Raizing Hell – Monsters Prefer Blondes

RH_RingMasterReview

If you have found the ground rumbling under foot in recent weeks, it is not the earth in rebellion but the dead rising to join the living in descending on the long and eagerly awaited second album from Romanian horror punk n’ rollers Raizing Hell. Providing devilish slices of graveyard boogie fuelled by punk rock attitude, Monsters Prefer Blondes is a carnivorous incitement from the crypt and quite irresistible.

Raizing Hell emerged in 2010, formed by vocalist/guitarist Liv Decay (ex-Howling Saints), guitarist Mr. Zombie, and drummer Oly Sinn. The line-up was soon completed by bassist Demented Vlash with the band laying down their live presence from 2011 and going on to share stages with the likes of Blitzkid, The Silver Shine, Tazmanian Devils, Fancy Dolls, The Argies, A Wilhelm Scream, Koffin Kats, Daily Noise Club, Orlok and the Rockin Ghouls, The Irradiates and many others over the years. Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Motorhead, The Plasmatics, Wendy O. Williams, Misfits, Nekromantix, Blitzkid, Demented Are Go, Horrorpops, and The Meteors, the Bucharest quartet soon evolved their own distinctive shade of horror punk which fuelled debut EP Psychoholics Unanimous in the December of that year and in turn provided a tasty part of the excellent Chainsaw Ballads split EP with UK bands Thirteen Shots and Trioxin Cherry via Psycho A Go-Go Records in 2013. First album Of Ghouls And Men was an even bigger attention grabber when released later that year; thirteen tracks which pushed the band into the full spotlight of the European horror punk and rock ‘n’ roll scene.

2014 saw Raizing Hell sign with the excellent Germany based label, Undead Artists Records, which quickly brought Of Ghouls And Men to a broader expanse of ears while last year the departure of Sinn, after the recording of their new album, brought the stick swinging corpse of Marky B. Morbid into the Raizing Hell mausoleum. Unleashing Monsters Prefer Blondes a couple of weeks back, Raizing Hell has not only provided a bigger and bolder slab of their horror gripped sound but also brought a real feel of their live energy and aggression to the recording and presence of the album. At times it borders on predatory and throughout is a constant blaze of contagious intensity coated with the organic rawness so many bands only manage to create on stage.

Raizing Hell Cover_RingMasterReviewIt all starts with I Like It Wrong and the resonating hefty beats of Sinn. Swiftly they are joined by tangy grooves with a hint of blues toxicity to their invitation. The distinctive tones of Decay are soon adding their dark flirtation and defiance to the mix too, her snarl climbing all over the virulent contagion of the hooks and grooves which are still working their temptation. It is a potent slab of rock ‘n’ roll with maybe few surprises yet making up for it with heart and attitude before Sold My Soul For Rock ‘N’ Roll saunters in with its punk ’n’ roll incitement. There is a touch of In Evil Hour to the song, an irritable hue which adds to the great blend of melodic enterprise and the grouchy snarling of voice and sound.

Two songs in and already it is easy to hear the fresh blossoming of the qualities and craft the band had already shown and the maturity and realisation of potential found in previous releases. I Am The Damned is quick confirmation as it eclipses its predecessors with its psychobilly swagger and flirtatious hooks. Vlash’s bass reveals its most cantankerous growl yet as it stalks the swinging lures of guitar and beats, a bestial essence echoing the edge in Decay’s otherwise clean and infectious tones.

Time Of A Killer Flies brings some delta blues scented enterprise to its robust and fiery body next whilst This Is It flirts with garage rock ‘n’ roll as it prowls of the senses to echo the creature crawling within its sci-fi themed narrative. As usual, Raizing Hell draw most on horror movies and dark tales for the lyrical seeds of the album, very often crafting their sound to echo and reflect the actions of the protagonists within their stories and here turning that first wave of stalking into a rabid devouring of ears and appetite by its finale.

