House Of Hatchets – Reach

Having heard rather good and promising things about UK outfit House Of Hatchets there was genuine intrigue and a sense of real anticipation facing the band’s debut album, Reach. Across ten slabs of multi-flavoured alternative metal, the encounter swiftly revealed all the answers to any questions posed and yes the Edinburgh quintet pretty much live up to the ‘hype’ and potential offered.

Reach also quickly established that the band’s sound is a kaleidoscope of styles and textures, each track a twist from another revelling in familiar flavours and unique enterprise and all emerging as something as individual to House Of Hatchets as you can imagine or wish. A hindsight listen showed that the seeds and hints were already firmly sowed in the band’s 2017debut EP, The Grind and now in full bloom within Reach. As with that earlier encounter, the band has linked up with Romesh Dodangoda (Bring Me the Horizon, Bullet for my Valentine, Monuments) upon their first album, a release in full rousing voice from its first breath.

Moth Song starts things off, looming in from the distance on a sonic thread with soon reveals its melodic intimation. Finally face to face with the listener wires of guitar entangle with restrained but muscular rhythms, a confrontation which relaxes a touch as the voice of Chris Allison joins in and erupts in full temptation as the track instinctively bounds through ears. Even then it is a mercurial attack, ebbing and flowing in intensity and aggression as its unpredictable nature colludes with enterprise and an impassioned heart.

It is a great start to the release driven by the rhythmic powerhouse of drummer Frazer Parker and bassist Pete Cook; their muscle complemented by craft as echoed within next up Epitaph. Similarly the prowess of Allison’s delivery and tones are a potent essence in the track’s adventurous stroll, the guitars of Jamie Parker and Lewis Wheeler writhing and creating around all with sonic and melodic dexterity. As all tracks; it too is an offering which revels in its mix of metallic and melodic strains which teases of others yet never shares anything less than individuality.

The voracious instincts and contagion of The Sick And The Damned follows with its web of styles and adventure across a melody rich and unapologetically infectious exploration. A relentless temptation within which guitars seduce and sear, rhythms tempt and assault and vocals singularly entice and unitedly arouse before Lilith unveils its own sonic landscape of beauty and tempestuousness. For all their ravenous appetites and imposing trespasses, there is an instinctive poppiness to songs which is no better highlighted than with the creative and fiery cauldron of this excellent proposal.

Uprising leaps upon the listener next, its nu-metal essences colluding with crossover instincts as the song jabs and incites before sharing its full melodic anthemic roar. Hooked on its lures in quick time, the track only escalated its persuasion by the twist and turn, placing a firm hand on best track honours though quickly rivalled by subsequent incitements such as the following Burn. Ferocious in breath and intent as extreme and melodic metal merge, the track provided an invigorating and thrilling incursion to challenge its predecessor.

There is a somewhat calmer nature to Open Ocean, a melodic tide in sound and voice infesting whirling sonic eddies to break up an otherwise fierce maelstrom of emotion and intensity. It is a skilfully woven mix which if not quite matching up to other tracks just captivated before Black And Blue brought its tempest of sound and imagination to accost the senses. Virulent in every trespass shared, it too made a potent play for favourite song with the outstanding Asylum making another compelling declaration soon after with a voracious onslaught of thrash fuelled adventure.

Last One Lost brings things to a close, the song a beguiling melodic metal croon come insurgent storm with richly persuasive power in its voice and heart as the album makes a final turn in its constantly changing sequence of enterprise and adventurous sound.

House Of Hatchets is a band demanding and deserving of closer attention and their first album one which you can only see bringing that greater recognition. For all the great releases heard across a year few truly ignite real excitement levels but Reach is one.

Reach is released June 21st; available @ https://houseofhatchets.bandcamp.com/album/reach

https://www.facebook.com/houseofhatchets/
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Pete RingMaster 21/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chasing Dragons – Faction

There is no doubt there has been plenty of eager anticipation for the debut album from British rockers Chasing Dragons, especially since the release of their last EP, Faction: Prologue, a couple years back. It was a kind of teaser for the band’s first full-length, unsurprisingly called Faction, which built on their earlier offerings and successes whilst peering into a whole new landscape of sound and imagination, indeed intimation now fully explored and expanded within the new encounter where we would suggest, the Chasing Dragons sound has come of age.

