The Redeemed – Obscured Misery

The sign of a really potent introduction is that it is still grabbing new attention and support months after its initial release, and that is exactly what Obscured Misery, the debut from UK thrash metalcore outfit The Redeemed is making a success of. Offering three slices of imposing and magnetic ferocity forged metal, the EP is an ear pleasing, appetite breeding assault from a band swiftly revealing the potential for great things.

The quintet comes from the heartland of Surrey with its seeds sown with the coming together in jam sessions of band founder Anthony Wiseman with fellow guitarist Ben Newton back in 2013. A mutual love for bands such as As I Lay Dying, August Burns Red, Inflames, and Caliban cemented their creative link, songs soon emerging from the pen of Wiseman and expanded with the lead guitar prowess of Newton. Subsequently after a few misses, a stable full line-up emerged with the addition of bassist Josh Lightfoot and drummer Steve Dun, eventually vocalist, once of Piss Viper, completing the band. Obscured Misery is the band’s first onslaught and one, with its creative web and striking dexterity, relentlessly making an impressive invitation to new attention.

The EP’s title track opens things up, Obscured Misery entangling ears in a maze of Newton’s creative tendrils, his guitar spewing sonic vines with skill and ease as a rhythmic intensity rumbles and then bursts. The throat raw tones of Fletcher are just as quickly surging through ears, growling with discontent as bass and rhythm guitar almost swing in attitude and enterprise. The song’s emerging landscape is a tapestry of twists and turns, never taking a moment to relax as neither can the listener as torrents of imagination loaded textures and eventful dexterity enjoyably impose. Forged on a host of metal bred styles, the track is a striking start displaying the individual and united zeal forged skills of the band but equally a maturely inventive composure.

The Concept follows and equally strikes a chord with ears and appetite in no time especially with Lightfoot revealing his clean vocal strength for a great contrast and complement to the rasping tenacity of Fletcher. As ravenous in character and tone as its predecessor, the song also slips into calmer waters with fluid adventure though never settling there too long before its volcanic heart and creative blaze resurfaces and drives things on again with Newton’s prowess exceptional throughout.

The EP is completed by Last Mistake; itself a skilfully bred maelstrom of craft and creative attributes leaving already impressed ears greedier. Certainly it lacks something indefinable compared to its companions on personal tastes but only accentuates and reinforces the real pleasure of being surrounded by the EP’s creative tempest with only its fade out something to grumble at and that is just a personal bugbear of any song.

Together the trio of tracks declare The Redeemed as a band attention is a forgone conclusion for with the promise of bigger and bolder exploits ahead breeding just as strong anticipation for those things to come. The UK just might have a new major force in the making.

The Obscured Misery EP is out now @ https://theredeemeduk.bandcamp.com/releases

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 Pete RingMaster 26/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unswabbed – Tales From The Nightmare Vol.1

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Not breaking the banks of originality but brewing up a rousing storm of metal and rock, Tales From The Nightmare Vol.1, the new EP from Unswabbed, is an encounter which easily inspires a very healthy appetite for more. Unveiling a new twist in sound and its direction from the French veterans, the five track release binds thick strains of melodic and nu metal with a harder rock voracity resulting in a proposition which holds no real surprises but has ears and attention fired up and greedy for the band’s fascinating adventure.

Hailing from Lille, Unswabbed began in 1995 with a harder and more voracious rock and metal fusion than found on the new EP. A couple of early demos bred an attentive fan base for the band which their 2004 self-titled debut album pushed to a wider spotlight. Two years later its successor Instinct was uncaged with a third full-length in the shape of In Situ coming a year later, both to critical acclaim. Across the years the band has also earned a potent live reputation and found responses for shows alongside the likes of Cavalera Conspiracy, (Hed)P.E. , Caliban, Senser, Empyr, Pleymo, Mass Hysteria and many more. The album Intact was unveiled in 2011, and following a decision  in 2013 to explore new musical landscapes and inventions, the quartet set about creating Tales from the Nightmares Vol. 1. Themed by individual stories spawned by nightmarish incitements, and written and sung in English, a first for the band, the self-released EP is a stirring slab of metal fusion. Not dramatically overwhelming or as mentioned casting brand new explorations it easily ties up senses and emotions in a thoroughly captivating and thrilling temptation.

The release opens with the excellent Come to me, a dynamic and gripping encounter which takes little time to ignite thoughts and emotions. A sonic coaxing is soon rife with magnetic riffs and thumping rhythms as the track bursts into life, to which an additional almost punkish coaxing aligns itself. The start alone has body and imagination involved which is only accentuated by the sturdier beats and rugged riffs which accompany the excellent clean vocal suasion. Essences remind of bands like Mudvayne and Nonpoint as the song continues to flare up and cast tight melodic lures across its invigorating and emotionally charged body. It might not be offering something new but boy the song is exhilarating.a2298760115_2

The following Wake me up employs a chorus of children chants initially which return throughout the release though maybe to a less convincing success compared to its opening pitch. The song itself is soon commanding thoughts and attention, keys brewing up a haunting ambience as guitars and bass carve out another magnetic web of persuasion. It is like a mix of (Hed) PE and Korn fed through the metal contagion of Fear Factory, and just as riveting as its predecessor even if taking longer to convince. Its potent enticement makes way for the darker croon of Hold the line. Expelling angst and drama with every note and vocal expression, the song slowly expands across the senses with thick exhales of caustic energy blended with gentle melodic caresses. Lacking the spark of the first two songs, it still leaves an inescapable enslavement over ears and emotions, luring both back time and time again.

Dead end zone is a hard rock romp with an open vein of rock pop to its joyful swing and anthemic beats. It is impossibly catchy from its first touch, hooks and grooves as irresistible as the continually impressing vocals and unpredictable invention which ensures no song is anything less than an event. It also shows another side to the heart of the release and the evolving sound of the band, and though it is probably fair to say the song is less adventurous than the other tracks in its character, when it sounds and feels so addictively good there is little to complain about.

The EP is brought to a scintillating end by Pull the trigger again, a track like the first which leaves the strongest bait to stalk the release time and time again. Cloaked in emotional shadows from its first enticing chord, the song is the dark to the light of the last song. Riffs from guitar and bass weave a brooding canvas over which expression drenched vocals and sonic suggestiveness brings intimidating yet simultaneously welcoming hues. It is an emotionally pungent and rigorously captivating track which at times stalks the imagination as it scorches the senses with its poetic melodies and sonic colour. It is a might end to a similarly impressing release.

Unswabbed is not carving out truly original ideation with their new direction but they are unleashing a highly rewarding and persistently thrilling proposal which leaves any familiarity to others redundant.

Tales From The Nightmare Vol.1 is available now @ http://unswabbed.bandcamp.com/album/tales-from-the-nightmares-vol-1

http://unswabbed.com/

https://www.facebook.com/unswabbed

8.5/10

RingMaster 02/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Voice Of Ruin – Morning Wood

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When a band’s bio starts with, “Voice of Ruin was born in 2008, driven by the common desire of five Swiss farmers who dreamt of leaving the family farm and becoming rock stars. Hungry for success and recognition, the five strapping young lads abandoned their shovels and harvesters to take on a different type of instruments, with the goal of becoming icons of sex, alcohol and rock ’n’ roll (or horny famer metal),” you cannot help offering it highly intrigued attention whilst also making inevitable assumptions. As shown by their new album Morning Wood though, the band whether by design or just by natural instinct do not realise the complete tongue in cheek encounter imagined. Certainly lyrically the songs upon the release come with a humorous swagger and intent bred from their ‘background’ but musically what you get is highly accomplished and passionate, not forgetting inventive metal. Like a mix of Lamb Of God, Sylosis, and The Black Dahlia Murder with plenty of extra additives, sound and album captures senses and imagination from start to finish. Admittedly severely original moments are as scarce as udders on a bull but it cannot stop Voice Of Ruin from providing a rigorously enjoyable onslaught.

Plucking relevant info from their farmyard history, Voice Of Ruin first made a mark with their debut EP The Crash in 2009 to be followed to greater acclaim by their self-titled album two years later. Its success led to the band breaking out into Europe with album and their live presence, countries like France, Russia, and Ukraine overwhelmed as the band’s homeland by their ‘Horny Farmer Metal’. Going onto share stages with such bands as Caliban, The Black Dahlia Murder, Entombed, Textures, Tankard, Sylosis, God Dethroned, Benighted, Dew Scented, Sybreed, Do Or Die, Breakdown Of Sanity and many more, the Nyon hailing band now uncages Morning Wood to take another step in cornering the worlds metallic dairy market.

