Bool – Fly With Me

Frustratingly it is far too easy for things to fly under the radar in a time where nothing is secret thanks to the extensive landscape of the internet, but one proposition we insist you do take notice of is Fly With Me, the new album from Bool. The German outfit roar in ears with a strain of alternative rock which infests the appetite with its grunge character and grips the imagination with an array of nagging hooks and rousing enterprise; it all coming together here for one of the year’s most compelling moments yet.

The band’s sound is maybe best described as Bush meets Morphine harassed by Damn Vandals and Fatima Mansions but from that mix thrills with its own unique personality of sound and craft. It demands attention and rewards with every passing second of bold and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll. Formed in 2007, Bool stirred up acclaim and an already growing reputation with the My Spirit, their third release realising the potential already heard in its predecessors. Recorded with producer Jon Caffery (Die Toten Hosen), Fly With Me hits and owns a whole new plateau for the band’s sound and invention, offering a relentlessly harassing and addictively creative trespass to lust over.

It opens up with Here We Are and a flame of guitar before, and not for the last time, a swiftly compelling bassline with its growling tone entices courtesy of Marc Fröhlking. The initial blaze settles down a touch as the vocals of lead guitarist Karsten Dittberner step forward, the bass continuing to offer delicious bait alongside as the crisp beats of Jens Geilert descend. Soon the fiery adventure of Dittberner and fellow guitarist Michael Malfeito rise again, the cycle repeated throughout with increasing energy and adventure.

It is a boldly striking start quickly matched by the more composed but no less sonically seared Soul Train. Emotion drenches every note and each syllable dropping from Dittberner’s throat with a crystalline melody a glassy temper within the growing tempest. Commandingly contagious and wonderfully irritable in many ways, it too lingers in ears and thoughts just as successors Shut Up and Kick Arse do. The first of the two is even more reined in which brings a tension and drama especially to its brewing crescendos which is raw seduction. Dittberner is a magnetic vocal presence potently backed by his companions, while together the quartet unite in imagination and dexterity with that earlier Bush reference at its enjoyable strongest. The second of the two has a Nick Cave like edge to its opening Doors-esque climate, hues which caress the brooding heart of song and sound before the track slips into an almost predatory stroll of primal rock ‘n’ roll at its inventive best with a rolling energy more than living up to its title.

My Own Heaven is a melodically grilled pyre of emotion which ebbs and flows through calm and volatility, each passing moment a web of arousing catchiness and suggestive enterprise around the addictive dynamics of Geilert while the following Revolution uncages a riveting holler of punk ‘n’ roll which has the body bouncing and spirit roaring. It is testy and flirtatious, a true treat among many within Fly With Me.

Bool equally show they are adept at caressing the senses as the dark yet elegant serenade of Hey You shows, its melancholic beauty and melodic croon pure enticement before You and Me stomps in with its own tenacious rock ‘n’ roll. Again Gavin Rossdale and co feels a big inspiration to the track but one which is easily welcomed within its infectious incitement. Essences of metal and heavy rock add to its theatre, a potent incitement more than matched by the rawer edged and dramatically textured Desire where again rhythms simply grip the instincts as the guitars create a web of sonic flames to be trapped by as vocals share their plaintive heart.

Through the even tempered if again tempestuous sonic reflection of Same Mistake, a song which feels very familiar for no obvious reason, and the similarly intimate balladry of Yesterday, there is no urge to pull away from the album, each rich captivation even if not quite reaching the heights of those before them. Fair to say both easily get under the skin as too next up Love is the Answer, a theatre of sound and temptation which barely hides its tension within keys and string woven melodies. The song is certainly a slow burner but over time grows to be one of the most memorable and essential lures of the album.

The release closes up with Right or Wrong, a song which pleases immediately but also takes its time to fully persuade and ignite the passions which, if without the stirring triumphs of its companions, it surely does. It is a potent conclusion to an album which for us has become an addiction in no time.

Fly With Me is the wake up call to one exciting band in Bool, be sure you do not miss the trip.

