more forcibly in its minute of instrumental darkness than many bands do in a ten minute plus flight of suggestion.

Dark Reveries finishes off with its title track, another song which is on the hunt from its opening seconds of sound and invention but with an eagerness which refuses a negative response. It is a swing and purpose which shuffles its attack but cores it with an infectious lure which never deviates from its intent and success.

It is a fine end to an album which just impresses further by the listen. Cancel might not grow to be one of Switzerland’s greatest exports but already they are definitely one of its most pleasurable and captivating.

Dark Reveries is available now @ https://cancel.bandcamp.com/

 http://cancelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/CancelBandOfficial

Pete RingMaster 03/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Coilguns – Millennials

For all their striking projects and releases, of which there have been numerous, it is as Coilguns that the trio of vocalist/guitarist Louis Jucker, guitarist Jona Nido, and drummer Luc Hess has most lit our personal fires and inspired further our love for instinctive sounds and creativity. Their new album Millennials, with synth player Donatien Thiévent in the fold shows exactly why; the ten track exploration of manipulative noise and physical intimation a beautiful predacious trespass.

Written and recorded at the beginning of 2016, the self-engineered sonic invasion instantly overwhelms with the senses ravishing Anchorite. Guitars entwine ears in a devious, corrosive web as the rhythmic ingenuity of Hess stirs and ignites body and spirit. As arousing as his boldly thrown beats are the Jucker and Nido spawned grooves and noise bleeding tendrils are corrosive, all uniting in a hellacious virulence which strings the imagination and senses like a feral puppeteer; a manipulator simultaneously venting through the vocal squalls of Jucker. The track is immense, a visceral seduction which had us cowering as much as we were welcoming its abuse with greedy open arms.

The following Deletionism manages to breed an even more carnal tone and air; its carnivorous jaws littered with biting beats and caustic toxicity but just as infectiously persuasive as its predecessor in temptation and energy. The throaty bassline echoes in the senses as it courts the mercurial but ever invasive stroll of guitar; it all coming together with concussive majesty alongside the rapier swings of Hess and the throat and word scaring roar of Jucker.

The album’s title track is next, a sense charring blaze of rock ‘n’ roll with sonic lava in its breath and inescapable virulence in its rhythms. Hess is simply superb, stirring the track’s intent with ravenous dexterity allowing the calm in its midst to challenge before stirring up a confrontation as violent as it is invigorating. From pure infection the track leaves as a toxic raping of ears and wow did it excite. From start to finish, there are compelling suggestions of best track on the album, and maybe that from Coilguns in general, this one of the most persuasive.

Spectrogram takes the listener into a sonically incinerated landscape, its shadows and scenery a lure of white noise-esque suggestion before a suffocating wave of sound and intensity thickens the drama and the increasingly haunting and haunted climate. Thiévent’s synth flows over the incitement like melancholic mist but with a surf like teasing which captivates, ears moths to its flame in the oppressively infectious dark of the track.

For one minute and a handful of imposing seconds, Music Circus Clown Care has the senses harassed and swinging as if on a barb lined trapeze before cavernous jaws drag them into the torturously arousing grip of Ménière’s. Once again, Hess had us bouncing as the sonic trespass of his companions infested ears and psyche, the track a murderous swagger of craft and contemplation borne of the darkest deeds and times and moulded into one irresistible breathless incursion.

The brief, inhospitable and again inescapably addictive blast of Wind Machines For Company emulates its title in a typhoon of sonic voracity while Self Employment Scheme is an investigation cynical in tone and air niggling at and sucking on the senses like an argumentative tick; never relenting in its harassment but ebbing and flowing in its severity. Both tracks simply brought our lust levels higher as too the grievously writhing antics of Blackboxing, the glorious track ducking and diving with quick footed rhythms and tenaciously swerving noise until delivering a brutally blistering concussion.

The release ends with The Screening, a fascination examination carrying intrigue, captivation, and threat in every note, syllable, and rhythm cast over the senses. Its initial temptation loaded coaxing with Hess once more shaping the bait, grows and intensifies by the moment, simultaneously becoming a harsher imposition and addiction to leave by its departure its victim on their knees breathless and lusting for more.

