XUL – Extinction Necromance

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Extinction Necromance is a release which wholly captivates whilst hitting the listener with a tsunami of malevolent sound and intent. Consisting of four tracks covering thirty minutes, the EP is a barbarous affair which at times defuses or certainly overshadows the invention and diverse textures within its depths through a continual tirade of vocal and emotional hostility. There is no hiding place from the encounter either, except the off button, but its creators Canadian metallers XUL, ensure that is never an option with their craft and fascinating enterprise.

XUL hails from Vernon, British Columbia and cast a merciless trespass of blackened death metal upon the senses. Influences to their intent include the likes of Behemoth, Dissection, Immortal, Emperor, and Watain, strong flavours noticeable in the band’s sound but without leaping miles away from such inspirations XUL has woven the spices into a sonic narrative built on the sole character of their imagination. Formed in 2008, the quintet released debut album Malignance four years later, a well-received encounter stirring up Canadian extreme metal especially across the Western side of the scene country, a recognition reinforced forcibly by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Obscura, Exhumed, Vreid, Kampfar, Woods of Ypres, Macabre, Withered, Cephalic Carnage, Archspire, and 3 Inches of Blood. New EP Extinction Necromance sees the band explore their darkest depths and most malevolent emotions, filtering all into intensive examinations of ears and psyche.

It begins with Frozen, We Drown, an immediate consumption of the senses through prowling riffs and grooves punctuated by lurking rhythms. There is also an underlying swing to the opening baiting of ears, a trait which is regular bait whether in a gentle melodic persuasion, a rugged rampage, or an unbridled savaging. There is also thrash bred virulence at the start which with the rabid sonic intensity subsequently evolves into a melodically scenic landscape of constantly developing climates and unpredictable intent. The track continues to shift and switch its attack and sound, merging murderous sonic and rhythmic affairs with almost seductive hugs of calm and evocative suggestiveness. XUL’s sound, as each song upon the EP, is not suitable for a lightweight consumption. It is with continual examination that the busy terrains and almost insidious nature of the aural tapestries unravel for increasingly dramatic and impressive proposals. That is not to say it is not a potent first introduction made, just a matter of almost too much to digest and get a handle on initially.

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

It does ensure every listen is a slightly different and fresh adventure too, epitomised by the following Orbit of Nemesis. It rises from the release with a heralding fanfare of horns and celestial harmonies, the epic air suggested in the orchestral hints of its predecessor in full regalia here. Like a majestic bird soaring into an expansive and thickly coloured atmosphere the track sparks the imagination but like the same being swallowed by the jaws of a violent storm, the expressive opening of the track is devoured by a bestial sonic explosion. The band surges over the senses from within that assault; volleys of violent beats from Lowell Winters the spearhead of a hellacious onslaught brought by the bass predation of Marlow Deiter and rabid guitar causticity from Wallace Huffman and Bill Ferguson. With the raw primal tones of vocalist Levi Meyers leaving their own inhospitable residues in ears too, it is a gripping fury taken to greater heights by the toxic but sonically invigorating grooves and shards of melodic imagination spilled by the fingers of Huffman.

As the first track, though maybe not as openly tangible, there is an evolving aspect to the raging and another swing to its vicious stroll, an ingredient which marks each song in varying ways and degrees as shown by third song Chaos Requiem. Rolling in on a ‘gentler’ gait and intent than its excellent predecessor, the song is soon sledgehammering the senses as guitars weave a tempting lure of melodic intrigue and expression. The turmoil is exhausting, ensuring that the brief respites when they emerge feel like oases in the merciless storm. It is increasingly gripping and an intensive incitement which as mentioned needs time to fully explore but more than rewards the effort.

Final track Summon the Swarm coaxes with the calm of water and a reflective melody before unleashing sonic and rhythmic carnage, but a tempest openly and precisely sculpted by each element of the band. It also delivers a thick anthemic lure alongside its punishing tirade of sound and voice, the track at times as intoxicating as it is corrosive as it frees a maelstrom of emotion and musical drama, especially in the closing ravishing of ears.

The more time Extinction Necromance is given the more it impresses, an undeniable success which marks XUL out as a band to watch closely as they surely start luring in a more global attention, starting right here. It might not quite be the best blackened death metal protagonist you will meet this year but it will be the one of those enticing the most repeats plays.

