SECTLINEFOR – Anorexic Insect

sctlfr_RingMasterReview

With a back story as cinematic as the sounds and suggestiveness conjured, reading between its lines it seems that SECTLINEFOR has been a seed and adventure long time in the making for its creator Pavel Stepanov aka Piton, the guitarist of progressive synthetic death metallers Ygodeh. It is a project as far away from that impressive proposition as you can imagine and one which with debut album Anorexic Insect seriously ignites the imagination.

London based, SECTLINEFOR’s sound is tagged as cinematic neo-metal though no precise description can be made for the unique and striking avant-garde lined adventure it takes the listener on. With fellow Ygodeh member in bassist Aal and vocalist/lyricist Jared alongside, Piton creates the darkest tales with Anorexic Insect, its series of haunting nightmares as seductively engaging as they are boldly deranged. Musically the album persistently infests body and psyche whilst the vocals of Jared are pure magnetism with their winy prowess.

It all begins with the album’s title track, its low key start of synths and atmospheric theatre instinctive coaxing for the listener swiftly accentuated by the vocal gurning of Jared. Beats soberly pulsate whilst Aal’s bass probes the senses, drama fuelling every second and note especially as the track subsequently erupts with muscular psychosis. As across the whole release, there is a touch of Trepalium, 6:33, and Cardiacs to its off kilter exploits; of Stump too with Jared’s vocal presence something closely akin to Mick Lynch of that band, but as suggested earlier, each is a flavour suggested merely hinting at what is on offer from band and album.

anorexic__RingMasterReviewThe outstanding start continues with The Aftertaste of Soap. Its initial industrial lure is soon a more forceful proposition preying on the senses, at times stalking ears and in other moments making bolder statements of intent as the song ebbs and flows in intensity. Symphonic essences bring greater evocatively suggestive spicing to the challenge while rhythms offer an infectiously energetic agitation as vocals and melodies entwine the harsher attributes of the compelling encounter.

As invasively dark as everything is, My Neighbour was on TV explores an even more sinister landscape next. Throughout the album, there is a suffocating intimacy in atmosphere and emotion just like the grisliness which lies at the heart of folk and fairy tales and in the third track it devours ears and thoughts, exciting each simultaneously before Birthmark Photograph uncages its own psychotic bedlam and electronic flirtation in a bed of metallic causticity. It is glorious stuff, like the album a proposition which will either work for you or not but if it does, SECTLINEFOR provide manna for the senses and indeed imagination.

Anorexic Insect is a fusion of creative beauty and unhinged dynamics which borders on alchemy and no more potent than in the bewitching addled embrace of Orange Soda and in turn the inventively provocative haywire that is Checkmate. Both songs twist and turn with certifiable imagination and relish and each presents in their individual ways a tapestry of skilfully woven adventure and incitement upon which Jared roars with vocal meshuga, a creative abnormality perfectly matched by the composing and craft of Piton and the throbbing stimulus of Aal.

Through the grand drama of Congratulations and the poetic grace of Gag Reflex of Stray Dogs, there is no let-up in unpredictable theatre and pleasure; each a web of inventive deceit and captivation gleefully twisting the listener this way and that. I’m Not Having That Much Fun Anymore equally exposes ears to raw insanity and imagination at its nerviest while the outstanding Little Handjobs strokes an already inflamed appetite for the album with hectic tenacity and hyperactive energy.

Finished off by the raw Lovecraftian instrumental trespasses of The Door and The Secret Behind, this certainly no warm Witch and The Wardrobe like fantasy, Anorexic Insect is a rare and exhilarating proposition. As mentioned some will run from its inner terrors and emotional turmoil but those with instinctive adventure in their tastes will be rewarded with one of the early true treats of 2017.

Anorexic Insect is out now @ https://sectlinefor.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pg/sectlinefor/

Pete RingMaster 01/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Exploring the rousing roar of Maxdmyz

Maxdmyz_RingMasterReview

Maxdmyz is a London based metal quintet who has earned a potent reputation over the year as a live proposition and through their striking sound and releases. We were took the chance to find out more about the band with thanks to its members, exploring its origins, heart, and creative pulse…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Twister: So I’m Twister – I sing, write the lyrics, melodies and make the odd contribution to the tunes themselves. You’ve got Roger on guitar, A’Zedd on bass, and Vortex on keys and programming with Jay on drums and programming.

The band has taken different forms over the years – I’m the only founding member, although Jay and I have been working in the band for quite a while now. A’Zedd and Vortex joined a couple of years ago, and have each brought their own flavours to the band – A’Zedd in jazz and blues, and Vortex in goth, industrial and electronica. Roger was the brains behind German death-metallers, Apophis, and Jay has an incredible number of influences from Cardiacs to Nile and Squarepusher.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Jay: Yeah, we’ve all been band whores ever since any of us can remember. I don’t think we consciously decided on one musical direction or another – what does mark us out though is an openness just to see where things take us. It’s a unique combination of influences and personalities and it’s that chemistry that gives us our sound, and everyone is welcome, in fact encouraged, to contribute as fully as possible to the best of their ability.

What inspired the band name?

Vortex:  Twis likes to tell a story where it was a dyslexic founding member who came up with it – I’m still not sure whether I believe him but the name at least is distinctive and, if not memorable, you remember that you can’t remember it – er, if you see what I mean!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

A’Zedd: Wow, I’d like to say there is and that we have a sense of a specific sound and vibe that we want to create. But it would be a massive lie. It’s much less conscious than that and all the better for it. Emotional connection – that’s the beginning and the end of it, and our music is the vehicle to do it.

maxdmyz1_RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Roger: What do you mean – “was” fresh-faced – I think the band has developed over time, but whether progression or regression, who knows. As for evolution, well, every time we play or rehearse, we get closer and stronger – the material improves, as do our live performances. We are all incredibly driven, and always will be – it’s just a compulsion to connect.

So since your early days, how would you say your sound has actually evolved?

Twister: We’ve become heavier and more melodic – we started out really almost as loopy drum ‘n’ bass laced with samples, goth vocals, and heavy guitars. And it’s definitely an organic thing, although this openness to see where things take us naturally has definitely led to innovation and experiment?

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations, you touched on it with Jay but are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A’Zedd: It’s weird, you know, but almost everything you encounter and process, musically or otherwise, has an impact – either as repellent or attractant. There are certain kinds of music and artists I don’t want to emulate – and that’s as much if not more of an influence on our music, vibe and outlook as anything else. But my native discretion forbids me from naming names.

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Jay: Each of us is a songwriter in their own right – so what generally happens is that one of us presents an idea, even at a relatively early stage of development, and we jam and refine it. We all have our areas of expertise, but we are all very open to contributions and suggestions from band mates. The songs refine and develop through practice and live performance.

Roger: If one of us doesn’t feel comfortable with something, we generally dump it as we’ve all got to be happy with the final product if we’re going to deliver it with conviction; having said that, we are all happy to compromise. This is one of the most productive and democratic bands I have ever worked in – it’s just mutual respect and everyone working towards the same goal. Publishing is always divided five ways, regardless.

Vortex: Yeah, part of the pleasure of being in this band is that everyone works to get the best possible level of creativity out of everyone else – we all see ourselves as enablers of the others’ creativity and are glad to be so. It feels so good to be working in a collaborative environment where everyone is respected and feels represented.

Where, more often than not, do you draw inspirations for the lyrical side of your songs?

Twister: I guess this is my shout – since I write the damn things. It’s from the extremes of emotional experience, more often than not – or sometimes from some ironic or sardonic take on an issue that grabs me – from anorexia to suicide bombers. They’re noises made to music in the end and they either work or don’t work.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?

Jay: It feels a little weird talking about it, as it feels a long time ago now and we will be releasing a new album later this year or early the next – The Hate Plane was released in August 2014, maxdmyz artmaxdmyz_RingMasterReviewalthough it still seems to be exciting interest and radio play etc. as if it had been released just a month or two ago; that may be a characteristic of the internet age, people come across this stuff online every day and for them it’s new and fresh. Grieve, the single off the album, is still getting a lot of radio play, especially in the States, as are All and Side with Satan.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the album.

Vortex: Apocalypse, the counter culture under pressure, individual desperation in the face of personal powerlessness and alienation, anger, boredom, sex, mental illness, political injustice – you know; the usual stuff. The premise is, I guess, is that existentially you have to make a statement even if the only one listening is yourself.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A’Zedd: The answer is yes. I think you have to be as prepared and ‘finalised’ as possible and that’s because things will always change and that’s good. We can’t afford financially or creatively to mess around composing on recording time. That’s why, when I estimate how long it’s going to take to record anything, I estimate, double the figure, then double it again.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Roger: As a relatively new member, I can say that that’s what drew me to the band. I’d seen them in one guise or other playing live for a few years on the London circuit. It was one show in particular which I thought was electric – at the Dome in North London. Twister is a fantastic singer, and A’Zedd is such a fluent, effortless bassist. Vortex has this extraordinary presence. And Jay is one of the most phenomenal drummers I have ever seen, let alone played with. Playing with these guys is an incredible adrenaline rush and communicates that excitement to the audience, and that, in the end, is what it’s all about.

maxdmyz2_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Jay: London is the last place in the universe you’d want to start or be in a band. There are probably thousands of different acts all trying to climb out of the sewer that is the London music scene. Some of the great metal bands have come from the UK, but culturally there seems to be less appetite for it than you’d think. There are opportunities to make a mark for new bands of course, but there is always that element of luck – being in the right place at the right time, knowing the right people and so on. Rick Wakeman once said that any band looking for a deal doesn’t deserve one – easy for him to say, but he’s only half right. With the internet now though, it’s sometimes easier to make a mark somewhere else in the world rather than closer to home.

So how has the internet and social media impacted on you guys to date?

Vortex: It’s had a massive positive impact on getting our music out there. There is a fantastic democratizing influence that the internet has had – it kind of flattens out celebrity – everyone has a website – you can visit Slayer’s or Maxdmyz’s and the experience is much the same – you listen and you either like it or you don’t. True, it’s less easy to get rich off music if you’re an artist – well, it was never that easy, but so what! In what moral universe does Phil Collins earn millions of dollars off a song it took him three minutes to write, where the average ambulance driver or nurse earns naff all by comparison. And you don’t need any specialist skills apart from the ability to click on links and send emails, seriously.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

A’Zedd: Well, thank you for your interest. Yep, we’ve just heard we’ll be playing Club Antichrist on 11th November. See you there!

Check out Maxdmyz further @ https://www.facebook.com/maxdmyz and their music @ http://maxdmyz.bandcamp.com/

https://maxdmyz.uk/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 17/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Phobophobes – No Flavour

 

Photo by Keira Cullinane

Photo by Keira Cullinane

Phobophobes is a British quintet releasing their debut single this month and though it is only one song heard, it is hard not to join the clamour of suggestion that the Londoners are going to provide the UK music scene with a new and fresh spark over coming years.

No Flavour is the name of the band’s first single, a track which shares its virulent psych pop/garage rock enterprise with a vaudevillian like mischief whilst instantly shedding light on many reasons why the band is causing a stir. Formed in 2014 within the creative belly of Brixton, Phobophobes consists of vocalist Jamie Taylor, guitarist George Russell, bassist Elliot Nash, drummer Dan Lyons who played in the original line-up of Fat White Family, and keyboardist Chris OC also plays in Meat Raffle. Fair to say, the band has earned a glowing reputation across the capital and beyond for their stage presence and sound, something sure to blossom just as eagerly elsewhere once No Flavour escapes the shadows.

Thick swinging beats hit ears first, their resonance as enticing as the fuzzy edge to the emerging guitar. Once keys dance in with flirtatious melodies, that carnival-esque hue is working away on ears and imagination, being only enhanced by the controlled barker like tones of Taylor. The virulence of sound is echoed in the vocals, especially in their broader prowess in a chorus for which there is no antidote for its incitement of listener involvement.

Continuing to bounce and enslave, the song swings and thrills like something akin to The Doors meets early Horrors meets Tankus The Henge, with added Cardiacs like mischief, to match that of the lyrical side, for keen measure. The track is manna to ears and imagination, with no complaints from feet and hips either. Coupled with a reportedly “extraordinary version” of Leonard Cohen’s Tower of Song on the B-side, a pleasure we have yet to hear, No Flavour is a mighty introduction to Phobophobes, a band as mentioned earlier, it is easy to suggest has a very potent future ahead of them.

No Flavour is released March 25th on 7” vinyl and download on BAM Records (via Republic of Music).

https://www.facebook.com/Phobophobes/   https://twitter.com/PPhobes

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Shatner’s Bassoon – The Self-Titled Album Shansa Barsnaan

SB_RingMaster Review

We have all had a dream which is ripe with randomness so abstract that it somehow makes sense, and that is exactly what it is like listening to The Self-Titled Album Shansa Barsnaan, the new album from Shatner’s Bassoon. Not that our brain cells have yet managed to come to terms with any of its themes, if there are any, or the intent behind its psyche twisting bedlam of creativity, but without doubt we are having the richest fun and enjoyment trying.

Shatner’s Bassoon is a sextet from Leeds taking influences from the likes of Tim Berne, Mr. Bungle, John Zorn, Frank Zappa, and an expansive range of styles and flavours into their warped composing and sound. Equally individual experiences of its members carry a diverse range stemming from European folk, Hindustani music, Brazilian music, straight ahead and free jazz, reggae, metal, contemporary classical, musique concrete and most likely plenty more inspiring spices. 2013 saw the release of their debut album Aquatic Ape Privilege and last year the live EP, The Crowd Grows Mild. Now representing “the summation of the last three years of working since the addition of Joost Hendrickx on drums and electronics”, Shatner’s Bassoon release their second album of unhinged imagination, an encounter from Johhny Richards (Keyboards/Piano), Michael Bardon (Bass/Bongos/Botanical String Quartet), Andrew Lisle (Drums), Oliver Dover (Saxophones/Bass Clarinet), Craig Scott (Guitar), and Hendrickx which puzzles, bemuses, seriously confuses but most of just thrills.