Welcome To The Stud Farm makes an intriguing and impressive entrance to the album, guitars casting a web of sonic enterprise and voice_of_ruin_morning_woodenticement around crisp rhythms and a throaty bass lure. Its presence and energy intensifies deepens into its minute and a half as it feeds the imagination a colourful and magnetic bait leading to the following Party Hard. The second track launches itself with a roar from Randy Bull exploding within rampant rhythms, a torrent of riffs, and another immediate weave of temping scorched melodic endeavour crafted by guitarists Nils Bag and Tony Cock. It is a fiery proposition, nothing startlingly dramatic but potently gripping and skilfully unleashed.

The strong beginning continues just as pungently through both Through The Eyes Of Machete and Day Of Rage, the first delivering a coarse battering of rhythms from drummer Oli Dick and antagonistic riffery veined by acidic grooves. The track almost spirals around the senses with its excellent guitar play whilst the bass of Erwin Van Fox stalks with a dark resonance. The encounter is another elevation in the release but it is the glorious unveiling of clean vocals cast by Van Fox within a more reserved passage which steals the strongest satisfaction and shows the potency of the songwriting and invention within the band. Its successor is a natural predator; from its first gnaw of riffs and the toxic breath which covers air and the varied squalling vocals a bestial yet resourcefully sculpted scavenger. It is an unrelenting incitement which ravages senses and emotions for another pleasing assault, the twisted grooves and the simple voracious urgency of the track irresistible.

The unbridled ferocity of The Rise Of Nothing consumes ears next, its intensive pressuring from the first second led by a superb carnivorous bass stalking and vindictive rhythms whilst its core canvas is a breeding ground for heavy metal colour and virulently tempting hues painted and sent soaring by the excellent guitar work. As mentioned earlier there are few times that the sound and songs throw you a curve ball in originality but it has to be said and epitomised by this track alone, that working its alchemy under the surface of songs is a bewitching flow of dramatic invention and contagious unpredictability, it is just you have to work to see it as openly as it deserves.

Both the title track and its successor Viols Désinvoltes provide thoughts and pleasure with further captivating adventures, the first at certain moments wrapping its uncompromising aggression and serpentine hostility with absorbing flumes of clean vocals which takes the track from a strong if expectations feeding level to something of a pinnacle on the album. It is not the vocals alone which make the difference though, piercing and technically thrilling invention equally effective as it spills out from the tempest to great success as the track leads into the second of the pair. The most anthemic track on the release, and the most hostile with its industrially kissed fury, the new song is pure sonic rancor framed by equally adverse rhythms and vocals; raw metal moonshine of the most toxic potency.

   The following Cock’n Bulls and the instrumental Today Will End descend with their own inhospitable bodies next, both belligerently intrusive and appealing. The first infusing a southern twang and groove to its admittedly increasing persuasive torrents and the second emerging from a black hearted storm with deliberate winds of sonic painting and reserved but still unstoppable intensity. In many ways neither matches earlier triumphs but do reveal more of the scope and skills of the songwriting and band whilst providing further variety to the almost pestilential attack overall of the album.

The trio of the salaciously jaundiced Sex For Free, the severely bruising Big Dick, and the closing creative storm that is Dirty bring the truculent album to a senses wasting close; the first of the three with its poisonous melodies and barbarous rhythms the most contagious and exciting of the closing stretch. Morning Wood is a thoroughly enjoyable ravaging even if one which keeps well within the walls of existing designs and when it does offer undoubted invention and mouthwatering ingenuity leaves it under a thick wash of almost uniformal surface rapaciousness. It means you have to work to discover the elements which set the band apart more than imagined but those rewards are full and impressive. So forget the image and gimmicks behind the sounds if new to the band just indulge in one very healthy and mischievous slab of bovine strong metal.

Morning Wood is available digitally and on CD now via Tenacity Music.

https://www.facebook.com/voiceofruin

http://voiceofruin.bandcamp.com

8/10

RingMaster 06/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Sweet dances and psychotic episodes: an interview with Fede of Destrage

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Difficult to describe but very easy to enthuse vociferously over,  Are You Kidding Me? No. the new album from Italian metallers Destrage is easily one of the most thrilling and innovative albums to come along not only this year so far but over a long time. It is a fever of invention and imagination which confronts and seduces the senses through a maze flavours, styles, and experimentation. It is sonic and noise anarchy at its best, a psyche teasing triumph which declares its creators as the exhilarating maelstrom of adventure metal and music is always crying out for. To find out more about band and release we had the pleasure to explore the depths of Destrage with drummer Federico Paulovich, venturing into the creation of the album, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, tomato juice, audience sex and plenty more…

Hi Fede and thank you for talking with us.

Before we look at your new album would you tell us about the beginning of Destrage?

The current line-up has been consistent since 2007 and after their first demo, Self Id Generator, Destrage signed a deal with Howling Bull Records, Japan, and released their first full length, Urban Being, which also saw a worldwide release by Coroner Records in 2009.The second full length The King Is Fat’n’Old was released in 2010 by Coroner Records and Howling Bull, supported by European and Japanese tours and international festivals such as Heineken Jammin’ Festival, Euroblast and Mair1 Festival, The Bad Side Festival, MetalItalia Festival, MAV Festival and more. The eclectic festival run afforded Destrage the opportunity to share the stage with Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Every Time I Die, Lordi, Moonspell and many more. In 2012, we wrote and recorded our third album. The result, the band’s most focused and dynamic effort yet, Are You Kidding Me? No. led to a worldwide deal with Metal Blade Records.

What was the spark and intent of the band at the beginning and does that still drive the band just as potently today?

We simply LOVE to spend time together, playing together, laughing and making jokes or just hanging. If “millions $$$” are not involved in a musical project (like in our case) every member needs to enjoy every single moment of the “band life”, form the sound check to the time spent on the van. It’s about alchemy in my opinion.

Of course conflicts, like in every relationship, are part of the game. But that was intent at the beginning and nothing is changed at the moment 🙂

How would you say the band has evolved over the years musically and emotionally?

We believe that our evolution as musicians and composers fully reflects our personal growth in real life. You gotta experience something before you can say something; that’s the main reason why we are always evolving, and we’ll always be. So, expect something really different from the albums to come… About how we changed through the three albums, there are a couple reasons that can explain the process. At the time we were composing and recording Urban Being, there was a big change of line up, and all the songs were composed mostly by Matteo; only with The King Is Fat’n’Old we started working all together on the songs, so the main difference from Urban Being is the result that came out from a combined work. We had the same approach in composing Are You Kidding Me? No., but a few years passed, so we were more close-knit as a team, and above all, our music influences had really changed in the meanwhile, as well as we grew up as persons.

Italy seems to have a rather rich and expansive metal scene, how have you found it on the inside and has it becomes easier for a

 Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography


Photo by Michael Gardenia Photography

band from your country to break into a wider audience over recent years?

In Italy, being in a metal band is definitely not easy. Italian scene, especially on rock and metal music, can’t be compared to the German, UK, Scandinavian or American ones. Our scene is based on pop-folk authors. We have to face a pop and hip hop mainstream market which dominates our local music market, and you have to fight a lot to find, not only a good label deal or an honest booking agent, but also a decent place to play. I have to say that Destrage always met great guys on the road, who contributed to support local bands and this was a great luck for us. Nowadays for the first time we can see a metal scene growing in our country and that’s incredible.

You have just released your third album as you mentioned, the quite brilliant, and I am not just saying that because we are talking, Are You Kidding Me? No. Because of the album we described the band as ‘a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.’ The album must be your proudest moment to date recording wise, even over the achievement of making your very first release?

I think this album is what makes us really proud at the moment. The first Urban Being wasn’t even a team work, the whole band wasn’t even there. As much as it can be uplifting to see your first record see the light, we believe it’s much more precious to wait a few years and deliver something that really reflects what you are.

If Urban Being was modern metal with a touch of Destrage, The King was Destrage with some modern metal dressing, Kidding is finally the essence of Destrage.

Your sound as clearly shown on the release employs a maelstrom of styles and flavours crossing fields of genres. How would you describe it in context to Are You Kidding Me? No. for newcomers to the band?

We destroy, create, transform, sublimate. We worship enthusiasm and venerate the shake that it gives.

I think Destrage sound’s is spontaneously various and weird. It’s like we learned how to speak the “metal” language as kids, and then growing up we opened our ears to the world and learned so much more, and the process is still going.

Everything that inspires us, from movies to fine art to haute cuisine to love and sex, can be easily translated into hard music as it is our native language.

This said if you take a look to our Spotify profiles you’ll be surprised. Or disgusted ahahah…

I’d love to tell these newcomers: we’d love you to take what the album is actually giving, with a clear and naive point of view, not expecting this record to be something that is going in the direction you already have in your mind. We are not saying the album is a unique piece of music that doesn’t resemble anything else you’ve heard before, no, but it definitely has its degree of originality.

It comes to my mind a story: the first time i tried tomato juice I almost puked, since it is a fruit juice and I was expecting a fruit juice-like taste. My brain was ready to enjoy a semi-definite, predictable experience and was already projecting it in my mind as the glass got to my lips. By the time the liquid touched my tongue I was disappointed, disgusted. The contrast with what I imagined was just bad.

Now tomato juice is my favorite.

Let’s not expect cats to bark.

Simply listen, enjoy or not.

1978605_10153840599710104_1863836033_nThe songs on the album are almost exhausting in their imagination and ever evolving inventive anarchy, they border schizophrenic at times haha. They sound like a puzzle to excitingly decipher and it is easy to assume they are constructed in a similar way so how do you approach the writing and creation of your songs?

Ahahah you’re right. It’s a giant puzzle made by post-it! We love to use them to keep always in mind the structure of every song, and be able to get an overview on the whole album structure as well.

A Destrage song can start from a riff, a melody, or a drum pattern coming out from any member. Then we work on it all together…in the name of post-it !

!We just try to make music that makes us happy and that is fun for others. If this means diverse people will come to our shows then be it! Can’t ask for more. We believe a band is like a person. No human being is always angry, happy or introspective all the time and a project of five different people should naturally deliver many feelings and states of mind at once.

!Also it is easier to swallow a bitter pill if before and after you eat a spoonful of sugar, that’s why complex parts are inscribed in a creamy song with melody and apparently simple rhythm. It is then choice of the listener to enjoy the surface or dig to the nerdy core, it is our business to make both levels as enjoyable as possible.

We don’t want people to come to our gigs and take notes, we want them to come and jump.

Do songs organically grow from those initial seeds or is there a stronger element of deliberate sculpting in their creation from you?

It really depends on the song, but usually what we try to do is to start from an idea or concept that has its own soul and then decorate it with our craftsmanship, instead of putting together many different elements, that most of the times wouldn’t match very well. It is way easier to write very complex stuff for the sake of being technical, so we try to make it enjoyable by anybody. Once I’ve been told by a wise person that we should put sex in every single thing we do, so we put a lot of effort in doing so because we believe that having sex with your audience is way better than masturbating on your own. So even if our technique may result impressive sometimes, we think that music must come before sport in any case.

Did you approach the recording of the album in any different way to your previous releases?

I think every time is different because we change, we evolve as persons and musicians. It’s really a big mixture of feelings, emotions and thoughts. For AYKM?N. after a long period of composition and pre-production, everybody was really focused and motivated to give his best. Somebody was excited, but still worried about some parts here and there, because we didn’t have that much time to rehearse every song properly, so the trickiest parts were kind of scary. Obviously everybody wanted to have fun as well, so jokes and funny moments happened all the time; that’s the way we like doing things together. Every time we enter the studio we realize how much we love making records, and how stressful it is at the same time. Everyone wants the record to be “perfect”, so sometimes somebody loses his mind or goes crazy. Fortunately we have five very different personalities, and we know each other very well, so everything usually sorts out very quickly.

Tell us about the recording of Are You Kidding Me? No. Did the songs evolve further in that environment and did you learn anything this time to take into your next adventure?

The recordings were a bit messy, definitely a non-linear path. Even in the final phase of the production we were having new ideas and insights. Probably hiking in nature, getting lost in an unknown city, visit art galleries, alternate your perception are good ways to get inspired in the beginning of the process and recording is the best way to get inspired in the end of it. Even in its half dark, closed, silent spaces the studio itself is a huge source of inspiration. You are there, but you are not what matters. The album is all and you disappear.

Many of the songs made it to the record the way they were written, other didn’t and we kept changing them until the very end.

We made a documentary of the whole recording process, it will be published soon.

As the album teased, seduced, and thrilled us we laid numerous comparisons at its feet; moments in the eclectic alchemy which Destrage 1reminded us of bands such as Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, Faith No More Kontrust and French bands Mucho Tapioca and Toumai, even at one brief point Ugly Kid Joe. It shows the diversity and expanse of your sound. Are there any specific inspirations which have really influenced you if not for the band as a musician?

All those that you mentioned played a crucial role in our inspirational feast, but not more than Michel Gondry, Quay Brothers or Paolo Barnard did. And they don’t release albums.! !

Are You Kidding Me? No. sees a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal of Guns’N’Roses on its title track, How did that union come about?

We all are Ron’s big fans. When we finished the track Are You Kidding Me? No. we felt something was missing in the end. In fact, a Bumblefoot solo was missing. Since we had no connection with him, Mat emailed Mattias “Ia” Eklundh, who played on Jade’s Place (in our previous record The King Is Fat’N’Old) and became our friend (he’s such a cool guy!). He asked him for an address, a number, some contact to get in touch with Ron. Mattias as usual answered very politely, but didn’t give Mat what he wanted (he’s a very respectful person). So Mat was left with no choice other than going on Bumblefoot’s website and write to the general mail address. And surprize, Ron answered immediately telling us the song was super good and he’d do the collaboration. He told Mat he was touring with GnR in that period, so we should wait for a month or so. We thought it was his way to refuse. Instead he actually wrote back when the tour was over, asking what we wanted exactly, and we answered “we want you to do whatever you want for 32 bars”.

Few funny private messages followed and we got our perfect solo in 3 days. Smooth. The song seemed to be made for him, as he also said later in an interview. So, good experiment, and when we got to meet the guy in person we liked him even more. Ron is rad.

That track is also the most, can we say creatively and thrillingly psychotic on the album, probably our favourite song though it is hard to choose just one. Can you give us some insight into its creation?

Are You Kidding Me? No. is one of our favourite tracks too, for two main reasons: its origin and its content. The song was born randomly, as Mat sang what became the trumpet melody while going around on his red Vespa.

So, in the beginning we only expanded what comes after the trumpet, all that gipsy-sounding part. We wanted to make it a bonus track and leave it as it was. Then with no reason or precise plan, we wrote all the rest around it, putting no limits and setting no borders, following the lyric concept “Everybody does all kind of shit, I’m sorry that I’m sorry, I had to do this”.

The content came along in exceptional short time, and surprisingly our mindless creation gave birth to some of the most cerebral and psychotic parts of the whole album. !

As you said earlier the album is also your first with Metal Blade Records. How has the link up impacted on the album so far?

Being signed with such a great label is a dream come true for us! Definitely it’s giving us way bigger exposure, and much more people are listening to the new album because of this. But on the artistic point of view it didn’t have any impact, simply because we could sign the deal with MB because we already had the new album finished and ready to go.

Destrage is a band never slow in hitting the road and stages, the same again for 2014 I can assume? Any details you can reveal?

Absolutely yes! Everything is “work in progress”, our goal is to play these songs live, touring as much as we can, bringing our music everywhere…we’ll see what happens! 🙂

We can’t wait to be on the road again!

Once more thank you for sharing time to chat with us. Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for your attention! Our new album Are you Kidding Me? No. will be release on March 3 in Europe through Metal Blade Records. More music and videos will be released soon, so stay tuned though our official pages http://www.facebook.com/destrage, http://www.youtube.com/destrage andwww.twitter.com/destrage!

Thank you so much for this interview guys! 🙂

Read the review of Are you Kidding Me? No. @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/03/06/destrage-are-you-kidding-me-no/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 19/03/2014

Destrage – Are You Kidding Me? No.

 

byMichaelGardenia_04

     Destrage is a force which confronts and seduces the imagination with such an exhaustive vivacity of sound and adventure that it becomes a proposition which has you simultaneously confused, bewildered, and thrillingly basking in a maelstrom of sonic alchemy. Hailing from Italy, the band has forged an impressive and unforgettable once bitten presence which is ascending into more fevered attention release by release, but it is the release of new album Are You Kidding Me? No. which feels like the trigger into worldwide recognition and ardour with its Metal Blade Records release. With more flavours, styles, and imagination than a carnival in Rio, the release turns a band which was still waiting to explode around the globe into an exhilarating infection of the psyche and passions with that target in its sights. With words like unpredictable and intriguing the weakest descriptions of the inventive anarchy teasing and ravishing the senses, Destrage is a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.

     Formed in 2005, the Milan quintet has been on a charge of persuading and recruiting hearts at home and further afield since their first days, the current line-up in place since 2007 especially stoking those the fires. From their first demo Self Id Generator, Destrage has continued to evolve into a aurally spectacular provocation, the albums Urban Being of 2009 and The King Is Fat’n’Old the following year potent bait greedily devoured by more and more willing souls, though you suspect it will be nothing compared to the awakening sparked by Are You Kidding Me? No. Live too the band has left wasted bodies and hungry bodies in their wake, the undertaking of tours across Europe, Japan, and numerous festivals and shows where they have shared spaces with the likes of Every Time I Die, Parkway Drive, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Lordi, Moonspell and many more, increasing their stock. The new album though feels and sounds like their time to lead the pack has now come and it is not a moment too soon.

     You may be wondering what the band sound like, which we will endeavour to reveal song by song, but suffice to say it is Coverwonderfully something quite impossible to label. Opener Destroy Create Transform Sublimate tells you all you need to know about Destrage and whether to unreservedly embrace or stand scratching your head over their voracious experimentation and invention. The track opens with a spiral of sonic enterprise courted by aggressive riffs and combative rhythms, the mix alluring and intimidating in equal measure. It is not long before the song is throwing off any restraint to stomp with entwining essences of groove and funk veining a still voracious assault of technical and carnivorous metal. The impressive vocals of Paolo Colavolpe are just as eager to tempt and savage as the music with a delivery as wide as the range of sounds around him. The song aggressively dances like a fusion of Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, and French band Mucho Tapioca, but even with its gait it switches and shuffles its suasion without notice or care.

   With a climactic finale which simply thrills and enthrals, dub and techno added to the spice cupboard of the song, the towering opener is swiftly matched in quality and psyche twisting grandeur by Purania. From a charged entrance of rapacious riffing and similarly hungry rhythms, the song settles into a melodic bordering mellow stroll which lasts just the length of the impatience the band has to light the touch paper to another maze of eclectic sonic fascination. Imagine a hybrid of Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, 6:33, and System Of A Down and you get a glimpse of the beauty and schizophrenic glory of the song, a triumph within which the guitars of Matteo Di Gioia and Ralph Salati craft a narrative and web which bewitches and challenges, their hypnotic mix of creative frenzy and skilful acidic elegance spellbinding within the predatory frame built by bassist Gabriel Pignata and drummer Federico Paulovich.

    My Green Neighbour rifles ears next, its first breath a frantic tsunami of beats and riffs courting a bedlamic mind-set. Forcing its agitated psyche and attack into a smoother flowing blaze of heavy and melodic metal, the song takes little effort in replicating the temptation of its predecessors, merging varied flames of sound and persistently captivating detours into a brawling riot of invention and insatiable metal manipulation. The stunning tempest then has to step aside for the more primal bordering bestial presence of Hosts, Rifles & Coke, its heavy throated savagery magnetic and even more tantalising when it shares time with a contagion of melodic prowess and mouth-wateringly catchy choruses, all seared by a scotching solo to top things off.

    Both the discordant and masterful mayhem of G.O.D. and the smoother voiced mesmeric Where the Things Have No Colour unveil new scenic aspects of the Destrage’s songwriting and imagination; the first a riot of Faith No More meets Ugly Kid Joe voraciousness aligned to a mind tripping sensibility and the second a progressively honed melodic venture through rapturous harmonies and exotic melodies within an irresistible toxin of craft and infectiousness. Arguably the track is the band at its most restrained artistically but certainly no less potent and imaginative as well as exciting.

     Waterpark Bachelorette has the band squalling and rioting over the senses, grooves and lethal rhythms a blistering endeavour matched by the predacious expulsions of vocals and sound which litter the rampant torrent of rock ‘n’ roll. Guitar doodling veins the song for only the most satisfying results whilst the addictive anthemic call of vocals and hooks make a lingering bait which seeps into the breather of melodic caresses and sonic entanglement. Its excellence is soon equalled by firstly the dramatically textured Before, After and All Around and the almost hysterical invention of – (Obedience), the track verging on maniacal with its avant-garde/melodic metal ants nest of busy yet ordered chaos.

    To prove that the song is still not the deranged imagination of the band exhausted the closing title track takes all honours on the Are You Kidding Me? No. Featuring a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal (Guns’N’Roses), the track is an inventive meshuga but one which knows exactly what it is doing. Fusing experimentation, jazz, funk, and pure dementia into its unrelenting crazed waltz, the track is a triumph of insanity which disorientates and seduces with perfect touch and irreverence. Ending on a sensational emotive stomp of gypsy punk with swing desires and reminding very much of Kontrust and another French band Toumai, the track is a magnificent concluding revelry to a quite brilliant and monumental release.  Quite simply Destrage has provided your probable album of the year.

www.facebook.com/destrage

10/10

Ringmaster 06/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

The Betrayer’s Judgement – Philosopher

tbj promo philosopher

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and EP_coverrigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Neaera: Ours Is the Storm

NEAERA_Promo_2012_Woods

    Fired with a tempest of sonic abrasion, the new and sixth album from German metallers Neaera is a furnace of aggression and intensity which has been stoked up into a confrontation which is as punishing as it is compelling. Whether Ours Is the Storm is the band at its most aggressively creative and destructive yet can be discussed in length as they have unleashed numerous onslaughts of impressively violent creativity, but certainly the new album shows they have not lost one ounce of invention, malevolence, and sonic spite.

Since forming in 2003 under the name The Ninth Gate, the band from Münster, Westphalia has triggered constant attention with their distinct maul of death metal with thrash veining, the quintet within a year being signed to Metal Blade Records. Changing their name to Neaera, after a character in Greek mythology, the band released their debut album The Rising Tide Of Oblivion in 2005 to a tide of strong positive reviews. The following years saw four more enthusiastically received albums all garnering strong acclaim in varying degrees and the band igniting stages in shows, tours, and festivals around Europe alongside the likes of Kataklysm, Caliban, Rammstein, Earth Crisis, Sworn Enemy, All That Remains, Soilwork , Bleed From Within, Callejon and many more. With their new album again released via Metal Blade, the band has continued to hone and evolve their sound into a full brutal expanse of imagination, energy, and passion. The release is a carnal devour of the senses which leaves you breathless, sore, and blissfully satisfied.

Opening track The Deafening is a inciting intro to the ferociousness to follow, its brewing corruption and blistered ambience a Neaera - Ours Is the Stormshort breath of oppressiveness before the title track runs with the in place intent to unleash a primal rage upon the ear. With rhythms slapping the senses with muscular persistence and riffs gnawing with rabid hunger whilst sonic spirals of intrigue and enterprise ignite the air further, the song consumes and ravishes person and emotions. It is a stirring bruising encounter which ignites the passions with ease, the varied growls and insidious squalls from Benjamin Hilleke a magnificent cry and scour as impacting and voracious as the sounds colouring the air black and blue around him.

Decolonize the Mind and Through Treacherous Flames both concentrate on the already deep sores ripped open by the first track, the guitars of Stefan Keller and Tobias Buck flattening defences with merciless riffs and branding with sonic flames whilst the skilled drums of Sebastian Heldt make no attempt to hide their hostility and malice. Between the songs and across the album there is arguably a similarity to the corrosive surface which threatens at times to overwhelm the continually challenging imagination and diversity within songs though it is never enough to deflect their intrigue and power, whilst looking each storm directly in the eye and searching its core reveals the depth of invention at work and

Deeper into its heart the album unveils a hunger driven by serpentine maliciousness locked in thrash savagery within Ascend to Chaos and a volatile grooved invidiousness in the outstanding Walk with Fire, a track which tears and violates with contagion and irrepressible craft. The song is one of the major highlights along with the title track though both are challenged seriously by the melodic fire of My Night of Starless and the thundering predator Black Tomb where bassist Benjamin Donath reveals his deepest grudging menace on the album.

Ours Is the Storm continues to deliver impressive storms of scorning anger and sonic antagonism with the likes of Slaying the Wolf Within and Back to the Soul igniting further strong pleasure. It is a release which is hard to say is inventing anything new or startling but at the same time it is a consistently invigorating and inciting fury which is impossible not relish with greed. Neaera shows no sign of losing their potency or vitriol for which we can be very thankful.

http://www.neaera.com

8/10

RingMaster 06/03/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

www.audioburger.com