Pinkshinyultrablast – Grandfeathered

Pinkshinyultrablast_RingMaster Review

Like the mesmeric shimmer of sun on crystal clear waters, the new album from Russian quintet Pinkshinyultrablast seduces and as if sinking further in that mesmeric state, Grandfeathered steers the imagination into a dream world of bold and unpredictable drama. Not much more than a year ago the Saint-Petersburg hailing band impressed and drew rich acclaim for their debut album Everything Else Matters, but now they have left it in the shadows with the richer invention and imagination of Grandfeathered, a second full-length taking the listener off on a collection of irresistible adventures.

The shoegaze beauty of its predecessor has not been abandoned in Grandfeathered but fair to say it is a bigger and bolder experimentation of sound and flowing ambiences wrapped in celestial born harmonies. That exploration is immediately in evidence within opener Initial. Its first breath is a singular electronic lure, a nagging siren-esque note which is soon joined by aural silver and sonic mercury. There is no escaping the metallic feel of the impending proposal and indeed its harsher dark depths as a scuzzy wind blows across the unpredictable coaxing on the senses. Subsequently though, the song dives into the warm waters of melodies as the bewitching vocals of Lyubov seduces song and ears alongside within the captivating landscape of Rustam’s keys.

It is easy to offer up bands such as Lush and Cocteau Twins as reference to the Pinkshinyultrablast invention but this time around they are mere spices in a recipe distinct to the five-piece as shown by Glow Vastly. Erupting in a scuzz ball of guitar from Roman loaded with fiercely enticing hooks, the song quickly shows a darker intent and range of imposing shadows. Equally though, it entices with a Japan like venture as an exotic climate envelopes ears amidst engagingly invasive electronics with Lyubov’s voice a beacon of radiance and the bass of Igor a provocative temper backed by the roaming beats of Sergey. As the first, and those to come, the song provides a suggestive travelogue of sound which sparks the imagination to roam its own adventure.

Through the rhythmically snappy and melodically bubbly I Catch You Napping and the excited shuffle of Kiddy Pool Dreams, the band sculpts another pair of infection soaked escapades. The first is a collusion of contrasts, heavy rapacious surges entangling with a pop toned catchiness and virulent swagger whilst its successor skips with melodic innocence across the heavier trespasses of raw textures. As ears eventually find themselves drawn into a kaleidoscopic realm of sparkling electronics and unconventional sonic scenery, the ever tantalising and seductive vocals make mesmeric company as a free fall through the song’s soundscape turns into a finale of rousing guitar rock.

The boisterously energetic and contagious Comet Marbles is a radiant shower of temptation and poetic enterprise next complete with a bass led funk seeded undercurrent whilst The Cherry Pit offers its own inescapable web of catchiness through rolling rhythms and flirtatious harmonics. Both tempt and tease in their individual ways with keys and guitars as compelling as Lyubov’s caresses and the blend of contrasting yet perfectly united textures anthemically inviting and often commandingly bracing.

The album is concluded by firstly the invigoratingly punkish exploits of the alternative rock meets fiery shoegaze that is Mölkky and finally the hip involving dance of the album’s title track. Every song has a surging energy and a liveliness which grips body and soul, it as much the by-product of the rich blends woven into their new musical exploration as a determined intent, but Grandfeathered is the one song which leaves exhaustion as rife as rich pleasure.

Pop, shoegaze, alternative pop, however you wish to describe Grandfeathered, the album is one highly stimulating and seriously enjoyable adventure. Its predecessor certainly pleased, but Pinkshinyultrablast has bred, nurtured, and unleashed a beast of unshakable temptation this time around which is sure to poke the keenest global spotlights.

Grandfeathered is released digitally and on CD February 26th via Club AC30 through most online stores with ltd edition “Ride The Sky”, “Pinkle”, and “Acid Lollypop” flavoured vinyl where still available.

https://www.facebook.com/Pinkshiny

Pete RingMaster 24/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Flyying Colours – ROYGBIV EP

Flyying Colours_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Like a favourite candy, the ROYGBIV EP from Australian shoegaze popsters Flyying Colours, is richly flavoursome, addictively captivating, and impossible not to treat oneself to another portion of. It is a delicious slice of aural contagion wrapped in inescapable melodic seduction, and one addiction it will always be ok to indulge in.

Hailing from Melbourne and formed in 2011, Flyying Colours cite My Bloody Valentine and Fleetwood Mac as influences to their own sonic explorations and with the former an immediate spicing and the latter becoming more apparent over listens, they make a healthy spicing to something individual to the band. Similarly the compelling beauty of a Lush and the psych pop seducing of House Of love also nudge comparisons yet there is a bolder, almost bruising texture to the Flyying Colours sound which adds stronger uniqueness to the creative theatre of songs and EP. 2013 saw the release of their self-titled debut EP, a full introduction to their attention grabbing, raw beauty clad sound which came after the first teaser of the single wavygravy. Its qualities and lures are now explored with new intensity and adventure through ROYGBIV, a success with the potential of awakening a really broad spotlight upon their presence.

Flyying Colours EP_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Single songs and the EP as a whole, are as rich in aural colour as its title suggests, but an evolving kaleidoscope of sound rather than a structure of individually layered hues just lying against each other. It all has a changeable and transfixing quality which starts with I Don’t Want To Let You Down. A sonic jangle works on the senses initially with its bait quickly joined by the thick beats of drummer Andy Lloyd Russell. The persuasion of guitar expands the moment the two meet and collude in awakening imagination and appetite, a sonic smoulder with a lively underbelly casting its spell on ears as the equally magnetic vocals of guitarist Brodie J Brümmer caress. The song continues to stroll with warm intent, getting feisty at times especially in a vivacious chorus which sees second guitarist Gemma O’Connor add her siren-esque tones to the mix. The bass of Melanie Barbaro is arguably the most laid back thing on the increasingly fiery encounter, yet her strings only add thick seduction through their thickly magnetic shadows within the blaze of the song.

It is a potent and infection clad track quickly backed and surpassed by the voracious shimmer of Running Late. Guitars jangle and dance in ears, offering a feel of British eighties indie pop a la Orange Juice and Josef K, whilst both vocalists twin up their mellow tempting to stroke ears. There is an unmissable sparking between textures in the song, igniting the thick sonic haze of the encounter further and indeed a sway of bodies and movement of feet and emotions before it.

The increasingly impressive adventure and ascent of the release continues with Not Today, and straight away the song has ears and thoughts spellbound as an opening melodic mist is pierced by one invigorating and tantalising bassline. Its groove is matched by those of the guitars and also in the more low key post punk vocal delivery of Brümmer. That post punk essence is throughout the EP but especially here makes the most delicious lure, suggesting that if Joy Division had gone funky with their sound it would have been something akin to this hex of contagion. Spicy hooks and a rhythmic swagger relentlessly feed a quickly hungry appetite and impassioned lust for the incitement and it is no surprise the song is the lead invitation to the EP, and indeed a favourite across the band’s recent UK tour with Pinkshinyultrablast.

In The End emerges from the closing strains of the triumph, swiftly laying down its own virulent persuasion though reining in the dramatic urgency of its predecessor just a touch as it wraps ears in a thicker smooch. Like the last track though, it barely takes a minute before full involvement of the listener is enticed, the still tenacious energy of the song inescapable incitement to the body as feet tap rigorously and hips swerve to the flow of the proposal.

Final track Leaks almost bludgeons its way into view in comparison to other tracks, the muscular snarl of bass and matching jabbing beats a heavily boisterous lure courting a caustic yet bewitching sonic mesh of sound from the guitars, it all coloured again by the immersive vocals. It is a fiery end to the release, and another irresistible song showing, as each proposition within ROYGBIV, another twist to the sound and invention of the band.

Flyying Colours is cast as shoegaze but their outstanding EP proves that there is much more to their voraciously bubbling shimmer of sound, plenty to appeal to fans of melodic and psychedelic rock as well as those of psych and lo-fi pop.

The ROYGBIV EP is available via Club ac30 in the UK @ http://store.clubac30.com/products/548073-flyying-colours-roygbiv-ep and in the US on Shelflife @ http://www.shelflife.com/catalogue/LIFE126.html now!

https://www.facebook.com/flyyingcolours   http://www.flyyingcolours.com/

RingMaster 18/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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