Through the sultry Django-esque climate and landscape of The Sun Is Down, the band has the imagination as forcibly involved as the body whilst Dead Girls Don’t Cry kicks up a feisty stomp with its punk rock. The dark harmonies and lone whistling within the first of the two simply adds to a compelling theatre of guitar and rhythms while a tinge of folkish temptation lines the spicy veining of the second to similarly magnetic effect. Both are further examples of the new adventure and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound, laying down new pinnacles within the album for a success soon matched by the smoky dark seduction of Trouble where Decay is the kind of temptress you know you should escape but cannot resist.

I’m Not A Monster is a grizzly stomp of an encounter; one again maybe feeding expectations a touch but with a chorus impossible not to join in on as the body bounces throughout, it matters little as it leads ears to the equally captivating antagonism of I’m Not Evil (I’m Just Bad). The next song is appetite pleasing punkabilly with a whiff of Trioxin Cherry meets Midnight Mob to its thick pleasure giving; another energy rousing persuasion more than matched by both the excellent old school punk infested Braindead, a track spinning a web of punk and horror rock strands  from recent decades, and Killing Time. The last of the pair is the kind of romp which has the feet engaged almost before ears; commanding body and attention with scything rhythms and punchy riffs as the band vocally rouses the spirit.

Monsters Prefer Blondes is completed by its title track, a predacious tango again aligning an array of punk rock with further instinctive rock ‘n’ roll diversity. We always like an album to end on a bang, and this anthemic infestation of ears and the passions certainly provides. As for Monsters Prefer Blondes the album, it provides a rich and thoroughly enjoyable blood soaked rebel rousing with adventure and creative fun. It is high time that Raizing Hell is recognised by the broadest rock ‘n’ roll spotlights; this album just might be the key lure. If not it is only a matter of time.

Monsters Prefer Blondes is out now via Undead Artists @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/monsters-prefer-blondes

http://www.raizinghell.com   https://www.facebook.com/Raizing.Hell

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2016

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Trioxin Cherry – Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space

TC Photo by Holly Monroe

The excellent Hell To Pay EP in 2012 more than suggested that its creators had the potential to make a big mark on the UK punk scene but Trioxin Cherry go far beyond making a mere potent impression with their debut album, unleashing one of the real treats of the year so far. Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is a virulent contagion of rock ‘n’ roll, a brew of garage and horror punk which sculpts its own identity whilst insatiably working on senses and passions. Carrying hooks like a gunslinger and grooves like a nocturnal temptress, the release is punk at its riotous inventive best.

The Nottingham bred trio as mentioned made their first sizeable impression with their Hell To Pay EP, a raw and magnetic five track release which stirred up eager attention and support for the line-up of guitarist/vocalist Rebecca Campbell, bassist/vocalist Pete Grady, and Ryan Murphy on drums. Their two song contribution to the Chainsaw Ballads split with Thirteen Shots and Razing Hell only cemented their promise and an eager appetite for their presence and sound. The releases certainly hinted at the possibility of big things ahead from the band but may be not to the extent offered by Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space or certainly as soon as its release. Since the recording of the album Murphy has departed the band to be replaced by Nathan Hart but he has left being part of a massive breakthrough and step for Trioxin Cherry.

The raw energy and intent of the previous releases has been retained in the new album but honed into a concentrated and clear proposition TC cover which simply ignites ears through to passions from first track to last. After a Japanese spoken intro, opener Baka Manko thrills and catches the imagination by surprise. Also sung in the oriental language, the song bursts into view like a robust caped crusader, muscles flexing and energy brewing for a riot. Riffs stride purposefully and rhythms stomp with crisp sinews but not for the last time it is the bass adding the danger to the character of the song. It has a grizzled throat to its prowl, a gnarly air which is infectiously toxic alongside the similarly virulent riffs and soon to charge vocal declarations. As to what the song is about who knows, but it matters not as the romp is irresistible and an open call to feet and imagination to climb on board with the awaiting rampage.

