Carnivora – The Vision EP

mkramer_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Boston metallers Carnivora first caught our attention with an appearance on the excellent Bluntface Records compilation Operation: Underground. It featured a track from the band’s debut album Eternal, which after investigation turned out to equally be a stirring and attention exciting proposal. Now the band returns with the vicious exploits and temptations of The Vision EP, a ravenous and thrilling declaration of all the band’s skills and even bolder creative enmity.

Everything about The Vision is a step up from their impressive and acclaimed 2013 debut, the EP’s four tracks a cauldron of fierce imagination and volatile invention cast in maelstroms of diversely sculpted extreme metal. Groove and melodic metal enterprise colludes with death and thrash animosity in slabs of unpredictable and brutally irritable incitements, but furies ripe with captivating sonic adventure and melodic expression. Its release follows a successful couple of years which saw the band tearing up festivals such as the New England Metal & Hardcore Festival, Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival, The Summer Slaughter Tour, and Rock And Shock Festival, all last year, with their merciless sound and share stages with the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Overkill, Trivium, Job For A Cowboy, Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Shadows Fall, and many more. The Vision is Carnivora now snarling viciously at broader and more intensive spotlights and a global awakening to their presence sure to be on the cards such the EP’s dramatic persuasion.

CARNIVORA_VisionCover_jpegReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It opens with A Vision In Red, a song venomously driving through ears straight away, swiftly getting under the skin and invading into the psyche. Riffs and grooves from Cody Michaud and Mike Meehan swarm maliciously over the senses, their addictive presence and prowess addictive bait to which the raw vocal squalls of M. Scott Lentine unleash a diversely delivered and magnetic hostility. It is a gripping proposition, the barbarous swings of drummer Dan DeLucia and serpentine tones cast by the bass of Cam Hunt, an addictive spine around which the guitars blossom and expand rich acidic textures bred in sonic imagination. As unpredictable as it is fascinatingly virulent, increasing in both the further it evolves its creative landscape, the song provides a tremendous start to the release.

Its success is quickly matched by Pessimist’s Tongue, its opening suggestive ambience subsequently whipped up into a tempestuous climate of blistering and rancorous intensity. The guitars lay out a melodic invitation even in the stormy climate of the song, a beckoning impossible to resist despite rhythms hailing down on them and the senses. The vocals, singularly and as the band, soon bring another shade to the encounter, offering a cancerous trespass and rally cry for thoughts and emotions. The song is a glorious violation with underlying temptations such as an understated but seductive lure of keys, solidly backed by Razors & Rust. Arguably more restrained than its predecessors, well slightly more merciful, the track stands toe to toe with the listener raging vocally and emotionally whilst guitars again entangle their enterprise around body and imagination. It does not quite have the spark of the first two tracks but easily entices ears and thoughts into exploring its rich depths and textures to a success similar to that found by those before it.

With a thrilling end to its creative ire, the track departs for EP closer The Reek Of Defeat to provide a final bracing and abrasive ravishing. It carries an almost mischievous flirtation to its melodic design and adventurous gait yet there is little about the song which not predatory or fuelled by bad blood. Its consuming maliciousness leaves ears ringing and emotions high and enjoyably completes a thrilling onslaught of a release.

Carnivora has climbed to new plateaus with The Vision EP yet you can only feel it is just the start of new and greater creative grudges, which in turn is a thought and anticipation to savour.

The Vision EP is available from 23rd June via Manshark Entertainment @ http://carnivora.bandcamp.com/ and http://carnivora.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/carnivoramass   http://www.twitter.com/carnivoramass

RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Castrator – No Victim

photo by Jorge Riaño

photo by Jorge Riaño

It is fair to say that the focus of plenty of the carnage and brutality cast by extreme metal songs protagonists are women; ‘weak’ dispensable victims to suffer and be abused as a theme. But now they have a voice and a just as lethal instigator to lead an uprising in the shape of death metallers Castrator, a band turning the tables and dishing out their own unrelenting revenge and creative ruin. The band consists of five pissed-off ladies, but each is also a skilled musician creating a voracious sound and in the shape of the No Victim EP, a debut release to match.