cover_RingMaster Review     Bruce Lawn starts the album off and according to the press release sees “Seemingly disparate musical fragments converge into a unified theme as catchy and uncomfortable as gonorrhoea. It dissolves as quickly as it manifests into a visceral aural soup, crashing into an overtly sexual Transylvanian organ punch.” It opens with a handful of lusty seconds of anthemic sax bursts and handclaps before flinging a host of discord kissed sounds made up of melodic and sonic tweaks. Already thoughts are conjuring a picnic in a thirties freak show, an abundance of off-kilter beauty providing an embrace of joy with sorrowful undertones. As with every track, and no matter the hints given by the band musically and in word, each listen sends the imagination down a new avenue of lively and shadowed adventure, though ones maybe not quite as disturbed or avant-garde as the ideas in the minds bringing the piece to ears. Band and song continue to ‘meander’ and spin new detours, a few of them Essential Logic like, as it drifts into an increasingly sinister haunting; coming out the other side with aural face paint smudged and mental coherence askew.

Bruce Lawn II: Arms like a Mirage comes next; the song’s initial elegantly chilled breath a surreal reflection of its predecessor’s final dark throes whilst spinning slowly deeper into its own turbulent intrigue of sound and barely masked insanity. It all leads to a bordering on bestial climax which is almost 6:33 like in its concussive collision of jazz, rock, and whatever else lies within its tapestry of aggression.

Like that initial spattering of water as rain clouds open is how Fringe in my eyes, Thighs in disguise sheds its mosaic of incompatible yet united sound next, each note from the song sheet a jazz bred splatter marking its territory; yes warped sounds seem to breed warped ideas, in us anyway.

Percussion and rhythms provide a skittish but fluent dance to set Mushroom/Fancy a Waltz away; bulging blobs of sax and clarinet flirting with the spicy strings of the guitar soon after before things get a little psychotically hairy in something best described by the band itself as “a machine gun spluttered duet finally melting into a refreshingly resolute meditation.” To be honest whatever we write or they say is a scratch upon the strange and spellbinding tapestry at work throughout the album and its individual exploits of tangling sound and ingenuity.

Ten seconds of innocence coated sax gaiety is all Mitch Fargone’s walk to school offers before Advocates of Anti-Funk pulsates and shimmers in a kaleidoscope of melodic and brassy sunspots, all wanting to share their swinging hips before eventually colluding in a dark carnival-esque seducing. Rip Rig & Panic meets Mr Bungle might be a good way to describe it…actually not really as again Shatner’s Bassoon cast only their own uniqueness over ears.

The dark enchantment of Boat Comforts moves in like sea fog, creaking boards and melancholic siren sent calls mesmerising and tantalising the senses. Every passing second brings darker and stranger nautical essences, the piece toying with the imagination like a Jules Verne on LSD written adventure complete with a bare boned and crazed shanty. Cardiacs come to mind the more the song spills its insanity and rum brewed frenzy before Boat Comforts Part II: Goat Conference / The Real Shim Lady unveils its own sonic choral of loco spawned textures and cracked rhythmic incitement. Like the unbridled discordance of eighties band Stump infesting the psyche and the creative prowess of a composer to a silent movie, the track goes from low key musical disorder to sinew swung hysteria and back again into deep melancholy.

Next comes DMT AABA which is like a nursery room found in American Horror Story, it in turn followed by the even more thickly haunting of The Ballad of Long Egg, a track which for whatever reason sparked thoughts of films like Roman Polanski’s Repulsion and The Tenant. Closing eyes whilst listening to the track ensures it is an atmospheric noir scare, its textual narrative high suggestion even if the results brewed mentally do or do not match the band’s intent.

Inspector Fargone is another passing swoosh of temptation, its twenty odd seconds like a spaced-out Jacques Tati moment whilst the brilliant Boghead (WaspSpeed) is a fevered uproar of energy through a palette of eccentric funky sounds and demented brass grimaces and eruptions, all coming together like a Dali sculpted painting by numbers, though of course there is no recognisable order or structure to the blaze of premeditated and free form ingenuity.

The album is brought to a close by an enveloping lure of sound which again can only be described as haunting. Will you be my Friend? draws in vocals for the first time, their harmonies as left field and fascinating as the sounds hugging their presence, and wonderfully as musically heretical as the gentle cacophony creating one enthralling and exhaustingly bewitching album.

When you listen to The Self-Titled Album Shansa Barsnaan you will have a totally different view and response to its songs, that is a given such its diversity and unfathomable genius but most will agree that for appetites of humour loaded music with an insanity as broad as the imagination and wealth of flavours in its creation, Shatner’s Bassoon have provided one feverish treat.

