Dendera – Pillars Of Creation

Album line-up

Album line-up

UK metallers Dendera whipped up plenty of eager attention and acclaim with their debut album The Killing Floor two years ago and now with its successor Pillars Of Creation poised to ignite ears and appetites with its own unique character, it is easy to expect the Portsmouth band doing the same again with greater success. Embracing a fresh roar of modern rock and invention with their heavy/classic metal breeding in their new offering, Dendera has honed a more distinct sound to themselves, not one to reinvent genres but undoubtedly one to really set the band apart from the tide of likeminded bands.

Since releasing their first encounter, the We Must Fight EP in 2011, it is fair to say the band has had the attention of fans and media alike, a ready to praise spotlight elevated by the release of The Killing Floor in 2013. Live too the band has earned a potent reputation and stature, touring and sharing stages with the likes of Saxon, UFO, Fozzy, Skindred, Firewind, Alestorm, Unearth, The Sword, Orange Goblin, Grand Magus, Ill Nino, POD, Soulfly, Kobra and the Lotus and….well the list goes on. Now the quintet of vocalist Ashley Edison, guitarists Stephen Main and Tony Fuller (the latter having left the band after the album’s recording to be replaced by David Stanton), bassist Bradley Edison, and drummer Andy Finch return with a seriously mighty slab of metal and with ease the band’s finest moment yet.

Dendera cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Pillars Of Creation opens with Claim Our Throne and quickly has intrigue and imagination awake with the track’s opening melodic suggestiveness. Its entrance sets the scene, casting a rich and welcoming landscape yet one with an initial melancholic air which as its depths and scenery builds and expands, evolves into a more intimidating presence. Eventually riffs and rhythms build imposing walls whilst hooks and grooves colour the increasingly compelling emergence of the track with inescapable temptation. In full stride the song roars with the impressive vocals of Edison leading the way as guitars and bass lay down magnetic bait through riffs and enterprise. The old school essences of bands like Iron Maiden and Saxon, which heavily coloured the band’s first album, are still clear hues in song and album but more spices now in a bolder and more creatively individual proposal from Dendera. It is not ground-breaking stuff as mentioned but the band has cultured something rich in variety and resourceful in exploration, and as shown by the starter and reinforced by subsequent songs, created a sound which will send fans into bliss whilst offering plenty for those who maybe do not have an appetite for a classic form of metal to have eager interest in.

The impressive start is matched by Bloodlust, the song straight away living up to its name and exploding with a far more raw and predatory presence than that of the previous song. Thrash spiced riffs are rampaging through ears from its first breath, they and rhythms whipped up by the confrontational vocals. It is a tenacious and grouchy encounter which mellows out for its melodically fiery chorus, but is soon back stirring up air and blood with the same insatiable surges of intensity and sound which it first erupted with. Its blend of contrasts is a fluid and alluring invitation, a persuasion emulated again in the stormy nature of In High Tide. A cantankerous tempest of rock ‘n’ roll, the track aligns sonic croons with bestial snarls and rugged hostility, their fluid passage making for a fascinating and increasingly anthemic incitement on ears and emotions.

Already across three songs, Dendera has infused elements from groove and melodic thrash to varied heavy rock, an involvement never diminishing just evolving and changing across every song starting with the stalking of senses that is Disillusioned. Another song reeking attitude and carrying an almost primal swagger, it prowls ears with an intimidating air driven by the ever impressive and masterful rhythmic webs of Finch. Groove wise there is a definite Pantera edge and swing to the track’s core lure, one in many ways copied in the excellent vocal persuasion of Edison and potently backed by the band’s roars and the guitar endeavours of Main and Fuller, especially with a seriously tasty and incendiary solo.

The Daylight Ending is a sweat and spit encounter, rhythms and the delicious bass bait of Bradley Edison a barbarous proposal matched by riffs whilst guitars and vocals carry an aggressive

new line-up

new line-up

nature to their provocative and inventive craft. The song is a gallop for the main, a relentless foraging of body and imagination leaving an even hungrier appetite which The Chosen One feeds with its dark and heavy trespass of the senses. The song does not quite grip as other tracks, missing an indefinable spark to ignite personal tastes but there is no denying or not enjoying its invention and adventure, especially it’s contagious and at times brutal gait.

The explosive sonic flames and melodic passion fuelling Unholy sparks a lick of lips within a few explosive moments next, riffs and grooves almost swarming over the senses and into the passions as bass and vocals virtually prowl with their own inescapable persuasion. The beats of Finch are a bully but a welcome protagonist as again he sculpts an addictive frame and engine room for a song.

Pillars Of Creation is brought to a close by Edge Of Tomorrow, a fire of aggression and passion within a sonically tempestuous soundscape. It fiercely pleases on first touch but, as the album, just impresses and draws keener lustful reactions with every listen. The release is a must for all classic and heavy metal fans but such the new adventure and variety the band has woven into their songwriting and sound, there is much for all metallers including, us among them, those without an instinctive taste for old school roars. In fact it very likely will, as here, emerge as a favourite of the year for fans and newcomers alike.

Pillars Of Creation is available via Metalbox Recordings from June 22nd @ http://www.denderauk.bigcartel.com/

http://www.dendera.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/DenderaUK

RingMaster 22/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Titans Eve – Chasing The Devil

Titans Finals print-1_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Photo Credit : Shimon Karmel

Not only reinforcing an already potent reputation, Chasing The Devil from Canadian metallers Titans Eve pushes their presence and sound powerfully forward whilst sharing the open declaration of this is who we are, this is what we have for you, enjoy! Fusing a broad flavouring of metal with a thrash bred heart, sure enough it is a hard to resist offer but also a proposition which ignites the imagination and emotions to giving modern metal a very good name.

Hailing from Vancouver, Titan’s Eve emerged in 2008 having been formed by lead vocalist/guitarist Brian Gamblin and his guitarist/vocalist brother Kyle; drummer Casey Ory joining them straight away and bassist Jesse Hord subsequently completing the line-up. Taking their time honing their sound and lighting up a local fan base, the quartet really began waking up the Canadian metal scene around 2009/2010 with a tour across Western Canada followed by debut album The Divine Equal. Extremely well-received and acclaimed, the release also led the band to recognition further afield and a two month tour across North America in 2011. Their strong emergence continued the following year, starting with supporting Korn and the creation and release of second album Life Apocalypse, which in turn was followed by playing with Anvil, touring with Kill Devil Hill, and supporting Arch Enemy on their European Khaos tour. The album followed its predecessor in luring strong praise and attention upon Titans Eve, something Chasing The Devil now will definitely replicate and most likely take to new levels. Recorded with producer and engineer Eric Mosher, and mastered by Jeff Waters of Annihilator, Chasing The Devil takes the expected aggressive and uncompromising sound of the band and ignites it with arguably their most melodic and creative spicing yet…the result one gripping and thoroughly enjoyable tempest.

Titans Eve-Chasing The Devil_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     Opener We Defy drives in from a distance first, healthily brewing riffs closing in before upon arrival triggering punchy rhythms and a highly flavoursome guitar enterprise. Once united it all settles into a muscular stride driven by crisply landed beats and a dark hearted bassline, the guitars spinning a web of thrash riffery bound in melodic and groove metal imagination. It is a pungent blend with the final potent ingredient being the snarling delivery of Brian’s vocals, his tones more sandy than gravelly but a great texture and attack for this and all songs. The album starter continues to grow and expand in invention and sound as its proceeds, never relinquishing its core anthemic contagion and blatant aggressiveness but filling ears with potent persuasion.

The immense start is continued by War Path. The second track is similar in style initially but soon unloading uncompromising beats and a surge of hungry torrential riffs, though they both pale against the excellent predatory bassline which really begins stalking ears after an early blaze of band vocals. There are essences of bands like Exodus and Testament to the song, as in many, but equally a weave of nu, groove, and heavy metal which only helps turn the encounter into one of the pinnacles of the album. The song is a benchmark for the release emulated with regularity starting with the following No Kingdom. A melodic caress draws in ears and appetite first before things get intensive and antagonistic, the drums unleashing a barrage of thunderous bait as the guitars drive ferociously and seduce melodically through another persistently shifting design. It is a fascinating proposition though it never goes far enough in its hostile voracity or sonic ingenuity for personal tastes, something which could be said of the whole album. It is as if the band is trying too hard to balance the opposites instead of giving them their reins, but nevertheless the song just hits the sweet spot as its successor.

Another Day is the most bestial song on the album yet, vocals and its sonic nature a barbarous confronting of the senses in turn coloured by the raw and bracing alignment of caustic riffing and imposing rhythms. A fiery solo sows seeds for further melodic endeavour as well as the tenacious, almost punk metal like surge of incitement which flares up. It is a song ensuring ears and appetite only get greedier for sound and album, a hunger equally inspired by the title track and in turn The Grind. The song Chasing The Devil brews a rich old school character from its tantalising and evocative melodic opening, the track weaving a tapestry of classic and heavy metal strands into a canvas of darker bred and fuelled flavouring. Thoughts of Judas Priest meets Machine Head are prompted as the track continues to ignite ears and imagination, through its more modern enterprise hints of Mudvayne too. They are all alluring hues colluding for another peak of the release instantly equalled by the second of the pair which from the initial carnivorous tone of bass, is simply a primal tempting sparking lustful attention. With its prowling voracious persuasion of sound, the song easily lives up to its name, its riffs a ravenous persistence on the senses and the swings of Ory an unrelenting intimidation. There is no lack of addictive grooves and sonic colour either, each lining the incitement with irresistible hooks as the encounter steals the whole show.

The album is completed by firstly the bewitching instrumental Stranded, where harsh cold and melancholic emotions are lit and conjured by a seduction of acoustic expression, melodic reflection, and stringed beauty. Dark shadows and keys crafted elegance only add to the mesmeric narrative before The Endless Light steps forward to bring the album to a fine close. The track is a maelstrom of sounds and skilled resourcefulness as raw and magnetic metal collude in a thrash powered and diversely cultured storm of dark hearted and captivating fury.

Chasing The Devil is a treat of a proposal, further evidence of the exciting craft and might of Titans Eve with only the suggestion that it was not as bold as it could or at times suggested it might have been a passing thought. It certainly provides a seriously enjoyable adventure for metal in 2015 and that in our book is a big success all should take a punt on.

Chasing The Devil is available from June 12th @ https://titanseve.bandcamp.com/album/chasing-the-devil-2

http://www.titanseve.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Titans-Eve/53568260495?fref=ts

RingMaster 12/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Sacred Wind – Sacred Wind

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Having had our pleasures goosed by Odin’s wind courtesy of Metal and Curry, the recent single from Welsh Viking bred rockers Sacred Wind; there was no option but to check out the album from which it comes. Released towards the rear of 2014, the thirteen track adventure, also going under the name of Sacred Wind, reveals the full landscape and creative emprise hinted at by our first introduction to the band.

The album is a tale of bold knights, even bolder flatulence, and a rampant hunger for cheese, not forgetting a few buxom women draped around a curry or two. Even more potently the album is bulging with glorious heavy metal and classic rock psalms of heroic deeds and Norse seeded challenges. From its first moments there is no doubting that Lord of the Rings/ Game of Thrones have found a richly mischievous companion in Sacred Wind, an alternative reality comparison, but that cannot hide or devalue the impressive craft and roaring sonic might of band and album.

Opener A Time of Magic is a vocal introduction between grandfather and child, be it a kid with the squeak of an adolescent aged forty plus with one ball dropped and one hovering. Questions from the latter bring an unveiling of the scenery and drama behind the album’s premise from the former, a telling of the background to the quest undertaken by the noble warriors regaled through the songs. These brave souls are called Sacred Wind and the following album title track, their opening scene. Hefty rhythms and fiery riffs make an immediate impression upon ears; the guitar hooks an almost predacious lure matched by the heavily throated bassline courting their attitude. Subsequently keys and raw melodies add to the canvas upon which Memphis bred Viking and vocalist/guitarist Olaf the Berserker reveals the narrative. It is a pungent offering, old school and swiftly anthemic.

The impressive opening song is matched straight away by Metal and Curry, the track similarly an inescapable anthem but with a lighter swagger to its gait and harmonic roar. Whilst meaty hooks and melodic tenacity from Olaf and Grundi the Windy are thrust through ears to seduce the senses, a rhythmic stomp provided by bassist Smid the Merciless and drummer Agnar the Hammered ensures neck muscles and imagination are flush with an appetite to devour the song’s tremendous contagion.

Already Sacred Wind is lighting body and emotions like a mix of Gwar meets Green Jelly meets Judas Priest, though that only narrows down what is a much broader flavour to the album. The band’s humour is just as open and ripe too but only in the lyrical and thematic adventure, their sounds a blaze of creativity and exciting endeavour which has plenty for all metallers, let along those just honed in with just a taste for classic rock ‘n’ metal. It is fair to say though that Hurricane Ass next is purely steeped in seventies metal bred in a bed of similarly aged classic rock. Begging for the power of a certain bodily function to help woo a prospective love, the song flames with sonic enterprise and vocal harmonies, transfixing ears as it heads towards to a firework like display of a finale, beats exploding across its melodramatic sky.