NYC based Castrator is made up of an international and prolific musicians hailing from Colombia, Florida, Mexico, Massachusetts, and Norway. Identities and background are scarce to be honest but the line-up of the band is vocalist M.S., lead guitarist/vocalist P. Serrano, rhythm guitarist M.D. Åkesson, bassist Robin Mazen, and drummer C. Perez. Their sound is sheer death metal ravishment which has led to references to Cannibal Corpse, Cerebral Bore, Dying Fetus, Incantation, Obituary and the likes coming their way. They expel an emasculating extreme brutality which certainly on No Victim rages lyrically, sonically, and emotionally on the listener like a primal tsunami.

frontcover     The first intensive examination comes with Honor Killing, a fury of ravenous riffs and excruciating rhythms from its first breath. There is no escaping its ferocious and rabid onslaught, or the melodic enterprise which subsequently veins the tirade of viciousness. The song also has a core swing to its tempest which is as contagious as the predatory riffery driving the incitement, whilst vocally the venomous deliveries have an intensity and uncompromising expression which instils even greater hostility in every syllable spilled. It is fair to say that the band is not worrying the outskirts of originality with the song but it barely matters in the thrilling abusing of ears and igniting of pleasure.

The following Brood has an even heavier destructive breath to its raging, every riff seeming more rabid and rhythm malevolent than the one before, a potency matched by the guttural vocal confrontations. Featuring a guest solo from Immolation guitarist Robert Vigna, the track grows in stature and dark devilry with every minute of every listen, bass imagination and guitar grooves especially flavoursome with their toxic endeavours.

The Emasculator opens on a sample from the film Hostel 2, male destruction the fuse to an unbridled and corrosive sonic devastation of the senses. Hooks and grooves again add inviting spices to the wall of rabid maliciousness but it is an avalanche of sound and rancor unafraid to twist and turn with unpredictable ideation and at times doom bred enmity. It is an outstanding track quickly matched by the EPs title track, itself a cancerous trespass of sound entangled in wiry grooves and blistering sonic spite aligned to a rhythmic tirade and discordance. As its predecessor, the track is a web of at times understated imagination, little turns and sparks of invention swallowed by the onrush of sonic and rhythmic violence but bold enough to still reveal their qualities.

The final two songs offer the strongest uniqueness upon the EP, and all leave appetite and bruised senses hungry for more. ‘Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned’ the saying goes, and now armed with the craft and attitude of Castrator, the worm has turned within extreme metal with exciting results.

The No Victim EP is available on CD now via Horror Pain Gore Death Productions @ http://www.horrorpaingoredeath.com/store/hpgd109.html and digitally @ https://castrator.bandcamp.com/album/no-victim-ep

https://www.facebook.com/CastratorBand

RingMaster 06/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Whisper of Death – Noise of Obstinacy

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Noise of Obstinacy is an album which if you are in the mind to, you can pick at for its lack of real originality and at times over reliance of certain sounds and textures within its ten ravenous offerings, but at the end of the day the debut album from French metallers Whisper of Death is still one unrelenting buzz saw of enjoyment. Neck muscles and flagging energies are the testament to that. Accomplished and rigorously captivating with a seemingly Cannibal Corpse and Cryptopsy inspired death metal voracity with flavoursome extras, band and album leave ears and appetite gratefully satisfied and often excited.

Whisper Of Death hails from Ablis, a small village south of Yvelines and were soon drawing potent local attention after forming with their live presence which has seen them support the likes of Manimal, Leng Tch’e, Pitbulls in the Nursery, Black Bomb A, the Spirit of the Clan, and Betraying the Martyrs. The quintet released first demo Desossage in 2008, an introduction well-received by the band’s fans and underground. Its unleashing though was followed by a low key period for the band which saw a line-up change and one of its guitarist involved in a serious accident when he was hit by a car. It was unsurprisingly a slow time for the band but as soon as they were able to return to full strength, Whisper of Death released second demo Epilepsy in 2012, followed by the resumption of the band’s live attack. Last year was predominantly given to the creating and recording of Noise of Obstinacy at Studio Dark Wizard with François Ugarte (Pitbulls in the Nursery). Mixed and mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side Music (Nile, Mastodon), the album was uncaged towards the end of 2014, pushing Whisper of Death instantly towards a new attentive recognition.