The Self-Titled Album Shansa Barsnaan is available via Wasp Millionaire Records from September 24th.

Pete Ringmaster 23/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Between the Buried and Me – Coma Ecliptic

Pic by Justin Reich

Pic by Justin Reich

 

It is tempting to call the Between the Buried and Me music a kaleidoscope of sonic and inventive hues yet that suggests a randomness which certainly does not apply to their persistently compelling and dramatic explorations. In saying that though, there is an organic unpredictability which seemingly evolves on its own so that at times you wonder if the band knows what is to emerge any more than the listener. And so it is with their seventh album Coma Ecliptic, a series of gloriously imaginative plains of roaming sounds and immersive textures which whether a BTBAM fan or not is seriously compelling, that together create an epic emprise of aural fascination which is either creative ingenuity or insanity.

It is easy to see Coma Ecliptic splitting opinions though hard to imagine many dismissing its technically immense, musically explosive, and rivetingly captivating journey out of hand. Equally the reference to it being like a rock opera does it no favours, certainly with those like us instantly cringing at the thought and term, but assumptions should be cast aside as, even though there are indeed moments of indulgences and flamboyant enterprise, the concept album is bred from the same template of musical and lyrical probing that made previous release The Parallax II: Future Sequence so bewitching and thrilling. It is a whole new beast of course bred from the similar seeding which unites all the band’s releases, but BTBAM doing what they do best, tearing up their own rulebook with zeal and tenacity.

Lyrically Coma Ecliptic follows a single protagonist who stuck in a coma travels through his past lives, each track an individual episode set in “a modern day, sort of The Twilight Zone-esque” world. In each place he can choose to stay or move on to search for a better place, ultimately being met with the ultimate question life or death. The rest is for you to find out but in true BTBAM fashion, the lyrical side of the album is as involved and time consuming to reap its full rewards as the music. There are a few things to pull Coma Ecliptic up on, if you wish to be over analytical and demanding, but like the best sci-fi/fantasy movie, run with its liberties and proposition rounding flaws, and unbridled pleasure through full-blooded adventure are the rich prize.

Cover_RingMaster Review     Opener Node cups ears in a gentle yet emotive touch of keys, Tommy Rogers’ fingers and voice swiftly stroking ears and imagination even before melodies broaden and their elegance mesmerises. The melancholic air of the song has its own ethereal light and hope, album and band immersing the listener into the realm of album and story with sublime ease, even adding Queen-esque flames of epic tones and sonic grandeur to striking effect. It is a potently enticing start which slips into the theatrical and magnetic embrace of The Coma Machine. Many have compared the album and some of its textures and flavours to bands like Dream Theater yet aside from the unavoidable uniqueness of BTBAM, here and often across the album Australian progressive metallers Voyager nudge thoughts. The track ebbs and flow in energy and rousing intensity as it explores its and the story’s depths, and is just as enthralling as it writhes with majestic imagination, whether in a gentle hug of a croon or roaring with aggression and passion.

Dim Ignition emerges from an electro bubble next, synths a lively and nagging simmer within drummer Blake Richardson’s increasingly intimidating rhythms. The song flows into the immediately darker hued Famine Wolf, portentous and ever gripping bass tempting from Dan Briggs alongside just as shadowed keys, their haunting smothering consuming the senses for the ever spellbinding craft and invention of guitarists Paul Waggoner and Dustie Waring to exploit and shape further. The track’s early predator like union grows from one relatively inviting premise to a volatile incitement, with Rogers vocally entwining his superb clean and just as impacting raw metalcore seeded deliveries to match the sounds. The track is thoroughly absorbing, even making its less than seamless slip into a jazzy, psych rock like twist work perfectly and never relenting in making every minute unique from another.

As outstanding as it is though, King Redeem / Queen Serene steals the show, growing from the departing breath of its predecessor into a tempest of pop, funk, melodic revelry, and ravenous metal ferocity; every aspect fuelled by a contagiousness which simply intensifies with every elevation of aggression and invention. Imagine spilling the essences of Periphery, Society 1, and Cardiacs into the BTBAM mix and you get something close to this exhilarating encounter.

Both the imposing Turn on the Darkness and fascinating The Ectopic Stroll keep the fires of serious enjoyment burning, the first at times bordering on the bestial as its landscape savages as siren like seduction joins in equal creative measure. Its successor explores a dance seeded gait and scenery, piano keys a punchy spark to the tenaciously evolving avant-garde landscape, and both songs, but especially the second, tempestuous weaves of expansive flavours, styles, and bold intent sculpted by musicians openly at the top of their game and imagination.