Fly With Me is available now through Boersma Records through most online stores.

http://boolofficial.com/    https://www.facebook.com/BOOLofficial/

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Simpletone – Angels’ Share

the-simpletone-band-pic_RingMasterReview

There are some releases which just demand success. Whether they get it in the increasingly fickle attention of the modern music fan is never a given but Angels’ Share, the new album from British rockers The Simpletone, does all the right things to make that commanding statement.

There is little we can share about the 2010 formed band other than its line-up is made up of John Davison, Craig Seymour, Glenn Eastoe, and Tom Cahill, it hails from St Neots in Cambridgshire, and has previously released the albums, Rampenny in 2012 and Dark Matter two years later, both seemingly well-received propositions. A UK tour with New Model Army in 2014 has been one of many live highlights for the band built on their stirring fusion of heavy and melodic rock with grunge, stoner and numerous other essences. It is a mix of flavours making for a striking proposition and imaginative proposal in Angels’ Share and songs which just roar with anthemic majesty and fiery enterprise.

The first of the ten cuts gripping ears and an early appetite for the band’s invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is Outta Control. Instantly a spicy groove winds around ears, leaning in closer as tenacious rhythms and riffs join its opening bait. Effect coated vocals equally lures keen ears as the song swaggers along with steady but rapacious grooves and a suggestive melody. The restraint stopping the track from exploding as it hints it might throughout is an inspired move, the song teasing and almost taunting along its enterprise shaped body. The heavier throb of bass and flames of harmonies only add to the lure of the song with guitar craft similarly as magnetic.

The following Love Street (Modern Mystery) keeps the rich enticement going with its punk folk lined stroll, simple but potent riffs colluding with swinging beats as vocals paint a suggestive picture. Its catchiness is a swift persuasion rapidly backed by the boisterous antics of the guitars as the track carries on the great variety already showing in the band’s sound, diversity more than confirmed by their mighty new single Storm Chaser. At over eleven minutes it is an epic persuasion which serenades the senses with melodic and harmonic caresses initially before building a bolder energy amidst an addictive rhythmic prowess. Weaving strands of space and progressive rock among other textures into its ever evolving adventure, the song is a kaleidoscope of melody heavy rock drawing on an array of decades while creating its own fresh, individual, and ever changing landscape of imagination. Like a mix of Skyscraper (the nineties UK band), Life of Agony, and Voyager, the track barely feels like its length and relentlessly has the listener compelled.

angels-share-cover_RingMasterReviewThe fact that next up Black Box still manages to eclipse it slightly shows the quality of its own exceptional design. A spirit stoking beast from its first touch, the song canters with muscular tenacity and fiery invention bred to virulent proportions as its mix of hard and heavy rock consumes ears and imagination. The track is exceptional, as punk in many ways as it is feisty rock ‘n’ roll with a drama of character and craft that demands attention and involvement.

Fire in the Sky steps up next with a growl in its basslines and a contagious swing in its rhythms, guitars and vocals dancing within their addictive tempting as soulful blues lined grooves bring an incendiary heat to the proposal. Like a seventies inspired union of Therapy? and Reuben, to try and offer a comparison, the song forcibly hits the spot before making way for the slower stoner-esque prowl of Nehemiah, an incitement pulling sludgy textures into its increasingly exotic and suggestive theatre. It is seriously compelling stuff, another song blossoming through an array of twists and flavours as it grows in ears.

The melodic charm of Day by Day is a similarly riveting proposition, the graceful yet sinewy instrumental finding a place between XTC and Tool as it seduces the imagination, setting it up for electrified air and nature of As Above so Below. Courting ears with a rapaciously formidable core in its raw riffs and bold rhythmic, the track wraps it in a melodic spiciness and mellower harmonic seducing which echoes elements of bands like Bush, Alice In Chains, and Sick Puppies yet sounds little like any.

If we tell you that Easy Come lacks the same galvanic sparks of its predecessors do not mistake it for a weak link within Angels’ Share; the song a highly persuasive slice of rock ‘n’ roll with guitar craft which shines like a beacon as the bass uncages a funk inspired personality. The fact the track is outshone by others is down to their might, a strength revelled in again by album closer Hunters. Whether by coincidence or design, there is a Horslips feel to the song certainly early on, and of fellow Brits KingBathmat but as across the album, things are soon woven into an addiction of sound and creative hooks roaring The Simpletone.

It is a glorious end to one treat of a release which deserves all the praise and attention it should and surely will get. Angels’ Share is another rousing encounter to add to our lustful favourites of 2016 list and no keener a recommendation we can offer.

Angels’ Share is out now across most online stores and on iTunes @ https://itunes.apple.com/album/id1169473074?ls=1&app=itunes

http://www.thesimpletone.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesimpletoneband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Clone Age – Fuse

CA_RingMasterReview

Though inspirations are unknown, it feels a safe bet to suggest that Queens Of The Stone Age and especially Foo Fighters is among them going by Fuse, the highly enjoyable debut album from alternative rock band Clone Age. Ten tracks fuelled by energetically dynamic and melodically thick rock ‘n’ roll, the release is an impressive introduction to a Croatian quartet which, on this evidence, has the potential to break into much broader spotlights.

Formed in 2002, Clone Age has gone through line-up changes and creative breaks over the years whilst also earning a fine reputation across gigs and festivals for their live show, wining numerous regional awards into the bargain too. It was 2014 which saw the present union of vocalist/bassist Robert Kriković, guitarists Adrijano Valpatić and Nenad Rešetar, and drummer Marko Lajtman come together; a moment in time which seemed to spark a new creative energy and chemistry in the band leading to the writing and recording of a host of new songs which make up first album Fuse.

Recently released via Croatian label Dallas Records, Fuse gets straight to work on ears and imagination with opener Give Yourself To Me. A lure of guitar entices first, it quickly joined by the potent tones of Kriković, which in turn soon welcomes the beefy beats of Lajtman amidst a thicker sonic roar. That initial nagging hook enjoyably continues as the track breaks out big melodies and rousing vocals; it all courted by one tempestuously throbbing bassline. As quickly as the song’s sounds blossom so too does the Dave Grohl and co scent, a flavouring never dissipating in song and album yet at no point does Clone Age or Fuse become replicas without their own imaginative ideas and creative characters.

The feisty and quickly satisfying start moves aside for the following Should I Care and the continuation of the album’s attention grabbing prowess. Less imposing than the first, its melodies smouldering on the ear, the track still unveils a potent catchiness which colludes with a seductive landscape of imaginative and sultry textures aligned to stylish sounds. At times more hard rock than alternative rock sculpted and in latter moments a bluesy proposal, the song simply hits the spot with increasing ease before passing its triumph over to We’ll Make It to try and emulate. That it does with its rhythmic shuffle and vocal tempting within an anthemic bellow which again is as familiar as it is fresh and greedily devoured. In sound and voice, Clone Age has the knack of inviting and involving the listener in body and emotion, a continuing success across Fuse which maybe is at its height in this rip-roaring protagonist of the spirit.

art_RingMasterReviewAddition shares its own spicy hook and groove laced bait next, its swaggering body and reflective blues laced nature carrying a touch of Alter Bridge and Sick Puppies to it to great effect. The guitar craft and imagination of Valpatić and Rešetar enthrals and excites throughout, the former also providing some great backing vocals to reinforce the emotive potency of Kriković.

A calmer time comes with the southern laced and lively balladry of My Little Miracle, its gentler embracing coming with maybe the most tenacious and bold rhythmic proposal from Lajtman on the album whilst Wake Me Up whips up the body and passions with its bouncing gait and instant hook lined flirtation. There is a whiff of nineties indie rock to the song, but equally a disarming post grunge/alternative rock pop magnetism which has hips swaying and the imagination gripped with consummate ease.

From one pinnacle to another and the mightily addictive Never Enough. From its opening thick and grouchy bassline, the song is in command, writhing spice rich grooves quickly adding to the fascination. Relaxing a touch as it hits its mischievous stride, a pulsating spotting of fifties seeded keys start their seduction, popping in and out of the sinew spun and vivaciously hungry flames of heavy rock ‘n’ roll. Like Squeeze meets Bush meets QOTSA, the track is glorious; rock ‘n’ roll manna for the senses and passions which almost alone provides one of many imposing reasons for checking out album and band.

