The Dirty Youth – Gold Dust

The Dirty Youth Promo

After the success of their highly acclaimed debut album Red Light Fix, The Dirty Youth have returned with a rousing stomp of a follow-up, a sophomore album to firmly establish the South Wales band as one of the dynamically refreshing and emotionally rousing bands on the British music scene. Gold Dust manages to be infectiously familiar and dramatically new simultaneously, with emphasis on the latter. It also offers a collection of angst and passion fuelled roars which impact and linger far beyond the length of the release itself. Its sound is a fiery blend of alternative/rock pop which plays like a mix of Paramore meets Fall Out Boy with healthy whispers of The Bambi Killers and My Chemical Romance. It is feisty, contagious, and sure to give the summer some irresistible anthems.

Formed in 2007, The Dirty Youth has seen an increasing arousal of support and praise since the release of their debut single Fight three years later. Already the band was earning strong and eager responses through their live presence, but the song which became an internet hit gaining over 3 million views on YouTube, was the catalyst to broader recognition. Debut album Red Light Fix which followed soon after, exploited and drove the awakening attention on in fine and persuasive style, earning potent acclaim across media and fans alike. Since then the band has toured with the likes of Korn, The Rasmus, Reckless Love, Heavens Basement, and this year Fozzy and InMe, as well as making successful appearances at the likes of Hyde Park alongside Bruce Springsteen, Getaway Rocks with Slash, and Motörhead, and Download last year.

The Dirty Youth - Gold Dust Cover Artwork   Now the band uncages their second album and Gold Dust takes little time to stir up attention and appetite with its presence. Opener I’m Not Listening To You is an instantly eager protagonist just as quickly capturing the imagination with a stabbing tirade of beats from drummer Freddie Green matched by raw strikes of guitar wrapped in expressive melodies courtesy of Matt Bond’s keys. Hitting a magnetic stride straight after, the song becomes an enticing web of riffs and melodies spread by the guitars of Luke Padfield and Bond and courted by the great throaty bass lures provided by Leon Watkins and the equally dramatic swings of Green. Within its first minute the song shows that predictability has no place in the music of The Dirty Youth, every moment adding new twists ensuring the verse chorus verse etc. passage is never the same second time around. Vocally Danni Monroe, also showing great diversity in her delivery, is a rich flame to the song, a focal point around which surrounding sounds lick to earn their rightful share of praise.

Alive comes next and similarly has ears and imagination enthralled with its vocally charged and impassioned croon. Encased in a cage of rhythmic agitation and a sweltering key bred atmosphere, the song has a more restrained embrace to its energy compared to the all-out stomp of the first, yet is just as creatively and emotionally tempestuous as keys, guitars and voice entangle to create a dramatic character.

Its successor Just Move On, explodes on a rolling temptation of again galvanic rhythms, expanding its bright and alluring adventure with a host of inescapable hooks and a melodic breeze of invigorating enterprise. Like the songs before it is a busy encounter in its own distinct way ensuring, as the album, every listen has a fresh feel to ears as more is discovered with the song’s depths.

The great electro fuzz opening to The One sets up the infectiousness of its revelry up perfectly, the song going on to dance with inescapable virulence across its lusty body as vocals and keys spin an insatiable weave of imagination backed by striking rhythmic and guitar endeavour. The track manages at times to be as predatory as it is vivaciously catchy, The Dirty Youth again showing from songwriting to presentation, no assumptions can be made as the track stalks ears with its attitude shaped invention.

Darkest Wedding opens with a darker almost gothic air to its presence, a theatrical essence reminding of MCR colliding enjoyably with the melodic and harmonic fire of the song, which in turn has a feel of Forever Still to it. Fair to say the track does not impact as potently as its predecessors on its first few showings but instead smoulders and almost burns away at thoughts to emerge as a rich tempting over time.

Both Invincible and Bury Me Next To Elvis have body and emotions fully involved, the first again maybe needing a few more listens to complete its persuasion compared to earlier songs, but with a rip-roaring essence to its rich melodic breezes and a potent drama to the keys matched by the ever tempting vocals of Monroe, the song only wins the day. The second of the two shows its thick seductive hand early before bursting into an exhilarating tango of thumping beats, seductive grooves, and enflamed melodies matched by the siren tones Monroe. The song is glorious, sheer intoxication.

The poppier enticing of Don’t Feel Right is just as endowed with rhythmic muscle and sparkling invention as anything on the album whilst the evocative roar of Who I Am provides a conflagrant wind of emotion and creative drama. Both only impress, but get outshone by the immersive depths and kicky exploits of Bedroom Karate, the song a huge bracing bluster with an intricate invention at its heart.

The closing reflective hug of Holding On has the album leaving on another energetically imposing and captivating high, its rugged balladry a final voracious kiss on ears and pleasure. As that song, Gold Dust is an illustrious and majestic offering as at ease getting its rock hands dirty as it is in powerfully seducing the listener. Certainly some tracks out-perform others but from start to finish album and The Dirty Youth leave a smile on lips and a spring in the step.

Gold Dust is available from May 11th @ and most online stores.

RingMaster 11/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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David Bronson – Questions


Emotionally intimate and exploratory, with a just as expressive melodic climate, the new album from New York City singer songwriter/producer David Bronson is a warm and resourceful landscape of thought and sparkling enterprise. Consisting of songs which as its title, seems to stem from Questions Bronson has asked of himself and his life, the album is a striking and immersive caress on ears and imagination. It is not an encounter which always consistently lights personal appetites to the same strength as its finest moments, but one emerging as a lingering and thoroughly enjoyable proposition easy to recommend to those with a want of soulful and melody drenched creativity.

The successor to his acclaimed 2013 debut album The Long Lost Story, ‘a decade-in-the-making, 22-song autobiographical double album’ split into two separate releases, Questions sees Bronson looking at his life and the world right now, and drawing on the likes of vocalist Robin Clark (Aretha Franklin, Bob Dylan, Michael Jackson, Al Green, Bruce Springsteen, Beyonce, David Bowie), guitarist Carlos Alomar (David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Paul McCartney, John Lennon), guitarist Robbie “Seahag” Mangano, drummer Lautaro Burgos, and Gordon Grody to inventively colour these investigations. Whereas the first release expressed a more indie rock seeded sound around his seventies inspired songwriting, the new album embraces new adventurous flavours such as soul, folk, and gospel in its new proposals, a spicing helping the Godfrey Diamond (Lou Reed)/Bronson produced Questions become a captivating and intriguingly varied encounter.

From the opening Songbird, Bronson and album has ears and attention awake, its acoustic caress of guitar the canvas for some delicious harmonies and the lyrical prowess and insight of Bronson. Immediately there is a Paul Simon like air to the heart of the song but also plenty to make it radiate a fresh and original presence. Vibrant beats only add catchy texture to the gentle swing of the song but it is the gospel bred harmonies which steal the impressive show.

Both Move Like Water and Day By Day glide through personal balladry with Bronson and guitar again offering a sure and warm entrance to which melodies and sultry climates, not david bronson questions cover lgeforgetting a great throaty bassline in the first of the two, immerse senses and thoughts evocatively. Each pleases with their individual charms but it is with Push that another surge of greed hits ears and personal appetite. The fourth track is an instant drama with keys straight away looming and laying down a single prod before taking a pause, returning a few seconds later with the same Boomtown Rats like potency as they align to the alluring strum of the guitar. It is a mesmeric track, voice and music sketching an easily accessible and emotively connecting narrative in a dance of creative and vivacious enterprise.

The following Task is another stirring and inescapable invitation for feet and emotions to fully engage in, its sway of funk fuelled revelry a swift and fascinating infectiousness with melodic resourcefulness to match. It and its predecessor provide the pinnacle of the album, the thrilling peak to which other songs aspire but with varying success cannot quite emulate. Despite that the likes of the Lennon-esque All These Things and the smouldering dark folk theatre of Life Is long provide thoroughly enjoyable and lingering temptations whilst the melodic rock fuelled My Good Friend with its compelling seventies psyche rock keys, add another strain of bright adventure and full pleasure to album and emotions respectively.

The closing pair of Connect The Dots and Passing Fiction slip into more reserved hugs of melodic and harmonic endeavour which, without finding the same persuasive spark as their immediate predecessors, ignite ears and thoughts with consummate ease. The guitar adventure of the pair is an especially thrilling and magnetic coaxing, the twinges of discord which bless the imagination of strings and fingers as enthralling as anything on the album.

Questions is a definite investigation for certainly fans of the likes of Paul Simon and John Lennon but equally those of current talent like Seth Lakeman and Thom Bowden. The album did not quite ignite enough fire in emotions across its length but really only due to personal tastes and with some quite thrilling tracks and invention involved it is easy to assume it will spark a blaze in a great many.