Extinction Necromance is available from May 19th @ https://xulmetal.bandcamp.com/album/extinction-necromance

http://xulofficial.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/Xulband

RingMaster 19/05/2015

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I’ll Eat Your Face: Hot Brains Terror

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Just the title Hot Brains Terror alone had anticipation firing on all cylinders as the latest album from Irish metallers I’ll Eat Your Face lay waiting to be investigated. It ignited hopes of a sonic creature feature type release, an album casting horror soaked manipulative fingers upon the psyche and it did not disappoint though it exceeding all wishes with its sensational  encounter. The album from the Cork duo is a delicious creative incursion upon the senses which fires up a furnace of passion towards its startling sounds.

Released on Grindscene Records, Hot Brains Terror is the second album from the band and an insatiable corrosive triumph of grindcore or as the band self declare “supergrind”. It employs extra noise, psyche additives, and more to bring a unique and explosive collection of tracks, each stirring up hunger and unbridled enthusiasm for more and more.  Consisting of guitarist The BOY and drummer Barrytron, the release is made up of nine rabid raptorial instrumentals gripping and twisting thoughts and senses out of shape whilst thrilling them with glorious corruptive sonic imagination. Formed in 2006, I’ll Eat Your Face has earned strong acclaim through numerous split, EPs and releases reaching a pinnacle with previous album Irritant. The new album is another step up in quality and sound which you can only imagine the attention and acclaim around it imitating.

The first thrill is opener Weasel Tank Slime, the track emerging from a swamp ambience to unleash badgering rhythms and psychotic sonic teases from the guitars. It is a schizophrenic joy which in its slightly longer than a minute presence is too short such the pleasure given, though the band takes no time in bringing an equal contagion to the ear with Acid Worm Monsoon. This track is a caustic dance with the senses driven by ravenous snarling riffs within scorching sonic fires and seeping smouldering melodic glaze, and stunning

As the likes of the insidiously shadowed Brainwolf: Revenge of the Priest which just demands ardour with its irresistible playful groove within the corruptive dark of the song, Drowning Dogs in a Swamp with a presence and energy as unpredictable and intimidating as the sounds it uses to subjugate the heart, and the blackened  Enslaved by the Prawnmaster grip with inventive and boundary stretching enterprise, the album elevates itself to what one can only declare as classic status. It would have taken a car crash of a second half to knock the release from this early pedestal and of course that was never going to happen.

Reverse Eagle Embeastment is a perpetual swash of acidic light and magnetic brilliance from both members of the band, the rhythms a crusading adventure within the blustery sonic squalls of the guitar, and a glorious union. The majority of the pieces are short which ensures tracks never come near to over staying their welcome though arguably they also depart too soon. It is certainly not a negative though just evidence of how greedy and devoted to the immense creativity and unpredictability to each song one becomes.

The album is completed by the excellent track The Eels of Love Lake, the even more outstanding Castle of Vomiting Owls, and the titan of a closer Forever Sealed in the Electric Brains’ Melting Slug-Ray. Again each song shows the impressive diversity across the album leaving one breathless and basking in their challenging and enthralling imagination. The first of the final trio is an incessant hypnotic layering of serpentine textures alongside niggling sonic rubs which just leaves one transfixed whilst the second gnaws away at the senses, tearing their surface asunder though not before luring one in with seductive melodies and soothing caresses. Now deeply tucking into its victim the track further lashes the remnants with spiteful groove laces for a totally bewitching experience.

      Forever Sealed in the Electric Brains’ Melting Slug-Ray closes the album with a final disturbing nightmare complete with bedlam screams and primal carnage masquerading as riffs. It is a mighty end to an equally immense album. Certainly a release for fans of bands like Pig Destroyer, Cephalic Carnage, and Devilman, Hot Brains Terror stands as the best instrumental album of the year alongside 7th Direction from Stinking Lizaveta, and to the fore of all releases.

http://www.ill-eat-your-face.com/

RingMaster 11/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Interview with Jonny Davy of Job for a Cowboy

With a new line-up the mighty Arizona death metal quintet Job for a Cowboy have lit up 2012 with their  magnificent new album Demonocracy. Returning with a continued evolution in musical maturity and technical excellence, the band retain their claim to being the most hostile, visceral, and exciting bands in death metal. As expected the album does not give an easy ride but is genuinely one of the most rewarding you could wish for. As ever we wanted to find out more about the album and look behind its sounds, as well as hearing more about the band itself. With pleasure we were able to do so with vocalist Jonny Davy who kindly tackled our questions.