The time since the last EP has also seen the Leeds outfit truly establish themselves on the UK live scene with a big reputation to match, Chasing Dragons sharing tours and stages with the likes of Stone Broken, The Qemists, Skid Row, SikTh, InMe, Diamond Head, Aaron Buchanan and The Cult Classics, Courage My Love, Skarlett Riot, Theia and many more. Featuring nine new songs along with re-recorded versions of the three tracks from the Faction: Prologue EP, the album swiftly ignites attention and imagination with opener Factionless. Part intro part full intimation, the track stretches up from its initial arousal on the ever striking tones of vocalist Tank. Like a flame within unsettled atmospherics, her potent presence is a rich lure and spark for the outstanding piece’s subsequent shadow bound predacious stroll. Portentous yet virally inviting, the track masterfully erupts before making way for the melodically inflamed How The World Went Black. Guitarist Adam quickly spins a web of metallic temptation woven with melodic rock enterprise whilst the track bites through the determined beats of Katie, they courted by the dark rumble from Murf’s bass. Progressive hues emerge as the song evolves, technical craft lining its invention as all the while Tank radiates with her powerful and impressive delivery.

Amongst the band’s influences stand artists such as Halestorm, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet For My Valentine, all open spices to the band’s individual recipe as proven again by the melodically vociferous roar that is Parasite and the dramatic exploits of Like Gravity. The latter is a tempest of textures and flavours carrying a volatility which accentuates its warmth and elegance rather than devours them. As many tracks, it is a proposition which grows by the minute through new twists and avenues, all unpredictable and each an imaginative turn along the track’s magnetic journey.

 Through the equally tense Bareknuckle Lover, the mercurial attack of the track as alluring as it is resourceful, and the lively emotive roar of For Kingdom For Glory, Chasing Dragons continue to add fresh adventure to their release. The second of the two in some ways promises more than it delivers, certain inventive moments not exploited as much as personal tastes wished yet is still a gripping snare of sound.

The calmer climate and croon of This Time Is Ours allowed a breath as it simply enthralled though it too has a sprightly nature which eventually catches fire with Adam casting another striking blaze veined with mazy temptation before the riveting Devil In Her Eyes wound eager attention around its tantalisingly creative fingers and in turn The Connection takes ears on a saunter through gothic lined shadows and emotionally suggestive caresses before subsequently erupting into a furnace of muscular sonic theatre. The second of the trio is especially irresistible, every moment a clever thread into the next unexpected and virulent turn of the song though then pretty much matched in glory by its successor.

As the classic seeds of the similarly impressing I’m No Devil (I’m Just A Girl) catch fire within its metal/heavy rock drama and Whitehorse teases and fascinates, the album continues to reveal new aspects in sound and craft; the latter’s haunting opening passage an especially mouth-watering incitement for ears and imagination which hints at new corners and corridors for the band to explore ahead.

We Are The Wall concludes the release, the track a ravenous onslaught of sound and intent driven by rapacious rhythms and coloured by wiry grooves and rich melodies as Tank for a final time powerfully incites thoughts as she potently roars.

It is a fine end to an equally ear-catching album which as suggested declares Chasing Dragons at a new level in songwriting, sound, and performance, a plateau teasy to suspect the metal/rock world will be unable to ignore.

Faction is available now across most online stores.

Chasing Dragons November 2018 Faction Headline Tour

 2nd – Manchester – Satan’s Hollow – support Ward XVI, Soul Desire, Fear Me December

3rd – Croydon – Croydon Rocks Fest

4th – Southampton – Joiners – support Novacrow + TBC

6th – Norwich – Brickmakers  – support The Killing Culture + TBC

7th – Birmingham – Hammer & Anvil – support Novacrow + TBC

8th – Nuneaton – Queens Hall – support Novacrow + Simai + Fleer

9th – Stamford – Mama Liz’s – support Synthetic + Black Hawk Down

10th – Wakefield – Black Mass – support Novacrow + The Sourheads + Seas Of Scarlet

https://www.chasingdragons.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/chasingdragonsuk/   https://twitter.com/xchasingdragons

Pete RingMaster 18/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

I Fight Bears – Self Titled

An encounter which just grows in strength and persuasion with every listen, the self-titled debut album from Welsh metallers I Fight Bears is an ear grabbing statement of potential and success. Brewing a healthy blend of the familiar and fresh, it is a declaration of a band with all the weaponry to make a potent impact on the British metal scene.

