Possessor – The Ripper

UK metallers Possessor have been a band fear and lust has equally and simultaneously been spawned for in the face of each release uncaged since they emerged within the death throes of 2013. The band’s doom nurtured, thrash fuelled sound is a crushing and violating experience but one which has enslaved body, imagination, and soul here with its virulent, invasive boogie. The London trio recently released new album The Ripper and we can tell you nothing has changed. Their third album is a cauldron of corrosive riffs and destructive rhythms honed into one of the rawest, insatiable, and thrilling trespasses you are likely to hear across this coming year and beyond.

As much grunge, stoner, and alternative metal as those earlier mentioned hues, Possessor’s sound is pure predatory confrontation often as demonic and lewd as the horror soaked premises it spawns. The band’s 2014 debut album, Electric Hell, was an unpolished gem of an introduction providing “a thrilling ticket to the start of their inevitable ascending ride.” It was a journey which has bruised and abused, gripped and thrilled across the following Stay Dead EP a year later and second full-length Dead By Dawn eighteen or so months on. The last album really thrust the band into new spotlights but it has to be said that all have been rousingly eclipsed and put in their place by the carnal majesty of The Ripper.

Instantly opener Conjure and Possess casts a sonic storm over the senses, its abrasive scouring the warm up and prelude to a ravenous stomp of riffs and rhythms bound in the most lustful of grooves. A temptation to rock the residents of a graveyard into life with the swinging beats of Matthew Radford as arousing as they are destructive, the track roars through ears bearing the raw dirty vocal tones of guitarist Graham Bywater with open devilment. The bass of Tom Fowler is just as devilish, its own grooved swing instinctive incitement in the multi-flavoured onslaught.

The following Guillotine is just as fevered in its attack, maybe more so but unafraid to slip into less intensive examinations of the listener as it conjures its own web of salacious grooves and rapacious enterprise. Bywater’s voice and riffs infest ears but even more so his grooves and sonic espionage manipulates body and appetite already caught by the primal claws of the rhythms.

Fowler’s bass finds an even more carnivorous voice for the following Wet Cemetery, its visceral gurning leading a wash of rasping riffs within which vocals spew causticity. Toxic melodies vein the relative calm which separates the song’s energetic lust, it all leading to moments of nefarious endeavour which itself is sheer magnetism. A mesh of essences which lure references to bands such as High On Fire, Cavalera Conspiracy, Electric Wizard, and Unsane, flavours rising throughout the album, the track emerges unique to Possessor and again a common factor to The Ripper echoed in The Slime immediately after and thereon in. The fourth track hits its crunchy stroll instantly, snarling riffs chewing sinew before grooves send liquor coated tendrils through ears, its varied metallic irritancy swiftly addictive as the psyche is increasingly possessed.

Through the grim viscera of Whitechapel Murders and the scalding tension of Lava, the scorching of the senses and unrestrained pleasure escalates, the first of the two bearing the early Therapy? scent our ears have always found and greedily consumed within the Possessor sound. Every part of the band’s unholy trinity is on the top of their game, a success applying across the whole release but at their hungriest or certainly most fervid here. Its successor is an inferno of threat and intrigue, less equipped with irresistible hooks and addiction sparking grooves than others around it but just as commanding in its escalating incessancy.

Notting Hell opens in a jungle of rhythmic machination, the piece a brief shamanic infestation of devilry setting up the blood strewn quarrel and sonic narcotic that is Hacksaw. The most barbarous exploit on the album, it is a bestial and concentrated blitz on the listener, manna for the beleaguered senses and primal rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

A pause as things take a breath simply marks the insatiable devouring sprung by closing instrumental Earth Shaker. It is a rampage driven by a horde of voracious riffs and fearsome rhythms with grooves and twists just as mercilessly toxic and though it does not quite hit the spot as fully as what came before, the track consumes attention and satisfaction with ease.

There are few bands which truly excite just from news of a new encounter with them but Possessor is among them and will continue to be so with hellish offerings like The Ripper.

The Ripper is available now through Graven Earth Records on cassette, Wicked Lester Records on CD, and digitally @ https://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/the-ripper

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 Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lody Kong – Dreams and Visions

Photo-Joey Nugent

Photo-Joey Nugent

Let us get the most publicised aspect about Lody Kong out of the way first. The Arizona based band is the creation of Zyon and Igor Cavalera, the sons of Sepultura/Soulfly/Cavalera Conspiracy famed Max Cavalera and brother of Incite frontman Richie Cavalera.

Now to the important bit; the release of the band’s blistering and increasingly impressing debut album Dreams and Visions. It is a ten track infestation of the senses as debilitating as it is invigorating as it uncages ravenous tempests forged in sludge thick, raw metal toned raging infused with punk belligerence and fuelled by post and hardcore causticity. Band and album challenges ears and incite the imagination at every turn with an array of invasive textures and flavours uniting in rabid exploits which generalising as psychotic punk ‘n’ roll would not be to deceptive.

Formed in 2011, the Phoenix hailing Lody Kong soon made a potent mark the following year with debut EP, No Rules. It was an introduction to the quartet of guitarist John Bauer, bassist Shanks, vocalist/guitarist Igor, and drummer Zyon reinforced and more by the band’s part in the 2013 US/Canada/European Maximum Cavalera tour and more recently last year’s Cavalera Conspiracy US tour. Now it is the turn of their eagerly awaited debut album to stoke up broad attention and for the major reasons of sound and fierce invention rather than band personnel.

The album opens with the outstanding Chillin’, Killin’; a venomous assault of a track offering searing bait from its first breath. That sonic intrusion soon erupts into an antagonistic rumble of raw riffs and hostile rhythms urged on by the emotive scowls of Igor. Piercing repetitive grooves only add to the compelling and exhaustive incitement, shifts in the predatory state of the track’s gait and character increasing its irresistible lure with a full throttle thrash kissed charge simply icing on the scintillating cake.

art_RingMasterReviewThe album’s title track keeps the grip on pleasure and appetite just as tight, its bruising weight and cantankerous intensity carrying an air of Pigs and Discharge to its irritable storm. It too is a song which twists through a host of inventive changes and detours, leaving a lingering psyche infesting dark presence and tempting which carries on into the likes of the emotively and sonically cancerous Kreative Center and the stalking animus of Pig In The Pen. The first of the two chews the senses with its nagging riffs whilst hooks and wiry grooves vein the scything swings of Zyon which cross another bestially toned bass trespass by Shanks. It is an unrelenting pressure of sound matched in its individual way by its successor whose initial doomy prowl soon expands into tar like sludge voracity interspersed with frenzied canters of energetic animosity.

Both tracks are spiteful punk rock with the virulence of numerous styles involved, much like the body of the bad-blooded Rumsfield where again band and sound enjoyably crush the senses with their creative and emotive jaundice. As across the album, there are moments of familiar hues and textures running headlong into ears yet each and every time their appearance is woven into something fresh, inventively damaging, and individual to Lody Kong.

Smashed and Blasted is proof as it presents its own hellacious and intensely imposing proposal next. The track is arguably the heaviest and most merciless on the release yet one with a host of imaginative hooks and sonic enterprise which hints as much at post punk and noise rock as it embraces extreme metal and post hardcore ferocity. Its thick enticement is followed and eclipsed by the predacious crawl of Some Pulp. There is liveliness to the song’s attack though it clambers over the senses rather than charges them, vocals and citric grooves the lead bait in its animalistic stalking with again numerous unexpected and incendiary twists.

Through the excellent old school punk/grunge feud of The Dangerous Quest and the dirty and schizophrenic Pistols-esque rock ‘n’ roll of Topaz, the album adds more aspects to its increasingly adventurous character. There are no major deviations from the heart of the songs before, but each explores another inventive hue and discord nurtured variation which continues with the closing sludge ’n’ roll consumption of the senses cast by Venomous Kool-Aid. It is a suffocating weave of thrash and doom metal with classic and hard rock strands, the guitars of John and Igor almost flirting with their bitterness laced craft around the latter’s rasping tones.