Hi Jonny and many thanks for taking time to talk with us.

We will cut straight to the chase and the new album Demonocracy. Wow impressive, has it emerged even more powerfully than you at first envisaged?

Absolutely. We ended up changing parts and experimenting ideas within the studio. Something we haven’t really done before. I’m glad we took the time and effort to rearrange parts and hash out new ideas. We are all super happy with the product.

I admit I am no expert on the back catalogue of Job for a Cowboy but from the previous album Ruination there feels not only a distinct evolution in sound but in maturity, the songwriting and song construction especially, is that something that has been simply organic or have you worked particularly on that?

It is organic only for the fact that our motto in the bands writing system was to ALWAYS progress as a band. We are here to impress ourselves and others amongst the band. A lot of bands find their niche and safe zone, writing the same material record after record. We are entirely opposed to this and continue to enhance our sound as much as possible.

How much has the addition of new members guitarist Tony Sannicandro and bassist Nick Schendzielos, sparked the changes in the band sound?

A new lineup always sparks a fire under everyone’s ass’s. The reality is, every time we find new members we make sure that they are a step up from the previous ones. I know that it is cliché to say, but this is the strongest lineup that we have ever had, and if any of these members leave… it will be the end of Job For A Cowboy.

You are never an easy band to listen to haha, you demand a focus other death metal bands ignore but offer deeper rewards for that but with Demonocracy there is maybe a more instant aspect to parts of the music with the solos etc, would you agree?

Haha, yes I agree. I feel like this is the type of record where you really have to listen to a few times before really digesting it all.

The album and band is still as aggressive and hungry, that is very apparent on the album but is there a fine line between expanding your sound and direction ahead and losing the impact you have always brought to date to be wary of?

You know, it is hard to say. We don’t necessarily nit pick our music at that angle. We just try to have fun with it and try to make sure it is an improvement from the past.

Many bands would have used the acclaim and success of Ruination as the base for the next album but you seem to have started with a clean slate though it is still obviously a Job for a Cowboy sounding album.

I think every album for us is a clean slate. We don’t want to focus on one record and work around that. We want to keep making new ideas and stepping forward.

How does the songwriting work within the band and has it changed in any way with Tony and Nick on board?

It has changed dramatically. In the past, we always wrote and even lived together in Arizona. Now, guys live in Boston, Denver, Seattle and Phoenix. All across the United States. We had to shoot our ideas through email and home recordings. I think giving everyone space however let everyone hash out their ideas without the distractions of other members knocking them down before they could really progress.

Tell us about the theme and inspiration for the songs and lyrics.

Obviously from the title they are very political. So many bands in our genre from a lyrical perspective write about the stereotypes of death metal. Anti-Christianity, gore, death, murder… We stray away from this stuff and have a much more punk rock attitude.

You have again worked with producer Jason Suecof, he seems to have a real understanding of what you are as a band and want to bring to your music?

Jason is awesome. He has become a great friend and we really respect what he does in the studio. It is nice walking into something and know what to expect. That is why we keep working with Jason.

The album cover is immense, a welcome into Demonocracy as powerful as the music. Can you tell us about it and who designed it etc?

Brent Elliott White, who also did the cover for Ruination did this cover as well. He is an amazing artist just in the sense that you can give him so little and he can create so much with it. I gave him a rough idea on the lyrical content and he nailed it right on the head.

As mentioned you have two new members, so was the band set back a little with the departure of Bobby (Thompson) and Brent (Riggs) and can we ask the reasons for their leaving and was it something  that was on the cards for a while?

I’ll start with Bobby. He simply wanted to start the family life back at home. He actually helped write Tarnished Gluttony on the record. Great friends to this day, he just couldn’t handle the touring life with what he wanted to do at home anymore. As for Brent… Well, drugs became his first priority. He fell into the black hole of caring about drugs over everything else. He had to leave.

What was it about Tony and Nick that made you realise they were the guys to help out firstly touring and then to be added as permanent members?