There is no one like Coilguns and nothing in even their own repertoire to match the noise alchemy of Millennials. It is far too early to declare an album of the year but believe us when we say it will not be straying from those most vocal nominations come late December.

Millennials is available now via Hummus Records and through https://coilguns.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/coilguns    https://twitter.com/COILGUNS

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

34 – Self Titled EP

34 Promo Pic  _RingMasterReview

Grouchier than a stoked up hornet nest and just as damaging, the sound of Kansas City hailing 34 leaves no hiding place for the senses and imagination on the band’s debut EP. The five-track self-titled offering is a rabid and ravenous fusion of hardcore, noise, and metal, all honed into an assault with a sonic sting just as merciless as its rhythmic and vocal bite, and both incidentally constantly veering towards irresistible.

Formed in 2015, 34 features current and former members of bands such as Sisters Of…, Eighteen Visions, At The Left Hand of God, David Hasselhoff On Acid, and Maps For Travelers. It has taken little time for the band to make a potent mark, their live ferocity acclaimed and devoured with shows alongside the likes of Black Breath, Motograder, 68, and Norma Jean adding to the quintet’s rising reputation. Now it is the EP preparing to stir things up further, a success hard to see failing with its impressive and seriously solid introduction to a wider landscape to the band.

The release leaves a lingering and memorable mark with its first two confrontations alone; the EP’s best tracks setting the tone and creative stature of the release with Alpha Blade starting things off. Fair to say we were hooked straight away by the dulled yet anthemic lure of drums which opens up the track. Their flat and compelling resonance easily has ears and appetite attentive, both further gripped as the wiry grooves and sonic animosity of the guitars winds around the senses before allowing the pulsating bassline of Erich Thomas and Jason Shrout’s increasingly addictive beats to lay their magnetic bait. With the throat raw snarls escaping vocalist Brett Carter taking their share of attention too, in no time the song shares a raw magnetism, showing itself a belligerent and aggressive beast with sinews sculpted in virulent noise and biting hooks. Like Unsane meets Pigs with the caustic catchiness of a Coilguns or Shevils, the tracks seduces as it corrodes the senses, every twist and turn within its unpredictable body enjoyably toxic.

34band_LOGO _RingMasterReviewThe following Stick Em Up is just as imposing and thrilling. It opens with chunky scarred riffs which need little time to persuade, their hint of repetitive temptation soon revealed to be one riveting texture in the grooved and rhythmic provocation of the track. As with the first though, things are soon evolving and shifting as melodically fiery and sonically scathing passages entwine with adventurously bruising endeavour within the track’s rock ‘n’ roll. The guitars of Phil Wolf and RL Brooks persistently nag and entice, stirring up the imagination and psyche as Carter vocally and lyrically savages with the backing of the similarly aggressive and potent tones of Brooks.

The final trio of tracks within the EP do not quite live up to the first pair, such their might, but with T.S.Y.T first, all only add to a thickly enjoyable and striking introduction to 34. The third track is as irritable and uncompromising as those before; bullying and arousing the senses with spiky grooves and predacious rhythms as vocals blaze while its successor, Flatliners, springs a Quicksand spicing across its scorched canvas and in its sonic causticity. The song is probably the most adventurous of the five, exploring different creative scenery which swiftly comes and goes, then returns with greater dexterity and imagination as new ear exciting twists become involved.

The EP closes with Machines, a furious tempest and web of emotional and sonic tempestuousness riding on the whiplash effect of Shrout’s and Thomas’ predatory rhythms. It is a forceful and fiercely satisfying end to a great first look at 34. It is easy to see and hear why the band has made such a potent impact already, and to expect, as their sound and imagination grow bolder, they are going to be a potent force in the driving of hardcore/noise ahead.

The 34 EP is released digitally and on limited edition clear red vinyl May 20th via Fountain City Records @ https://34kcmo.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/34kcmo    https://www.instagram.com/34kcmo/

Pete RingMaster 20/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright