Bad Solution – The War Within

BS_RingMasterReview

A handful of weeks over two years ago, British metallers Bad Solution seriously impressed with their first EP, Self Destruct. A fiery and inventive roar, it seeded a keen anticipation for the London based band’s debut album; a hunger made to wait but now rewarded with a beast of a first full-length not only confirming that early promise but pushing their sound and writing to a whole new level.

That fresh new adventure tempers the slight disappointment of four out of the album’s ten tracks coming from that first release though such their impressive and highly enjoyable impact there is never a negative hearing them again and again. Their infusion within the brand new tracks on The War Within actually brings other previously less noticeable attributes within the quartet out to join those of their newer companions to create a fully rounded and increasingly riveting proposition.

With originally an all Polish line-up, Bad Solution was formed in 2011 by guitarists Trix and Mariusz Chojnowski. By the November of that first year, British vocalist Alex Willox came in with fellow Brit Joe Patterson replacing Mariusz Burzynski on drums two years later. With the current line-up completed by original bassist Wojtek Suberlak, Bad Solution has gone from strength to strength on the UK live scene, also sharing the stage with the likes of Gallows, The Blackout, and Soulfly across numerous festivals. The release of Self Destruct in 2015 thrust the outfit into a new richness of attention which can only be eclipsed by that generated by the outstanding exploits of The War Within.

Drowning starts things off, instantly confronting ears with rapaciously wiry grooves and hard jabbing beats. It pulls back a touch soon after, relaxing into a more controlled stroll as the guitar weaves a melodic web though still the rhythmic incitement of Suberlak and Patterson brings a bite and lively tenacity. The quickly impressing vocals of Willox are potently backed by the roars of Trix as the song develops a Clawfinger like snarl, it in turn evolving into a just as enticing melody rich cry. The carousel of the song continues to turn, increasingly engaging ears and involvement with very round whilst developing a volatility which only adds to its potency.

cover_RingMasterReviewIt is an outstanding start matched by the equally boisterous and aggressive proposal of Nothing (You don’t know me). Like a fusion of Five Finger Death Punch and Bloodsimple, it is a fiery protagonist grabbing and teasing ears with its muscular and melodically seductive enterprise, Willox again a striking and impressive presence within a maelstrom of ravenous and creatively tenacious magnetism.

Demon In My Bed then follows, beckoning the imagination with its initial Middle Eastern flavoured coaxing, a hue continuing to seduce and flourish throughout the track’s beguiling tapestry of sound and flavours. Once more there is a Clawfinger-esque feel to moments within the song but as in its predecessors, the song soon shows its own individual character in sound and writing as mellow passages beget invasive groove stoked dexterity which begets revolving flames of melodic endeavour.

The melancholic caress of the piano amidst sorrowfully ethereal keys brings Self Destruct into view next, Willox laying his plaintive tones in their arms as darker hues simmer and eventually grow. Veining them are spicy tendrils of guitar and a bass snarl which just intensifies as the song eventually erupts into greater aggressiveness bringing a Papa Roach meets Spineshank air to proceedings. Trix and Chojnowski add additional creative flames with their magnetic guitar craft, the track boiling up with every passing twist and turn for an impassioned climax taking a final bite out of the senses before the calmer presence of Echoes Of The Cry steps forward. With captivating elegance to its melodies and atmosphere, Willox similarly restrained in his tone, the track smoulders and simmers but with an increasing edge which sparks thicker flames of intensity across its lively croon. Though a slow burner compared to those around it, the song simply blossoms over time to one of the album’s truly memorable moments.

The chunky invitation of The Last Lie has ears and appetite swiftly on board whilst adding another strain of refreshing flavouring to the release with its echoes of One Minute Silence. Added to the progressive, slight seventies scented journey of the encounter, it makes for a beguiling and seriously virulent persuasion though still not as addictive as the ever manipulative exploits of Desert Rock. The star of the first EP, it seems to grow with every listen even two years on. It’s also Middle Eastern seeded temptations come backed by a rhythmic incitement which has feet bouncing within seconds. As infectious as they are though, they carry an aggressive bent which strikes almost venomously, the snarling bass matching that ferocity as those early evocative melodies continue to seduce around the addiction stoking chorus. Every band has a track which seals the deal with fans more than any other; this is Bad Solution’s and then some.

The swinging stroll of Dear Sarah follows, a flirtatious affair grabbing feet and hips with its first breath as the imagination comes under the magnetism of tangy sonic tendrils and the vocal prowess of Willox. A fusion of alternative metal and hard rock, the song is as rugged as it is graceful ensuring that the album only increases its grip on ears and pleasure; a hold tightened further by the classic/blues rock hued FOD. A fire of sound and intensity equipped with its own contagious kindling, there is no escaping its creative drama.

The War Within is completed by the equally inflamed White Washed, a track with irritability in its veins and a melodic rapacity in its heart. Suberlak’s bass is a delicious grumble within the flames, though not given enough clarity to groan for personal tastes, whilst Patterson masterfully scythes across the hungry tide of riffs and resourceful web of grooves cast by Chojnowski and Trix.

Though maybe not as impacting as those before it, the track is a fine end to a greed inspiring album. Two years back, the Self Destruct EP suggested Bad Solution were knocking on the door of major recognition. Its opening surprisingly never quite came but no worries, the quintet have just kicked it down with The War Within.

The War Within is available now from most online stores.

 

https://www.facebook.com/badsolution    https://twitter.com/bad_solution

Pete RingMaster 08/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Khasm – Fenris

KHASM_Band_RingMasterReview

Hailing from Colmar in France, it is fair to say that French metallers Khasm have introduced themselves in fine style with debut EP, Fenris. Consisting of four tracks sculpted from the emotional rancor and creative hostilities of old school thrash and death metal, with additional caustic essences, the recently released tempest is a compelling and increasingly rousing incitement for ears and the band’s already growing reputation.

A quartet made up of vocalist Christophe, guitarist Philippe, bassist Matt, and drummer Laurent, Khasm draw on inspirations which include the likes of Feared, Hatesphere, Six Feet Under, and Hatebreed for their own uncompromising sonic trespasses. As swiftly shown by Fenris, there is rawness to their sound which fits their lyrical confrontations but equally an inescapable if punishing virulence bred in the instinctive thrash side of their creative character.

They are essences which instantly grab ears in the Jocke Skog (Feared, Clawfinger) produced EP and its title track. Opening up the release with a great throbbing bassline, the song is soon backing up its coaxing with a tide of inviting riffs and biting beats. Almost as swiftly it hits its thrash driven stride, badgering and snarling at the senses with a repetitive wave of riffs and Christophe’s vocal hostility. There are no surprises with the track but plenty to get eager teeth into and find a hungry appetite for.

FENRIS COVER_RingMasterReviewIt is the same with No More Justice, the song needing mere seconds to whet ears and the imagination with its opening bait of Clawfinger-esque riffery. That passing lure is soon lost in the predatory prowl and rhythmic stalking of the song, an intimidating invitation in its own right which in turn twists and turns into a web of sonic enterprise and galvanic hooks within the track’s open discontent.

The already impressing nature of the EP continues with Nightwatch, a track featuring the guest sonic prowess of Scar Symmetry’s Per Nilsson. It is probably the most inventive and boldly diverse track on the EP without losing the hellacious nature fuelling those around it. The song savages and seduces across its brazen sonic landscape but does miss the final spark as found its predecessors. Nevertheless, satisfaction is thick and another aspect to the Khasm sound and character welcomed before the outstanding Turmoil brings it all to a thunderous end.

The closer opens on a lone reflective vocal, which soon provides the trigger to a senses harrying pressure of rapacious riffs and irritable rhythms, they matched in tone and presence by vocal rabidity and rebel rousing. Subsequent grooves only add to the thrilling drama and assaultive tenacity of band and track. It is a final addictive roar of punk ‘n’ thrash, the pinnacle of the EP and Khasm showing they can rock ‘n’ roll with the best of them.

Fenris is a powerful and memorable base for Khasm to spring forward from with anticipation for their next step already impatient.

The Fenris EP is out now on CD and digitally @ https://khasm.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/khasmofficial

Pete RingMaster 05/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Convoluted – Self Titled EP

convoluted_RingMaster Review

Providing a potential loaded and quickly satisfying introduction to themselves through their self-titled debut EP, Convoluted is a Swedish rap metal band beginning to make a hefty stir, certainly back home. Formed in 2014 by guitarist Stefan Stajkovic, bassist Michael Bergstrand, and vocalist Viktor Brus, the band has a depth and character to their sound which is much more than that previous tag implies. Merging an array of flavours it stands somewhere between Rage Against The Machine, Clawfinger, and Papa Roach, but additionally shows an open fondness for nineties grunge amongst other spices. It is a potion which going by the evidence provided by their EP, creates a slightly fluctuating but constantly rousing incitement.

With their line-up completed by drummer Oscar Ahlbin, Convoluted have become a potent live proposition on the Swedish underground scene, playing the likes of the Emergenza Festival and with fellow local bands such as Oviraptor Club and Mazed on their growing CV. Earlier this year the single Hospital Bed sparked online attention the way of the band through fans and radio shows alike, a success easy to see continuing as the band’s EP begins sizing up and confronting ears.

Recorded at Arena 305 and mixed at Weird Pony Studios by Bjorn Stegerling, the EP opens with The Doctor, a dark and sinister bellow that is as lyrically enticing as it is vocally and musically gripping. In no time ears and appetite are brewing a hunger for what is on offer; its hefty mix of flavours colluding to create an attention grabbing brawl of sound and creative energy sculpted in metal tenacity and getting the release off to a compelling and impressive start.

cover_RingMaster Review  Decide comes next, announcing itself with a bait of tangy choppy riffs which definitely has a spice of Limp Bizkit to them. From there it expels a controlled but energetic stride; the ebbs and flows in its gait adding additional drama to the emerging feisty swagger of the song. The strong voice of Brus leads the antagonistic yet respectful attitude of the track with potent style whilst plentiful grooves and hooks line each aggressive move offered and every wash of fiery melodic endeavour. It is a raw and enjoyable challenge which at times does lose its spark but only for brief moments before re-asserting a pleasingly hostile roar.

The following Get Back Up has a bit of Bad Brains to its confrontation but equally that Clawfinger-esque quality, especially around the vocals and the understanding sounds around them whilst Hospital Bed gets its groove on early with a bluesy/grunge coating. These soon spiral into a sonic weave of enterprise around a sturdy and bracing rhythmic imposing, the blend a rousing tempest to the unmistakable RATM canvas of the song. Excellent when unleashing its volatility but also captivating in its melodic calm, though not always consistently gripping ears as it should have, the track is an attention grabber with a tremendous fury of a climax.

The EP is concluded by the predatory and increasingly adventurous proposal of If There’s A God, an encounter sculpted with tangy grooves and emotive intensity. It is the most unpredictable and thus exciting track on the EP, one which if anything does not go far enough with its unique invention. It certainly brings the release to a strong and magnetic end, with the EP top and tailed by its loftiest peaks of invention, originality, and sound.

Convoluted reveal plenty of potential across their EP and a thick dose of it in certain songs. Theirs is not a sound with its own unique voice yet and the release is not without limitations but both have sparked healthy intrigue and anticipation for what comes next from the band whilst thoroughly pleasing ears.

The Convoluted EP is out now via iTunes.