We knew Nick from Cephalic Carnage, he still plays bass for them to this day. As for Tony, he was with Despised Icon for a couple years. They were both easy fits, especially from a personality perspective.

What have they brought to the music that was possibly lacking before?

Much much much much more technicality.

Has the new dynamic and ideas the two have brought in made you return to older songs with a slight re-invention in mind?

No, I think people like to hear our older songs the way they are. We don’t want to pull a George Lucas and recreate Star Wars.

I am no musician but was wondering when you bring a new guitarist in alongside the existing one is there a change required in both in regard to how they have played previously or in the existing member’s role within the already written and established songs?

It just turns into a new collaboration. We want our new members to do everything freely as they want.

One can assume you will be touring the ass off of Demonocracy?

Yes! Nonstop!

How do you think the live shows will change with the new guys on board compared to before?

A lot more energy.

You all seem to love every aspect of Job for a Cowboy but one senses the live arena is where you have the biggest thrill from?

Absolutely, we have toured nonstop for years. It is our true passion.

Too early I know but anyway what is next for the band and you as individuals?

More and more touring across the world.

Once more many thanks for taking time out to talk with us and good luck with Demonocracy, though one feels it will not be needed.

Would you care to leave us with any last words or thoughts?

Check out the new record!

Read the review of Demonocracy @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2012/04/04/job-for-a-cowboy-demonocracy/

The RingMaster Review 16/06/2012

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Cattle Decapitation: Monolith of Inhumanity

Without having a full and firm knowledge of the career and previous output of Californian death grinders Cattle Decapitation, there is still a feeling that it is not too far from the mark to claim their new album Monolith of Inhumanity is up there as possibly the best thing they have unleashed upon. The album is immense, a towering brutality that takes all that the band is known for to a deeper and harsher level whilst stretching themselves and the genre with an incisive invention and inspired originality. With previous album the excellent The Harvest Floor as the main reference to compare the new album with, there is a further defined intention and realisation on the new album to bring not only the aggression and combative directness but also themselves and their music as a whole into new and imaginative avenues.

Cattle Decapitation have not veered sharply away from the intense and dehabilitating extreme sounds they have been known for and cultured since their beginning in 1995, in fact they have turned that aspect up to flesh searing and bone snapping heights. Into this though they have brought irresistible melodic insertions, groove fuelled hooks and lures, diverse vocals, and multiple infectious invitations unlike anything the band has created before. These are used subtly and sparingly but when used they bring something special to the visceral decimation going on all around. Monolith of Inhumanity is outstanding and makes being punished by its limitless violence a pleasure.

Released via Metal Blade Records on May 8th Monolith of Inhumanity sees the first appearance of bassist Derek Engemann in songwriting and recording. Joining vocalist Travis Ryan, guitarist Josh Elmore, and David McGraw on drums and alongside producer Dave Otero (Allegaeon, Cephalic Carnage), together they have spawn an album which lives and breathes to annihilate the senses as it brings through its concept of where humanity will end up if it continues its current course. From the moment the opening track The Carbon Stampede swarms around and bears its heavy vindictive weight upon the ear you know Cattle Decapitation have not lost their might and viciousness but have increased it with relish. The track rages like a furnace as the riffs splinter the sinews holding the ear in place whilst twisting the senses into a defenceless molten obedience. It is a devastating start still only suggests the greater things to come.

The darkly grinning bass of Engemann in the following Dead Set In Suicide alongside devastating rhythms from McGraw send bestial claws straight into the soul but it is the impressively varied and contrasting guttural gratings of Ryan with presumably his own high higher pitched demonic chorus which whips the song to be an immediate highlight. With riffs puncturing the body like offspring from a semi-automatic and melodic guitar play as sharp as cheese wire the track is enormous.

The album though just gets better and better, from the consuming vehemence of A Living, Breathing Piece of Defecating Meat with more brilliant diverse vocals and …well, just about everything, through the spiteful deeply intrusive Gristle Licker with a groove that opens up in the latter stages as demanding and additive as heard anywhere, to Lifestalker a track which almost breaks out initially into a wanton grooved swing attack until its bestial heart reasserts itself, the quality simply rises and rises.