Hailing from Bridgend, I Fight Bears draw on the inspirations of bands such as Killswitch Engage, Parkway Drive, and Lamb Of God for their voracious sound. It is not necessarily the most unique proposal you will come up against yet each song within the band’s first album has a freshness and adventure which commands attention. Since emerging around two years ago, the band has stirred ears and praise with their singles and a live presence which has taken them alongside the likes of When We Were Wolves, Skies In Motion, and Perpetua. Predominately self-recorded by the band itself with Micheal Paget (Bullet For My Valentine) involved on some songs for both mastering and mixing, their first album is a big nudge at richer and thicker attention and instantly makes a potent impact.

It opens with the mighty Hammers, melodic enticement and hungry rhythms instantly to the fore before it all unites for a rapacious and inviting enticement. A great blend of throat scraping and clean vocals grab their own healthy portion of attention soon after, the excellent mix matched by the predacious craft of the rhythms and creative weave of the guitars. Infectious and intimidating, it is a great start to the release; as suggested familiar and new imagination entangling in magnetic success.

Upcoming single, Envision, follows sharing melodic vines which maybe are not the most original but make a tasty appetiser for the blossoming enterprise of the song to flourish upon, again vocals captivating at the heart of the creative web. As the guitars weave, rhythms pounce with an anthemic touch, fiery grooves and spicy hooks latching onto their intrusive swing. With a touch of Avenged Sevenfold to it, the song hits the spot before making way for the band’s current single, Lost The Fight. The track’s roar is unleashed on a snare of grooves and sonic temptation, their enticing bait laid on the more volatile but no less gripping lure of the rhythms. I Fight Bears have a multi-flavoured surge of sound at the heart of all songs and maybe none as compelling as that fuelling this very easy to devour proposal, especially as it grows more predatory by the minute.

Design And Purpose carries that intrusive intent into its following proposition, beats and bass a grumbling trespass soon bound in melodic strands with their own imposing touch. Vocals blast the mix with a raw emotive breath, the song a predacious assault before opening up its melodic dexterity as clean vocals again provide a superb contrast matched by the endeavour of the guitars. As imposing and catchy as its predecessors, the track is a just as inviting lead into the band and its sound, quickly matched in that quality by Life Of One. Another smart weave of styles and sound bound in an adventurous intent, the song a swift and increasing captivation epitomising the band’s craft in songwriting, performance, and imagination.

It is fair to say that next up Disposed did not grab our ears as dramatically as those before it, surprises less open yet it is a richly satisfying and intriguing encounter with vocals once more especially magnetic before Trust thrusts its rousing prowess through ears. Rhythms harry and punish the senses as raw vocals graze their surface, an appetite stirring mix only enhanced by the melodic and harmonic tenacity of guitars and the cleaner side of the two pronged vocal persuasion. Barbarous yet seductive, the song is superb and only escalates in captivation with every subsequent twist.

From the cantankerously wired Exhale, an incendiary slice of metal with a hardcore lining that is as irritable as it is infectious, and the senses crushing tempest of Smoking Gun, the album hits another high spot to rival its early plateau. Both songs are a cauldron of what the band does best and right to the fore of our favourite moments, their might leaving System a task to bring things to a just as potent close which it does with its own corrosive furnace of enterprise and power. The trio alone leave ears and pleasure full with a hunger for more in close attention.

With the realisation of their inescapable potential and a real vein of individuality, I Fight Bears could become a real presence within the broadest metal scene. Their thickly enjoyable first album already declares the band one exciting prospect on that British landscape.

The I Fight Bears album is out now.

http://www.facebook.com/ifightbearsband   http://www.twitter.com/ifightbearsband   http://www.instagram.com/ifightbears

Pete RingMaster 20/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Counterpoint – If Not Now, Why?

Almost demanding attention, UK rockers Counterpoint provide a thumping introduction to themselves with their debut EP. If Not Now, Why? offers five slices of rousing thickly flavoured alternative rock, tracks which has the body bouncing as eagerly as it has the appetite keen to savour plenty more from the Liverpool formed, Manchester based quartet.

