Beauty In Chaos – Beauty Re-Envisioned

With their debut album, Finding Beauty in Chaos, an acclaimed release last year, Beauty In Chaos has returned to its contagious adventure for their second full-length, Beauty Re-Envisioned. Revisiting those earlier tracks though does not mean that the new release is simply an easy echo of songs which have already enticed keen attention, indeed what we found was a whole fresh exploration based around a mix of dramatic remixes, bold new visions and alternative versions of those original encounters.

Beauty in Chaos is a LA-based collective led/curated by guitarist Michael Ciravolo (Human Drama/ Michael Aston’s Gene Loves Jezebel) featuring a host of renowned luminaries and unsurprisingly Beauty Re-Envisioned is littered with them. For the album Ciravolo admitted “I basically handed the keys to the car over to an amazingly talented cast of producers, engineers, re-mixers, DJs and artists… giving them near total autonomy to throw the puzzle of ‘Finding Beauty in Chaos’ on the floor and reassemble it as they hear it.” What has emerged is a proposition in its own right aside of that first offering, one bringing new bold characters and potency to songs which over past months had already become good friends.

 Beauty Re-Envisioned opens with a snarling MGT Remix of the Beauty In Chaos take on the T-Rex classic, 20th Century Boy. With Al Jourgensen’s rapacious tones enticingly scowling across its infectious electronic bounce and harmonica scorched canter, the track reveals itself  as virulent as it is feral and proving an immediate impossible to refuse invitation into the album which swiftly further rewards with the glorious embrace of Man of Faith. The Preacher Man Mix again has the ever potent tones of the Mission’s Wayne Hussey, one of our all-time favourite vocalists, and The Cure bassist Simon Gallup at its heart, the track a quickly addictive slice of shadow wrapped melodic rock as seductive as it is voraciously rousing.

Canadian duo Ummagma add their creative touch to Look Up next, the band’s instinctive atmospheric craft and radiance soaking the inescapably absorbing song around the temptation of vocalist Tish Ciravolo while the Collide Mix of Un-Natural Disaster springs even stronger alternative /industrial metal ferocity and intensity into the dUg Pinnick, Zakk Wylde and Ice-T embracing track. Both songs had us fully and greedily hooked as too the acoustic version of Storm with Ashton Nyte at its vocal helm. Written by The Awakening frontman and Michael Ciravolo, the song finds a new earthier intimacy and emotive depth without losing a sense of the catchy virulence in the original’s veins.

The alluring beauty of I Will Follow You featuring Evi Vine and the mutually fascinating draw of the Robin Zander (Cheap Trick) and Michael Anthony (Van Halen) contained Drifting Away in their respective Cotton Socks and High Water mixes only entangled pleasure and imagination, each making a less striking impact initially but only more hungrily consumed by the listen while the Kitty Lectro Mix of Man of Faith offered up a more eighties post punk/electro pop energy and enterprise to the already devoured encounter with similar force of appetite involved.

The enjoyment of Mr Hussey’s voice did not stop there as immediately his tones infused power and emotion to The Long Goodbye (Au Revoir), the track not exactly stripped back to its core but certainly exposing its melancholic heart with greater clarity as emotive piano, evocative strings, and sonic intimation wrapped intense vocals.

I Will Follow You returns with its IVaD Mix as in turn does Storm via the Vampyre Mix, again offerings which left pleasure full before another slice of 20th Century Boy sees Rolan Bolan and Wayne Hussey united in a great southern kissed, glam nurtured funk ‘n’ roll arousing which just had us bouncing.

Beauty Re-Envisioned is completed by the crepuscular Eclipse Mix of I Will Follow You and the compelling Fall & Sway Mix of the Ashton Nyte featuring Finding Beauty in Chaos, another two tracks which had little difficulty entrapping ears and enjoyment.

We will admit we are not naturally drawn to remixes and especially releases based on such collections but such the quality of the songwriting behind the tracks here and the rich imagination in their evolutions Beauty In Chaos have again simply enslaved.

Beauty Re-Envisioned is available now @ https://beautyinchaos.bandcamp.com/album/beauty-re-envisioned

https://www.beautyinchaosmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/beautyinchaosmusic/   https://twitter.com/MichaelCiravolo

Pete RingMaster 20/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Smash Fashion – Rompous Pompous

With a mere but rather tasty single in between, it has been a long wait for the successor to their highly enjoyable and highly praised third album Big Cat Love but finally US rockers Smash Fashion have unleashed its successor in the shape of Rompous Pompous and a devilishly mischievous and captivating proposition it is.

Eagerly anticipated, the album lives up to its excellent title with eleven slices of multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll which romp and stomp in a way only the La quartet can. As ever the band feeds on rich rock essences from across the decades; everything from fifties rock ‘n’ roll, sixties mod and psychedelia through to seventies punk/new wave aligned to eighties glam and hard rock going to flavour a sound just as spiced by subsequent years and modern enterprise. As its predecessor, Rompous Pompous is an adventurous and lustily fun stomp with the band but with even keener diversity and a sharper definition to its writing, performance, and character.

It opens up with Can’t Take You Anywhere and straight away a potent hook with something more than familiar to it keenly entices. It is just a lure though into the song’s own invention with the vocals of guitarist and band founder Roger Deering swiftly to the fore. Its classic rock breeding is littered with new wave and seventies pop rock flirtation, the tenacious rhythms of bassist Scarlet Rowe and drummer Reijo “Repo” Kauppila driving its boisterous stroll as lead guitarist Lloyd Stuart Casson weaves real temptation within the just as magnetic tease of keys.

It is a potent start to the release ensuring attention is firmly on board and equally strong as the following Soft As A Rock (Helium Head) takes its place with an air of Cheap Trick meets The Motors to it. Its infectiousness is swift and eager as hooks join grooves in casting a net of catchy enterprise around Deering’s ever alluring presence while within the album’s following title track the band pulls the listener in with a fifties rock ‘n’ roll nurtured saunter with a delicious B52’s-esque lilt to its blossoming revelry. The track is superb also hinting at the respective glam/art and hard rock of bands like Sparks and The Tubes as it caught ears and imagination.

Wolves Of Wonderland brings a blues flavouring with its steady hard rock canter next with not for the first time just a sniff of Queens Of The Stone Age to the melodic graining while Teenage Demon is a punk ‘n’ roll courting holler with a garage rock lining which swiftly had feet and neck muscles rocking. Again there is no missing a seventies/eighties seeded nature to the excellent track; a regular ingredient in the increasingly individual Smash Fashion sound.

Another putting a firm hand on best track honours is the Bolan-esque Proper Way To Eat A Muffin, its flirtatious almost salacious swing aligned to classic rock ‘n’ roll equipped with power pop boisterousness and lyrical devilment. Quickly and unerringly hitting the spot it had the body eagerly swinging before Runs In The Family adds further diversity to the release with its pop, punk and melodic rock collusion with a great resemblance to The Vapors to it. It too is one of the major highlights within Rompous Pompous closely matched by the Bowie kissed Tender Was The Hook, a song also embracing a sixties tone with a Hollies like scent to it.

Through the likes of the blues rock sprung Ugly Thugly and Gentle Hand with its slightly dirty melodic radiance around one irresistible hook, the album continued to light up ears even if neither song quite lived up to the heights of those before them. Nevertheless each left thorough enjoyment in their wake leaving the emotive balladry of Smiles & Daggers to bring the album to a fine close. Beginning with drama carrying piano with big shadow clad rhythms in close company, an entrance reminding of a certain Boomtown Rats classic, the song is a magnetic example of the more mature and bolder songwriting within the album. As all songs, deeper into its body you go more the different flavours and twists emerge to please and fascinate.

And that applies to Rompous Pompous as a whole, a release which gets you going from the off and just gets more intoxicating and infamous by the listen, much like Smash Fashion themselves.

Rompus Pompous is out now via Electric Pudding Recordings across most online stores.

 http://www.smashfashionmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/smashfashion

Pete RingMaster 14/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Madjive – Business first

All work and no play makes…. well you know the rest though no one seems to have told French rockers Madjive. There new album suggests that it is Business first but it is a sentiment which does not stop the band taking the listener on a feverish, mischievous, and riotous rock ‘n roll romp which is all about fun, fun, fun…

Hailing from the east side of France, Madjive has been unleashing their creative devilry since 2008. As their third album reveals, theirs is a sound which evades guidelines and rules, Business first a cavalcade of various styles and textures woven into a proposition as punk as it is hard rock, as garage rock as it is funk. Across two previous albums, a trio of EPs and a split vinyl release, the band has only cemented and increased their reputation while live Madjive has stomped across the broad landscape of Europe to matching acclaim, sharing stages with the likes of Powersolo, Richie Ramone, The Phenomenauts, Fuzzy Vox, The Jancee Pornick Casino, The Inspector Cluzo, Nada Surf, Lords of Altamont, VCPS and many others along the way. Business first is the wake-up call to those yet to be infested by the outfit’s devilment, a boisterous and excitable encounter which would not surprise if it incited global attention.

Ignition program turns the album’s key, its scything riffs and tenacious beats wrapped in a vocal web before leaping into a punk rock stroll sparking the body into a blur of eager movement. The funk growl of the opener twists into the punk ‘n’ roll of I am addicted. Again guitars chop and entangle the senses with their agitated jangle whilst rhythms shuffle within the quickly established funk infested saunter of the song. Led by more lively vocals, it continues to bounce and infest ears with a persuasion causing reactions living up to its title.

Its masterful temptation is swiftly eclipsed by the salacious lures of Same bone; a feisty charge of bold rock ‘n’ roll with the growl of Rocket From The Crypt and the instinctive devilish catchiness of  The Phenomenauts. At barely a handful of breaths over a minute in length, the glorious pleasure is sadly sort lived but imposingly memorable and thrilling before A spooky bargain brings its own haunted impishness to the party. Hooks escape its imagination at will, keys and guitars alone conjuring seductive bait as vocals colour and incite proceedings with mutual dexterity. Hints of Neal Hefti, the creator of the classic Batman theme tease throughout; the adventure recalling his finest moment within creative shenanigans all Madjive.

The contagious punk rock of Kid bazooka bursts to life next, it too equipped with appetite piercing hooks and devilment before the album’s title track declares its intent with rousing vocal unity quickly joined by forcibly persuasive rock ‘n’ roll. The track feels like a prelude to the bigger picture of Draft, sketch and outlines, the meeting’s  minutes setting the tone before its successor twists and turns with forceful enterprise and garage punk meets funk rock roguery. At its final statement, a moment of jazzy rascality comes over the album and ears, its unexpected detour leading to the blues funk playfulness of I can’t complain, a track somehow managing to sound like a hybrid of Red Hot Chili Peppers, System Of A Down, and Kings Of Leon without making such influences more than a whiff of a scent.

Both the previous tracks leave pleasure full if without quite at the heights of earlier tracks or found in the heavier rock ‘n’ roll of Rigged show. The track is a muscular and gnarly yet controlled and flirtatious encounter demanding subservience to its scything beats and sonic antics. There is hint of bands like Cheap Trick and Golden Earring to the song, but small hues in a certainly seemingly familiar but distinct escapade.