Save Me might have a less unpredictable and dramatic air and character to it next, but the song is an appealing tapestry of harmonic vocals and fiery guitar enterprise around a steelier rumble of bass and kinetic beats. It lets no one down in pleasure and anthemic potency before What’s My Name offers up its own restrained but infectious smoulder of melodic suggestiveness and emotive reflection. Hinting at further nineties grunge influences without being pinned down; the track is as intriguing as it is compelling.

Alone completes Fuse with a fusion of power pop and again grunge inspired alternative rock. Taking ears on a heady and contagious ride of sound and energy, it sums up the invention and recognisable but commandingly fresh sound and exploits of Clone Age perfectly; and tells you all you need to know about the band’s ability to write songs which almost demand physical and emotional involvement.

Clone Age will most likely be strangers in name and sound to you right now but it is something you should amend with Fuse. The reward is an adventure of rock ‘n’ roll to improve any day.

Fuse is out now via Dallas Records across many online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/cloneageck   https://cloneage.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Walk In Coma – Narrenturm

Walk In Coma Promo shot_RingMaster Review

Providing plenty for the imagination to get its teeth into as ears are intimidated and aggressively roared into, UK metallers Walk In Coma give us one heftily enjoyable tempest with new EP Narrenturm. Offering a fusion of varied metal and heavy rock flavours within a perpetually mighty bellow of intensity, the release unleashes a raw and caustic climate over a constantly twisting canvas of invention. Inspirations, including Machine Head, Lamb Of God, and Architects, are open within the Walk In Coma sound but it does not prevent Narrenturm being a confrontation bristling with potential and raging freshness.

Hailing from Southend-on-Sea, Walk In Coma was formed in 2006, quickly stirring up support and a potent reputation through their live endeavours across the capital and south of England. The years have seen the quintet also share stages with numerous bands, including of Breed 77 and Funeral For A Friend, alongside their own successful headlining shows. Now a release, already waking attention online, gets to put its big nudge on a national spotlight, Narrenturm attempting to awaken wider flung appetites to back the band’s continuing hunger to play live.

Walk In Coma Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review     The release opens with the ambient suggestiveness of Fool’s Tower; the brief instrumental as atmospherically portentous as it is melodically captivating, and growing in intensity with each passing chord to lead ears and thoughts into the bestial jaws of the following Raising Hell. Instantly a Pantera like growl infests a groove loaded assault of sound and attitude, that Machine Head reference a rich tone within the southern spiced temptation. The bass of Tom Case develops a glorious swagger within the track, seemingly inspiring a similar stroll and swing to Mark Elliott and James Cater’s guitar enterprise. It is a compelling and quickly virulent incitement only added to by the ethereal touch of keys and the ferocity of Joe Reid’s beats.

Just as impressive and impacting is the grouchy growl of Alex Adlington’s vocals, a delivery hinting at good variety in his armoury on the first song and realised within next up Nein. As grooves and riffs collude to create an infestation of inescapable persuasion, Adlington reveals a cleaner touch to his prowess yet still with a dirty snarl that can easily slip into predatory antagonism at any given moment. It is a strong essence within the equally imaginative twists and creative throes of the song. There is a touch of Bloodsimple meets Architects to the encounter but equally the grungy/melodic flavouring of a Bush or Gruntruck rears its head at times too.

Asylum lives up to its title straight after, its body of sound accomplished and volatile with a sense of welcome adventurous bedlam to its nature whilst Retreat stalks the senses, its Devildriver meets Mudvayne animus crawls maliciously over the body. In all songs, the heaviness and hostility of the band sound and energy over wraps the imaginative and often sublime craft and invention working away within the storm a touch, but never really defusing the potency and fascination of such elements and ideation, as shown by this gripping pair of tracks.

Narrenturm is concluded by the rapacious furnace of The Fire, a track not quite living up to what came before with consistency but at times sparking a lusty reaction for its persistently riveting musical and emotional ire. The track is all the same a fine end to an increasingly mighty release. It is still early days for Walk In Coma in many ways but they are, according to the thoroughly satisfying Narrenturm, heading in the right direction to bigger success.

Narrenturm is released through all stores on Friday 23rd October.

http://www.walkincoma.co.uk    https://www.facebook.com/walkincoma     http://walkincoma.bandcamp.com/releases  https://twitter.com/walkincoma

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Freaks Like Me – Philosophies For The Modern Ant

FLM - bandpic01

It is probably no surprise that there is a healthy essence of Kurt Cobain and co to the Freaks Like Me sound, considering its members also make up the world’s No.1 Nirvana tribute band Nervana, but that is only part of what is a rather compelling and enjoyable proposition on offer in the trio’s debut release. The Philosophies For The Modern Ant EP is a contagious and rigorously captivating encounter which has body and imagination leaping in tandem with its energetic and invigorating enterprise. As mentioned there is no escaping the rich familiarity of the band’s main inspiration across the songs but with its grunge sounds merged with punk ferocity and melodic rock tenacity, what emerges is an admittedly less than original but easily more than richly satisfying incitement. Think Nirvana meets Sick Puppies in the embrace of early Bush and you get a great hint of what is on offer.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Jon O’Connor, bassist Dave Eve, and drummer/backing vocalist Steve Kilroy, Freaks Like Me emerged when the threesome decided it was time to explore and offer something different and fresh from their highly successful and acclaimed Nervana presence which has been going since 2009. The seeds of their union go back much further though, Eve and Kilroy meeting in the early 2000s in London while recording an EP with Gods Little Joke. Playing together in Ireland in 2007, the pair met O’Connor in Dublin after a show, reconnecting with him later when looking for a vocalist for their new project. The rest is history, with a new turn and direction in its narrative coming with Freaks Like Me.

1. FLM EP - COVER_FRONT - FINAL   Recorded in London, Boston and Holland, Philosophies For The Modern Ant, on the back of successful shows in Europe and the US, instantly has ears and attention gripped as opener Better Off Blind sets things off. Hefty riffs and similarly intensive grooves encase ears initially before the song relaxes into a more familiar grunge bred tempting. Melodies and a snarl equipped bassline court the slightly grizzled tones of Jon O’Connor, his voice sharing the raw essence of again Cobain and similarly Gavin Rossdale, it all creating a restrained but open drama to the song. It is fair to say that the EP starts with a recognisable and unsurprising offering but equally a captivating one which like the warm up act to the main show, gets anticipation and appetite in the mood.

All In A Lie is a different beast of a proposition, its instant almost predatory splatter of riffs and sonic discord within a carnivorous assault of bass led rhythms, immediately irresistible. It is a riveting and thrilling entrance loaded with rugged hooks and ravenous grooves. Submission to its raw and imposing suggestiveness is swift, especially with the effect drizzled vocals which are soon riding the tempestuous and aggressive onslaught. Bearing down on the senses with seemingly increasing creative turmoil, urgency, and seduction, the intoxicating tempest is quite outstanding, sparking as its successor at times thoughts of UK based band Feud along the way.

If the bass exploits of Eve have already seduced the passions across the first two tracks, he steals them outright within Cynical. A dirty repetitious temptation from his manipulation of strings is simply irresistible as it provides the start and spine to the raucous and fiery encounter. It is an old school punk lure in many ways, a resonating simplicity which steers song and its creativity to striking endeavours. It again has many recognisable twists and aspects to its adventure but this time of a more post punk seeded comparison a la Gang of Four.

Both Down and Idol Fall keep EP and pleasure blazing, the first with virulently infectious expulsions masked as choruses. As in the previous song there are glimpses of a post punk flavouring, hints of Flesh For Lulu spicing the melodic radiance spilling from the heart of the otherwise thickly Nirvana-esque swamp of abrasive rock ‘n’ roll. The second of the two is again drenched in the flavours of the band’s other project, but it is spicery twisted and woven into fresh and inventive imagination which easily enthrals thoughts and ears, especially in its unexpected and transfixing psyche rock detour.

Closing song Poppies and Rain provides an absorbing croon to end on, but a shadow wrapped one with portentous rhythms and haunting sonic suggestiveness crowding its melodic and melancholic elegance. The song is a bewitching finale to an excellent debut from Freaks Like Me. Certainly there is little startling new about Philosophies For The Modern Ant but it is potently fresh and stirringly invigorating, and most of all thoroughly enjoyable. What more could anyone want?

Philosophies For The Modern Ant is available from April 7th via Pavement Entertainment through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/freakslikememusic

RingMaster 07/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Oceanic – City Of Glass

Oceanic PR 2

Not sure exactly why but the depth and quality to the Israeli metal/rock scene always surprises, even despite covering numerous releases and artists from its creative well. You have the likes of Orphaned Land, Ferium, and Desert amongst a great many stirring up the world scene with their varied sounds, and from within the underground bands like Walkways making their mark. To the latter you can now add Oceanic, a band beginning to draw and earn potent responses to their presence and debut album, City Of Glass. Formed in 2009, the Tel Aviv quartet has inspired strong and increasing attention, especially over the past couple of years, and now with their first album nudging greater awareness, Oceanic has the potential to be another breaking into broader spotlights well beyond their homeland.

The band’s sound is melodic/alternative rock but with an appetite to throw in unique twists of progressive exploration and feisty imagination. As shown upon City Of Glass it makes for a fascinating and unpredictable proposition which can offer familiar essences in a fresh and often offbeat design. There are moments where things just confuse and miss their target but for the main, album and sound are one captivating tempting. The band itself has grown its stature and reputation in the Israel underground scene through appearances at events like Progstage 2012 and in supporting the likes of Pain of Salvation. Band experiences are not restricted to Oceanic alone either, bassist Or Lubianiker having toured as part of bands for Marty Friedman and Gus G whilst playing on Yossi Sassi’s album Desert Butterflies. The ex-Orphaned Land guitarist is now returning the favour by producing City Of Glass, and providing guest guitar, vocal, and bouzoukitar enterprise within certain songs on the release.

A Scanner Darkly starts things off and swiftly has ears and attention intrigued; it’s atmospheric opening inviting but also oppressively hazy. It is a tantalising mix veined by gentle melodic Oceanic - City of Glass - Front (sRGB)coaxing and soon joined by the gentle husky vocal reflections of guitarist Idan Liberman. The song gently immerses senses and imagination, broadening its intensity and provocative textures with smooth and warm persuasion. Before long its passion and energy breaks through the calm though, crisp beats and a dark bassline uniting with fiery enterprise from the guitars of Amir Manbar and Liberman, whilst the latter’s vocal tones also elevate in emotion and roaring vivacity. The song by now offers a mix of Palms, Bush, and in some ways System Of A Down, melodies and harmonies blooming in a fiercer cage of beats from Gal Shochet and throaty bass suggestiveness from Lubianiker. The song continues to ebb and flow in its intensity, increasingly impressing and exciting ears and imagination.

The following Wind Up In Barrel (Tribute To Walter) continues the strong start, raising the album’s game straight away with its rolling rhythmic start. A sudden drop into an emotive calm catches ears by surprise, losing that potent start quickly and dramatically wrong-footing, especially first time around, but it is soon embroiled in a brewing climatic of creative voracity and sonic agitation. Vocally too, Liberman seems to find a left field approach to his delivery which only adds to the riveting drama of the song. It takes time but the track eventually emerges as an inescapable seduction whetting the appetite further for album and the sultry embrace of South Of Heaven which follows. Its smouldering lures and charm is just the lead into more tempestuous but restrained musical and emotional progressive bred turbulence. It is a compelling encounter, essences of bands like Shinedown and Seether making glimpses in the magnetic presence of the song.

Both Enter and Clouds keep attention and enjoyment high, each again a mix of aggressive energies and reflecting tranquillity, never lingering in either too long and uniting them with craft and invention. Neither song creates new templates for rock ‘n’ roll it is fair to say, but both provide refreshing and thoroughly satisfying proposals, the first a melodic bellow with tangy sonic endeavour from the guitars and another rhythmic enticement to equally intimidate and excite. It only grows in pungent appeal and strength over time whilst its successor almost stalks ears with its heavy rhythmic resonance and predatory riffing, though again it is tempered by the strong vocal and guitar sculpted enterprise bringing warmth and light to the darker tones.

The brief and harmonically elegant Fish You Shouldn’t Eat (Part 1) slips in next, its musty warmth and sonic shimmer, a pleasing appetiser for the impact of These Countless Hours. This is a song which left ears and thoughts undecided and still does even though it is also a compelling puzzle. It starts off in impressive style, rugged beats and caustic tone a swiftly enthralling protagonist aided by similarly robust vocals. It continues to light ears until something strange happens, an exploration of invention emerges which sees music and vocals going in different directions. Both continue to work just not together for personal tastes, and we devour anything with a warped twist or avant-garde approach. It is almost as if singer and instruments have their own individual songs and are trying to unite them as one. The fact that it keeps luring ears back to try to make sense of it is a testament to what is going on in ideation just not its success.

We are back on an even keel with HMS Beagle, an intensive ballad of power and emotion with more roaring senses licking flames than a bushfire, and straight after through the melodic smooch of Eva The Cat Doesn’t Sleep, a song with a Poets Of the Fall whisper to its melodic and creative beauty. Vocally Liberman shows his full and strong range, occasionally showing an Andy Partridge like lilt, whilst guitars and rhythms combine in a graceful romance of accompanying sound.

The track Oceanic brings City Of Glass to an epic end, its meaty length and imaginative textures a rich croon of soaring vocals and provocative melodies wrapped in thick bass shadows and gripping beats. It has a latent aggression and underlying anger to it too, which only seems to intensify the emotion and sonic tempest smothering ears. It is a fine end to a great album. There are certainly moments which do not work as well as others but ultimately, City Of Glass is a dramatic and enthralling storm of melodic and alternative rock very easy to recommend all at least should check out.

City Of Glass is available now @ http://oceanicband.com/album/city-of-glass-full-album

https://www.facebook.com/OceanicBand

RingMaster 18/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Feud – G.U.S.H

Feud pic

    Feud is a band you can never get tired of, a group of musicians that seem to pull out another gem with every new song and release they treat the ear to. New single G.U.S.H (Growing Up Seems Hard) is no exception and in fact is probably the best thing they have done yet, and with the potency and quality of the past trio of singles that is the mark of its height.

Founded by brothers Guy (drums/vocals) and Greg Combrinck (vocals/guitar), and a full on proposition when the pair moved to the UK from their home land of South African, Feud with Ian Harper (guitars/vocals) and Tom Syrett (bass/vocals) alongside the two has become one of the most vibrant and impressive rock bands in the country. Shows alongside the likes of Cancer Bats, Young Guns, Jettblack, and Days In December has earned their live performances strong acclaim whilst releases such as debut EP Out From The Inside, the album Waterdog, and the Singles EP has enslaved many hearts and their passions through the blend of alternative rock, grunge, and punk flavoured energy. G.U.S.H sets another bar for the High Wycombe based quartet, one that is not that adrift from previous releases in sound or invention but in maturity and craft exploits the promise already showed wonderfully.

Big bulging rhythms rattle the ear first whilst the moody deep throaty bass adds its cantankerous temptation to seal the deal between 128695-thumbhunger and song. As guitars flare up with sonic and melodic imagination, their flames spiralling through the sky of the track before settling into an almost pop punk swagger to court the excellent vocals of Greg, the song like so many of the band’s has a familiarity which comes with no obvious references, Feud accomplished in creating infectious and warmly inviting slices of honest and easily accessible rock ‘n’ roll. As it dances over the ear with its energetic romp thoughts of Bush and especially Everclear do come to mind but still the distinctive tones of the four stands to the fore.

As virulently addictive as watching Kelly Brook in Piranha 3D, go on try and claim you were not transfixed by her and it too I dare you, G.U.S.H is a riot of a single and yet one more reason why Feud should be on every one’s playlist. Accompanied by B-sides demos of Save Me and an acoustic version of I’ll Find You, the single and also all the bands previous releases are now available for FREE from http://www.feudmusic.com/musicdownloads

Why are you still here?

http://www.feudmusic.com

9/10

RingMaster 02/08/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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