     Cadaveric Discharge sets the ravaging off, emerging from a swarm of flies to grip ears and imagination with its artillery of lethal beats amidst a squall of savage guitars. It is a vicious Whisper Of Death - Artworkentrance but equally a magnetic one with a contagious swing lining emerging grooves and ferocious riffing. The vocals equally grab attention, a dual assault bringing variety to the malevolent delivery of venom soaked words and growls. With all songs sung in French and being linguistically challenged, lyrical adventures are unknown but there is no mistaking the rancor behind them. Turning more bestial with every second, the track is a formidable and pleasing start to the album backed right away by Cemetery Market.

Almost mischievously toying with ears with a quirky sonic flirtation, the second track needs little prompting to throw off the masquerade and show its malicious intent; ragged riffs and hostile rhythms colluding in one precisely honed provocation which is unafraid at times to uncage its darkest animosity and in other moments turn on expectations with striking and slightly warped invention. Across the album there are definitely certain twists and moments of ingenuity which break songs away from feeding assumptions and showing recognisable influences, maybe not enough to be honest, but as here when it occurs even in brief temptations, it turns songs and album into a very potent and potential fuelled proposition,

Both Desossage and Organ Bath pleasingly stir up air and senses, the first a blaze of raw antagonism with shot gun cocks and virulent scourges of tangy grooving making tasty additives to the infectious turbulence around them. The second has a slower gait, virtually lumbering along with low slung grooves and barbarous rhythms. There is still a ferocious intensity and energy to the encounter of course, just with a more pestilential intent rather than rabid instinct. Each hits the mark of enjoyment if not making startling impacts; something the following OBF has far more success with through its avalanche of rhythmic brutality and sonic toxicity. The track is a glorious truculence of sound and attitude, every swing of drum sticks leading to deranged bait whilst venomous grooves provide a sonic straight jacket twisting the psyche with their enterprise. With no lesser a devilish persuasion from the raw vocals and dark hearted bass rabidity, the track is the most adventurous and strikingly unpredictable on the album, and further reason to suspect Whisper of Death will emerge from the crowd if not now some point in the future with this kind of adventure.

Happy Burial whips up a blistering senses flailing storm next, not quite emulating the endeavour of the previous track but creating a bedlamic tempest to easily devour and enthuse about before Surgical Strike unloads its rhythmic torpedoes and sonic rapacity. Once again the track feeds the wants and matches levels already breached by the album but just does not go far enough to forge something truly remarkable. Nevertheless with a great agitation and psychotic mania to the changing assaults of the drums as the bass again finds the most salaciously dark lines to seduce with, the track has attention and pleasure tightly grasped.

Torture for Dummies bounces around like a serial killer waiting its moment to strike, a certain glee and excitement driving hooks and riffs as well as the catchy stride it initially offers. Of course this all plays out within a harsh landscape of sonic cruelty and toxic emotion which is just as bracing as the creative turmoil within it and helps turns Cannibalism Airlines into a visceral theatre of torrential spite and violently wanton rhythms. The track is another major highlight of the album, guitars and bass a flurry of intimidation and fury in their own right.

Battlefield brings the exhausting brutality to an end but not before creating its own peak in the album with a battering of flesh scarring beats, intrusively lingering grooves, and noxious vocals. It is the lighter caustic flirtations of imagination and psyche twisted endeavour which ignite the song predominantly though and ensures the album ends on a real high.

Noise of Obstinacy is as its title declares, a release doing its own things with zeal and defiance. It is not trying to reshape the walls and originality of death and extreme metal but increasingly it thrills and leaves emotions blissful, and I know which I prefer.