Pete RingMaster 29/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Feared – Synder

feared_2015

Six albums in with the release of Synder and Swedish metallers Feared have uncaged a fury and voracity which not only confirms the band as one of the relatively unsung greats but has the listener smiling broadly as their soul is desecrated. Feared’s new album is a rousing, destructive beast of a proposition. It is an encounter which is not exactly menacing new boundaries within a thrash/death metal landscape but taking its already established template to dark and creatively ravenous depths which are as fresh as they are rabid. The band’s name describes exactly how their music should be contemplated with the ‘sins’ of Synder greedily devoured.

The story of Feared goes back to 2007, the project the creation of guitarist and producer Ola Englund (ex-Six Feet Under). Despite a potent start and a first demo in 2008, the band disbanded until two years later when things stirred again. Englund and vocalist Mario Ramos (Demonoid) released a self-titled debut album which swiftly earned support and acclaim from fans and media alike, a success built on the following year through second album Rejects. The 2011 encounter lit further focus upon the band which once more escalated as Furor Incarnatus in 2013 came out, though in turn a greater hungry appetite outside the band and striking creative energy within came with fifth album Vinter. The album followed a period which saw Englund also become the new guitarist of The Haunted and the addition of drummer Kevin Talley (Suffocation, ex-Dying Fetus, ex-Black Dahlia Murder) and ex-Clawfinger bassist Jocke Skog to Feared. The release revealed a new intensity and inventive tempest within the band’s songwriting and sound, a gateway to darker ferocious climates which has now been driven on and overshadowed by Synder. Produced by Englund and Skog it is the finest Feared assault yet, from the striking artwork of Sylvain Razorimages wrapping its hellacious roar to the furiously flavoured and diversely coloured adventure, it is an intensive examination and explosive incitement for ears and imagination.

feared_synder_cover  The album’s title track opens things up, the brief instrumental an initial melodic caress of guitar courted by an ominous air which brews and expands as the track comes to rigorous life with thick rhythms and evocative sonic endeavour. It is not a startling start but a potent atmosphere setter, warming up ears and thoughts for the immediate ferocity of Your Demise. Riffs fling their spite at ears with rage and virulent animosity, their thrash breeding an instant gripping lure enhanced by the spicy grooving and thick throat shredding vocals of Ramos. Framing and igniting it all further, the growling grouchiness of Skog’s bass and the precise rabidity of Talley’s beats drive an anthemic urgency and contagion within the track, it all colluding for a breath-taking and thrilling full start to the album.

The impressive and riveting tempting continues in Of Iron And Ashes, the song equally uncompromising and carnivorous but quickly adding floating melodic clouds of keys to its turbulent canvas. Their presence and touch is minimal in the otherwise violent climate but cast an intrigue and unpredictability which eventually is realised in a calm, melodic eye of the storm moment. The volcanic heart and nature of the song is soon ravishing ears though as squirming grooves and tenacious riffery leads ears through a rhythmic jungle into the resourceful venomous grasp of Caligula. Again this song shows as those before it, that there is plenty involved in the thrash/death sound of Feared, here a groove/alternative metal weaving adding to an inventive theatre for a potent Bloodsimple like essence.

My Grief, My Sorrow follows suit in its own individual way, its heavier prowl and imposing intensity a predatory insistence on the senses. It’s stalking takes on even greater malevolence as rhythms make venomous jabs and stabs though the acidic grooving is a constant temper reining in the fury enough to allow mouth-watering melodies and sonic imagination to have their say. As its predecessor, the song takes the imagination on an enthralling ride whilst bruising and battering the body, a respite found straight after though in the classical elegance of the melancholic Dygder, another short and descriptive instrumental.

It leads thoughts and emotions in to the waiting ravenous jaws of By Silent Screaming, an immediately caustic and bracing tsunami of vitriolic energy and creative tenacity. Though never quite matching up to those around it, hail their torrents of riffs and beats, the song is the most exploratory on the album with changeable scenery of melodic endeavour and an almost psychotic air to its rhythmic and unpredictable imagination. It is a fascinating encounter revealing more about the intent of the band’s latest creative explorations with every listen.