Questions is available from 19th January via Big Arc

RingMaster 19/01/2015

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The Floodgates – You


The Floodgates is a young acoustic rock band which, if debut single You is any indication, is looking at a rather healthy and rewarding future. The song is a transfixing and intensely pleasing proposition which dances and emotionally engages with ears and imagination with impressive ease and creative charm. There is a bit of a buzz brewing up around the band and it is easy to see why through this introduction.

Hailing from Tunbridge Wells, The Floodgates consists of vocalist/guitarist Martin Stenning, guitarist/bassist Tim Fullbrook, and keyboardist Alex Wane, a trio bringing inspirations from the likes of Mumford & Sons, Bruce Springsteen, Jeff Buckley, and Tom Odell into their own ideation and invention. Since emerging not so long ago, the band has already notched up an array of successful shows, played the ColdHarbour Festival 2013, and been invited to play at the open a0944602616_2day of Heavyweight boxing champion David Haye’s gym after being spotted whilst busking. You is their big prompt for national attention and it is hard to imagine it not lighting up a keen and hungry spotlight on the band.

Emerging from warm yet haunting keys, guitars and beats are soon strolling with a smiling gait and melodic temptation whilst Stenning lays down an equally impressive caress of vocals. The song is instantly catchy and inviting, every aspect a gentle yet potently bulky enticement in individual and united engaging charm. The quaint vintage tone of the keys midway especially adds a drama and tone to the already vibrant and resourceful folk seeded scenery evocatively colouring ears and thoughts, but it is the enterprising elegance and virulent passion of the song which makes the richest connection and leaves a lingering persuasion behind.

You is an impressive entrance and though only one track to cross our gaze so far from the band, it is hard to resist suggesting that The Floodgates has the potential to make big and eventful moments ahead to excite us all.

You is available now @

RingMaster 14/10/2014

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Gifted Kings – Lose What Makes You

gifted kings pic

    It is hard to say that Lose What Makes You, the debut album from Scottish rockers Gifted Kings, ignited a fire in the passions for their accomplished and soulful sound, but certainly the 2012 formed band sparked an appetite and satisfaction with their enjoyable release which many emerging bands can only dream of. Consisting of eleven impressively crafted and expressive songs, the release makes a potent and promising introduction to a band we are sure to hear and enjoy a lot more of in the future.

    Hailing from Glasgow and consisting of two sets of brothers, Derek (guitar/vocals) and Andy Murray (lead guitar) alongside Gary (drums) and Paul Smith (bass), Gifted Kings build on the undeniable potential and presence of first single Dead End Road, which has just received its video release also, in fine attention grabbing style with the album. It is not unfair to say that the band’s sound has a rich familiarity to its presence right now, not of any specific band but in general which defuses some of its ability to surprise and stoke those emotional flames, but there is little else to raise a quizzical and disapproving eyebrow over. Recorded with producer Nick Brine (Oasis, The Darkness, Bruce Springsteen) at the same studio which housed the making of Oasis’ What’s the Story Morning Glory and Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody, and mastered by Pete Maher (U2, Depeche Mode), the album proves its case with a stirring presence and potency which easily awakes positive reactions and attention to match that already brewing as far afield as Russia, Ukraine, Thailand, and India over the band. With their music already gracing several shows on Channel 4, S4C, ITV1, and Sky Sport as well as being adopted for advertising campaigns by Ripcurl and O’Neill Sports targeting the USA, Australia, and Asia, the quartet are on a rapid visible ascent which What Makes You Lose has all the qualities to accelerate.

     The album makes an instantly engaging and gripping start with Rains Will Come, its opening a sonic intrigue of guitar which expands with a rhythmic jabbing and fiery melodic glaze as company. It is not a startling entrance but one which secures full focus especially as the expressive vocals of Derek Murray joins the already pulsating lure of the song. Thoughts of Bristol band Mind Museum offer a suggestion whilst essences of Placebo also hint throughout the increasing emotive brewing of the track; all to a positive effect. The only strange thing about the song is that it never explodes, just simmers as if an intro to the album rather than a stand-alone proposition. Nevertheless it is a great start matched right away by The Last Time. A heavy throaty bass sound and imposing rhythms make the initial temptation as the guitar’s thoughts crowd around in a sonic breeze before making inviting weaves of melodic endeavour around the incoming vocals. Again there is something recognisable about the encounter, though it just makes it an easier ride to immerse within, which with its especially persuasive rhythmic enticement just infects.

     Both No One Knows and Drive keep the album bubbling in thoughts and emotions if missing the heights of the previous pair. The first is embraced by powerful emotive melodies and crescendo like rises in energy and passion as melodic veining arguably inspired by the previously mentioned Mancunians works away, whilst the second strolls with a reserved and enticing alternative rock weight and texture to draw in the imagination. Neither sets sparks to tease the passions into major action but definitely each provides a healthy offering for the appetite to chew over and enjoy, as equally does Dead End Road with its alluring and richly expressive narrative and sound. Though definitely not the best song on the album it is still easy to see why it has drawn such eager responses the band’s way since being released as the first single from the album.

     The following pair of Tell Me Something and Fortune In The City return the release to the commanding and contagious levels it started on, controlling rhythms and rich melodic fire rigorously and anthemically tempting the senses within the first whilst its successor explores another evocative climate with an inventively gripping groove and an infection clad chorus within an unpredictable exploratory landscape. Both tracks alone reveal the depth and potential of the band in sound and songwriting, reach easily lighting keen anticipation for future endeavours.

   From the pleasing and very decent creative exploits of Last Trace Of The Sun and the sonically colourful, not forgetting contagious Wait, the album’s best moment is brought with Neon, a song built on addictive nagging riffs and crisp rhythms which persist until full submission is given for their vivacious bait. Once more the band casts a virulent infection over the ears and imagination which is impossible not to find a lingering hunger for, it’s dramatic touches and blues kissed strikes quite irresistible. Alongside the closing and strong if underwhelming in comparison Written On The Wall, the pair bring Lose What Makes You to a thoroughly entertaining conclusion.

     Gifted Kings has laid the strongest base with their debut, the first of many potent and impressing encounters ahead you suspect.


RingMaster 23/02/2014

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Darktown Jubilee: The World, The Flesh & The Devil

©trevorpalin 2012

©trevorpalin 2012

    The World, The Flesh & The Devil is one of those releases which refuse to die down after completing its musical persuasion before the ear. Though the debut album from UK indie band Darktown Jubilee does not particularly offer anything strikingly new or adventurous, its songs have the intriguing habit of popping up again in thoughts and memory long after departing the speakers. Whether a melody, hook, or particular rhythmic encounter from the album they sneak up on you and strongly invite a return to what is a rather decent release.

The Manchester based band consisting of David Boardman (songwriting, vocals, guitar), Stuart Day (bass), John Cosgrove (drums), Al Roberts (lead guitar), and Gary O’Brien (keyboards) formed in 2010 and have been on a sure ascent ever since. Their sound finds inspiration in the likes of Bruce Springsteen, The Doors, The Killers, and The Temper Trap, a wide flavouring which certainly spices up the robust and anthemic album. Produced by Boardman and long- time collaborator John Kettle, The World, The Flesh & The Devil involves the listener from first note to last with rampant rhythms and colossal hooks a continuing temptation alongside the flames of strong melodies. Released on their own Parade Recordings, the album as mentioned does not stride into uncharted territories at any point but certainly creates waves which offer the longer term seduction. It is also a release which takes time to makes its full persuasion, maybe only a few tracks immediately having an instant irresistible temptation, but it smoulders with each return to its presence convincing a little more.

The two singles from the album open up the release starting with the energetic Breakdown. The song is a feisty storm of guitar avatars-000006888741-tsflnt-t200x200driven sound with a thumping heart and expressive breath vocally and musically. Guitars and bass stroke the ear initially whilst beats tumble across their gait, the rhythms increasing in force and frequency as Boardman begins the songs narrative with his impressive tones and delivery. There is an unmistakable Foo Fighters infectiousness and rampancy to the song coring the melodic teasing of keys and guitars and by its end the fiery encounter leaves one breathless and deeply satisfied.

The terrific start is matched by second single Stay, a less demanding but equally potent tempest of infectiousness. With a pulsating and mesmeric pulse from bass and synths, the track is a magnet to the senses and once in control sends layers of sultry keys, persuasive vocals, and stirring guitar strokes across the ear for the fullest creative suasion. Like the opener the anthemic depth of the song is towering but tempered by the emotive and shadowed lyrical presence. Both of the two songs find Darktown Jubilee at their best which could have left the album top heavy but the following tracks with varying success ensure the release is rounded and relatively consistent.

The likes of acoustic ballad The Great Escape and the big boned power ballad All I Want bring immediate diversity to the album after the adrenaline coursed start and though admittedly neither comes near to grasping the same impact as the first pair they are well crafted songs easily worthy of attention. Give Me a Sign, though a song which gains better appreciation with more companionship, slips below the already pleasing standard, though again here or at any point on the album you cannot criticise the songwriting or musicianship bringing the songs to life. It just does not ignite much more than appreciation due to its familiarity to plenty of other songs before and undoubtedly coming after it, something which cannot be said of Stop! Look Around. Starting on a sparkling cascade of sonic sprinkles the track bursts into a tall rampant gait with the occasional reserved restraint to create impressive crescendos of energy and sound. It is another catchy anthem puller which puts the album back on course.

The thrilling When You’re Wrong which starts as seemingly another emotive ballad before brewing and unleashing addiction fuelling rhythms and bighearted melodies without losing that initial intimate feeling and the intriguing Beautiful Night both continue the again enthralling lure of the album. The latter of the two is a weave of atmospheric grace and definite familiarity though without allowing a defined reason as to why emerge in thoughts, and a further refreshing variety to the album.

The remainder of the album settles into a strong if unremarkable stance though again songs like the Costelloesque Lost and  Something’s Gotta Give with depth and style ensure further strong pleasure.  The World, The Flesh & The Devil is an album which could be said does not ignite a fire in the belly or explode with dramatic moments but boy does it linger and return with ease whenever it wishes. If you are looking for accomplished and powerful big hearted tunes than Darktown Jubilee certainly fits the bill.

Given time…8/10

RingMaster 23/02/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Rayne: The New Enlightenment

Sixteen years is a fair time to wait for a debut album from a band to say the least but when it sounds as good as The New Enlightenment from British alternative rockers Rayne, the wait for fans will have been more than worth it. It is a release which just pulsates with quality and craft, making one wonder how it has taken so long for us, like so many others, to have come across the great sounds of the band. The album has been out a few months as you read this but is worthy of a look for all those yet to discover the melodic and imaginative presence of the Sunderland trio.

Since forming all those years ago whilst at school, vocalist and bassist Ben Potts, guitarist and keyboardist Adam Dagg, and drummer Steven Naisbet, have certainly made their mark on the UK underground scene. Four times they have been Battle of the Bands winners at a national level, come runner up at the 02 Live & Unsigned final out of 10,000 bands, and been awarded an ‘outstanding contribution to music’ award from a national music organisation after a public vote. Rayne has also raised approaching £20,000 for numerous charities across the years and with their impressive album and the luck all bands need, one feels a wider recognition is coming soon for the band.

The band is constantly compared to the likes of Muse, U2, and Coldplay, and it is hard to disagreed, but they offer other essences which point at the likes of Mind Museum, Doves, and Incubus, though they are all breezes in the original melodic wind of Rayne. The songs are nicely varied but come with an epic air, whether brooding or ignited for a full expansive breath, which wraps warmly around the ear and offers an infectious involvement for the senses.

The expressive grace of the title track opens up the album, its building energy and lively contact a notable introduction and entrance into the album. The following Raise The Alarm then steps forward with fiery riffs and firm rhythms to grab attention before resting slightly for the golden weaves of the keys which drove the first track to return and glow within the skies of the song alongside the strong impressive vocals of Potts. It is a potent brew of rich melodies and emotive heart vocally and musically which captures the imagination.

The excellent mix of sinewy riffs and teasing harmonies of The Ground Floor raises levels next, its inventive blend of incendiary guitars and smouldering harmonies against effected vocals and stirring rhythms an impacting brisk encounter to lick the lips over. It has a rawer more intense presence which marks the beginning of an unveiling of diversity to band and songwriting, soon emphasized by the emotive My Final Plea with its impassioned expression and tender keys. The song holds its shadows close whilst lighting its path with slivers of melodic caresses and heated charm, evolving into a blaze of fervid guitar play at its climax.

Consisting of fifteen inventive and superbly crafted songs the album is a constant pleasure with its greatest heights coming in the irresistible Twisted Flame, the heaviest song on the release with its forceful riffs and prowling energy even in the mellower melodic moments, the equally compelling track The Impossible Story, and My Desperation. The second of the three has a classic rock gait to its excellent body of inventive sounds whilst the last is another passional feast of heart and what feels like personal relevance to the band such the potent delivery and expression.

The classic rock seeded sounds return in Hero Soldier and the closing Springsteen like Against The Natural Order for satisfying and enjoyable results though neither song manages to match some of the other tracks mentioned but again they show the accomplished variety of the album. They are certainly despite their strengths found wanting up against the best track on the album, Compel To Be Pure.  Starting with sound bites discussing mental illness over an impacting emotional piano, the track erupts into a punchy slice of rock with fervent guitars and thumping rhythms. It moves into an exquisite mix of the still inciting piano, acute lyrics, and challenging vocals before thrilling further with feistier rhythms and sizzling guitars combining to offer an anthemic treat in exchange for a defined ardour its way.

The New Enlightenment is a tremendous album which all rock fans should take the opportunity to explore and immerse within, its triumphant sounds and large textures an inspiring joy. One can only hope it does not take Rayne so long to follow it up.

RingMaster 27/11/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Need To Breathe: The Reckoning

It is fair to say that even if US rock band Need To Breathe does not send your senses into raptures or even enthused passion, they are a band one can easily appreciate in regard to their qualities and skilled craft. The same can be said about their fourth album The Reckoning, a release full of excellently crafted and delivered songs brought with passion and heart dealt energy. We cannot say the release left us excited and soaked in any lingering presence due to personal tastes but it certainly was a decent listen throughout with its southern rock invention and in a couple of moments a more than satisfying companion.

     The Reckoning gets its UK release September 10th and seems sure to follow the great success it had back home upon its arrival last November. The South Carolina quartet has already made a mark through their previous releases and hearty rock sounds, which bring essences of the newer Kings of Leon music and Mumford & Sons into their own climactic stadium rock sounds. Just off of a six month tour of the US, the foursome of brothers Bear and Bo Rinehart (vocals, guitar, piano and guitar, backing vocals respectively), Seth Bolt (bass, backing vocals), and Joe Stillwell (drums, backing vocals), follow up their acclaimed previous album of 2009 The Outsiders, with fourteen big boned sky filling songs which persistently drip with soulful and emotive imagination. Yes for us the style does not light raging fires but for those loving the earthy American drama of a Springsteen and arguably Tom Petty as well as those previously mentioned Need To Breathe and The Reckoning will have their ardour sparking greedily.

Easily the best track on the album opens things up and it is a song which instantly captivates. From its initial dulled melody and emotive vocals Oohs And Ahhs has the ear in close attendance and mesmerised, but when the chorus breaks loose to sizzle upon the senses passions, for arguably the only time on the album, go soaring. In to its stride the track is a hearty forceful rock song to leave anyone breathless and caught up in the moment. Midway in the song take a brief respite before rekindling its energy and building up to a fiery crescendo which has grins breaking out everywhere. The mischievous track then repeats the event though this time the stride towards the flaming ending is tinged with stirring brass and discord driven keys. It is simply a stunning track which the album for personal tastes fails to repeat again.

The following White Fences and Drive All Night stretch their melodic wings to bring expressive depths to their soulful breaths, both finding an energy and tension which evokes thoughts and feelings. The songs of Need To Breathe are not necessarily faith driven but do bring a moral touch to their strong lyrical content though importantly it can also be interpreted into the lives of all.

Songs like Slumber, Maybe They’re On To Us, and Wanted Man, as well as the title track, all wrap around the heart with rousing and in their individual gaits, stomping anthemic majesty. As we said at the start there is no missing the quality and accomplished invention of the band let alone their ability to wring every emotion and passion out of every note and line, and for those receptive to their Americana/Southern rock songs it is hard to imagine anything other than deep pleasure gained from The Reckoning.

The other big highlight for us came with the newest single Keep Your Eyes Open, a song which takes inspirational and stirring sounds and songwriting to their fullest expansive heights. You can argue how original the song is with nothing openly surprising going on but it is hard to recall any rock song which has sparked the heart into reflective and eager life as potently.

If Southern rock/Americana is your brew to hungrily feast upon than The Reckoning will leave you full to the brim, and to be honest even if it is not your preference, the album and Need To Breathe is still worth an hour of your time to be sure.

RingMaster 08/09/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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