The combative character of Warriors of Asgard takes the success of its predecessor to new heights next, the track sinew and ferocity as the warriors take arms to rescue damsels in distress. Equally though it is unafraid to light their way with beacons of melodic ingenuity through the guitars and the symphonic yawn and soar of keys. The track is a delicious cinematic like escapade, not only a potent visual offering for the imagination to run with but simply an infectious slice of melodic metal.

Both the eighties kissed Sail with Me and the climactic bellow that is Rock, Rock, Rock, Rock Ragnarok keeps things on appealing and satisfying course, though neither can rival the some of the previous encounters. The first covers an emotional realisation brought by romance and the other an apocalyptic incitement to the Gods. Each brings new diversity and intrigue to the album leaving thoughts engaged and enjoyment contented is without setting a fire in their attention, something the power ballad Frigg certainly manages with its dark grouchy shadows and sonic balladry of vocal and melodic expression. Strong the first time and increasing its lure thereafter, the track is a slow burner which as quite a few songs upon Sacred Wind has the ability and persistence to flirt with the memory whenever it wishes.

Fart for Odin, by title alone, needs no help in explaining its narrative to the imagination, it a bar room ode and mead fuelled anthem within a tempestuous sonic and rhythmic turbulence. It is another thumping antagonist to body and fun though soon surpassed by the outstanding Dragon Ships and Women’s Hips. Impossibly virulent from its first sweep of vocals and initial tease of melody, the song brings rock pop from the late seventies, glam metal from the eighties, and nineties folk metal in one irresistible catchy croon. Think Alestorm meets Duran Duran and you get an inkling of the majestic lure of the pinnacle of Sacred Wind.

The battlefield brings the background to My Sword is my Sword firmly into thoughts, the power metal offering soon expanding its tale with horn like calls of the keys and predatory rhythms around the vocal roar of Olaf, all courted by the cantering invention of the guitars. Its spicy persuasion is followed by the celestial instrumental hymn of The Sheep’s Lament, which in turn makes way for the closing celebration of The Power of Cheese, though why anyone would want to crow so favourably about the mouldy stuff beats us. The song, as the previous track is a bonus offering on the album, and brings the release to a riotous yet melodically sizzling end.

It would be wrong to think of Sacred Wind as a one off good time to file away as you might a Green Jelly or in some ways a Steel Panther offering. Lyrically yes it is a roaring laugh but musically album and band stand side by side with any power metal, classic rock offering, just with an extra dose of mischief. Produced and arranged by Andy Coffey, who has a much bigger hand in things then you might suspect, including writing the excellent books which accompany the album’s story, the album is recommended to anyone with an appetite for strong, accomplished, and most of all enjoyable full fat metal.

Sacred Wind is available now via iTunes, Amazon etc. and the Sacred Wind books @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Andy-Coffey/e/B00LXLNW64/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sacred-Wind/136135083263791

RingMaster 18/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

Sacred Wind – Metal and Curry

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The Vikings came, rampaged, and going by Sacred Wind, left some berserker seed to breed and bide its time before invading the classic metal timeline. The band from the hill sculpted landscape of Llangollen in Wales is the embodiment of Tolkien like mischievous adventure, heroic wrongdoings, and salacious revelry. They also create a classic metal incitement which sears and excite body and soul, as proven by new single Metal and Curry.

Taken from the band’s acclaimed self-titled debut album, itself an invigorating march of anthemic riffs, fiery melodies, and soaring hair wilting vocals, the new single tells you all you need to know about Sacred Wind and its dynamic sound. Like a Terry Pratchett inspired Friday night out narrated by firm tongue in cheek lyrics and a similar rascality in presence, Metal and Curry leads the listener by the hand into dens of liquor running devilment.

With the band members going by the name of Olaf the Berserker (lead vocals/lead guitars), Grundi the Windy (lead guitars/backing vocals), Smid the Merciless (bass guitar/backing vocals), and Agnar the Hammered (drums and percussion), newcomers to Sacred Wind might expect something like Gwar meets Green Jelly or Spinal Tap. The band though swiftly evades those thoughts taking firm hold by unleashing a sound which is as skilfully accomplished as it is dramatically fiery and an energetic presence which makes Alestorm seem reserved. The band’s album is all the evidence needed to suggest Sacred Wind is one of the UK’s brightest heavy metal protagonists, Metal and Curry even swifter proof.

