High Down – Moving On

Suggesting they might be the ones to give the British pop punk scene an invigorating new breath, Portsmouth hailing High Down have just released their first EP. Moving On offers five slices of ear pleasing infection carrying punk rock, each bearing a sound with a spikiness which alone commands attention and further investigation.

Emerging last year, High Down made a potent mark with debut single Family & Fiends, the track recorded with producer Matt O’Grady (You Me At Six/Deaf Havana). Its impact was followed by the band playing slots at the likes of Seasick Fest, Butserfest, and Teddy Rocks Festival as well as share stages with bands such as WSTR, Roam, and Like Pacific. It is fair to say that things are beginning to stir for the quartet, a motion sure to gain momentum through Moving On.

The EP opens up with new single Life Lessons, guitars instantly luring ears with their catchy invitation. It is an infectiousness which is as instinctive in the vocal prowess of Luke Smithson and the rhythmic stroll of bassist Tim Hoolahan and drummer James Grinter who it appears has since left the band. The energy of the song is bold but with an enterprising restraint, it constantly pulling on the reins throughout but blossoming from that same reflective control. Feet and ears are soon lost to its temptation, appetite to its mix of harmonic warmth and again reserved but open irritability.

Making History backs up the fine start with its own line in melodic suggestion and rhythmic persuasion, it too keeping a hold on its boisterousness but giving enough of a rein to stir the spirit especially within another rousing chorus. The guitars of Darrell Ellis and Joe Soar weave a captivating web of sonic adventure with the former’s vocals potently backing the lead tones and expression of Luke Smithson. There are no big surprises yet each moment of accomplished endeavour increases the song’s draw, a quality just as inescapable in next up All On You. High Down has been given comparisons to artists such as Blink 182 and New Found Glory, the third track with its high kicking beats and nagging riffs a contagious example of why. There is a greater fire in its belly than in its predecessors and similarly an even more imposing catchiness that commands attention and response as smart hooks and harmonic dexterity relentlessly tempt.

The acoustic seduction of Rescue Me follows with vocals and guitar crooning knowingly with thought and emotion. The song features the guest tones of Nottinghamshire singer Christina Rotondo, her vocal beauty a striking essence in the union with the similarly impressing presence of Smithson. With a rawer edge to its gritty finale, the track grows in intensity and emotion to truly hit the spot before making way for the pinnacle of the release. The best track on offer for these ears, Against The Tide instantly winds wiry tendrils of guitar around ears, their steely touch alone a keen lure but only tightening their invitation with their niggling prowess, one matched in dexterity and persuasive trespass by the muscular swings of Grinter and the growling bass of Hoolahan. It is a dynamic and imposing yet again seriously infectious proposal to bring the highly enjoyable encounter to a fierce close.

In many ways there is nothing overly remarkable about Moving On yet every moment it shares is rich in enterprise and energy whilst being backed by a potential which suggests High Down can have a big presence on the UK if not European pop punk theatre.

Moving On is out now and available @ http://highdownuk.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/highdownuk    https://twitter.com/highdownuk

Pete RingMaster 05/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Midday Committee – Girls In Open C

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UK pop punks Midday Committee continue their steady and increasingly impressive emergence with new release Girls In Open C, a six track plus intro mini album of melody rich emotively designed pop songs with a raw edge to their presence and energy. There has certainly been a buzz around the Portsmouth quartet across the south of England for their vibrant presence, shows with Kids In Glass Houses, Lower Than Atlantis, Mallory Knox and Verses adding to their strong stock, but with a newer grazing glaze to their sound that attention threatens to spread much further afield through the new release. Arguably there is nothing dramatically new to the songs upon the release, a familiarity always making its hints to stop the band from distinctly standing apart from other similarly genre clad bands, but equally there is a craft and passion not forgetting creativity to the foursome which ensures they are not just another easily forgettable proposition. With songs which linger and hooks that dig in deeply to prolong the potency of tracks long after they have finished their declarations, Midday Committee warrant eager attention.

Formed towards the end of 2010, the band has been through the expected line-up changes in its initial growth as well as less assumed happenings like near fatal accidents involving Jet Ski’s to build a presence with the prowess to turn heads and light fires as their increasingly potent fanbase proves. Their previously two EPs, Nice Kids, Bad Judge Of Character in 2011 and I’m Sure Someone Mentioned A Cheque the following year, marked out the band for acclaim and attention but it is fair to say that the Matt O’Grady produced Girls In Open C sees the band at a new level in songwriting, sound, and craft. As all good pop punk proposals, the songs making up the release are as anthemically infectious as they are melodically bewitching, whilst the heart and passion of the band soaks every note and syllable so that the release may not be unique but it is undeniable contagious and a long term engagement.

From a fourteen track Intro which maybe has been given a track listing of its own just to say there are seven offerings on the release (too Frontcynical?), things start properly with I Swear To God I’m Going To Pistol Whip The Next Guy Who Says Shenanigans, a track which emerges from the coaxing of that potent brief starting piece. The guitars of Rich Sanders and Keiran Heath cast a pleasing graze of riffs and sonic tempting across the ears but it is the great throaty tone of Adam Hall’s bass which steal the initial focus most of all. That is until the excellent vocals lay their compelling hand on the suasion. Whether it is Sanders or Heath which leads the narrative, both driving the vocals together across the release, we cannot say but it is hard not to take to the delivery as keenly the potent sounds around them. With the drums of Kurtis Maiden a respectful but thumping protagonist to it all, the song makes a powerful marker for the release to follow. Melodies and hooks do not demand but command a healthy appetite towards them whilst the accomplished stance and flavoursome weave of enterprise just catches the imagination.

Maybe I Should opens up with a similar melody to its predecessor though it is soon courted by distinctly different rhythmic bait and guitar sculpted endeavour. As the first everything from the individual skills and united melodic enticement is easily accessible and infectious though the track does lack the spark of its predecessor, that little something to lick at and tease the passions into a stronger submission. Nevertheless with precise hooks and good group vocal calls the track continues the strong start with ease which Casino through a slower emotive showing matches. The shadowed dark tones of the bass once more seduces whilst the emotionally atmospheric caress of vocals and guitar bring senses and emotions thoughtful satisfaction which is lit further by the ever catchy choruses.

The pair of the virulently infectious and inventively bright Hometowns and the eagerly vivacious in energy and charge Game’s Been Called, keep spirits lively and pleasure intense, both rife with addictive hooks and ear seducing melodies all coming with a bite and edge to captivate further. Again there is that definite surface familiarity across songs which prevents some tracks leaping out as they should but beneath that with focus there is plenty simmering and subtly inventing within songs which ultimately stand out, and in the case of the second of these two with an open blaze of dramatically imaginative persuasion leaning into a classic closing vocal lure.

The release is finished by the excellent Just Me And You which features Christina Rotondo of the also impressive and well worth checking out Searching Alaska. The song starts out as an acoustic embrace with simply bewitching dual vocals which alternately embrace the senses. The track is a delicious encounter which if remaining in this state would have brought the curtain down to a rousing applause but once the vocals hold hands and the rest of the band flesh out their emotive hues, the track becomes an evocative fire.

It is easy to see why Midday Committee is highly thought of by a great many and with Girls In Open C expect them to move into a more intensive and deserved spotlight. The release also suggests that the band is still evolving with plenty left in them to discover and explore which has anticipation already quite excited.

Check out the video for Hometowns @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUQwO5_evP8

https://www.facebook.com/Middaycommittee

http://middaycommittee.bandcamp.com/

8/10

RingMaster 07/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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