Though for personal tastes the loftiest highlights are found in the first two thirds of the album, Dreams and Visions is an unrelenting rousing of body and spirit, and indeed the debilitating devourer of both, which simply leaves a want for more from start to finish.

Dreams and Visions is out now via Mascot Label Group @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/lody-kong-dreams-and-visions-cd.html

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Pete RingMaster 30/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Black Oil – Resist To Exist

Black Oil_RingMaster Review

I think we can all agree it is seriously hard to be truly original in the music scene now and just as difficult to be noticeably unique against the hordes of other bands tempting time and attention. A few though do instinctively stand out through sound or presence to stand many steps from the masses, and one such proposal is US based groove metallers Black Oil. Their sound is a furious maelstrom of various strands of metal, Latin and worldly invention, and a defiant passion which binds it all for one, as shown by their new album, blistering and rousing confrontation. Resist To Exist is a riot in the imagination, a tempest in the ears, and an anthemic incitement just leaving the body alive.

Calling LA home, Black Oil originally emerged from Brazil with a sound crafted and honed with a unique blend of cultures and years of experiences gained by founder Addasi Addasi, whose travels have taken in the life and flavours of over thirty countries. Since forming the band has earned a big reputation and following through a previous pair of acclaimed albums, including the predecessor to their new encounter, the Logan Mader (Machinehead, Soulfly, DevilDriver, Gojira, FFDP) produced the Not Under My Name, as well as a live presence which has seen them play with the likes Megadeth, Fear Factory, All Shall Perish, Soulfly, Otep, Cavalera Conspiracy, Arch Enemy, Anthrax, Cattle Decapitation and many more. Their renowned metal-samba sound and hard hitting politically charged lyrics has made Black Oil a hungrily devoured proposition already, and now with Resist To Exist it is easy to expect even greater reactions and spotlights on the band, the album simply one of the most exhilarating incitements of the year.

cover_RingMaster Review     Produced by Cristian Machado of Ill Nino, with many other contributions, Resist To Exist sees the quartet of guitarist/vocalist Addasi, vocalist Mike Black, bassist /vocalist Drew Petropoulos, and drummer Michael Gomez joined by a host of guest contributions including Fear Factory/Archaea’s Raymond Herrera and ex-Static X/Soulfly and now Fear Factory bassist Tony Campos amongst them. This and the unbridled imagination and ideation soaking songs all goes to create incendiary tapestries of sound and energy which from the opening track makes Resist To Exist one feverish conquest of body and emotions.

It all starts with Rise Up, a song with its intent in its title and success in a character which just will not accept anything less than full involvement from the listener. From its first breath, riffs and rhythms are a cauldron of enticing intensity, a tenacious prelude to swiftly joining and just as quickly virulent grooves. Aligned to the guttural roar of Black, the track is in full violent swing in seconds, its rhythmic hips casting a commanding swagger as guitars and bass cast an inescapable web of searing grooving and infectious riffery. Like Five Finger Death Punch meeting Powerman 5000, but so much more, the track is an incendiary device of invigorating and exhausting metal contagion, raw alchemy to get the blood and energy rushing through anyone’s veins.

The ferocious start continues with the just as explosive Justified where malevolently swung beats and a carnivorous bass tone add their great grouchiness to a wind storm of sonic hostility, and that is just the initial impact on the senses. Soon Middle Eastern hints stir within a spicy expulsion of guitar before the track puts its head back down for another hellacious and rabid stomp. As much death and industrial like as it is a grooved fury, the encounter continues to ignite and incite ears and thoughts before passing the senses over to Callate. The third track, which features Campos on bass and vocals, is a predator of emotional bedlam and creative unpredictability, its sound as diverse and ravenous as the vocals fuelling its inner corrosive rage, and as irresistible.

Exoskeleton savages ears with its vocal and rhythmic hostility next, whilst simultaneously seducing the imagination with a tangy web of melodic grooving and feistily flavoured enterprise. The result is something which roars like a blend of Fear Factory and Devildriver yet equally only has its own distinct animus of sound and intent. It is a flesh searing bellow leaving the body shell shocked and ready to be taken on a fiery ride by the following Combustion. From its initial fierce caress of sound, Latin bred percussion and melodic hues are enriching the song’s rhythmic and sonic tempting, elements of bands like (Hed) PE and Bang Data joining the muscular rebellion and expelling even greater influence as the track springs its bruising anthemic shuffle. Joined by guest Silverio Pessoa on vocals, Black is the ringleader of one addiction forging, body igniting tempest. The guitars alone create an enslaving persuasion with their relentless and evocatively creative twists whilst the percussive aspect of the song aided by Mario Pallais, is simply a puppeteer on the listener.

One brilliant encounter makes way for another in the insatiable shape of Revolution. Featuring and driven by the ravenous rhythmic swings of Herrera, the track is a bestial onslaught but one littered with infectious grooves and sonic devilment. The track is psychotic, never allowing the listener to make assumptions on its direction and with more guests involved, evolving character. The same can be said about Stand Against Everything which comes straight after, the song akin to the last and taking certain aspects of its persuasion into its own persistently evolving and fiery samba.

Resist To Exist closes with Paper Slave, a final aggressive and venomously inflamed uprising of creative hostility and impassioned defiance. It comes shaped with cantankerous riffs, merciless rhythms, and mesmeric invention, bone breaking hostility merging with worldly and emotive resourcefulness. Stuck Mojo and Ill Nino come to mind as it ravages air and ears but again the song in reality is something else again, and though maybe not matching earlier heights, it leaves the listener only wanting more upon departure.

Black Oil brings something different and relentlessly exciting to the metal table with Resist To Exist. Some tracks soar above others in creative adventure and sheer compelling power but all leave a greedy hunger and thick pleasure behind them. Who can want much more than that?

Resist To Exist is available now via Sliptrick Records through most digital stores.

http://www.blackoil1.com/   https://www.facebook.com/blackoilofficial

RingMaster 22/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Threatpoint – Careful What You Wish For

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An album you may have missed but certainly need to know about is Careful What You Wish For, the second album from US groove predators Threatpoint. It is a fury of an encounter infusing varying flavours of metal and heavy rock into a snake pit of grooved hostility, and though there are thick strands of recognisable influences and essences, band and album incite nothing less than greed and thick enjoyment with its brand new proposition.

Hailing from Scranton, Pennsylvania, Threatpoint emerged in 2012 and quickly drew potent attention and praise for their voracious live presence and a similarly hungry sound which further stirred up the local and US metal scene through debut album Dead to Rise the following year. It has been an increasing success now creating new waves further afield through Careful What You Wish For, an album over a year in the making and equipped with a torrent of irrepressible grooves, deeply rooting hooks, and a creative antagonism which just gets the blood surging.

The blistering tempest of sound and attitude begins with The Age Of Godlessness, its opening coaxing a provocative atmospheric scene of raw winds and solemn church bells. It is a portrait of ominous dark shadows and scenery from which the track subsequently bursts with ravenous riffs and heftily examining rhythms. The onslaught is torrential and instantly virulent, the raw and ferocious vocals of Chris James the perfect provocateur within a tsunami of aggression and caustic grooving. There is a feel of bands like Devildriver and Cavalera Conspiracy to it as the band mixes styles into a bracing tempest veined by melodic and sonic enterprise.

threatpoint album  It is an explosive and gripping start matched by the following Vultures Of Prey, an even more predatory and sinister corruption of the senses. Though the song has less of the physical and creative rabidity of the first, it is a just as rigorous and intimidating stalking of ears and emotions with a Static X like breath creeping in with vocals and riffs from the simultaneously enticing and savage guitars of Alex Olivetti and Mike White. Two songs in and fair to say Threatpoint would have to seriously go awry to lose the hungry appetite and inflamed satisfaction already ignited by the opening pair of rages. Though some tracks understandably impress more than others, the quintet continues to enslave with craft and diversity as the ferocious Divide & Conquer takes over. The great raspy tones of James prey on ears as the rhythmic hostility of drummer CJ Krukowski and the increasingly bestial qualities of Eric Ross’ bass lay down addictive bait within a flood of salacious grooves. A spicy solo adds further heavy metal magnetism to the torrent of sound and persuasion before it all departs for the sonic devilry of Mockingbird.

