Vienna Ditto – Circle

Vienna Ditto _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With every song and single released, UK duo Vienna Ditto has enhanced the seductive hex they have laid on certainly our ears since being infected by the band’s Ugly EP in 2013. Now the pairing of Hatty Taylor and Nigel Firth has set free their long awaited and highly anticipated debut album, and fair to say that their melodic voodoo has just got seriously enslaving. Bringing some old fan favourites together with re-workings of older releases and brand new slices of sonic devilment, Circle is a bewitching romance of sultry atmospheres, bordering on sinister melodic beauty, and psychedelic sunspots of harmonic alchemy.

Originally meeting when Firth taught Taylor the guitar when she was 11 years old, the duo began writing and creating together in 2009 after meeting by chance again in the street. Within a week of that moment, they recorded an electronic version of the Johnny Cash classic Ring of Fire and in a matter of another seven of so days created and unveiled their own first song Long Way Down. This quickly managed to find itself played on Huw Stephens’ Radio One show, leading to Vienna Ditto playing the BBC Introducing stage at Glastonbury. 2011 saw the band’s self-titled debut EP get a well-received release, its temptation the beginning to greater attention and responses earned by a couple of singles and more so the Liar Liar and Ugly EPs two years later. With further singles only enhancing and confirming the duo’s potent emergence and increasing evolution of sound, there has been a greedy appetite brewing amongst a great many for this first album. Now here it is easy to say that no-one will be disappointed and for newcomers, well simply welcome to a new musical lust.

The encounter opens with This Is Normal, a song instantly luring ears through a minimal but potent bassy riff and the siren-esque tones and expression of Taylor’s voice. As crispy beats and additional guitar enticing joins the mix so the song’s energy also elevates, though it is quickly back into the low key gait so things continue to be potently intriguing and unpredictable. As electronic invention springs its bait next, the track eventually slips into a magnetic stroll with Morningwood like revelry but yet again things only get twisted and turned around to relentlessly excite ears and imagination.

Owly circle_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review    The irresistible start is emulated and surpassed by the following Feeling Good. With garage rock hooks colluding with surf and sci-fi shimmers, the song is quickly teasing and flirting like a sixties Venusian temptress. Also though there is simultaneously a climatic and sultry air enveloping the senses whilst beneath it a smouldering Tarantino cultured landscape becomes the home for an irresistible dance of vocals and grooves. The song is pure musical and emotional drama, an infection getting under the skin and into the psyche whilst providing the first major pinnacle of the album.

A melodic calm caresses ears next through the mellow charm of Wintertime. Comparisons to Portishead have been a regular offering since Vienna Ditto began and easy to see why with the golden kiss of charm offered by the tantalising third song on the album. It has its own intimacy and individual, almost raw innocence and beauty though as it casts a lingering peace which eventually makes way for the off kilter cosmopolitan enticement of A Happy Car is a Stolen Car. With a ska shaped bassline and exotic melodic hues within a spatial atmosphere, the song is a fascinating waltz of warped imagination and enterprise. The effect hugged vocals of Taylor court the bedlamic shuffle of the song and again a sixties pop hued psyche rock twisted soundscape. It takes a couple of listens or so to fully explore and understand the wonderful turbulence of ideas and bold adventure at work but rewards patience with another major highlight within Circle.

The band takes ears back into the dusty climes of a Morricone like terrain next through Pale Horse Rider, voice and strained guitar strings a compelling lead into a continually evolving and absorbing immersion of sound and emotion. Beauty again is the keenest description to lie at its door before the first of the band’s two current singles step forward side by side. Oh Josephine which we are led to believe is a tribute to dancer and civil rights icon Josephine Baker, has a haunting and pulsating shine to its air, a glow which resonates across every aspect as rhythms and the simply catchiness of the song steal body swerves and lustful thoughts from the listener. The following Long Way Down is an epidemic of addictiveness and brilliance. Primarily garage punk and rock across its numerous strands of temptation, the song also weaves a funk and synth pop lure encased in psychedelic salaciousness. Think Chick Quest meets MGMT with a touch of Jingo for good measure and you have a closer clue to the brilliance of the song.