Noise of Obstinacy is available now digitally and on CD @ http://whisperod.bandcamp.com/

http://www.whisperofdeath.com/

RingMaster 28/02/2015

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Bloodlust wrappings and carnal tempting: talking Cannibal Corpse with bassist Alex Webster

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The unleashing of a new Cannibal Corpse savaging is always a cause for eager investigation and so the recent release of thirteen studio album A Skeletal Domain was met with enthusiastic intrigue. No matter your taste for their visceral sounds, the US death metallers has been an undeniable driving inspiration and boundary beater within the genre which the new release reaffirms with raw potency. Leaping at the chance to get a glimpse into the making and background to the album, we took some of the spare time of bassist Alex Webster as the band continue on their successful European tour, to talk album, new producer, zombie video, and much more…

Hi Alex and thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

With latest album A Skeletal Domain earning predominantly and deserved acclaim from fans, the metal underground, and beyond since its recent release, did you have any specific hopes and expectations for its unleashing, other than hoping it is liked of course?

Not really. I mean, we feel the same way about all of the albums when we put them out I think. A new album represents the best music we could make at that point in time. I guess since we had a different producer this time we were interested to see what people would think of that, but really our expectations were about the same as always.

Your thirteenth studio album, how were emotions around the unveiling of a new release after two and a half decades laying waste to metal and ears?

Like I said, about the same as always. We are very proud of the new album and hope that our fans will like it.

We felt there was of course the recognisable Cannibal Corpse sound to the album but also fresh exploratory twists to its voracious enterprise and vehemence fuelled depths. How does its sound and presence differ from say its predecessor Torture for you there on the inside?

I think the biggest difference is probably in the production, which was handled by Mark Lewis this time around, rather than Erik Rutan. Both are great producers but each has a different way of approaching recording.

I think the album is also a bit different when it comes to song writing. It just sounds a bit different. There are a few songs on this album that (in my opinion) sound quite unusual for us. It’s still death metal, just a bit different.

Was there any deliberate direction and ideation taken in regards to its sound and intent or was it more an organic evolution emerging as A Skeletal Domain emerged?CannibalCorpse-ASkeletalDomain

We just wrote the song individually and gradually the character of the album developed. We didn’t really have a plan; we just tried to write the best music we could.

After so many releases and years is it easier to sculpt something original to the band or more difficult, with as we find in music in general ideas and sounds going in cycles as in fashion?

We definitely try not to repeat ourselves, but of course it happens anyway. But we do make a deliberate effort to make each song sound unique and fresh.

As you mentioned you recorded the album with Mark Lewis this time around after working with Erik Rutan for the previous trio of albums. What was the reason for the move and why specifically did you go with Mark?

We had gotten to know Mark pretty well since he lives in Florida like we do, and we thought he was a cool guy- so his personality was part of it. We also really liked the work he had done with bands like Six Feet Under, Deicide, and Devildriver. His skills, personality, and convenient location of his studio made him a perfect choice.

What has he particularly brought to A Skeletal Domain which is different to its predecessors and works most potently with your new ideas?

It’s hard to explain so it’s better for the reader to listen and compare. He just has a somewhat different approach to recording than our previous producers, and I think you can hear it right away.

Was a change of producer an early intent as songs and the album began coming together?

Yes, we decided at least half a year before the recording date that we would work with Mark this time.

How did the band approach the studio this time around and was it pretty much as you went into the recording of previous albums?

It was different, since it was a different producer and studio. We were well prepared, as we always try to be, but things did go a bit differently once we started. Mark is a great engineer and editor, and things went very smoothly during the recording. We had a great time and we’ll likely work with him again.

cannibal-corpse_photo02The album is sonically and lyrically as visceral as ever, as expected from a Cannibal Corpse provocation, what breeds the first seeds of songs more often than not?

The music comes first, then the lyrics. The songs are usually written individually at home by each song writer, and then once the song is finished or almost finished, the band will learn their parts and play the song together to see how it sounds. For each writer, the songs probably start out with a main riff and develop from there.

On this album Rob wrote music for 2 and 1/2 songs, I wrote 4, Pat wrote 5, and Paul wrote music for half of a song. The lyric writing was varied in a similar way: Paul wrote 6 songs, I wrote 4, and Rob wrote 2.

At times it feels from the outside that successful and established bands like yourselves come under a harsher and more predetermined focus from the major media spotlights. How have you found it and particularly in regard of A Skeletal Domain?

It’s hard to say. I think by now everybody already has an opinion about us and a new album is not likely to change that. The press that likes us still will, and same for the press that doesn’t like us. Their opinions don’t seem to be very flexible

Can you give us some background and insight into the imposing and startling video for Kill Or Become from the album?

The video was directed by David Brodsky; he created a concept based on the song’s lyrics and went from there. We think he did a great job. We’ve been writing about zombies since our first album, so I guess it’s about time we had a full-on zombie video.

As one of death metal’s leading lights and inspirations for seemingly ever, how do you see the expanding depth and diversity to the genre? Do you embrace and takes sparks from its ever growing expanse of exploration or prefer a more old school focus to feed your personal tastes?

I like anything that sounds good to me. Some newer death metal is amazing, and I still listen to plenty of the old stuff too. If it’s well-written and heavy I usually like it.

Listening to A Skeletal Domain there are seemingly essences from other genres and styles which flirt with ears and thoughts however slight and whispered they are. What are the inspirations outside of extreme metal which you would suggest have added something to the band sound or ideas over time?

We all listen to lots of different kinds of music so that probably directly and/or indirectly influences how we write. For me personally the classical music I’ve listened too might have an influence.

Where do you see Cannibal Corpse in the ‘family tree’ of inspirations and contributors to death metal?cannibal-corpse_photo06

Hopefully we are considered an important part of the death metal family tree, part of the 2nd wave after Possessed, Death, Master, Massacre, and other earlier bands.

What is left in 2014 going into next year for the band to devour and offer?

We’ll be doing lots of touring in support of A Skeletal Domain. We are currently on tour in Europe; next year we’ll do a big tour of Canada and the USA. So we have some big touring plans ahead.

Thanks again for sharing time with us. Any last thoughts you would like to offer us?

Thanks for the interview! We hope to see all of our fans on tour soon!

Finally is there anything grotesque and blood fuelled which the band has not yet explored but you have a yearning to attack at some point?

I don’t know! We’ll see when we start writing the next album.

Check out our review of A Skeletal Domain @ ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/cannibal-corpse-a-skeletal-domain/

http://www.cannibalcorpse.net/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 23/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Cannibal Corpse – A Skeletal Domain

byAlexMorgan_01

Cannibal Corpse and their sound need no introduction to metal fans and in many ways nor does the band’s new slice of savagery, A Skeletal Domain. The thirteen studio album from the US death metallers feeds all the wants and expectations of the genre and fans yet also manages within its contagious surface turbulence, to explore new twists of endeavour and vehemence soaked adventure in the depths of songs. The distinctive fury is a fresh if not startling evolution in the onslaught we have all come to know and assume from the band; one providing the rich flavours the quintet is renowned for whilst providing a breath-taking rampage through the senses to again seriously ignite the passions.

A Skeletal Domain also sees the band move from the production of Erik Rutan who added certain richness to previous releases Kill, Evisceration Plague, and Torture. For the new album, Cannibal Corpse has recruited the talents of Mark Lewis at Audio Hammer Studios who has produced the recent albums of The Black Dahlia Murder and DevilDriver amongst many. His touch allows clarity to the emerging twists of ideation and sound within the violations posing as songs. The elements are arguably still not as vocal and instantly striking as maybe they could be but they are allowed a platform to increasingly tantalise from by a production which seems clearer and more conducive to the enterprise than on earlier encounters.

Lyrically there are no surprises; blood, gore, and violence providing aural ‘horror movies’ within the sonic and rhythmic severity as immediately shown by opener High Velocity Impact Spatter. From an intimidating waspish sonic mesh of sound, the track pounds ears with some of the heaviest swung beats heard this year, every swipe thunderous within the brewing assault of corrosive riffery and psychotic sonic endeavour. There is no escaping that recognisable Cannibal Corpse toxicity or the addictive web spun by the guitars of Rob Barrett and Pat O’Brien. It is an intensive and contagious furnace exploding within the ears, driven venomously by the thick caustic growls of George “Corpsegrinder” Fisher and the increasingly intrusive beats of Paul Mazurkiewicz. There is always a ready and waiting hunger for the band’s sound and its appetite is potently fed by the song with extra flavouring from the swirling invention cast by the guitarists.

Both Sadistic Embodiment and Kill or Become seduce and ravage the air as well as senses with skilled animosity, the first a barbarous torrent of rabid riffery and bone splintering rhythms bound in a merciless predation. The bass of A Skeletal DomainAlex Webster growls spitefully from within the severe enticement, another aspect of the band given closer attention on the album compared to some earlier incitements. Its successor finds an even more bestial air to its prowling heavyweight presence, its muscles flexed through every hellacious swing from Mazurkiewicz and the venom unleashed through a horde of rapacious riffs and the increasingly contagious vocal suasion of Fisher. The track is a maelstrom of malicious enterprise, one threatening to become unravelled at times, especially around a senses searing solo, but always checks itself to parade a pestilential and irresistible scourge.

The title track tears through ears and imagination next, its intensive stomp flaring with malice and rhythmic sadism whilst vocally it sprays inhospitable emotion like a sand storm. A welcome variation in gait and intensity offers an intriguing turn whilst another potent solo flames excitingly across the track adding to the weighty fascination of the proposition. At first glance the following Headlong into Carnage is a close relation to its predecessor but eventually emerges with a distinctive tone and ruinous attitude which is as compelling as it is enjoyably oppressive.

The deranged and blackened suasion of The Murderer’s Pact is next, guitars crafting an addictive and destructive sonic trap to which vocals and rhythms make available their rewarding yet ruinous hues. It is an absorbing challenge, the band delving into tortured shadows with open relish and magnetic invention. The sonic ingenuity of the solo within its haunted climate is exceptional, not outstaying its potency but adding enough colour and radiance to light the cavernous malevolence of the song. Its triumph is matched by the pernicious lumbering atmosphere of Funeral Cremation, its increasingly expanding and toxic voice breeding an uncomfortable and invigorating onslaught of coarse sonic rabidity and rhythmic voracity. It is the winding groove of the song though which lights the passions most of all, its crawling temptation irresistible within the tempestuous climate around it.

The viciously chilling and tenaciously compelling Icepick Lobotomy and the enthrallingly inventive Vector of Cruelty ensure senses and emotions are ablaze with pleasure and breath-less satisfaction but it is after their outstanding efforts that the album hits its pinnacle, the final trio of tracks leaving the strongest lingering impression. Bloodstained Cement steps forward first and from its drama fuelled start unleashes an insatiable rampage of hypnotic rhythmic turmoil and contagion drenched riffery. There is a flowing addictiveness to the track which soaks every aspect of its unrelenting swarm of sound and ideation. The track is an exhaustive treat but soon surpassed by the brilliant Asphyxiate to Resuscitate. As expected there is no peace from its poisonous intent and rabid jaws, guttural growls and drums a finely honed and barbaric blitz on ears whilst guitars and bass combine to sculpt an impossibly infectious malignant gale.

The album closes with the hellacious creative fury of Hollowed Bodies, a last explosion of bad blood and ear seducing grooves within a back breaking intensity. It is a scintillating end to a mouth-watering release, seeing Cannibal Corpse at their best with very loud whispers of new exploits to tantalise within a recognisable presence and sound which fans will willingly embrace. The band’s best album can and will be debated but one of their most pleasing and enjoyable A Skeletal Domain definitely is.

A Skeletal Domain is available now via Metal Blade Records @ http://www.indiemerch.com/metalbladerecords/item/27304

http://www.cannibalcorpse.net/

RingMaster 17/09/2014

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Heboïdophrenie – Origin Of Madness

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It may not be healthy and it most probably will end up in physical damage of some sort or another but being ravaged by French metallers Heboïdophrenie is one of our new favourite pastimes thanks to their debut album Origin Of Madness. A mercilessly brutal and carnivorous onslaught of death metal which has been equally bred from the seeds of thrash metal whilst employing certain deathcore voracity, the release like the band’s sound, is an exhaustingly uncompromising and almost theatrically creative savagery which sets senses and imagination afire. Whether the band is carving out sonic atrocities which are as original as they could be can be argued but it is certainly one of the most demandingly satisfying and enjoyable extreme metal releases in recent years.