The fourth song is bred from a swirling of melodic enticing which seizes precise moments to magnetically flirt with ears from within another tsunami of impassioned intensity and creative voracity, vocally and musically. Once more strikingly different flavours are woven into its ravishment with its substantial melodic and heavy metal colouring employed further in an equally pleasing but darker terrain through Blessings and Curses where they court a black and death metal seeded trespass on the listener.

Collapse almost toys with ears initially, a bedlamic soaking of essences the first fierce hug before song and bands expel a flood of ravenous emotions amidst a brawling collusion of tangy grooves, dogged riffs, and rapier like swings from Krukowski. It is a beast of an encounter, an irresistible ravaging unafraid, as all songs, to mix up its attack and presence to leave expectations redundant and the imagination feeding on more familiar but openly fresh confrontation. It is a brutal highlight springing to another in the hellacious stalking of the senses that is Stronger Than Death. It is yet another offering where vicious hostility and sonic adventure collide in an invigorating raging. As the music is a maelstrom of flavours and styles within each of the album’s cyclones, so are the vocals of James and the band as a broad diversity and delivery shares the singer’s similarly uncompromising and hard hitting lyrics.

The thrash and death spawned Mark My Words has the pulse and emotions racing next, the imagination seduced by a great progressive melodic twist around two thirds in, whilst Devil You Know and Tree Of Sorrow are both rancorous hurricanes eroding the senses but rewarding with more creative infusions and twists of sub genres within metal and rock. Though all songs provide strong individual characters and presence there is a unity in sound and invention which ensures all are audibly Threatpoint, even with the strong feel of a Killswitch Engage or Hatesphere across these particular offerings.

The album’s title track unleashes its carnivorous might and potency next. Sharing its merciless grudge in an irresistible multi-flavoured cyclone of grooves, scarring antipathy, and sonic devilry, the track ignites another wave of greed and satisfaction but finds itself shadowed slightly by the even greater animus and punk infused raw beauty of Secrets. From the deliciously nasty bassline cast by Ross in its first breath, the outstanding song is an insidious and unstoppable seduction with every element and second of its presence sheer carnal temptation.

It all comes to a close with firstly the masterful and sinister menacing of Hatebox, where James finds a Dez Fafara like grievance to his tones, and lastly the compelling When Karma Comes. The final song emerges with an acoustic melodic beauty which simply transfixes as the background sneakily brews up a sonic grievance which eventually erupts in hostile weather embraced in a bad blooded climate.

Given the luck and attention that Careful What You Wish For deserves, it is easy to see Threatpoint making their presence a global one if not now certainly on a near horizon. Their new proposal is not a game changer for the metal scene but gives it a new protagonist to get excited over and that is almost as good.

Careful What You Wish For is out now from most online stores.

http://www.threatpointofficial.com https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint

RingMaster 09/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Unswabbed – Tales From The Nightmare Vol.1

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Not breaking the banks of originality but brewing up a rousing storm of metal and rock, Tales From The Nightmare Vol.1, the new EP from Unswabbed, is an encounter which easily inspires a very healthy appetite for more. Unveiling a new twist in sound and its direction from the French veterans, the five track release binds thick strains of melodic and nu metal with a harder rock voracity resulting in a proposition which holds no real surprises but has ears and attention fired up and greedy for the band’s fascinating adventure.

Hailing from Lille, Unswabbed began in 1995 with a harder and more voracious rock and metal fusion than found on the new EP. A couple of early demos bred an attentive fan base for the band which their 2004 self-titled debut album pushed to a wider spotlight. Two years later its successor Instinct was uncaged with a third full-length in the shape of In Situ coming a year later, both to critical acclaim. Across the years the band has also earned a potent live reputation and found responses for shows alongside the likes of Cavalera Conspiracy, (Hed)P.E. , Caliban, Senser, Empyr, Pleymo, Mass Hysteria and many more. The album Intact was unveiled in 2011, and following a decision  in 2013 to explore new musical landscapes and inventions, the quartet set about creating Tales from the Nightmares Vol. 1. Themed by individual stories spawned by nightmarish incitements, and written and sung in English, a first for the band, the self-released EP is a stirring slab of metal fusion. Not dramatically overwhelming or as mentioned casting brand new explorations it easily ties up senses and emotions in a thoroughly captivating and thrilling temptation.