If the last song was relatively composed, We’re clear let’s manic traits fuel its character as it escapes speakers and the enslaving restraints of life to stir up body and imagination ready for the stormily sultry adventure of Desert peddler. The Morricone laced climate of the song is pure western drama, suggestiveness bound in similar descriptive intensity and artfulness to which Helldorado revel in, and quite glorious.

The album concludes with the vocal and melodic chicanery of Another guidance, a track trying to be composed and refined but it just cannot keep its punk heart chained, involving ears in a thrilling burst of garage rock high jinks with more than a keen nod to old school rock ‘n’ roll.

Business first, from its first dose of addictively satisfying and enterprising misconduct, inspires a hankering to get back with it as soon as possible, even before it actually comes to an end. It is a powerful lure from a stomp any fan of rock ‘n’ roll knavery will find a lusty appetite for. Throughout it does seem to persistently nag and remind of one band in particular, though one our thoughts have still yet to pin down, but Business first only announces Madjive as a band ready to stir up the rock world with inventive capers.

Business first is out now across most stores and @ https://madjive.bandcamp.com/album/business-first

Upcoming live dates:

16.04.207 – Clou – Grünberg – Germany

22.04.2017 – Cafe Ohne – Emerkingen – Germany

12.05.2017 – La Rodia – Besançon – France w/ Imperial state electric

16.06.2017 – Festival Erbasons – Etupes – France

30.06.2017 – Atelier des Moles – Montbéliard w/ CJ Ramone

25.11.2017 – La Taverne – Nevers – France

http://www.madjive.fr/    https://www.facebook.com/Madjive/   https://twitter.com/Madjive

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Waste Pipes – Fake Mistake

WastePipes2016_RingMasterReview

According to bassist Lava, “Our history is in this record; the story of five kids who become adults unwittingly, beating harder and harder on their instruments.” Going by new album Fake Mistake, it is a history which has seen Italian rockers Waste Pipes embrace a web of varied inspirations and flavours in their own hard rock bred rock ‘n’ roll. Their ear grabbing full-length is a tenacious proposition in sound and energy, an encounter which will not be the most unique proposal heard this year but will be one of the most enjoyable.

Formed in 2003, the Rivoli hailing Waste Pipes soon began drawing attention and support with their live presence which over the years has seen the quintet share stages with the likes of Elio E Le Storie Tese, D-A-D, Meganoidi, Perturbazione, Thunder Express (ex The Hellacopters), Adam Bomb, Octopus, and Fabio Treves Blues Band amongst many more. A trio of EPs starting with Begin To Grow in 2004 also invited attention; Let Blood Boil in 2006 and Make A Move four years later pushing the band into broader spotlights within the Italian and European rock scene. With shows and tours across the likes of France, Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Slovenia now also under their belts, and the recent signing with Atomic Stuff Promotion for the promotion and distribution of their new album, Waste Pipes is ready to break even bigger spotlights with the pleasure giving rock ‘n’ roll of Fake Mistake.

Co-produced by Federico Puttilli (Nadar Solo) and mixed by Gianni Condina, Fake Mistake opens up with Headstrong. Straight away riffs and a throbbing bassline has ears attentive, their bait swiftly supported by the potent tones of vocalist Chris and the jabbing beats of Boe. The appetite igniting start relaxes into a more familiar hard rock stroll eventually, a presence equipped with enticing hooks and melodies though it is the eruptions of explosive energy and sonic confrontation which especially brings the song alive.

WP_Fake Mistake_cover_RingMasterReviewIt is a potent beginning to Fake Mistake more than backed by Fire Below, a track veined with the sonic and melodic enterprise of guitarists Kina and Guarro. Embracing blues and classic hues in its hard rock canter, it also slips into unpredictable moments of imagination to add further appealing spice to its body before Stay The Night provides a seventies scented melodic rock shuffle. Highly infectious in no time, the song swings and seduces with increasing adventure and individual craft, Lava’s great dark basslines the thick constant veining it all.

Three tracks in and the album is already showing track by track growing steps in adventure and variety, as well as impressiveness. The Loser Song is no exception; its magnetic body a weave of punk hooks, grunge melodies, and richly varied rock ‘n’ roll imagination. At times it seems to touch on Cheap Trick/ZZ Top like essences, in other moments more Houston/ The Cult flavoured mixes; it all colouring another inescapably highly satisfying encounter.

Chaos comes next, offering a melody strong tapestry of temptation over an anthemic rhythmic spine. As its flavours are broad, the song’s energy and aggression is a vibrant mix of intensity too, the song as at ease seducing ears as it is invading them with a physical hunger. It is captivating stuff instantly matched by For All The Time We Waste, a rousing stomp of blues and heavy rock with a spikiness as indie and punk as it is raw rock ‘n’ roll. Between them, the pair are the pinnacle of the album with the latter stealing the biggest plaudits.

The compelling Not Enough opens with a melancholy spiced coaxing before building up into feisty passages of energy and emotion, switching between the two contrasts throughout whilst adding further imaginative twists and turns with keys a great additive. Its healthy array of styles and creative spices is matched and eclipsed by the excellent Little Devils Scratched My Ears, another spirit and imagination rousing proposal whipping up eager involvement from the body too. Proving a creative buffet of blues grooves and sonic tendrils around catchy hooks and rhythms as Chris continues to vocally entice, the track hits the sweet spot for another highly memorable moment within Fake Mistake.

The album closes on the emotive flame of Bad Growing, a potent croon which might not have the same dramatic spark of other tracks but soon reveals its own dynamic canvas of imagination and adventure to fascinate and strongly please.