     Both the hypnotic almost oppressive psychedelic wash of A Wheel Within a Wheel and the bulging devilry of Hold On enthral and thrill; the first a song bordering on psychotic with its kaleidoscope of sonic colour and melodic seducing aligned to off the wall ingenuity. The second of the two is jazz/funk pop twisted out of shape and stretched on muscular rhythmic sinews, then infused with guitar jangles and electronic mania before being given to Taylor to bind in her ever alluring vocals. The result is one virulent dance of unbridled infection and enjoyment though it is soon overshadowed by the sensational Hammer and a Nail. Opening with a caress of southern guitar and the endearing tones of Taylor, the song soon spreads into again Morricone seeded scenery within a dusty hot ambience. It is a transfixing maelstrom of mystique kissed sounds and emotional drama which toys with ears and imagination. The more revealed the darker the track becomes, its rapacious throat and intensity an encroaching clouding over the open beauty and sultry resonance of voice and melodies. As a single this incitement was glorious but reshaped and re-coloured for the album it is simply majestic.

The gentle croon of Liar Liar Quietly is almost an anti-climax initially after the previous glory but soon has ears and thoughts firmly in its soft and persuasive melody soaked hands. It is a spellbinding kiss with a need to spill eighties post punk like invention from within its serenade, again the band reaping seeds from earlier decades to enrich their own scintillating invention.

The album closes with a smouldering slice of gospel bred psyche balladry; I Know His Blood Will Make Me Whole another cast in the dark country of psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll. As expected the track spins a mesh of perpetual unpredictability and off beat exploration which just gets darker, bolder, and more addictive with time and age.

There is also a bonus track on certainly the digital version of Circle called Squeaking Wheel and it too is a sensational romp, one built on a blues sound and craft wound in creative mischief and ingenuity. Whether this or I Know His Blood Will Make Me Whole completes the album, Circle is easily one of the most scintillating and invigorating thrills of the year so far. Full of surprises and originality, album and Vienna Ditto deserve all your attention with the only losers being those not taking a listen.

Circle is available now @ https://viennaditto.bandcamp.com/album/circle

http://www.viennaditto.com/ https://www.facebook.com/viennaditto

RingMaster 16/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Kyshera – Circle

Kyshera 1

Not only did the release of Made In China, the second album from Welsh alternative rockers Kyshera, in 2012 ignite a lusty appetite and passion for the band’s sound and invention right here it also declared a coming of age of a band already stirring up the UK music scene. It was a stunning fusion of styles and intense flavours defying classification whilst sparking a fresh exploration of modern rock ‘n’ roll. It was a pinnacle which you could not complain if the band had merely continued to emulate its success with its successor. But this is Kyshera and they have pushed things on again with new album Circle. It is a release which in many ways has toned down the band’s ‘deranged’ inventive attack of sound this time around yet everything about it from songwriting, imagination, and again sheer diversity is a kaleidoscope of new maturity and irresistible enterprise.

Kyshera (pronounced K-eye-she-ra) consists of vocalist/guitarist James Kennedy, bassist Matt Warr, and drummer Glyn Bateman, the latter joining the band between Circle and its predecessor. Made In China was as mentioned a wake-up call for a new horde of fans and media interest towards the Cardiff trio, a tsunami of warped inventiveness and melodic ferocity which ignited ears and imagination with invention and ease. Circles does the same but with a less dramatic onslaught of startling wrong-footing moments, showing less incendiary twists of gait, time changes, and conflicting yet seamlessly entangling styles. This is not to say that it does not have moments of ingenious unpredictability though, just less dramatic and more smoothly infused ones. It would be fair to say that personally those mouth-watering moments of psychotic adventure are missed at times but replaced by explorations which simply catch the breath with their creative grandeur, the band again simply igniting the passions.

Circle is a concept album based around the tale of a “central character and the journey of his life in the modern age. His rise from the bottom to the top of our consumerist, celebrity culture only DIGIPAK WITH POCKET template INHOUSEto realise that in doing so, it came at the price of losing everything that was ‘real’ and on the last song, he dies alone.” The exploration of death, morality, celebrity, love, and consequence begins with opener Napoleon, a track which in its first breath is stirring up rigorous attention and involvement from ears and emotions. Rhythms pound with intensive hunger whilst a sonic mist brews around an early scrub of riffs. It is an initial coaxing which only intensifies as thick hooks and melodic enterprise colludes with the expressive tones of Kennedy and the throaty lures of Warr’s bass. Though subsequently relaxing a little, the song does not hang around and swiftly turns into an even spicier creative roar, returning to the more aggressive and voracious essences which it started with whilst spinning a web of diversely flavoured and inventively intriguing exploits. Groove metal and melodic rock merge with electro mischief and grungy tenacity as the track continues to grow and seduce with increasing imagination.

It is an imposingly impressive start matched immediately by the scintillating stomp of Behind These Lies. Weaving in mouth-watering nu metal revelry and quirkiness, the track strides and prowls ears, revolving through varied gaits and flavours to create a Korn meets Manic Street Preachers meets System Of A Down like devilry. The track is superb, an unrelenting temptation laying an addictive and rebellious bait of metal and heavy rock which is emulated through its own unique design by Demon straight after. The third song has a similar attitude and creative nature but an even rawer snarl and a stronger whiff of the just mentioned Welsh rockers to its captivating persuasion. The track is an inescapable anthem, vocally and musically a tenacious call to arms for senses and imagination with, as the previous songs, a very healthy twisted ingenuity in its otherwise direct and raucous rock ‘n’ roll.

     New single Gone steps up next, an inviting if unspectacular harmonic croon within a melodic bellow with a southern twang to its expression and acoustic elegance to its emotive touch. Personal tastes determine it is the full-blooded stomps which go down most riotously in tastes but there is no avoiding the increasing potency of the song and the fresh ideation emerging in the band’s new direction of sound. Its smouldering persuasion is followed by the pop rock bred The Wrong Size, a magnetic stroll swiftly involving the energy and voice of the listener , pleasingly setting them up for the outstanding Break This. Courting emotional and sonic shadows in its tempestuous web of emotive discord and musical intensity, the track blazes with rich grooves and sharp hooks, they in turn aligned to fuzzy electronics and turbulent rhythms. It is imposing and contagious, a master-class of dark and light in one furious yet inviting creative outpouring.

Endgame leaps at ears right after, no breath allowed to be swallowed as its invigorated dance of vocal and sonic bedlam bounds over the senses with vivacious appetite. It is a funk fest of pulsating basslines and swinging hooks, almost pop punk at times with leanings to electro rock in other enticing moments, and a constant revolving shuffle of diverse and unbridled rock ‘n’ roll.

The entrance of Coma next is spellbinding, simple vocal lures cast by Kennedy resonating in the psyche as they bask in the effects accentuating their coaxing. The song is soon providing a fiery and provocative mix of sonic and emotional turbulency with reflective and haunting balladry, its persuasion a transfixing and fascinating slice of songwriting and sound with simplicity as gripping as its fierce invention and claustrophobically atmospheric beauty. It is a creeping darkness contrasted by the fire like radiance and energy of Inertia which follows with its Manics meets Soundgarden like proposal. An early taster of the album as a single, the track provides a lingering pleasure matched by the more explosive but similarly melodically blazing Helen. Reminding of fellow Brits An Entire Legion, the song is a rugged and robust incitement unafraid to allow its rage and seduction to simultaneously embrace the listener.

The heavy funk romp of Full Circle strides in rigorously right after, offering a heavy rock swagger with punkish attitude as grooves and hooks enslave attention, though all is outshone by the mesmeric vocal and melodic smile of keys within the sturdy charge of the track. As you should assume here, and in all songs, there is much more going on though, heavy and classic rock a strong additional breeze and unpredictability permeating this particular impressive offering.

Circle comes to a close with acoustic ballad The End, a song which satisfies without leaving a deep mark but as a musical and lyrical epilogue to the premise of the album, ensures a potent closure. The album as a whole is simply outstanding, not a greater beast than Made In China but certainly a just as enthralling, and thrilling, unique continuation of the band’s masterful invention which in turn creates another unmissable proposition from one of the UK’s most exciting and inventive bands.

Circle is available from March 16th through Konic Records @ https://kyshera.bandcamp.com/album/circle

In April, the band embarks on their UK wide ‘Full Circle’ Tour, stopping at:

15th April – Cardiff, The Globe

16th April – Brighton, The Albert

17th April – Harlow, The Square

18th April – London, Underworld

21st April – Wolverhampton, Robin 2

23rd April – Nottingham, Rock City

24th April – Selby, The Riverside

25th April – Sheerness, The Ivy

16th May – Sheffield, The Mulberry

**Support comes from Gooding and The Broken Chords**

http://www.kyshera.com     https://www.facebook.com/kyshera

RingMaster 16/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/