Erupting from out of Bordeaux in 2010, with influences from the likes of Vader, Cannibal Corpse, Ingested, The Black Dahlia Murder, Meshuggah, Cerebral Bore, Whitechapel, Carnifex, and Kataklysm raging in their own depraved invention, Heboïdophrenie were soon ignited local stages and gaining a potent reputation with their live shows, a presence pushed into a new spotlight home and further afield by Origin Of Madness.

From an Intro of hell bound human suffering, the album explodes into life with the track Heboïdophrenie. Instantly that thrash breeding shows its potency in the predatory striding of the riffs and rhythmic intensity. It is not an assault a0960544968_2with overwhelms but definitely sets the senses and imagination on edge ready for the coarse guttural growls of the vocals. They are as bestial as the sounds and unafraid to twist their delivery with varied guises. It has to be admitted we have a soft spot for porcine squeals within metal and they do not come any finer and more riveting than those offered by the song and album. The song continues to examine and test ears and senses, rewarding them with strenuous slab of extreme provocation before making way for the outstanding Feast Of Death. Irresistible grooves bind ears from its first second, intensifying with every second as their virulently nagging toxins work on the senses and passions. The track snarls and grinds vocally and sonically with irresistible hostility and merciless rhythmic provocation but it is that deliciously nagging of grooves which seduces and enslaves the passions.

Both Decay and The Butcher keep that ferocious tempting going, the first another stalking incitement which sizes up the listener whilst preying on their senses and psyche. As all songs though, it is not happy settling for one form of attack, expelling urgent bursts of destructive intent and dirty energy within its slower ear crowding incitement. The second of the two is an even more intensively intrusive stalker, its heavy footed gait coming with a rhythmic swagger and jagged riffery which belies its predacious intent. Returning swinish vocal squalls interrupt and enhance the intimidation whilst again the song agreeably shuffles the charge of its violation.

Rotten drives forward with its own predominately thrash seeded fury, merging it with heavy tempestuous stabs of riffs and beats throughout. A mouth-watering surge of sonic invention spears the track too, it’s solo moment a seductive lance in the pestilence of the track whilst the vocals continue to impress in their strength and varied persuasion. It is a masterful malefaction straight away matched by the unrelenting demands of Bonnet M. The drums mix up a stride of pack like military inspired strength with a brawl of dervish bred swipes to provide an insatiable and infectious spine to the inhospitable emprise. Across this guitars weave blistering sonic netting which sears and entices dramatically. Every song on the album is a bane to expectations but this is to the fore of thrilling unpredictability.

Heavy metal grooves bring their potent expression to the warlike character of Death To All, adding contagious colour to the voracious malevolence and intensity of the track. It is another skilled and irrepressible blend which flirts with the imagination whilst devouring the senses, as emulated in the anthemic Morbid Satyriasis. Old school metal spawned grooves also frequent the scintillating and gloriously barbarous track. Vocals and riffs chew the senses whilst hooks and grooves spill malice soaked seduction with every note. It is a brilliant hunting of the psyche, the listener the quarry to its creative and jaundiced vendetta.

The album closes firstly with Cadaver, a final impressive trespass where vocals worm virulently under the skin and adversarial rhythms conduct the sonic tempest of rage and flesh scorching enterprise. It is another contagion which never relinquishes its tight grip, and a last reminder of how infectious extreme metal can be in the right inventive hands and creative attitude. It is followed by the expressive instrumental Outro, an evocative close to an exhilarating encounter.

   Origin Of Madness is a provocation which turns existing essences and inventiveness into something belonging solely to Heboïdophrenie, and is mercilessly exciting not forgetting powerfully compelling.