The invigorating Wolf At The End Of The World has ears back in a bracing barrage of sonic and rhythmic raging next before My Own Redemption plunders even heavier, darker exploits. From the gut spilling tones of Ramos to the spidery grooves of Englund, the track bewitches as it chews up the senses. It is another stalking incitement but one with the raw heart of a predator and the inventive emprise of a troubadour, the vocals alone a union of bestial pestilence and melodic crooning. One excellent song is replaced by another as Dying Day explodes in ears with incendiary effect, grooves and hooks whipping up the imagination and vicious rhythms taking care of the body as Ramos spills rancor with every syllable.

War Feeding War keeps appetite and emotions inflamed next with its corrosive lures and fearsome persuasion whilst The Narcissist, with a disturbed and vehement web of sound and hostility, is an instantly enjoyable onslaught with plenty that escapes first attention but goes towards increasingly richer return listens. Both tracks involve the whole of the listener, though a point to offer for the whole of Synder to be fair in varying degrees. Some songs, like the first of these two, are more unbridled physical enticements whilst the latter, as also the closing Godless Devotion, provide dramatically deeper and longer to explore proposals.

All tracks though combine to provide the listener with a blistering protagonist to get excited about in Synder and confirm Feared as one of those bands many may have heard about but really should now be making the effort to dive deeply into.

Synder is available now via most online stores and @ http://www.fearedband.com/store-feared-synder

http://www.fearedband.com   http://www.facebook.com/fearedband

RingMaster 28/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Spirytus – The Fundamentals EP

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     An invigorating splatter fest of styles upon a nu-metal canvas, The Fundamentals EP from UK metallers Spirytus is one of those slaps around the chops reminding you just how thrilling the core genre to their sound is when explored with imagination and a snarl which ignites the primitive inside. The use of the word splatter in our description should not be read as meaning it is a random approach with flavours by the Nottingham and Leicester based band as they thoughtfully and skilfully weave those spices into a voracious attack which constantly hits the sweet spot. Not since those halcyon days of Korn at their best and when early Drowning Pool gripped attention has nu-metal sounded this good.

      As mentioned there is plenty to entice and seduce in the band’s sound, its funk rapaciousness showing seeds bred in the likes of Limp Bizkit and Sugar Ray whilst their almost carnivorous side and the spicy elements of the sound holds a close relation to bands such as Rage Against The Machine and even more so Clawfinger. It is a scintillating mix which the The Fundamentals EP brings in feverishly exciting encounter even if one you feel does not quite reap all the potential you suspect is brewing in the band’s inventive belly. It is a magnet of an EP all the same from a band which formed in 2004. though it was three years ago they truly erupted into action. Their self-titled debut album of 2010 sparked keen critical attention upon their presence with the band equally earning an impressive reputation for their live performances which has seen them alongside the likes of Skindred, Panic Cell, Breed 77, Ill Nino, Wolf, Evile and many more. Since that debut Spirytus has brought a shift in their sound through the loss of a guitarist and the welcome of a turntable master in 2012, a move which has only added depth and diversity to an aggressive and mouthwatering confrontational sound. The EP is the first seduction since the album and simply a masterful treat of metallic grooving.

      The quintet of vocalist Ryan Walton, guitarist Alistair Bell, bassist Ben Edis, drummer Ben McAlonan, and Daniel Jones on the Spirytus Cover Artworkturntables from an opening sample go straight to the passions with a sturdy rapacious snarl of riffs and equally intensive rhythms. The bass craft of Edis immediately stands out, intimidating and skilled but it is fair to say the guitar and drums similarly steals their share of the imagination whilst the excellent vocals of Walton toys with air and syllables in a varied and thoroughly enjoyable vocal delivery and incitement which never relents across opener Fundamentals and the whole EP. The track bounces and twists with a creative rabidity around its sinew driven spine of almost disorientating rhythms and predatory riffery. It is an incendiary mix for senses and emotions which to the rear of the song dips into a restrained yet still urgently excitable passage allowing the vocals clear rein to tease and coax. It provides the icing on the feisty cake whilst the British feel to the band’s sound where most might and do emulate the American tone and breath of the genre, is a final potent ingredient to the blistering triumph.

     The following Qandahar strolls in on a resonating throaty bassline before sending streams of riffs and sonically cast grooves around the ear. In seconds though the track is roaming thoughts with a simple but inciting reserve of guitar and vocals before all collude for a fiery infectious chorus which brings not for the last time on the release that Clawfinger reminder. Though not as explosively gripping and dramatic as its predecessor the song is another to swing funk clad hips and forge a groove sculpted swagger which sees the already awoken appetite licking its lips.

     Next up comes the outstanding forthcoming single Mandem, a track also with an accompanying video to eagerly latch onto. A Korn like sonic nagging opens the track whilst the bass again lays down irresistible bait before the song leaps out forward with melodic flames and the ridiculous potency tempting turntable skills of Jones. The antagonistic flow of vocals and the surrounding gritty sonic invention reminds of Hed (PE) at times whilst the groove and table splattering taunts as well as the alternative infectious air of Walton’s delivery is definite Limp Bizkit bred but all soaked in a juice and invention all of Spirytus’ own making. The guitar craft of Bell not for the first time is impressive and perfectly controlled furthering the virulently contagious lure of the song.

     Horses Will Bleed is an eyeballing blaze of provocation and again a track which merges intensity and clarity into a compelling mix which is incredibly addictive and powerfully resourceful without bludgeoning the ears with an overload of greedy ideas. The challenging breath of the song develops another funk toxicity which is irresistible and only the guitar solo, which this time feels a little like showing off and a little at odds with the track, a minor niggle.

     The senses carving electro start to Patience Of A Saint is another thrilling entrance to a song on the EP, an invitation which the track takes through a melodically fuelled smouldering, which again merges Clawfinger and Sugar Ray like essences, plus a pinch of early Papa Roach, into a sultry sonic heat rife with plenty of biting vocals. A slow burner of a track compared to those previous triumphs on the EP, it emerges as one of the most exhilarating and inventive propositions on the release to steal top honours.

     The final stretch of the release does not tempt and grip as strongly and feels like a lost opportunity. The brief instrumental/sample piece Horses is fun but wasted whilst All Because Of Me though again impressively presented and crafted lacks the spark and fire of the previous songs; not a filler but a song too far for this particular release and not really offering anything new upon it. It makes way for the Tribal Riot Edit of Fundamentals featuring Dave Chavarri of Ill Nino; it a more percussive endowed version of the great track which reprises the towering start without really stretching it further, but it is such a thrilling song there are no complaints here.

    The Fundamentals EP is an excellent slab of nu and funk metal devilry, a release soaked in old inspirations but forging its own path. Spirytus have re-ignited an arguably forgotten genre and are right on course to become one of its most inspirational tempters. This is a breath-stealing release from a thoroughly impressive band and they can only get better.

www.facebook.com/spirytusband

9/10

RingMaster 13/01/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Mycelia – Nova

Mycelia Online Promo Shot

Though at times it is uncertain what to make of some elements of Nova, the new album from Swiss metallers Mycelia, the ultimate outcome is a release which leaves the senses alive and thoughts through to passions empowered by the riveting and superbly crafted confrontation. A fusion of progressive and technical metal, the nine track album takes the listener on an enthralling and impressive escapade through sonically carved ventures fuelled by uncompromising melodic and djent invention.