     Rapid Calm brings a spatial yet melodically and emotionally intimate proposal forward next with mellow vocals, harmonies, and keys the warm serenade to the carnivorous walls and depths soaked in challenging intensity lurking and eventually exploding from deep within. Bewitching hardly does the song justice but that is what it is as it wraps its mesmeric and often rabid charms around ears and thoughts. Coma Ecliptic is undoubtedly an album which challenges and involves both aspects with every second, it shown again with Memory Palace and after that Option Oblivion. The first of the pair is soaked in blues and funk rock resourcefulness, a folkish festivity also getting in on the persuasion as the song traverses through ten minutes of instinctive and virulent creative alchemy whilst the second is like looking into a fire, every flame of sound distinct to another yet perfectly aligned in one senses sizzling incitement.

Coma Ecliptic is completed by the emotionally rousing Life in Velvet, another fusing intimacy with grander winds to fine effect. The intoxicating Jamie King produced album leaves the richest hunger to hear and learn more, which is lucky as like their other encounters, it is a proposition which needs numerous plays to really get into its constantly revolving corners and levels, our words above barely scratching its surface let alone depths to be truthful.

The best album from Between the Buried and Me to date?…Well it has to be seriously considered and argued over but there is no denying this is another major success and thrill from the band which their fans will get lustful over and others will at least offer a thick complimentary smile or nod.

Coma Ecliptic is available now on Metal Blade Records @ http://www.metalblade.com/btbam/

http://www.betweentheburiedandme.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BTBAMofficial

RingMaster 14/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Craig Scott’s Lobotomy – War is a Racket

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Like the soundtrack to a deranged tale fed on Tim Burton’s vision of Alice in Wonderland and soaked in the lunacy of a Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band, War is a Racket is one of those propositions which simply send ears and imagination into overload. Created by Craig Scott’s Lobotomy, the album is a kaleidoscope of sounds and textures uniting in a fascinating and warped adventure, whilst Craig Scott himself is the aural Willy Wonka, offering sonic and melodic candy created from the tang of discord and sweetness of insanity.

A bordering on psychotic tapestry of experimental jazz, alternative rock, and similarly unpredictable electronica, album and sound casts ears and thoughts adrift in a sea of instrumental incitement. Every track is a unique vehicle for the imagination to go on a creative rampage with yet they also all contribute to a perpetual flight through one fluid and invigoratingly bedlamic soundscape. War is a Racket has been three years in the making, drawing on influences, experiences, and the things Scott has learned during his life to date as a professional musician involved in numerous diverse projects. The result of everything combined is a debut album which dangles bait after bait of startling sound and seriously intriguing unconnected essences, all united in a creative toxicity which just gets deep under the skin to set off a lustful reaction in ears, thoughts, and ardour.

The previous years has seen Scott play regularly with the likes of ‘Shatner’s Bassoon’ , IKESTRA , CottonWoolf, The Bugalu Foundation, and The Hot Beef Three as well as perform with artists such as Tom Arthurs, Baba Adasose Wallace, Matthew Borne , John Potter (Hilliard Ensemble),Chris Sharkey (Trio VD/Shiver), Ball-Zee(UK Beatbox Champion) Jean Tousaint (Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers) , Les Smith (Cradle of Filth), and Ruby Wood (Submotion Orchestra , Bonobo). His music has grabbed the ears and support of fellow musicians like Gary Lucas (Captain Beefheart / Jeff Buckley) amongst a growing horde of fans which also includes cult horror classic House of 1000 Corpses’ Bill Moseley. Anticipation for War is a Racket has certainly been more than keen but it is now with its release that it is easy to expect major awareness embracing its creator.

a4033067006_2    The album, which sees Scott accompanied by a plethora of skilled and inventive talent, opens with Gibbles and a distant wistful melody. The ear is soon under the temptation of dark double bass slaps and bass clarinet seduction though; they in turn courted by a web of brass teasing. A jazzy air soon takes on an exotic flavour through guitar and sax, excited elements entwining for a sultry and mouth-watering dance through Arabian avenues and more Caribbean spiced festivity. All the time though there is a tempering shadow, an underlying turbulence which brews up a danger with fresh seeds for thoughts to twist and redesign its visual landscape with. The nearer its conclusion the more unravelled the track and its calm becomes as it takes the listener into the sonic distortion and percussive bubbling of Proud to be a Mirkin. The second song also brings a brass fuelled agitation aligned to a sinister electronic stalking of the psyche. It is the stuff of dark dreams, though as hindsight will eventually show, just the start of bigger nightmarish intrusions to come.

Peace returns with Tempest in a Teacup next, a nine minute stroll through summer gardens and reflective atmospheres. Of course already, even on the first listen of the album, expectations are soon expecting darker warped twists too and it does not disappoint, though equally the track sets senses and emotions ablaze with a deliciously manic melodic enterprise equipped with mischievous hooks and perverted imagination. Like something from Brian Brain in a drug induced stupor, the track ebbs and flows with bright revelry and noir clad infestations of ears and thoughts. Ultimately though, you come away with feet bouncing and emotions leaping to that devilish jazz pop lure and the emerging gypsy/world music spicing which has a distinct Les Négresses Vertes feel to it.

The following Technicolor Yawn is a brighter and relatively straight forward hug of the senses, initially at least as of course it too has contrasting and darker flirtations of sound and invention to its gentle cruise. Guitars and synths collude to colour the elegant canvas with shards of seemingly improvised jazz incitement, each nudge and jab of sound a tempting spark to new diversions or characters in the imagination’s interpretation. Almost a travelogue of unique lands and atmospheres on its own, the transfixing pieces makes way for the climactic and psychotic For those with a Short Attention Span. The track is a splatter of sounds and textures which somehow within the ears unite to create a coherent if still furiously unpredictable weave of sonic colour. As all the tracks it leaves a pantry load of food for thought before making way for the irresistible lures of Voodoo Friday. Rhythmically tribal and virulent, the track opens like a thumping ‘sketch’ from percussionists Stomp, but is soon embracing darker strains of sound and harmonies. Its persuasion is meditative and demonic simultaneously, the perpetual invitation from tablas, matched by grouchy bass sounds and a swarming cloud of brass and stringed fermentation which only add to the psychedelic Hammer Movie-esque visualisation inspired across the glorious encounter. Its closing romp reminds of deranged versions of eighties bands like Pigbag and Mouth, that alone leaving ears and emotions basking.

The album’s title track comes next and swiftly returns the listener physically and mentally to the dark clutches of haunted realms and sinister trespasses. Keys impact with a classic thirties/forties lilt to their narrative whilst rhythmically and harmonically, the track is a web of ravenous shadows and psyche grasping evocation. The bewitching nightmare prevails with increasing sideshow devilry as the song continues its descriptive presence, reaching a restrained yet ‘hellish’ climax taunted by crooner inspired keys. The drama and air of the song is traumatic and seriously compelling just as the lighter but no less drenched in espionage album finale of Ormchestron. Opening like the theme tune to a sixties spy/thriller TV show, keys dangling inescapable bait for the imagination, the piece becomes a much cloudier and thematically minatory adventure yet with a constant tempering of melodic and inventive whimsy. The brass escapades brings hints of Essential Logic to thoughts whilst strings and keys offer a Cardiacs like devilment, but ultimately, as War is a Racket itself, it is all wholly individual to Craig Scott’s Lobotomy.

It is fair and easy to say that War is a Racket is quite brilliant, maybe not something for everyone but for those with real adventure and love of life’s and music’s discordance woven into something truly unique, simply a must.

War is a Racket is available through Wasp Millionaire Records from 30/03/2015 on CD, 12” Blue vinyl (Ltd to 250 copies) and digitally.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Craig-Scotts-Lobotomy/102612563153288   http://lookatmemummypr.com/

RingMaster 30/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Allusondrugs – Self Titled EP

Allusondrugs Promo 1

UK rockers Allusondrugs has been working away at the imagination and passions for the past couple of years, laying down a bait of three diverse and increasingly impressive singles which has led to a hungry anticipation for the prospect of something bigger from the West Yorkshire quintet. That sizeable offering comes in the enthralling shape of their self-titled EP; a six-track revelry for the passions and tease for the psyche. The band’s last single showed the increasing maturity and immersive expression of the band’s songwriting, now it is in full swing within the suggestive technicoloured seduction of the EP. At times it is tenderly mesmeric, in others psychedelically psychotic, and from start to finish it is a magnetic captivation to reinforce thoughts that Allusondrugs is about to ignite the British rock scene with their raw edged fusion of grunge and warmly warped psychedelic rock.

The band began in 2012, its members coming together out of the Leeds music scene. Taking influences from the likes of Nirvana, Deftones, My Bloody Valentine, and Sonic Youth into their unpredictable adventure of sound, the impressive entrance of debut single Plasters and the following twisted teasing of My Cat/Fruit of 2013 soon thrust the band into a certain underground spotlight whilst earning attention from mainstream ears. Earlier this year, third single Nervous woke up a wider expanse of attention with its masterful presence and call to the imagination. Released on Clue Records, as the singles, the new EP embraces all the essences of the individual delights that came before and casts them into a new inventive drama and virulent persuasion to unapologetically steal the passions.

With the core of the release recorded live over a week in Greenmount Studios, Leeds, the EP immediately flirts with ears and thoughts through the opening beats of I’m Your Man. It is an instantaneously coaxing sure to awaken a3102663430_10attention; a focus soon fed by sonic waves of acidic guitars and the excellent group harmonies we have already become accustomed to. The song is soon holding a bold stride as enticing melodies wrap their temptation around the rhythmic spine of the song whilst rawer rubs of riffing and the creative sonic web crafted by guitarists Drey Pavlovic and Damo Hughes dance with ears and a growing appetite for the rich invention of the song. The track though is a full seduction, the excellent vocals of Jason Moules supported by Hughes and the punch packing beats of drummer Connor Fisher-Atack alongside the rich darker tones of Jemal Malki’s bass equally as impressive and persuasive.

The band is constantly being, and understandably, being placed under comparisons to the likes of Nirvana and Soundgarden, two references easy to bring forth with the following Ted, What’s The Porn Like In Heaven?, but the opener is more Pixies-esque in its immersive and discord kissed ingenuity. It is a flavouring and spark to appear across the whole EP, though as said the second song is firmly spawned from a grunge haze. It roars from the first second, riffs climbing over ears with anthemic purpose whilst the bass of Malki simply roams with a predator’s heart into the imagination. The guitars continue to sling caustic notes and riffs with a freedom and raw intent that puts the listener right there in the studio whilst the vocals and rhythms stir up the sense with their own raucous lures. It is hard to avoid that Nirvana suggestion, especially from around the Bleach album, but there is always that undeniable uniqueness which turns it all into another invigorating original encounter.

The pinnacle of the release comes in Cherry Pie, a song which from the opening grumbling bassline sets ears and passions aflame. It is soon swiftly and provocatively striding with a determined directness as post punk like guitar stabs spear its intent. A brewing sonic potency grows around the irresistibly addictive hook of the song, its groove which would not be lost in a Joy Division intrusion bringing a hunger and resourcefulness which is as punk as it is noise rock. The song is glorious; a thrusting of rhythms and toxic invention, not forgetting that insatiable groove, which across its contagious trap has whispers of Public Image Ltd, Cardiacs, Queens Of The Stone Age, and the St Pierre Snake Invasion, yet still emerges as a distinct beast owned by Allusondrugs.

Nervous caress ears next, its swarming temptation draped in a melodic coaxing, instantly holding ears in a tight embrace to which jabbing beats set a firm punctuation. The grip relaxes soon after though as warm vocals and melodies soak the senses, their kiss aligned to the darker mood of the bass and a new vein of sonic invention. It is riveting, a mesmeric croon with the outstanding dual vocals adding a Walker Brothers like suasion within at times a tempestuously stirring emprise of evocative sound which again offers that Pixies like flavouring. An air of surf rock also adds its wash to the psychedelically fuelled beauty of the song, an elegance ignited further by the eruptions of grunge rapacity which reinforce the depth and insatiable persuasive alchemy of the song.

The release is completed by firstly the emotive climate of Sunset Yellow, a shimmering flight of melodies and haunting harmonies veined by melancholic basslines and slightly bent out of shape, distortion lent sonic ingenuity where again with that Frank Black and co leaning shows its face. It is a smoulder of sound and adventure which just gets more potent overtime, setting up emotions and intrigue perfectly for the final track Thingio. With almost grudging respect from its primal riffery and bass taunting from the first moments, the track stalks and preys on the senses, stroking them with a melodic seducing as the string manipulation of the band brings a raw rabidity to the imposing leer of the song. It is a stunning slice of musical entrapment, the entrancing vocals and weaving melodies a rein on the predacious heart of what is an exhilarating beast.

It is fair to say that we like so many were expecting big things from the band when news of the EP broke and we have not been disappointed, in fact such its might those hopes and expectations were almost an insult to its glory. Watch out UK, Allusondrugs are coming for your souls.

The Allusondrugs EP is available via Clue Records 21st July @ http://cluerecords.bandcamp.com/album/allusondrugs-ep on download and Ltd Ed CD as well as an Ltd Cassette via Pinky Swear Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Allusondrugs

9/10

RingMaster 20/07/2014

Allusondrugs Tour Dates:

JULY

25th July = Tramlines Festival, Sheffield (Millenium Galleries)

26th July = Lounge 41, Workington

27th July = Clarence Festival, Wakefield

AUGUST

1st August = The Puzzle Hall, Sowerby Bridge

2nd August = Temple of Boom, Leeds

7th August = Bar Bloc, Glasgow

14th August = Wharf Chambers, Leeds

SEPTEMBER

11th September = The 13th Note, Glasgow

12th September = Downstairs, Aberdeen

13th September = Pickett, Liverpool

14th September = Think Tank, Newcastle

15th September = Static Bar, Swansea

16th September = Red Rooms, Nottingham

17th September = The Garage (upstairs), London

18th September = Sticky Mikes, Brighton

19th September = The Crauford Arms, Milton Keynes

20th September = Huddlefest, Huddersfield

21st September = Boiler Room, Guildford

22nd September = Joiners, Southampton

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