Origin of Madness is available now @ http://heboidophrenie.bandcamp.com/album/origin-of-madness

http://heboidophrenie.wix.com/heboidophrenie

9/10

RingMaster 02/09/2014

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Triverse Massacre – With Bared Teeth And Truths

Triverse Massacre Online Promo Shot There is nothing kind or merciful about With Bared Teeth And Truths, the new EP from UK extreme metallers Triverse Massacre, its title more than hinting at the ferocious and torrid tempest grasping every second of the encounter. It is a formidable and reasonably striking encounter which at times does arguably offer more potential than realised triumphs but still incites a healthy appetite for the Carlisle quintet. From a decent enough yet underwhelming start, the EP emerges as a creatively flavoursome and pleasingly hostile protagonist reinforcing the suggestion set by its predecessor that Triverse Massacre is a band with a potent horizon ahead of them. Formed in 2010, the band soon earned a strong reputation for their uncompromising sound and fierce stage performances, the sharing of stages with bands such as Aliases, The Sun Explodes, and Meta-Stasis cementing their emerging presence in the UK metal underground. The band has earned comparisons to the likes of The Black Dahlia Murder, Cannibal Corpse, and Slayer along the way whilst debut EP, In The Jaws Of Deceit set a potent base for the band to move on from. With Bared Teeth And Truths is possibly not as big a step forward from that well-received release as expected but certainly evidence of a band on the right course. The release opens with Wolves At Your Gates, a track which suggests more than it gives. From a raw and brewing tempestuous climate of distressed and pained sounds, rhythms emerge with intensive muscle and riffs with predatory Triverse Massacre Cover Artworkdesign, all ridden by the excellent insidiously venomous growls of Liam Clark. As the song settles into its purpose and stride there is an expected spark missing, hooks and acidic grooves from guitarists James Graham and Chris Kelsall imposing yet safe in their intensity whilst the rhythms of drummer Mike Collins, aligned to the sinister prowling intent of bassist Dan Fisher, are demanding but also devoid of real viciousness. Whether it is the production or the song itself, the encounter whilst still appealing potently just does not come alive as hoped. The individual craft of the band is impressive and the structure of the track as it tries to intimidate and scar the senses enticing but even with its inventive rabidity there is something amiss and lacking. The following Exhale Betrayal is instantly a more formidable and threatening proposition, swift grinding riffs rich bait to which rampaging rhythms add their mighty swings. The vocals again squall and squeal with an addictive presence, Clark’s delivery something you suspect will work for some and not others, but for those with a liking for his serpentine abrasing it is a highly pleasing asset of the band and songs. A virulent urgency drives the track as the guitars cast their unpredictable weave over ears and though there also is an incomplete air to the song, it is down to a lifeless production more than anything.      Bullets Kill Beasts opens on a melodic reflection, guitars casting an emotive hue framed by a military bred march of rhythms and a potent throaty bass suasion. Straight away the track brings a new breath and strength to the release, bringing more antagonism and potency to the vocal hostility and winding thrash fuelled grooves as well as the flurries of riffs. The track is soon charging contagiously into the imagination, its twists of ideation and sonically catchy enticements ensuring that With Bared Teeth And Truths is a completely different and now rigorously impressive proposition. The production still mutes some of the strengths of the track but compared to its predecessors it is able to throw off its restrictions to leave a lingering and fully satisfied impression. The closing Torn From The Throne takes things to another level again, the best track on the EP unleashing a greater physical and aural enmity on the senses and passions. The track simply tears at ears with a brutal predation and bestial rancor, bad blood infectiously flooding its sonic and melodic veining as oppressive weight and severity drives vocals and rhythms. In many ways the EP is one of two halves, the first appealing and full of promise but the second is where the real potential and potency of the band is on show. Triverse Massacre is gaining a fine reputation as they grow and With Bared Teeth And Truths definitely adds to that but it also seems like a missed opportunity to push the band onto a loftier step within the national metal scene. As said though they are heading in the right direction and more encounters like this, with a deserving production next time, will do nicely. The With Bared Teeth And Truths EP is available now via http://triversemassacre.bandcamp.com/album/with-bared-teeth-and-truths https://www.facebook.com/TriverseMassacre 7.5/10 RingMaster 04/08/2014 Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://audioburger247.webs.com/