The brilliant Fly, Bill Murray! steps up next, riding on a rigid spine of grooves from bass and guitar punctured by again firm rhythms. It is a composed yet hungry stroll of rock with nostrils flaring in its intensity and inventive chorus. The song sees the band just as keen to twists vocals and harmonies as they are their sound, but never taking its foot off of its anthemic potency as it roars and badgers as a fiery climax comes into view before making way for the equally voracious Psycho Killer. Campbell takes little time to unleash a masterful howl as the new track establishes a predacious stalking of the senses, guitars climbing over ears with hungry riffs as the bass again bringing a bestial growl to the scenery. Caged by a similarly intimidating stroke from the drums, the song crowds and pressures the senses until submission is inevitable, wiry hooks and that grizzled bass temptation only adding to the addictive lure with Campbell’s vocals the icing on the bloody cake.

It is a massive start to the album which only builds and seduces the further you go, Good Day To Die the next triumph in line to steal the passions. Campbell brings her Fay Fife like tones out for the song, backed by some great vocal shadows from the band. The track is a real predator, lurching and glaring with withering riffs beside antagonistic rhythms, but it is the glorious twisted surf rock toxicity of the emerging groove which is the most venomous and scintillating temptation and helps send the track to the top of the pile.

Both the melodically sinister Wrong Turn and Let’s Take Off continue the slavery of thoughts and emotions, the first a blaze of discord kissed sonics and pacey beats lorded over by the ever fine tones of Campbell and plays like the result of a demonic act between The Rezillos and The Duel. The second of the pair launches from another deliciously primal bass sound, guitars soon replicating its lure in their own colours. The song swings and saunters belligerently as it gives the kiss of death to the world below, adding its rapacious stomp to the dust.

A reworked version of the acclaimed title track from the band’s EP comes next, Hell To Pay crafted into an even stronger and irresistible enticement than before. Cored by a sultry groove which worms under the skin within seconds, the bass again providing its own addictive dark poison, the song manages to brew richer hues and darker corners to it’s just as epidemically contagious incitement, a success matched by another revisit to a track from the previous release, Hit Me. This track again develops new toxins and depths to its original premise but also an even greater aggression to its defiant spite and avenging intrigue. With another groove which simply winds so tight around the passions that lust bleeds from pores, the track is quite magnificent and with the previously mentioned song makes the atmosphere tough for the song splitting the two to contend with. Not that the old school punk bred Ratbiter notices as it rampages with relish, riffs and rhythms abrasing with contentious brawls and badgering as ridiculously catchy hooks and another bass exploit provide something more to drool over. It is the storming chorus though that clinches the deal, its venom and enterprise sensational.

You Belong To Me is the most adventurous song on the release but also pleasing ‘messy’. Like a fog of intense sonic squalls and thickly clouded aural animosity, the song is the soundtrack to hell, a caustic hymn to the outbreak of ravenous cemeteries and waiting devastation. It’s a noisy maelstrom which works a treat and shows more of the adventure of the band and further hints of how strong the band is yet going to become.

The album is completed by the excellent Rebellion, a storming ode to the renowned UK festival. Starting with an acoustic caress of Campbell and guitar, the track explodes into one last stomp of punk rock. It is the perfect anthem to close the release, like a mix of Holly and the Italians and Flogging Molly. Do remember to hang on after its conclusion too, as a great acoustic version of the same track is hiding in the silence.

Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is a massive festival of punk rock, multi-flavoured and diversely sculpted and proving that punk is always an essential proposition and Trioxin Cherry one of its new masters.

Let’s Take Off And Nuke The Site From Space is now available on STP Records (www.stprecords.co.uk) and @ http://trioxincherry.bandcamp.com/album/lets-take-off-and-nuke-the-site-from-space

https://www.facebook.com/trioxincherry

10/10

RingMaster 29/04/2014

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