Spawned from the ashes of their previous band, Operation: AEON, Counterpoint was formed by vocalist Dominic Lucock and guitarist Martin “Ted” O’Neil in 2015. Numerous ears were enticed by an early demo track in Borrow Your Past, Steal Your Future, including producer Jim Pinder (Bullet For My Valentine) who offered an interest in working with the band on their first release. Cementing a praise earning live presence since then, with a recent show with Crazy Town only pushing their increasing reputation, Counterpoint subsequently joined Pinder and Dan Jeffries in Treehouse Studios with If Not Now, Why? the potent outcome.

It opens up with Leave It All Behind, an immediate tease of sound and anthemic intent which looms up and envelops the senses. Swiftly it finds its muscular stroll, the swinging beats of Ed Sutton inciting alongside the throbbing canter of Mikey Gaffney’s bass and O’Neil’s lively riffs and grooves. At the same time Lucock blends raw and melodic enterprise in his vocal enticement, it all coming together for an inescapably catchy yet energetically imposing proposition.

The great start continues through Honestly, it too gathering its attributes in its initial breath before gripping ears with its subsequent enterprise. Ebbing and flowing in its aggression, perpetually captivating in its resourceful dynamics and imagination, the song creates a tapestry of melodic intrigue, emotive suggestion, and tempestuous energy which just beguiles the imagination. References to the likes of letlive, Papa Roach, Deftones, and While She Sleeps have been offered before the Counterpoint sound and easy to understand why with the EP’s opening pair of encounters.

The following Between You And Me has a great irritability to its heart and raw air which does not defuse its infectious virulence and harmonic prowess; a trait and creative agility which reminds of Reuben in some ways. Every handful of seconds brings a fresh twist and a hungry surge of persuasion, each combining with the other to match the heights of its predecessor’s triumphs, in certain moments eclipsing them before next up DownDownDown boldly swaggers in. It too reveals a skilfully woven mix of rapacious aggression and melodic seduction in its boisterous stomp in creating its own inescapably catchy and stirring incitement.

The EP closes up with One Sided Conversations, a calmer melody tempting serenade with power in its voice and intensity in its heart which inflames the song’s increasing urgency and zeal. It is a fever which soon has the track storming the senses but with the ability to slip into mellower breaths for sublimely captivating moments.

It is a fine end to a striking first listen to Counterpoint, If Not Now, When? a release suggesting a band with all the traits to make a rich impact on the UK rock scene if they realise and develop its bold potential and easy to greedily enjoy sound.

If Not Now, When? is released February 9th

https://www.facebook.com/UKCounterpoint/

Pete RingMaster 09/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Never Found – The Human Condition

Having laid down ear pleasing foundations with their debut EP, British outfit Never Found build bigger lines of attention with its successor The Human Condition. The release sees the Oxford / Bridgend hailing band take their punk infused, metal seeded sound to new throes of adventure and enterprise. It is not a proposition which exceptionally startles but certainly excites whilst whetting imagination and appetite for the future of Never Found with its rousing songs and raw energy.

With their first EP, Sorrow & Cyanide, coming in 2015 not long after the emergence of the band at the tail of the previous year, Never Found has continued to build a potent and loyal fan base and an increasingly strong reputation for a live presence which has seen them support Aiden on tour and share stages with the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers, William Control, and Annisokay among many to date.

The Human Condition is the next step in the band’s ascent through the UK rock scene, a push which quickly gets down to business as the instrumental of its title track sets an atmospheric and imposing scene. Its dangers and vocal statement pulls the listener into the waiting jaws of new single Come To Me. Comparisons to bands such as A Day To Remember, Funeral For A Friend, and Bullet For My Valentine have been placed upon Never Found but the track openly has a potent Reuben feel to it; an irritability which colludes perfectly with the melodic trails of the guitars and the harmonic lure of Daniel Barnes’ vocals. With the stabbing beats of Kieran Ivey in league with the brooding tones of James Sweeten’s bass, the song is a lure and trespass of the senses in equal measure.

The lead guitar of Samuel Redmayne continues to weave a flavoursome web in next up Favourite Mistake, the riffs of Barnes strolling invasively alongside his own vocals with raw throated and melodically nurtured tones as similarly united as the guitars. The track has the infectious instincts of its predecessor and the aggression but misses out on its richer adventure. Pleasure is still a given though and its cinematic heart provocative before The Monster Remains steps in to part steal the show. The band’s metal inspirations instantly fuel riffs and a predacious air, keen bait which only expands and blossoms as the contagious exploits of the band bound in with punk spirit and imagination. It is a great blend with Barnes heading great vocal variety within the virulent roar.