The best is saved to last though with the trio of tracks Do Not Resuscitate, Your Disposal, and the closing Kingdom Of Tyrants. The first of the three turns the senses into a splatter board for the debris from its uncompromising intrusions of blistering riffs, acidic invention, and ravenous vocals. As shown everywhere the production allows each member to express their individual agenda and malice to bring a fuller and open but no less titanic assault from Cattle Decapitation. Your Disposal is the best song on the album, bringing all the best elements on the album into one rampaging maelstrom of intensity, violation, and ingenuity. It is like being in the middle of a charnel pit as your skin and bone are flayed by the sounds.

Kingdom of Tyrants is equally impressive and unpredictably imaginative, the perfect creative and destructive end to an outstanding album. With essences of the likes of Carcass, Dimmu Borgir, and Cannibal Corpse spicing up their own distinct death, grind, and what is at times melodic black metal, Cattle Decapitation have let loose one of the best extreme metal albums in a long time. Monolith of Inhumanity will leave you on your knees and devoid of feeling but most of all it will leave you fully satisfied.

RingMaster 03/05/2012

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Deadborn: Mayhem Maniac Machine

From the very first drum hit Mayhem Maniac Machine from German tech-death metalers Deadborn lights up the senses with formidable yet undemanding, insatiable and high quality destructive sounds. Consisting of nine muscular deliberately combative tracks the album is a deeply satisfying varied and abusive tower of steel.  Unrelenting with brutality and direct sonic manipulations Mayhem Maniac Machine hits every one of the senses with an unerring bullseye.

Formed in 2002, Deadborn released their first four-track EP Decades Of Decapitation two years later to be followed by their debut album Stigma Eternal in 2007. Both releases as well as tours with the likes of Graveworm, Disbelief, Hate Eternal, Cephalic Carnage, and Dying Fetus, and their own shows brought them an enthused attention and respected name within German metal and further afield. Now consisting of vocalist Mario Petrovic (ex-Necrophagist), lead guitarist Kevin Olasz (ex-Jack Slater), Jo Morath on rhythm guitar, and drummer Slavek Foltyn (ex-Necrophagist), Deadborn look set with their new album released via Apostasy Records on April 20th to take an even bigger stake in the attention of the world.

Mayhem Maniac Machine is an unrelenting technical metallic dance across the senses, each and every track ripping away their safety to replace it with tense intrigue and intimidating intrusive grooves. There is no respite from the driving aggressive rhythms, crushing defiant riffs, and scorched blistering melodies that frequent each and every metallic soundscape on offer. The album to be honest does not open up new chambers of sound and directions but simply is a gloriously stimulating and exhilarating rampage to full within and be inspired by.

Though classed as death metal the album opens up many more doors of metal to add a extra flavour to their striding sounds. From the opening march of Premises Of Cryonics one feels ranks of varied metallic spices coming together to lead a mighty and unassailable sound. The track forges a deep bond between complete captivation and senses obliterating extreme metal to create a song as catchy and irresistible as it is disarming and venomous. As the rhythms of Foltyn hungrily and continuously machine gun the ear the guitars lead the rest of the body and thought through showers of flesh stripping riffs and burrowing razor sharp melodic intrusions.

The following Profanatic Reanimation takes a sideways step in sound to infiltrate the listener just as accurately and effectively as the opener. The groove and melodies fly with a raised temperature and acidic sound to ride the wave of heavy weight rhythms and intensity from bass, drums, and the excellent bestial growls of Petrovic. The vocalist offers an overall similar styled attack throughout the album but adds a coarse mesmeric edge that ensures it never grates or becomes dull and constrictive within the songs.

The album has a mass to it not only from the music and intensity but also within the production from Christoph Brandes. Together he and the band have given Mayhem Maniac Machine an intimidating thickness and imposing ominous atmosphere but still have brought and allowed clarity to the intricate exploitive grooves and the at times deranged rhythms. Songs like the combative declaration that is Slaves Of Megatron, the sonically piercing Reinvented Power Process, and Second Order Cybernetics a full fury of metal, all lay their bulk upon the ear whilst splintering into distinct and openly compulsive features.

The twin highlights on this impressive album, are Insane Motor Cortex and Replicants Device. The first is the best track on the release, an uncompromising stretching of the senses through cyber madness and tumultuous metal invention, every note like a destructive nanobot stripping the body of feeling and breath. The second of the two stands over the ear like a towering behemoth of hardened iron, its riffs dropping down like lead from on high whilst the melodies and insistent groove garrottes feelings and emotions. Both are majestic death/metal conjurations from a well of maniacal ingenuity and ferocious intentions.