The release opens with the excellent Come to me, a dynamic and gripping encounter which takes little time to ignite thoughts and emotions. A sonic coaxing is soon rife with magnetic riffs and thumping rhythms as the track bursts into life, to which an additional almost punkish coaxing aligns itself. The start alone has body and imagination involved which is only accentuated by the sturdier beats and rugged riffs which accompany the excellent clean vocal suasion. Essences remind of bands like Mudvayne and Nonpoint as the song continues to flare up and cast tight melodic lures across its invigorating and emotionally charged body. It might not be offering something new but boy the song is exhilarating.a2298760115_2

The following Wake me up employs a chorus of children chants initially which return throughout the release though maybe to a less convincing success compared to its opening pitch. The song itself is soon commanding thoughts and attention, keys brewing up a haunting ambience as guitars and bass carve out another magnetic web of persuasion. It is like a mix of (Hed) PE and Korn fed through the metal contagion of Fear Factory, and just as riveting as its predecessor even if taking longer to convince. Its potent enticement makes way for the darker croon of Hold the line. Expelling angst and drama with every note and vocal expression, the song slowly expands across the senses with thick exhales of caustic energy blended with gentle melodic caresses. Lacking the spark of the first two songs, it still leaves an inescapable enslavement over ears and emotions, luring both back time and time again.

Dead end zone is a hard rock romp with an open vein of rock pop to its joyful swing and anthemic beats. It is impossibly catchy from its first touch, hooks and grooves as irresistible as the continually impressing vocals and unpredictable invention which ensures no song is anything less than an event. It also shows another side to the heart of the release and the evolving sound of the band, and though it is probably fair to say the song is less adventurous than the other tracks in its character, when it sounds and feels so addictively good there is little to complain about.

The EP is brought to a scintillating end by Pull the trigger again, a track like the first which leaves the strongest bait to stalk the release time and time again. Cloaked in emotional shadows from its first enticing chord, the song is the dark to the light of the last song. Riffs from guitar and bass weave a brooding canvas over which expression drenched vocals and sonic suggestiveness brings intimidating yet simultaneously welcoming hues. It is an emotionally pungent and rigorously captivating track which at times stalks the imagination as it scorches the senses with its poetic melodies and sonic colour. It is a might end to a similarly impressing release.

Unswabbed is not carving out truly original ideation with their new direction but they are unleashing a highly rewarding and persistently thrilling proposal which leaves any familiarity to others redundant.

Tales From The Nightmare Vol.1 is available now @ http://unswabbed.bandcamp.com/album/tales-from-the-nightmares-vol-1

http://unswabbed.com/

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8.5/10

RingMaster 02/09/2014

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Athanator – The Perfect Enemy / Architect of Disaster

athanator pic

Though Athanator was a name often on the wind surrounding our ears the RR had never taken the plunge and investigated the band further despite their mention always coming in positive and strong declarations. Thanks to an email from Alberto Arias of their Columbian label LIXO Sonido & Discos the chance to remedy that fell into our laps as two of their albums The Perfect Enemy and Architect of Disaster were sent our way for covering. Neither is new, from 2006 and 2009 respectively, but such their quality and compelling persuasion another of our intermittent retrospective reviews was definitely the order of the day.

Hailing from Medellin, Colombia, Athanator formed in 1989 and was soon one of the biggest draws on the country’s metal underground scene. Demo recordings began building an emerging stature for the band with the usual line-up shuffles many bands go through adding spice to the progress of the band. 2000 saw the band release debut album Rise the Death which not only cemented the band’s place in the passions of the underground but sparked wider world awareness for their contagious melody fuelled thrash metal. A place on Raise The Slaughter- A Tribute to Slayer in 2002 only brought greater recognition upon the quartet leading the band to selling out numerous shows and supporting German thrashers Destruction, whilst second album Earth of Blood, a release bursting with old school thrash might, pushed the band further into the sight of the world before the two albums concentrated on here sealed the deal and set  the band one of the best emerging metal bands not only from South America but the genre itself.

The Perfect Enemy instantly warns the ear with the first track’s war zone introduction. Thoughts On The Battlefield then erupts into viewathanator and into a charge of thumping rhythms and explosive riffs; its eager and hungry assault gnawing the ear to spark an immediate appetite for release and sound. As the hoarse vocals of Jaime Ocampo graze the senses from within the fiery and greedy exploits of his and Eder Zapata’s guitar enterprise, the track brings the prime essences of Slayer and Anthrax into a keen and potent mix. It is maybe not the most staggering start but is the perfect appetiser for the likes of the rapacious Fill Your Heart With Fury and the predatory Unsocial God to build upon. The first of the pair employs essential grooves into its adrenaline driven riff attack with the vocals finding an even more impressive position at the heart of the climactic song. The bass of Kike Ramirez enjoyably grumbles and prowls gloriously throughout song and album whilst the drums of Juan Carlos Sanchez, which for personal tastes are given a weak tinny production, cages it all with flare and skilled eagerness.

The third song on the album is a trigger to greater things on the release, its imaginative welcome and twists bringing a varied slant to sound and release. There is a Metallica like whisper through its emerging shadows and riveting sonic premise whilst Cavalera Conspiracy intimidation teases across the restrained but potent provocation. This new level is matched by the creative riots of Purified and the scintillating Gallery Of Dreams whilst Smile Of The Death with riffs and rhythms flying from its core like missiles steals top honours on the album with its mix of Static X and Megadeth seeded invention. After a more than decent start The Perfect Enemy evolves into one fine thrash/metal album finishing with another triumph in the mighty shape of Hatred In Shater.

architect     Its successor Architect of Disaster again opens with a scene setting breath, this time an industrialised haunting atmosphere generating menace and fear. It leads into first song Morbid Fear with evocative hues which seamlessly evolve into confrontational jaws of the opener. Instantly there feels a darker more predacious energy and breath to the album than its predecessor which soaks the song with formidable intensity. Like on the previous album the opening song is a very solid and welcoming encounter which awakens the senses for following songs to exploit better, though it should be noted the guitar play and spicy latter hooks offered are pure addiction.

The following tempest of The Army Of Death raises the temperature and intimidation higher whilst the likes of Scarred For Life and Method To The Madness whip up deeper passion for their destructive temptations. The first of the two songs grinds away at the emotions and body with grinding grooves and rabid riffs whilst the drums of Repe Mejia, the only change in the line-up to the last album, punch and slap the ear as a mighty hunger for the album breaks loose, soon to be satisfied by the blistering storm of the second of the pair. As it taunts and drags the passions into its anthemic fire thoughts of Testament and Kreator are no strangers but as before it is fair to say the song and sound is distinctly Athanator’s.

There is an open maturity and adventure pinning this album to the wall of glory, a thrilling build on the previous impressive endeavours. Tracks like the viciously tantalising Into The Shadows and the even more malicious Void bring the album to another powerful and intensive climax which the throaty bass lure and lethal swing of No Room For Error and the brilliant closing The Path Of Anarchy endorse passionately. Best track on the album with vocals, riffs, and rhythms enslaving the passions in a defined brawl of creative ferocity, it leaves body and mind declaring Athanator as eternally welcome violators.

Both the Jose Uribe produced albums are tremendous and if like us you have been slow to catch on to the might of Athanator they are the essential gateway to their impressive presence. Though The Perfect Enemy probably has the greater individual moments in its body Architect of Disaster, which comes with an equally exciting live DVD, is the stronger and more accomplished of the two, but truthfully both leave even current thrash releases floundering in their wake.

http://www.athanator.net

The Perfect Enemy 8.5/10

Architect of Disaster 9/10

RingMaster 28/08/2013

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