Anyone But Me brings its own catchy and tenacious strain of metal bred rock ‘n’ roll with tempting hooks amidst emotional and vocal discord. There is something openly familiar to the track but plenty to reinforce the growing individuality of the band’s sound though it is quickly eclipsed by the mighty throes of My Grave. It is the other half of the two prong pinnacle of the EP, an aggravated and mercurial trespass which manages to flirt with the passions whilst chewing on the senses with its punk metal nurtured tempest. For its dark side and temperament, the song is as irresistibly infectious as anything on the release and another easy excuse to keep Never Found under close attention ahead.

The EP closes with the equally boisterous Misanthropy (A General Hate), a track with its own crabby tone though tempered by the song’s melodic dexterity. It is a fine end to an encounter which just blossoms with every listen while suggesting that Never Found is a proposition riddled with more than just potential.

The Human Condition is out now and available @ http://www.neverfound.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/weareneverfound    https://twitter.com/weareneverfound    https://www.instagram.com/weareneverfound/

Pete RingMaster 09/10/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Brightlight City – Our Future’s Not Dead

Having impressed with debut EP, Adventures in 2015, British rockers Brightlight City now reveal the blossoming invention and increasing maturity in their sound with successor Our Future’s Not Dead. Hinted at by a pair of singles last year, the new release is evidence of a band building on an impressive start and potential with stylish adventure whilst nurturing a whole new promise for continued growth.

Surrey bred, Brightlight City weave in inspirations from the likes of Hundred Reasons, Million Dead, Yourcodenameis:milo, At the Drive-In, Biffy Clyro, and Jimmy Eat World into their sound; indeed sparking comparisons to the former and others such as Thursday and Hell Is For Heroes with their melody rich and harmonically honed songs. Equally there is a fresh and potent catchiness and steel to Our Future’s Not Dead which as suggested was first glimpsed within last year’s singles Gravity and Thieves. It is a growth in sound which has come with an increasing reputation and praise for their live shows through the quintet sharing stages with Max Raptor, Fizzy Blood, Bad Sign, and Blood Youth and playing alongside Rise Against and Millencolin at Envol et Macadam Festival in Canada in 2015as well as their own shows.

Recorded with Matt Hyde (Funeral For A Friend, Bullet For My Valentine, Slipknot), Our Future’s Not Dead is likely to spark another bout of attention and hunger for Brightlight City, setting out its persuasive strength with opener It Depends On You. Skittish beats alongside vocal and guitar offered temptation bring the song into focus; their low key yet agitated attitude soon a full roar as vocalist Jamie Giarraputo heads a web of melodic enterprise from guitarists Jonathan Staunton and Justin Giarraputo, the latter adding his own potent vocal expression to the mix. Anthemic in heart, imposing in rhythm as the hefty jabs of drummer Ben Bell court the brooding lines of bassist Tom Stock, the track roars with energy and passion.

With a mellower air Leave A Light On follows, wiry melodies swimming round a throaty bassline as emotive vocals entice with distinctive expression. Once again there is an instinctive catchiness at work, never wavering as fiery textures evolve and unite in a livelier blaze of sound and emotion. In some ways it is a less intricate proposition than its predecessor but only to its strength as each element is a flame of craft and drama before making way for Heart Stops. The third track comes coated in the infectiousness of the opener, its swinging body almost pop punk like and relentlessly coaxing listener involvement with its vocal harmonies and controlled but boisterous swing; a tenacious essence just as open in the calmer moments of a song taking best track honours.

The EP is brought to an end by Past/Future, a track epitomising the evolution in the Brightlight City sound with its rounded fusion of melody and energy amidst a new depth of contagiousness and invention. As all the songs within Our Future’s Not Dead it is a memorable and lingering encounter going to make a thoroughly enjoyable and impressing release. The Brightlight City sound has yet to become something truly unique but as the EP shows, it is well on the way and providing some rather tasty encounters along the way.