    Mayhem Maniac Machine is a gem, an album that intrudes upon and makes use of every part of the body and in return rewards with sheer unadulterated metallic pleasure. It is hard, consuming and without mercy, and also as is Deadborn, the reason metal is so important to our souls

RingMaster 13/04/2012.

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Job for a Cowboy: Demonocracy

Job for a Cowboy return with a new line-up, new ideas, a continued evolution in musical maturity, and in Demonocracy their new album, one of the most formidable releases so far this year. The sheer power and quality to the songwriting and its realisation means that even if you are not a fan or the songs within the album do not grab you the musicianship and technical excellence is still unmissable and undeniable. Demonocracy is not a put on and listen once or twice and it clicks type of release, though for many it will do just that, this album demands your focus, attention, and at times your patience before divulging the ingenuity and excellent varied construct within the brutal onslaught it consumes with.

Released April 10th via Metal Blade Records the album follows up the widely acclaimed Ruination of 2009 by moving all aspects of the sound and songwriting of the Arizona quintet forward. From listening to Demonocracy it is evident there was no temptation to rest on their laurels even a little after such a strong and deep affection thrown over the previous album. For sure the change of personal has brought a natural change, the fact that songs now contain solos and at times the guitars take the lead suggests that, but there is an apparent organic shift too, a determined intent to find a further progression to themselves as musicians and the band as a whole.

The time between the two albums has seen the departure of guitarist Bobby Thompson and bassist Brent Riggs. Their replacements have not just come in to fill the slots but from the evidence on Demonocracy have instantly added a new dimension to compliment what their predecessors and the band had already impressively created. Cephalic Carnage bassist Nick Schendzielos and session guitarist for Despised Icon Tony Sannicandro initially were brought in as touring musicians but the chemistry that was immediate from playing and the songwriting ideas they brought into the band on the 2011 Gloom EP saw the arrangement become a permanent one. Alongside vocalist Jonny Davy, guitarist Al Glassman, and drummer Jon “Charn” Rice the pair has added a different dynamic which has also created another within the band as a whole to make their new release something that grabs the attention on every level.

From the opening onslaught of Children Of Deceit, Job for a Cowboy unleash their recognisable death metal/metal power but with a fuller and one can almost say more elaborate sound and texture. The track scrapes flesh from the ear as it thrusts its muscular riffs and full intensity through seeking to consume the senses but it is veined by guitars, melodies, and technical manipulations that are as scorched and venomous as you will find anywhere.  As mentioned now solos appear on tracks and though something almost unexpected and new for the band it is an easy and impressive fit.

As always listening to Job for a Cowboy is a testing and challenging experience, they are a band that requires a deliberate focus rather than a passing listen to appreciate all their attributes and this album is no different but the new progression to their sound and the additives brought from the new members and the determined ideas of the band as a whole are openly audible and enjoyable and again understood and complimented by returning producer Jason Suecof (The Black Dahlia Murder, Whitechapel). Tracks like the excellent Nourishment Through Blood, Imperium Wolves with its excellent cello/keys ending though the song as a whole blisters and abuses perfectly, and the tumultuously intense Black Discharge, leave one numb, bruised and fully satisfied from being obliterated by a band that has found something very flavoursome to add to their already mighty sound.

Tongueless And Bound and The Manipulation Stream are the two songs that really ignited the most on the album, both slicing though the senses with technical precision whilst tearing the wounds wider with a pummelling that aches rather than numbs. Every track on the album is immense but this pair offer extra sparks from the guitar work of Glassman and Sannicandro through to the dehabilitating rhythms of Rice and Schendzielos. Davy too has upped his game on the album offering more variety to his delivery whilst still spewing and spitting the politically and socially themed lyrics as vehemently as ever.

Demonocracy will not be the album of the year for everyone as the band demand much more than most are willing or able to give with their hungry and intense sounds but it is hard to think of a death metal album as fulfilling and inspired as this for a long time. Job for a Cowboy might not be a flavour for everyone but with the new album they offer much more for many more making it at least a definite investigation.

RingMaster 04/04/2012

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