The song is a potent end to one highly enjoyable album; a release which only leaves pleasure strong and ears wanting more. A success anyone can take a shine to.

Fake Mistake is out now with promotion and distribution on all major digital platforms through Atomic Stuff Promotion and physical distribution by Andromeda Dischi.

http://www.facebook.com/Waste-Pipes-20325293369   http://www.atomicstuff.com/wastepipes.html

Pete RingMaster 04/05/20156

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Smash Fashion – Junkie Luck

smash fashion live_RingMaster Review

Ahead of their eagerly anticipated new album, US rockers Smash Fashion have uncaged a feistily flavoursome teaser in the shape of new single Junkie Luck. It has all the trademarks of the band’s decades bridging rock ‘n’ roll and the rousing mischief fans have come accustomed to and greedy for. It also hints at new flavours in the band’s power fuelled melodic roar ensuring intrigue for their upcoming release is all the more ripe.

Los Angeles bred, Smash Fashion has spent the past decade or so brewing up a sound merged from the raw energy of fifties rock ‘n’ roll, the hungry adventure of sixties psych and garage rock, and essences of punk ‘n’ roll forged ever since. With the salacious scent of glam and the anthemic energy of hard rock amongst other flavours also involved, the quartet create something that defies being pinned down yet has a broad familiarity which swiftly seduces ears and imagination. The creation of and driven by vocalist/guitarist Roger Deering, Smash Fashion has increasingly lured acclaim and eager attention across a trio of albums starting with A Gentlemens Guide to Sophisticated Savagery in 2006. Three years later Don’t Pet The Sweaty Things stirred things up further for the band though it was Big Cat Love in 2014 which sparked the most eager and broadest spotlights yet on both sides of the Atlantic. With a clutch of ear teasing singles and a praise garnering live presence which has seen the band share stages again on both sides of the pond with the likes of Ian Hunter, Arthur Lee and Love, The Zombies, Cheap Trick, Psychedelic Furs, The Alarm, Missing Person, Silversun Pickups, Orson, JET, and The 88 over the years backing up the success of their albums, Smash Fashion has become a greedily devoured band with songs that just make tongues lick lips; the new single Junkie Luck no exception.

smash fashion art_RingMaster ReviewFrom its firs breath Junkie Luck is a rich enticement of guitar, the strings of Deering flirting alongside the sonic lead of Lloyd Stuart Casson (ex- Rock City Angels) before the former’s recognisable and always persuasive vocals potently leads the emergence of the song’s infectious heart. The swinging beats of drummer Repo (ex-Smack) manage to cage and incite further devilment in the song, assisted in kind by the prowling lure of Scarlet Rowe’s bass, both aiding the track’s grip on the listener’s hips and involvement. Musically Junkie Love is like a fiery blend of The Cars, Cheap Trick, Turbonegro, and Sweet with a healthy punk rock attitude but it emerges with a character and uniqueness which roars Smash Fashion.

On the B-side of the single is the boisterous punk ‘n’ roll cover of Golden Earring’s Long Blond Animal, Deering and co giving it fresh attitude for a rousing impact which for personal tastes actually puts the original in the shade just a touch. A song which will not be on the forthcoming album, it alone makes the single more than worthy of being checked out; Junkie Luck itself the thicker temptation urging all to add it to their music collection.

It is probably fair to say that you know what you are going to get with Smash Fashion, a blistering good time with sounds that easily incite body and soul, yet each release to date has only surprised and impressed with its own fresh revelry. There is no reason to expect anything different from the new album, just much more of the fun offered by Junkie Luck.

Junkie Luck is out now via Electric Pudding Recordings on download and on Ltd Ed 7”red vinyl.

https://www.facebook.com/smashfashion   http://www.smashfashionmusic.com

Pete RingMaster 10/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Braddock Station Garrison – A Hint of Recognition

BSG_RingMaster Review

Last year US rock band Braddock Station Garrison gave a strong and enjoyable introduction to their rock ‘n’ roll with debut EP/mini album High Water. Exploring all the best bits of that release whilst honing other potential but previously less striking elements in their sound, the Washington DC quartet has recently unveiled its successor, A Hint of Recognition. Still carrying a flavoursome Americana tang to their no frills rock ‘n’ roll, Braddock Station Garrison have produced another highly magnetic and creatively organic proposition with their second full-length to thoroughly enjoy. It is probably not a game changer in stirring major awareness of the band by wider spotlights, though it has enough to make a stir if given the chance, but A Hint of Recognition is definitely going to entice new fans as they show they are heading in the right creative direction for bigger rewards ahead.

Formed by vocalist/guitarist Steve Schillinger and lead guitarist Tom Soha in 2011; Braddock Station Garrison take inspirations from the likes of Tom Petty, Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Cheap Trick, Aerosmith, Johnny Cash, and The Smithereens into their openly growing sound. Completed by drummer Michael Chapman and bassist Michael Haddad, a line-up in place since mid-2014, the band released High Water last year to keen responses. Its fusion of classic and modern sounds was a highly appetising if unspectacular proposal which left a richness of pleasure in its wake. A Hint of Recognition continues the groundwork it laid but with more inventive tenacity, bolder imagination, and depth of sound. It is still not the offering to make an explosive impact but it definitely guarantees a thoroughly enjoyable time with every listen and who can say no to that.

cover_RingMaster Review   The album opens with Forgotten Teenage Dream, a contagious little number with jangly riffs and a great alluring bassline alongside the ever distinctive and appealing tones of Schillinger. With crispy beats adding to the easy going stroll, the song rather than providing a big splash to start things off is more a catchy coaxing, a warm up to bigger and brighter things. Nevertheless grooves and melodies offer a pleasing tempting which the more relaxed and emotive She’s Too Cool employs with relish in its more fifties rockabilly seeded stroll. As in its predecessor and the band’s sound generally, there is a masterful simplicity at work; leanness to the invention which ensures only the choice cuts of sound and imagination get involved in the song whilst avoiding unnecessary embellishments.