Our Future’s Not Dead is out now through Undead Collective Records.

https://www.brightlightcityofficial.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/brightlightcityofficial   https://twitter.com/blcband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Seeds in a wasteland: engaging with Remnants of Hope

remnants-of-hope_RingMasterReview

Forging a potent reputation with a sound going against the general trend of their local music scene, Remnants of Hope is an Atlanta bred band on the rise. Their Industrial/punk rock sound has seen the band have their most potent year yet since forming in 2014, the sharing of stages with the likes of Eyes Set To Kill, Famous Last Words, Wednesday 13, Allegaeon, Byzantine, and Not Tonight Josephine among numerous all adding to the reputation of Remnants of Hope. With thanks to vocalist Alexander Death, and guitarists Nykii Nightmare and Paul Graveyard, we grabbed the opportunity to find out more about this growing force…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Hello and thank you for having us!

Can you tell us about the band and how it all started?

We’re a band called Remnants of Hope from Atlanta, Georgia. We started out covering songs from bands we liked then making our own music videos and putting them up on YouTube. After we became more passionate we started writing our own material, not long after that we came up with the name “Remnants of Hope” and started performing.

Is Remnants of Hope your first foray into music or have you been involved in previous outfits?

Group: We’ve not been in any bands before this one.

What inspired the band name?

Group: We’re an industrial band and most of our songs take place in a post-apocalyptic setting. We wanted a name that would describe fighters for the greater good in that setting.

roh_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Group: We wanted to be an industrial rock/metal band. We wanted to have flaming guitar solos as well as screaming and singing. We wanted to put on a very theatrical live show, when we’re afforded the time to set-up and we’re allowed to bring extra stage items we take fog and lights with us, as well as stage props.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Group: Our passion for music. That will never change.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Group: Heavier with much more complexity.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or do you deliberately push yourselves into trying new things?

Group: Both, as artists we want to progress and do new things, that plus the natural maturity of our song writing progressing makes our sound change.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Zander: Danny Worsnop. His vocal style on Death to Destiny was very intriguing and encouraged me to change up my own style.

Nykii: Bullet for my Valentine. The way their songs are composed is inspiring to me in creating my own compositions.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?roh3_RingMasterReview

Nykii: I compose all the music then Zander and I get together for the lyrical content of the songs. After that we go down the list of what vocal style the song needs to sound the best. Once the vocal style has been selected me and Paul write the guitar solos. That’s the process and steps we usually go through each time we write a song.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Group: Real life experiences, video games we’re playing…Possibly horror movies for some songs (Afterbite).

Please give us some background to your latest release and some insight to the themes and premise behind it.

Group: Mirroring My Pain. We put it out last April. The EP is about dealing with and defeating your demons.

Mirroring my Pain [the intro] is the start of the story line, the realization that the character of the story can change certain aspects of his life. See Me Fall is about the character confronting his demons, saying how they only want to see him bleed. Every time he looks into the mirror his demon self is threatening to slit his wrists. At the end he confronts and defeats his inner demons. Digging Graves is the part of the story where he buries the worse half of himself, once and for all letting go of his pain. The character has inner turmoil as he fights against his darker emotions to move on. Worth Fighting For is the final song on the EP. The character has taken care of all of his inner demons, but his emotions that lash out are still plaguing him. He fights and kills “Anger” and “Pain” in a symbolic measure that he now has them both under control.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Group:  Yes, we do a lot of pre-production to make sure we get things right once we start recording them.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?roh2

Group: Whether we play for fifteen minutes or forty minutes, we give it our all the whole time. To us it’s what we live, breathe and train for. The live show is everything to us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Group:  Sometimes, we’ve been really really lucky this year with opportunities to open for bigger bands. Last year we were not nearly as fortunate, so we were basically just trying to push out as much online promotion and campaigns as possible.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

Nykii: Where we’re from bands are either death-core or pop-punk. This has put us in both a fantastic and a terrible place at the same time. Thanks to social media other band members from different bands can quickly go to one of our sites and comment on the fact in a negative manner that we’re not exactly the same as them, making the exact same music as them. On the other hand, we’re different and we fit better on some shows than others would. I think social media for the most part is already becoming a negative thing at our current place. Keeping it working to your advantage is just a massive game of X’s and O’s. Every time you get three in a row the game appears to restart and you need to find a new corner to try and occupy with your work.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Group: Once again, thank you for having us. Our music video for A Warriors Heart is out now! (or will be by the time this interview is posted). You can watch it here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94ZNBLFhA8c

https://www.facebook.com/RemnantsOfHopeBand/   https://twitter.com/RemofHope

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 26/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright