Left For Red – Human Complex

Approaching their ten year anniversary on the UK metal scene, Left For Red are poised to uncage their new album, Human Complex. Offering ten voraciously toned, imaginatively woven tracks, it is a record which highlights all the reasons why the Midlanders have earned their strong reputation and support to date and many more why the next decade could be even more exciting for them and definitely for us.

Since emerging in 2009, the Stourbridge quintet has lured acclaim for early releases which only grew eagerly richer for their 2015 unleashed debut album, All Things Known and Buried. It is success echoed in a live presence which has equally brought thick praise and an increased following, the band sharing stages with the likes of Chimaira, Crowbar, Beholder, and Breed 77 amongst many more as well as make highly successful appearances at numerous festivals such as Bloodstock, Hammerfest, and Mammothfest. It is now very easy to expect and assume that Human Complex will bring even greater attention such its potent character, bold sound, and rousing snarl.

Recorded with Tom Gittins of Monochrome Productions, Human Complex explores the human psyche, focusing on “why people can be so arrogant and careless with their actions, and the effects they have on themselves and others.” It opens up with Dancing With Misery, a suggestive crawl of provocative sound and dark intimation. It is a shadow draped serenade, a caliginous enveloping of ears and imagination with the potent tones of vocalist LC Decoy bringing a physical head to its atmospheric Deftones hued pea-souper of a haze.

It is a start which had attention and thought deeply enthralled, the body soon as tightly engaged as Switchblade Romance followed. With its initial wiry groove enough alone to entice further eager scrutiny, the guitars of Aaron Foy and Philip Smith entangled and enthralled with ease, the senses lashing swings of drummer Rob Hadley pining down an already keen appetite as the track rises to its striking feet. Like a blend of Fear Factory and Fuckshovel, the song quickly burrowed into the psyche, providing a lingering creative toxicity ensuring many swift returns even in the face of the inescapable lures of its successor Slaves To Causality. Less grievous in its breath but just as virulent in its grooving, the third track soon placed a firm hold on attentiveness, the tantalising voice and touch of Daniel Carter’s brooding but infectious bass to the fore. Again LC enticed as inescapably as the resourceful sounds around him, the track maybe not as unique as the previous pair but equally as magnetic.

The outstanding Leech is next up and instantly throws a web of rapacious grooves and contagious rhythms around ears, its contagion invigorating and body increasingly adventurous to give The Circus which follows, a ready-made platform to tempt with its classic metal lined, groove metal fuelled show. With a potent alternative metal swing as eagerly involved in its ever evolving roar, the track stands side by side with its predecessor as one of the peaks of Human Complex before Hand Of God more than ably backs them up with its own sinuous, emotionally torturous uproar. Serpentine in nature, fractious in breath, it too is a multi-flavoured metal trespass with grooves as melodically alluring as its rhythms and irritability are invasive.

The Storm brews next, its relatively calm flesh and emotive air carrying a volatility which never ignites but brings a riveting threat and discord to the track’s captivating croon while Journey Within straight after had the body bouncing and spirit swinging through its instinctively and manipulatively catchy ingredients and enterprise. Again the band’s smart fusion of flavours to a groove metal seeded breeding makes for a greedily devoured proposition, one even more hungrily devoured within the just as individual Tame The Tides. The track is a ravening predator of a song but carrying just as delicious melodic enterprise as numerous textures unite to match the mix of metal spices; both tracks further major highlights within the album.

Human Complex closes with the evocative balladry of Sunrise Bring Serenity, a strongly engaging temptation which blossoms and fascinates with each passing moment of time and imagination. With hope and optimism lining it’s still tempestuously suggestive climate, the track brings the album to a fine conclusion.

As much as we enjoyed and were impressed with previous releases and especially the band’s first album, Left For Red has cast their finest moment yet through Human Complex, a release which could and should set the band down in the biggest spotlights.

Human Complex is released April 6th

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Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Numb – Self Titled

September is proving this year’s most productive month for striking releases and to support the claim allow us to introduce the debut album from British outfit Numb. The self-titled introduction offers up eight slices of rousing multi-flavoured rock littered with imagination spearing hooks and ear thrilling grooves. The band is also no lightweight in casting fiery seductive melodies and a rhythmic incitement which has feet and hips as submissive as the senses to the combined temptation.

Formed in 2015, Numb was the rekindling of an already established long term musical collaboration between guitarist songwriter Darren Caven-Quantrill and multi-instrumentalist composer Barney Byron (The Calling, Audioeinstein) which quickly enlisted lyricist and vocalist Lee Rayner. With its line-up subsequently completed by drummer Damo Falkowski (Deadeye), the Northampton band took their time writing and honing the sound now lighting up their debut like a beacon.

The album instantly has ears seriously attentive with the initial groove of Common Love, the lure a riveting enticement soon supported by rhythmic tenacity and a wave of infectious riffs. Establishing a stirring surge of rock ‘’n roll, the track continues to build its body and alternative nurtured temptation. The vocals of Rayner similarly grab the appetite, his tone and words bouncing on the web of guitars and bass as a great blues spicing lines the grooving and urgency guides riffs and beats but with a control and invention which enhances the instinctive infectiousness of it all.