Things really takes off from the album’s third track, Lies, where once more a fifties breeding is carried by the tantalising air of the song, and initially through another tasty bass lure and the rich vocals. It is a flavour continued by sultry melodies and welcoming riffs cast by the guitars whilst a raw cascade of intensity only adds to the drama and unrelenting addictiveness of the song. Its success seems to spark something extra in its following companions too, Hey Cindy spinning a web of sonic tendrils across its body within a great rhythmic beckoning next. To this the guitars spray a creative smog like contrails behind a plane, with both Chapman and Haddad laying down gripping bait before Never In Danger emulates the earlier Lies with its own dark rock hues, though this time they touch upon a R.E.M. colouring in the song’s evocative swing. Infectious from first breath to last, the track is a reserved but lively seduction adding more warmth to the satisfaction already brewed by A Hint of Recognition.

More heady bass temptation brings a grin to lips as Any Day Any Way opens up, the enticement persistent as guitars spread fuzzy causticity across a punkish encounter unafraid to change tact and energy at the drop of a note. More inventive and fiery with each passing minute, the track is another striking high point which Stop and Reflect struggles to match right after, though its country twang and melodic smoulder only feeds a happy appetite before Johnny Stone Stole My Girl brings things to a rocking close. Its unsurprising yet irresistibly catchy shuffle feeds all wants from a slice of rock ‘n’ roll, especially with more of that flavoursome old school fifties tone to please personal tastes; a pursuit of which would definitely go down well and add something more to future Braddock Station Garrison songs it is easy to suggest on the evidence of A Hint of Recognition. More of the very solid and enjoyable sounds found on the band’s new album would be quite fine too.

A Hint of Recognition is out now via the Braddock Station Garrison Bandcamp.

https://www.facebook.com/BraddockStationGarrison   https://twitter.com/BSGRockNRoll

Pete RingMaster 29/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Smash Fashion – Big Cat Love

s m pic

The wantonly enigmatic sound and presence of US rockers Smash Fashion has always made for a compelling and thrilling proposition since forming in 2004 and new album Big Cat Love provides no deviation in that potency. In fact it takes it to richer captivating levels with another collection of riotously varied and adventurous fusions of rock ‘n’ roll. The album sees the band again reaping the blooms of various decades and styles of raw and boisterous rock music, hard and glam rock as home within their invention as fifties rock ‘n’ roll and power pop. It makes for a tantalising proposition from the band’s third album, one which even with a couple of lulls in its persuasion is a stirring captivation from start to finish.

Hailing from Los Angeles, Smash Fashion consists of musicians drenched in experience and successes. The band is led by vocalist/guitarist Roger Deering alongside bassist Nigel Mogg (ex- London Quireboys), drummer Repo (ex-Smack), and guitarist Lloyd Stuart Casson (ex- Rock City Angels). Their previous full-lengths A Gentlemens Guide to Sophisticated Savagery and Don’t Pet The Sweaty Things in 2006 and 2009 respectively, set the band apart and into an eager spotlight for their expansive sound whilst last year’s single Blame It On The Brandy more than hinted at the promise of and raised anticipation for the new release. It was potential easily realised by the again Electricpudding Recordings released album, a confirmation of that clue and of the ever hungry invention and appetite of a band which has graced stages with the likes of Ian Hunter, Arthur Lee and Love, The Zombies, Cheap Trick, Psychedelic Furs, The Alarm, Missing Person, Orson, JET, and The 88 over the years.

A gong opens up attention and the entrance of first track Wicked Ways, a shock to ears which are soon filled with enticingly grooved big-cat-love-albumguitars and crisp probing rhythms. It is instant agreeable bait which only increases its lure with the vocals of Deering and an increasingly potent infectiousness which soaks the melodies and chorus of the song as well as the vocal delivery. You cannot say that the song is a startling protagonist for the imagination and emotions but it is a persistently persuasive stroll of finely sculpted hooks, fiery grooves, and sonic enterprise which achieves the same impact. Feeling like an old friend in new clothes in many ways, much like the album, the song is an impressive opener which is swiftly matched by Marionette. Bringing more punkish seeds than the first whilst still firmly involved with a hard rock canvas, the excellent track seduces like a mix of early days The Jam and The Vapors, easily igniting and passions. The fact that it is a reworking from an appearance on the last album makes no difference to its might and presence on the album, such its thrilling offering.

The following Strike My Fancy (Knickers Down) is as flamboyant and wonderfully sleazy as its title suggests though with a refined touch in restraint behind a melodic colour which flames around the senses as keys tease their submission. It is another excellent romp with more contagion than a strip club and just as sexy, especially with the incendiary guitar craft blazing across its body, a skill just as evident in Stay Off My La La and You Love to Suffer. The first of the pair shows its intent to rock from the first seconds, riffs and vocals a keen devilry within a sturdy frame of rhythms and dark roaming basslines. As all the songs there is something virulently catchy and anthemic to the track easily bringing feet, voice, and emotions into its grasp. Thoughts of bands like The Motors and Eddie and the Hot Rods are stirred occasionally through the song before it makes way for its successor, a smouldering ballad which from humble temptations emerges over time as a riveting enticement with dark sixties punk croon to its suasion.