Its first breath is a stomping invasion of heavy footed beats courted by a predatory bassline and swiftly bound in sonic enterprise. The potent start relaxes a whisper to open up the way for the rich vocals of Olaf to harmonically roar, his entrance accompanied by meaty hooks and melodic tenacity from the guitars. As maybe you would expect from the band and its creative backgrounds, there is a swagger to the song which translates to every swing of a drum stick and forceful plucking of strings, not forgetting a raucously anthemic chorus expelled by the band. The core of the track is not startlingly original you could argue but with a glorious flame of craft and enterprise from guitars which includes a highly magnetic solo, it soon establishes a unique and ridiculously contagious presence.

It is a beast of a song but more inviting than barbarous and an irresistible recruitment of neck muscles and voice. The song is a wonderfully rowdy doorway into the heart of the band’s album but also sums up the character and devilish presence of Sacred Wind as a complete proposition. Accompanied by a trilogy of books written by Andy Coffey, who might just be involved even deeper in the band we say in a whisper, Sacred Wind is a Norse bred Sláine corrupted Game of Thrones theatre in many ways but with a musical creativity and rich blaze of a sound which puts many established classic metal bands to shame.

Explore the whole world of Sacred Wind @ http://www.sacredwind.co.uk

RingMaster 20/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Forged In Black – The Exodus

Forged in Black Online Promo Shot

Though UK heavy metallers Forged In Black is far from being a new band, they have found a new shift and exploration in their sound and thoughts which has led to a relatively recent name change, a renaming which reflects line-up changes and this progression in sound. Their new encounter is The Exodus EP, a release consisting of one brand new track and a couple of early demos of older songs. It is sure to be a tonic for all fans of adventurous classic metal, imposing riffs, and flesh scoring vocals, whilst for the rest it still has enough to stir attention.

The band began in 2009 under the name Merciless Fail, emerging with the intent to merge traditional heavy metal with a unique contemporary essence. The band swiftly earned a strong reputation for their live performances, playing both Bloodstock Festival and the main stage at Red Roar Festival in 2012 and going on to win Metal to the Masses and Band Quest competitions. 2013 was the band’s most successful to date, playing Metal Gods Festival 2013 alongside the likes of Beholder and Savage Messiah, supporting Skreamer and again Beholder, and re- releasing acclaimed debut album Forged in Black. As the following and similarly well-received The Tide EP, the album came out last year for its second outing, two years after the first appearance and under the new band name. It was the four-track EP which showed a suggestion of a twist in the band’s sound, something far more pronounced and exploratory now with the Romesh Dodangoda (Motorhead, Sylosis, Bullet For My Valentine) recorded The Exodus.

The opening melody of the title track is simple bewitchment, a potent lure reinforced by the emerging stride of imposing rhythms and climatic swipes of guitar. There is a definite thrash breath coverto the track once fully in view, an early Metallica essence to ignite imagination and appetite. It is swiftly infused with heavily toned riffs and the rich vocals of Chris Storozynski, his classic style standing eye to eye with the rugged elements of the track but matching the acidic sonic flames around him. A great bruising vocal backing from bassist Kieron Rochester badgers the fiery tones of Storozynski as they lie on the skilled weave set by guitarists Tim Chandler and Andy Songhurst. The track ebbs and flows with its driving torrents and dramatic crescendos, providing a fascinating encounter offering something for thrash, classic, and heavy metal fans and as suggested previously enough for even those not as enamoured in the genres to find intrigue in.

A 2013 demo of Accusations Of The Innocent is next, the original track having previously featured on album and last EP. Once again a thrash invention helps open up ears and focus before the track spreads into more classical metal scenery wrapped with a creative web of guitars and spicily delivered vocals. Again there is plenty to get your teeth into even if the track feels a little reined in compared to its predecessor. With a cauldron of impressing guitar craft and invention courted by the excellent punching rhythms of Joshua Moreton, the song before it makes way for the 2011 demo of the song Forged In Black, shows exactly why the band has inspired such a potent fan base and reputation. Its successor instantly reveals the rich seeds and bait which has been persistent within the band from their start. Comparisons to the likes of Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, and Black Sabbath come with the mention of the band’s name and it is easy to see why with the closing song. Muscular and sonically sultry, it has feet and neck muscles pumped whilst the operatic calls of Storozynski finds a welcome home in the rich melodies veining the incitement.

The Exodus is a release to put a smile on all heavy metal fans but as shown especially by its lead song, it also has the potential to awaken strong appetites in those less taken with its core breeding, a potency shown by it persuading our less than enthused tastes for classic metal and its vocal styling.

The Exodus is available through all stores from December 1st.

https://www.facebook.com/forgedinblacks

RingMaster 01/12/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Metal Moth – Rise EP

Rise Artwork

Though the band name might not have convinced yet, there was no such problem with the aggressive incitement unleashed by UK metallers Metal Moth on their Rise EP. The band’s debut is four slabs of classic metal bullied and twisted into a rampage of modern melody enriched rock ‘n’ roll. It has more familiarity than originality to its potency and presence but this only fuels the potential and thorough enjoyment given by the heavily flavoursome entrance of the band.

Formed in 2012, Metal Moth was soon stomping across country and venues with their adrenaline fuelled barbarous sounds. An enthusiastically growing fan base came hand in hand with their emergence, one sure to be reinforced and accelerated with the release of the Rise, the first of three consecutive EPs. Band and release ignite appetite and imagination within seconds as opener Moth To The Flame stands toe to toe with ears, flinging weighty rhythms and sinew crafted riffs with antagonistic intent. It is a ferocious start which only intensifies as the riffing and heavily swinging beats stampede with flared nostrils across the senses. Around this assault invention mischievously offers acidic grooves and a deliciously carnal bassline whilst vocally Kurt Hudson excels with his melodic yet snarled delivery. From the merciless swipes of drummer Natalie Gaines to the threatening bass predation provided by David Collinson (who announced his departure from the band in recent days), and the fiery adventure and skilled devilry provided by guitarists Mark Gibbons and Chris Fisher, the track is gripping drama and ruggedly impressive.

The same can be said of the following One More Time, again a proposition which has speakers bulging under its savage rhythmic onslaught and ravenous riffery. Equally there is no escaping the rigorous contagion uncaged within the track or the unpredictable twists and jagged barbarism which gnaw on the senses as wiry flames of melodic endeavour flirt with similarly rapacious intent. It is a full blooded stomp which again has recognisable traits but just as plentiful new designs and invention in its lyrical and sonic provocation.

Melt Down steps up next and immediately is a haze of sonic menace swiftly speared by those pungent beats of Gaines and the crunchy scythes of riffs from the guitars. Either side of that core Metal Moth Pic 2there is the vocal quality and fluid expression of Hudson and the dark predatory tones of Collinson’s bass, each complementing and sparking against the other. It is a blend which magnetically colours the threatening prowl and confrontation of the track, especially when aligned to the intermittent eruptions of melodic and unpredictable intrigue offered by Gibbons and Fisher. Though the song does not brawl with and corrupt the passions at the same strength and immediacy as its predecessors, it reveals more depth to the invention and skills of the band whilst laying down a tasty appetiser for the EP’s finale.

The closing Metal Maniac also takes a more restrained approach to its seducing of ears, the bass rumbling with dark devilry whilst guitars create a web of melodic coaxing. It is not long though before the song settles into a fevered stroll as addictive grooves and hooks provide riveting barbs to the feisty lure of the track. Providing a thrilling end to a just as exciting debut, the track sums up the band and release perfectly, that being rock ‘n’ roll at its instinctive and insatiable best.

If the next pair of EPs matches and confirms the promise and already accomplished quality in skills and sound of the band, it will be impossible not to suggest that as they evolve Metal Moth will be a band playing a big part in the evolution of British metal ahead. To be honest though, if this is as good as it gets there will be few complaints either.

The Rise EP is available digitally now @ http://metalmoth1.bandcamp.com/album/rise

https://www.facebook.com/MetalMoth/

RingMaster 12/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Asomvel – Knuckle Duster

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Roaring at and bruising up the senses with a riot of belligerence and unkempt rock ‘n’ roll, Knuckle Duster the new album from UK band Asomvel is an uncompromising and thrilling storm of prime beef heavy metal. With a more than healthy throbbing vein of punk rock and Motorhead like bruising rock to it also, the album is a pungent blaze of sound and attitude which continues the impacting and sparking presence of the band since their first days and provides the year with a release which has no want to create new pastures for metal but is more than ready to churn up and reseed existing fields.

The band was formed in 1993 by guitarist Lenny Robinson and bassist/vocalist Jay-Jay Winter, with a line-up completed by ex-Cathedral/Acid Reign drummer Mark Wharton. The position behind the beats changed on numerous occasions in the earlier years before The Blood Eye demo was released in 2002. Establishing a strong reputation for their sound and live performances Asomvel released the To Hell with All the Rest Demo in 2005 and the Full Moon Dog EP two years later to strong responses and acclaim. It was debut album Kamikaze of 2009 which really set the metal underground and media on alert with its raucous presence and set a rigorous platform for the band ahead. Within a year though tragedy struck when Winter was killed in a road accident which understandably devastated the band. Determined to continue with the spirit and presence of Winter still part of the band, Robinson took time to find a musician to not only match what the frontman brought and intended for the band, but to continue his attitude. It was with the finding and addition of ex-Deathwing bassist/vocalist Conan that the band came back to full life, Asomvel soon after headlining their own inaugural Full Moon Dog Festival in Bradford in 2011 in honour of Winter; the event also seeing the stage thriving with the likes of Carcass, Anvil, and Orange Goblin. Following the Stare at Death & Spit EP of the same year and the split release Vol. 1 of last year, the band with drummer Jason Hope surge back with the Bad Omen Records released Knuckle Duster and it is a fluid continuation of the last album and sound.

Produced by James Atkinson (frontman of Leeds rockers Gentleman’s Pistols), Knuckle Duster flies at the ear with opener Dead Set on Asomvel Knuckle Duster cover loLivin’, drums and bass making an instant rapacious charge around and through the ears whilst the guitar scorches their surface with sonic causticity. The vocals of Conan snarl and growl with a throaty rasp which you could easily mistake for Winter without prior knowledge, to again cement that feeling of the band around the time of Kamikaze though there is also an air of the now in the venom and inciting breath of the track, and subsequently album. With a raw edge suggesting the release was recorded live in the studio and an unpolished touch which only ignites the instinctive appetite for dirty rock ‘n’ roll, the track makes a strong and magnetic  start to the album, its groove one which only eager submission is the order of the moment.

The following Cash Whore and Sheep in Wolf’s Clothing immediately take the impressive start and shift it up another adrenaline fuelled gear, the first of the two a carnivorous persuasion which grinds its way to the passions whilst tearing up the scenery with a blaze of hungry riffing and rhythmic barracking whilst its chorus is simply a primal torrent of pleasure giving dirt throwing excellence. The melodic flames of the guitar also send shards of addiction causing pleasure through to the heart to help sculpt one of the early pinnacles of the album. Its successor stands side by side with its swagger of blues bait and intensively contagious punk ‘n’ roll teases. There is a southern lilt to the hooks which only light greater attraction whilst the punk rock scythes of guitar and anthemic vocals add to a combination which leaves senses and passions with a great greedy hunger for more.

Both Thrash Talker and Waster settle down the climb of the release though each provides a provocation which continues the compelling draw of the album and the uncluttered, organic fire bred fury of sound. The pair again leaves appetite fully satisfied though its greed is ready to devour the insatiable thrashing surge of Shoot Ya Down and the groove carved Wrecking Ball with a grin on its voracious lips, a lust the songs feed but incite further. Like their predecessors the two encounters leave ears full of cutting riffs, commanding vocals, and a bass grizzle which especially on the second of the pair is as predacious as any offering this year.

From the outstanding title track, a song which glares at the listener eye to eye and challenges it to resist its irrepressible temptation, the album unleashes a closing ravaging of the senses with firstly the savage Final Hour. The track is a ferocious yet melodically grooved blaze of ridiculously infectious combative posturing which is backed up within a gulp of breath by the sizzling intimidation that is Strangehold, the drums of Hope a hypnotic conjuror and instigator of instinctive compliance so the riffs and vocals can cut and graze their punkish vitriol into the psyche.

     Hangman’s Rope closes up the album with a searing heavy metal finale though it is the one song which noticeably pales against the rest of the tempests upon Knuckle Duster. It is still a satisfying and easy to return to growl finishing off a powerhouse of honest to the ground rock ‘n’ roll which maybe is not offering anything new but provides a potently exciting bruising and thrilling confrontation. Asomvel are still one of the true joys of UK’s metal underground just now you sense they may get a much wider recognition.

http://www.asomvel.com/

8/10

RingMaster 07/10/2013

 

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