Founded in 2010 by guitarist Mike Schmid and drummer Marc Trummer in the idyllic Swiss mountain town of Le Croix, Mycelia using inspirations from the likes of The Human Abstract, Meshuggah, and The Dillinger Escape Plan was soon creating potent songs. The line-up expanded soon after with the addition of vocalist Marc Fürer, second guitarist Patrick Küng, and bassist Roy Sonderegger. Two digital EPs and shows supporting bands such as Carnifex, Veil of Maya, Suffokate, and Maroon followed as the band built an impressive reputation in the metal scene of their homeland. Debut album Isolator arrived in 2012 to greater acclaim and reception though not long after Küng departed the band. Remaining as a quartet the band worked on writing their second album which they started recording in the latter part of the year with Clawfinger guitarist Jocke Skog at the controls. Seemingly investigating the depths and expanse between bands from The Human Abstract, The Faceless, and Meshuggah to those like Between the Buried and Me, Nova emerges as a riveting exploration which though not flawless leaves a very hungry appetite for the band behind.

The album opens with the towering Shmashmortion, the track immediately standing tall and wide before the ear with crushingMycelia Cover Artwork kinetic rhythms, grievous throaty bass snarls, and ravaging riffs with sonic grooving twisted around their sinews. With great and varied guttural growls squalling over the whole thing as well, it is an intimidating invitation which leaps with expulsions of raptorial intensity directly on to the senses, chewing them feverishly as the guitars dance tight melodic flames over all surfaces. Leaving breath an absentee in the lungs, the song is a scintillating fury to set passions off in tandem with the absorbing corrosive assault.

The following Ectoparasite exercises the same brew of maelstrom bred rhythmic attack and sonic tantalising but in a distinctly different gait and stance. The bass and riffs prowl and provoke a menacing narrative to the venture but that eventually evolves into a mesmeric sultry weave of melodic grandeur and emotive manipulation before returning in union with the acidic beauty. Though not as instantly dramatic as the first song it worms its charms into the heart and emerges as one of the many highlights of the release.

After the brief and refreshing instrumental Dopamine, the track a rhythmic dance within a heated sway of melodic ambience which allows its sinews to also add their potent textures, Nova takes another of numerous twists with C.O.R.P. and its invention. Ridden by less successful clean vocals which admittedly took time to adjust to, the track teases with some psyched grooves and devouring  rhythms veining another devious web of sonic enterprise which seduces the ear and emotions with ease, the technical flare beguiling without being flamboyant. Intriguing and descriptive in its aural narrative, the song leads thoughts into the visual arms of a sultry and dangerous landscape leaving behind a lingering satisfaction.

The Timemasheen is odd, well in its appearance on the release. A mix of dubstep and trance metal it is a decent enough piece which grips limbs to do its bidding without igniting any real fire in the belly but is utterly out of place on the otherwise impressively creative album. Its touch is soon forgotten though as firstly the excellent instrumental Event Horizon with its predacious intensity and carnivorous rhythmically provoked riffing makes its appearance followed by the three part expanse of The Golden Ratio. The Golden Ratio – Prologue opens with a glorious kiss of classical keys and symphonic whispers before climatic drums and growing energy adds extra passion to each aspect. Bone gnawing riffs and flesh scorching grooves emerge to consume without completely dispersing the beauty as the piece pulls the listener into the heart of the sonic travelogue. The Golden Ratio – Interlude takes a moment to re-establish its classic lined grandeur before opening a torrid heat of rapacious malevolence to take the seduction to deeper depths, the pervading union realised to its fullest potency with The Golden Ratio – Epilogue.

It is a stunning three track conclusion declaring and investigating the rich lengths and textures of the songwriting and its immensely crafted interpretation. Nova even with its surprising and less successful moment is an album of the highest pleasure.  Mycelia will be a major force in the future, whether this album is the accelerator is debatable but it gives the confidence to say it will happen at some point.

www.mycelia.ch

8.75/10

RingMaster 10/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Grenouer – Blood On The Face

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Russian metallers Grenouer have been regularly featured and devoured on our podcast The Bone Orchard at www.audioburger.com over the past couple of years so the news and chance to review their new album offered a rapacious hunger to the excitement. The band has left a striking presence with their evolving sound across the years and Blood On The Face continues that accomplished course with ease whilst opening up further suggestions of distinct explorations ahead. The sound is familiar to their fans, their melodic potency and sonic sculpting at its pinnacle, but equally it is a continuation of their now established intent and tempting with an invention and imagination which blends varied flavours and adventure for a deeply impressive encounter.

Released through Mausoleum Records, Blood On The Face combines the five tracks which made up previous acclaimed EP 251139 - Grenouer - CoverComputer Crimes with six new songs and a cover. Initial thoughts were that filling almost half the release with a previous one will disappoint fans but such the strength of those tracks with their new ‘revisited’ arrangements and more so the new compositions, it will be surely merely a passing niggle for most and for newcomers makes the perfect introduction. Produced by the team of Dualized & Eddy Cavazza (Mnemic), Anssi Kippo (Children Of Bodom), and Joonas Koto, the album is an absorbing and enthralling landscape of distinctive melodic metal. At times thoughts of other bands as inspirations make suggestions but Grenouer have a sound which is theirs alone and Blood On The Face a thrilling vehicle to share it through. Formed in 1992 by vocalist Andrey Ind and guitarist Alexander Motor, the Saint Petersburg based quintet have moved far on from their extreme metal origins, the years and releases since then drawing in and embracing a rich and passionate melodic heart to the precisely and inventively crafted songs. This their seventh album, has the opportunity to make a full declaration to the world of their might thanks to the new link up with Mausoleum, and one suspects their rewards will be just as plentiful.

A brooding intro opens up the release, Thunder Phase a dawning of a warm and provocative ambience filled with drifting vocal calls, before merging into the waiting title track. Thick riffs and sonic flames immediately erupt around the ear whilst the rhythms of drummer Michael Coroner cage it all with punch and strength. The ever impressive vocals of Ind unveil their distinct and impressive flames, his unique melodic and at times soaring range just as pleasingly supported by the backing tones of Motor and fellow guitarist Igor Buzzy. It is an intriguing and riveting blend which envelopes senses and thoughts whilst the throaty bass of Dmitry Daemon persistently adds the shadows and menacing depths which lurk and prowl the hot climate crafted elsewhere. The track is a restrained yet imposing start which opens up the album perfectly if without, in hindsight, reaching the subsequent plateaus breached later.

Both Sands of Silence and Midday Show induce greater involvement from the passions, the first with its plaintive yet seductive breath and vocals wrapped in fiery arms of melodic adventure and atmospheric emotion and the second of the two through vigorous and snarling riffs from bass and guitar which stalk and incite the ear around the again intense and emotive call of the song. It is like its predecessor a masterful expanse of imagination and enterprise with only the rapping insert later on into its persuasion taking a while to convince, the excellent song emerging as a mix of Absolace and Clawfinger.

The impressive quality and enjoyment continues and grows with each temptation masked as songs, the compelling Golden Years and the explosive Rejected igniting further lustful obedience before their creative and adventurous lures, whilst Fix Your Life/A Few Miles from Paradise finds a mix of the familiar and new which is honed into a fascination that is lingering and provocative, the keys exploring deeper invention and textured ambiences.

The most thrilling highlights in nothing but, come with firstly the predatory Brain Fever, one of those truly dangerous hunters which deceitfully lay out a welcome of melodic beauty and seduction before gnawing on senses and thoughts with corrosive riffs and crisp splintering rhythms. It is an outstanding song instantly matched by See No Sun and Last Stop. The first of the pair is a smouldering caress of a song, hazy atmospheres veined by a melodic beauty and sculpting which sways and kisses with every second of its sirenesque grandeur though it holds a carnivorous surprise too whilst the second is a reserved but forceful riot of rippling sinews and ferocious enterprise, simply an irresistible contagion.

Completed by a cover of the Stone Temple Pilots song All in the Suit That You Wear, this should be the album to bring Grenouer the recognition long deserved. Blood On The Face is an outstanding album full of refreshing invention, time for the world to wake up to the band.

http://www.grenouer.com/

9/10

RingMaster 28/05/2013

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