The title track comes in next, starting with a mischievous almost tribal groan which sparks real intrigue but then as swiftly abandons the bait to twist into a glam/seventies pop rock which is more than decent but just does not excite like the previous songs. Like Darts meets The Quireboys it is a satisfying romp but not one to fire up any real passion in personal tastes, though the bass endeavour and climactic conclusion to the song are big pluses. The perfectly accomplished and varied Just a Kiss At the Starting Line is much the same in success though different in sound with its country rock twang and bold melodic rock stroll. The guitars and drums again ensure there is plenty to engage and run with, just not enough to spark any major ardour for.

Super Glam next builds a bold rock lure of country bred spice amidst a power pop lilt and darkly toned vocals. It is another song taking time to convince but succeeds eventually through its excellent pop swagger and hard rock veining of outstanding guitar craft and pumped rhythms. It is one of those devious songs which takes a deeper grip than first realised to be a lingering presence, though the following punk infused Aim for the Heart soon has total attention for itself, the song an outstanding fusion of the addictive hooks of Buzzcocks and rich drama of Psychedelic Furs all immersed in the kind of premise which only Smash fashion can conjure. The song is an infectious temptation with feisty intent, a mix equalled by Blame It On the Brandy right after. The song immediately has ears at attention as it opens with ridiculously addictive rhythms before settling into a brew of alluring hooks, stirring riffs, and healthily anthemic vocals. Bringing seventies glam flourishes into a tempest of blues kissed rock n roll, the excellent encounter is a mix of American rock and Thin Lizzy, and a complete joy.

The dusty climate and vocal shade to Live to Tell makes for another very satisfying if not explosive avenue to the album, its scenery a bloom of shapely guitar invention and flavoursome rhythmic wile, before Stairs to Nowhere brings Big Cat Love to a rousing close. A big boned mesh of seventies hard rock and garage punk with unsurprising but enjoyable animated energy and passion, the track makes for an eventful conclusion to a fascinating triumph. Boundaries are not worried and originality arguably left alone for the main by Smash Fashion on their album but they still present a proposition which incites pleasure and the rocker in us all and that is more than enough for us.

Big Cat Love is available via Electricpudding Recordings now!

http://www.smashfashionmusic.com

8/10

RingMaster 09/05/2014

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Midnight Mob -These Days

 

MM

    The second in their range of very limited edition CDs helping to get UK coverage for bands from around the world, STP Records are releasing the excellent These Days album from New York City rockers Midnight Mob. Consisting of ten rousing tracks of punk and incendiary rock, the release is a feisty and thrilling showcase for an equally compelling band.

     Midnight Mob formed in 2009 and took little time in firing up audiences and passions with their seduction of passionate and bruising rock ‘n’ roll. A year later the band’s line-up became a stable confrontation, its frontline provided by the rich and feisty tones of Blackey Deathproof, sweetness and venom wrapped up in every unleashed syllable. Alongside her the guitars of Mickey Squeeze and Spydyr cast equally riveting and persuasive sounds whilst dangerous rhythms are bred from bassist Carly Quinn and drummer Catastrophe. A self-titled EP was uncaged in 2011 alongside a video for the track Overdrive. Both drew healthy attention to complement the band’s live reputation which has seen them play sizeable chunks of the US. Last year a second EP, Black Moon Rising, pushed the band further into the spotlight with the singles These Days and All For Nothing stand out opportunities, both subsequently receiving video releases filmed by Jarret Bellucci and Adam Bailey respectively. 2013 also saw the departure of Catastrophe but also interest from STP in bringing the band to the attention of a European appetite, which the new CD achieves with ease and quality. Bringing all the EPs and singles into one concentration of fevered rock music, it is hard to imagine that These Days will not make Midnight Mob a heavily talked about and sought after import for British passions.

     Overdrive starts things off and instantly has appetite and feet launching their support. From a distant vocal cry within an intriguing sonic breath, the song collects its sinews and fire in a brewing intimidation before unleashing a torrent of sonic bait, thumping rhythms, and rebellious riffs. Into full stride the track, ridden by the instantly provocative and enthralling delivery of Blackey, seduces and rages with hooks and grooves aplenty, all enslaving the imagination whilst frisking the passions. It is potent punk ‘n’ roll, a fire of enterprise and passion which nags and taunts for the fullest satisfaction.

     From the scintillating start, the album moves from a brawl to a wanton rock dance with All Or Nothing. More reserved in its gait and intensity though certainly not potency, the song romps with melodic majesty and a delicious vocal harmony which just caresses all the naughty places. Like a mix of eighties band The Photos and the early days of Blondie but with the snarl of The Objex included, the track is a contagious temptation instantly matched by Hit Or Miss and Perfect Crime. The first has a chorus which stands before you eye to eye, daring you not to join in with its ridiculously tempting chorus like calls from the first few seconds. Almost preying on the senses with its energetic stomp and virulently masterful persuasion, the song merges pop punk and hard rock for a quite magnetic encounter which may not fire up the emotions as the first pair but certainly leaves them grinning as broadly, especially that deviously addictive vocal enslavement. The second of the two takes a more straight on rock route to thoughts, its body as with so many of the songs familiar, though it might just be to the fact that we have listened to the album much more than anything else these past couple of weeks, and engagingly welcoming. Again infectiousness works its way into ears and passions for another persistently fun time.

    Through the belligerent rhythmic and riff driven stomp of Be Mine, a track which lays shadows on vocals and thoughts like a warm glaze, the band continues to light the fuse of rapturous hunger. At times the song, especially through its ratchet of guitar strikes, reminds of Penetration but also with its blaze of melodic rock enticement presses other thoughts of artists like Lita Ford into the blend, as does the following Walking Dead, it a masterful menacing seduction from Blackey matched by the melodic weave of Squeeze and Spydyr and the bass prowl offered by Quinn. Listening to the album is like indulging in an expanse of greatest hits tracks with this one of the biggest pinnacles.

   The twin musical growls of Black Moon Rising and My Undead Darling “You Still Haunt Me” push the listener into a darker diverse corner of the album, the first a sultry embrace with a bordering on psychobilly swagger and Danzig like drama. It is a riveting adventure abrasing and seducing the emotions in skilled and tempting style whilst its successor rolls in on a wash of rhythmic incitement soon aided by sonic and bass teasing, again a rockabilly essence seeding the magnificent stroll of rock ‘n’ roll. The band states as one of their influences Cheap Trick, and certainly this joy has that epidemic pop rock essence and passion stealing potency, to which you can adds tasty moments of The Creepshow.

    The title track leaves little time to compose your clothing and temptations, whisking the listener to their feet for a waltz through heat climates and smouldering emotions. It is an elegantly absorbing invitation with the charm to calm wild stallions and rioting crowds. Something the closing So Hard would achieve the opposite of, its sinews and boisterous intensity a punk rock provocation with melodic rock armoury. Though the track does not reach the same levels as the rest of the album it makes a powerful finale and only adds to the reasons why this side of the pond should join the Midnight Mob.

      These Days is not an album to push boundaries it is fair to say but for honest and give it all rock ‘n’ roll there are few better. Jump on board and grab a copy of Midnight Mob’s UK debut is the recommendation, before it is too late.

http://www.midnightmob.com/

These Days is available from http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page5.htm

9/10

RingMaster 12/03/2014

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Braddock Station Garrison – High Water

Braddock Station Garrison

    Merging evocative Americana with feisty rock ‘n’ roll, US band Braddock Station Garrison make a very pleasing and richly promising introduction with their debut EP High Water. Six tracks which ignite the imagination and appetite for instinctive melodic rock, the release is an adventurous endeavour which at its heights ignites the passions and in its quieter moments of persuasion provides a vibrant and absorbing charm draped with drifting emotive shadows. It is not an explosive invitation into the band but one of compelling substance and lingering persuasion.

     Hailing from Washington DC, Braddock Station Garrison’s seeds began when vocalist/guitarist Steve Schillinger and guitarist Tom Soha, who had known each other for years, started to jam together. Officially formed in 2011, the band was soon expanded with the addition of drummer Michael Chapman and original bassist Patrick, who left the band last December to be replaced by Jim Bledsoe. Taking influences from artists such as Tom Petty, Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Cheap Trick, Aerosmith, Johnny Cash, and The Smithereens, the band has evolved a sound which grabs attention whilst suggesting, certainly on the EP, that it is still a work in progress with greater potent things to come.

    High Water has its major highlights topping and tailing the release but in between offers an equally magnetic clutch of dark coveredged melodic enticements. Opener Into Your Arms is a dramatically infectious treat setting things off in immense style. From its first breath thumping muscle bound drum beats hypnotise the ear soon joined by a gloriously throaty bass lure making even greater bait for the imagination. Once the excellent expressive vocals of Schillinger cast a sultry lure over proceedings the track melts the passions and steals their allegiance. At this point the song reminds of the Orson Family track Heartbeat, evolving as flames of caustic guitar ignite the atmosphere alongside rasping riffs into a more Chris Issak seeded encounter with essences of Roy Orbison to its almost rockabilly lilted temptation. It is a masterful and virulently contagious stomp with a melodic acidity which brings garage rock rawness to its beauty.

     The impressive start provides a tall order for the following songs to complete and though for the main they run in the openers wake, all starting with A Lot to Ask offer a pleasing and accomplished endeavour to immerse in. The second song is a straight forward melodic rock stroll but with, vocally and musically, a distinctive enterprise to give it a unique if not ground-breaking character. Thoroughly enjoyable and deceptively infectious the song passes the ears over to Fall, which with a similarly cast blend of riffs and melodies continues the expressive pull of the EP. No aspect of the song stands out with striking brilliance but everything slots in and unites for a skilled and mature invention which treads existing paths with invigorating energy and enterprise.

    The following Maria With Child with a stronger country twang to its presence is the least persuasive song on the EP though there is little to dismiss about its melodic elegance and rhythmic convincing. There is certainly a close similarity to the song with the previous pair of tracks and if there is any sobering thought to temper the enthusiasm for the release it is that you wonder if they bring enough variety in their songs yet. As the pleasing guitar craft and quality shows backed by all other elements, skill and imagination is not lacking.

    California Specific gently coaxes in the listener with a singular guitar and vocal beckoning before expanding with a fuzz kissed blaze of sonic temptation and crisp rhythms which sculpts a smouldering rock pop contagion blending seventies psychedelic radiance with modern alternative rock adventure. Without ever exploding into the fire you expect, the track is a riveting and thrilling proposition which answers in some ways that question about bold variety to the band’s songs, a reminder immediately reaffirmed by the excellent closing track, Girl Gotta Gun. A scuzz fuelled garage rock built romp with garage punk bred abrasiveness and caustic guitar flaming, the track is different in every aspect to what came before but still fits effortlessly within the release and easily at home with the previous Americana coated songs.

   Without doubt the first and last songs are the pinnacles of the EP, and hopefully the direction that Braddock Station Garrison explore further but such the strength and appeal of the rest of High Water, you suspect only good and enthralling things will come from the band as they spring forward from this impressive start.

Get the High Water EP as a Buy now name your price download @ http://braddockstationgarrison.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/BraddockStationGarrison

8/10

RingMaster 28/01/2014

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Challenges and instinct: an interview with Dave Curran of Pigs

Dave Curran

Amongst plenty of raging creatively incendiary triumphs to have bruised the year, the Gaffe EP from noise rock band Pigs stood out with ease, its trio of tracks a thrilling rapacious bridge between the band’s acclaimed debut album You Ruin Everything and the bands coming follow-up release scheduled for early next year. Consisting of Unsane’s Dave Curran, Jim Paradise from Player’s Club, Freshkills and Hellno, and renowned producer Andrew Schneider (Cave In, Converge, Made Out of Babies, Unsane, Keelhaul), Pigs confront the senses and imagination with a unique and instinctive fury of intensive sonic weight and antagonistic adventure. To find out more about the origins of Pigs, the member’s numerous and constantly commanding projects, Cheap Trick and more, we had the pleasure of talking with guitarist and vocalist Dave from the NYC band.

Hello Dave and welcome to The RingMaster Review, many thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Firstly can we get you to tell us about the beginnings of Pigs, how you all met and the spark to form the band?

Jim Paradise and I had known each other for years from playing in Players Club together.  In 2008 I had demo-ed 20 or so songs playing guitar, and let Jim hear them.  He then suggested we start a new band.  Pigs was born.  We started out as a 2 piece then hired Bob Russell on bass and Eric Cooper on guitar.  Bob could unfortunately not tour because of his work, and Cooper moved to Texas.  Enter Andrew Schneider… Andrew and I met while he was recording a Keelhaul record at his studio.  I asked if he would record the next Unsane record and join Pigs on bass, he said yes and yes!  He’s been with us ever since.

You were heavily involved in other bands at the time of coming together, and of course continue to be, so did Pigs simply come out of filling spare time between projects or was it an idea long in thoughts and the waiting?

I had some down time and wanted to start a new project where I played guitar again.  We all clicked from the onset and decided to keep at it.

Initially the band was a quartet and now of course a trio; how has that leaner set up enhanced the band if at all?

10 million dollars divided by 3 is better than 10 million dollars divided by four?  Not sure if it’s better or not, it’s just the way it wound up.

You have just released the outstanding Gaffe EP, a three track incendiary bruising which for us feels like a natural offshoot of your 599359_727999003883154_249750389_ndebut album You Ruin Everything whilst pointing at an incendiary evolution in process. How does it feel from the inside?

I like the EP.  There was no conscious effort toward any evolution; I suppose that’s just how things go in general.  I like challenging myself, as do the other guys, which hopefully leads to a more interesting end result.

How has your sound moved from the first album, is there any aspect which you feel has found a particularly distinct step forward?

I’d like to think our sound would simply progress every record.  It’s something you have to work at but when it’s fun it should be no sweat.  We always throw around tons of ideas and keep the ones that strike as interesting and, more importantly, don’t sound like anything we’ve done before.

Does Gaffe present a fair representation or promise of what your current writing and sophomore album will hit us

Sure!  Hard to say though…  There will be some surprises…

How do songs come about in Pigs?

It depends, some I write at home and bring ideas to practice for us to work on.  Often we just write together.

Are there situations where ideas maybe thought up for your other projects have found a perfect home with Pigs or in reverse, ideas created as Pigs you felt would work better in your other bands?

Nope.  All Pigs songs were written for Pigs.

How much time is there for Pigs in comparison to your other projects; is there an element of urgency to everything about the band, a need to explode in every aspect just to fit things in or is it a more relaxed situation time wise?

We’re all fairly busy when we’re home, but we always make time for writing and touring.  It’s just a more focused schedule but nothing terribly stressful.

Does the band in some way give you a creative freedom maybe less accessible in your other projects and bands?

We all went into this with no structured plans for Pigs at all.  We basically keep songs that feel right to us.  Then again I’ve never felt musically stifled in any other projects I was in.

pigsAs mentioned earlier Gaffe is three song storm containing two original and one cover. The new songs have, as well as an evolution in sound as talked of, a more defined voraciousness to their creative ‘scourge’ and intensity. Something you feel also?

Well, 2 songs are covers actually.  Cheap Trick and Betty Davis ‘If I’m in Luck’.  But why not!  Voracious and Scourgey as all hell!

You mentioned there the Cheap Trick song, a brilliant cover of Elo Kiddies, a song with for us where Cheap Trick meets Alice Cooper meets KEN mode. What sparked your choice of the song and how did you approach it to make the track something with a unique Pigs feel?

I’ve always wanted to cover that song since I was a teenager.  It wasn’t going to happen with Unsane, so it seemed appropriate. I don’t think there’s a secret formula to feel of it, we just learned it, tuned down and played

You have just completed a European tour with one of our favourite bands, French noise metallers Sofy Major. How did that go?

Terrible, those guys are jerks…  Ha!  Not at all, great band, great guys.  The tour was very fun, can’t wait until the next one.

…Any memorable moments?

All of them.

What comes next for Pigs, can you give any hints or secrets away about the next album?

New record in the late spring – early summer of 2014.   Whistling solos, tell all your friends…

That’s it for me except Melvins tours.  Andrew has a bunch of recording coming up as well as the re-opening of Translator audio soon!

Once again thanks Dave for sharing your time with us. Any final thoughts or words you would like to leave us?

No problem.  I suppose ‘Goodbye Cruel World’ would be a final thought…

Read the review of the Gaffe EP @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/10/16/pigs-gaffe/

www.pigsnyc.com

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 03/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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