It is an outstanding start swiftly eclipsed by the following Love Of The Cartel (Part 2). Instantly a Latin melody hugs grooves as the track seduces with a great Breed 77 like air, indeed there is a feel of the band’s frontman, Paul Isola, to Rayner’s tone. Swinging with eager and muscular dexterity, the song is pure temptation grabbing body and spirit with swift success. Not for the last time in a Numb song there is a feel of rockabilly spiced rock ‘n’ roll at work within the tapestry of metal and heavy rock and that catchiness which again simply infests the psyche.

Everyman Deserves The Right To Choose His Own Path To Hell comes next, it too sharing a spicing of the aforementioned Gibraltar band within its more composed gait. Riffs jab as beats stab, melodic flames surrounding the potent vocals of Rayner as it heads to another contagion loaded chorus so easy to get wrapped up in. There is a great theatre to the song which is only enhanced by the Muse-esque venture of the guitar towards its tantalising finale, a spirit sparking climax perfectly setting up the appetite for the compelling enterprise of Time. The stringed temptation of the guitars is instant seduction and only accentuated by the rampaging thick tide of riffs and the tone gurning bass. The song relaxes into a stable energy as vocals enter the affair but eventually everything becomes turned on and hits top gear with mouth-watering imagination. The song is glorious, never settling down into any sense of predictability with each cycle a new and fresh adventure.

There is an industrial hue to certainly the opening bait of The Tears You Cry, its cosmopolitan suggestion aligned to thought teasing melody before it all evolves into a raptorial rock ‘n’ roll prowl led by Rayner’s expressive presence. The bolder invention of its predecessor is more subdued in the track but not absent and it does not stop it grabbing tightly ears and a by now greedy appetite for the release and increasing the pleasure. That extra strain of imagination is saved instead for successor Love Of The Cartel (Part 1). Why part 1 is after 2 we cannot say but the track is a journey of sound and emotion in its own extensive right. Caressing melodies court Rayner’s emotive voice, the bass a melancholic yet vibrant companion as the song reveals its creative and emotional drama. Like a growing battlefield within which sabre like hooks flash and fly as riffs and running grooves entwine and rhythms badger the senses, the track is sheer magnetism. In time volatility hits voice and heart, antagonism fuelling emotional outbursts before it is all pulled back into the surging infection of the thrilling encounter.

The release is concluded by the final pair of War and Burn. The first carries a steely antagonism in its riffs and rhythms, a defiant attitude which shapes the song’s physical and vocal character as well as its melodic reflection, while the second rumbles and grumbles with a Danzig like hue, twisting with irritability and turning with complimenting temptation. Both tracks leave greed for band and sound further intense and with us an already impatient anticipation for what comes next from Numb.

There are numerous times when as a reviewer you feel really blessed to have the opportunity to cover new music and there are other times when you feel truly honoured; this is one of the latter moments.

The Numb album is available now through Attic Records @ http://atticrecordsuk.bigcartel.com/product/numb

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Pete RingMaster 15/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sertraline – Guilty

Sertraline

Sertraline

March sees the release of a new EP from British melodic metallers Sertraline, an encounter earning a fair amount of anticipation due to its well-received predecessor and the band’s increasing reputation. The Guilty EP offers five potent slices of rock and metal fronted by the quickly engaging tones of Lizzie, tracks which revel in the new growth of sound and imagination spawning them from within the band.

Formed in the Autumn of 2014, the Stoke-on-Trent hailing band quickly stirred up a loyal local fan base and close attention, their first single a couple of months in, Set The World Alight, luring strong radio play and support from BBC Introducing. Their well-received debut EP Bury The Ghosts pushed the band into national spotlights in 2015, its success more than backed by Sertraline’s dynamic live presence which has seen them shared stages with the likes of Butcher Babies, Toseland, Kobra and the Lotus, Skarlett Riot, and Normandie along the way. Last year saw a new line-up in place and the further honing of the band’s sound, Guilty showing the enjoyable results from the evolution.

The EP title track is first up, ears consumed by a wall of carnivorous riffs and intrusive rhythms. It is a striking appetite raising start soon relinquishing its threat as a wiry melody escapes the guitar. Any disappointment from losing that raw trespass dissipates as Lizzie’s tones dance on the emerging web of riffs and grooves from Mike and Wilson. With beats still swiping with fierce intent as the bass of Hendo enticingly grumbles, the song takes a firm grip of ears and imagination. Throat raw growls intermittently join the adventure, contrasting with the harmonic beauty of Lizzie but for personal tastes lacking the bite to be as successful as their certainly welcomed addition could have been. Nevertheless it only adds to the strong character and increasing potency of the excellent track.

sertraline-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewSuccessor Snakes opens with a melodic coaxing, atmospherics gently kissing a lone melody before a weave of Periphery scented enterprise sparks song and imagination. As the first, the individual prowess of the band is a captivation, their combined adventure just as compelling if lacking the imposing impact of the first track. It is the subtlety of its twists and turns which predominantly make that difference resulting in the song taking longer to reach the same heights though with listens it surely does.

New video/single Change Of Heart is next, an even mellower proposal with a poppier catchiness to a harmonic stroll courted by cantankerous riffs, rhythmic punches, and that coarser expulsion of voice. It is obvious single material, melodies and Lizzie tantalising but does not quite live up to those around it for personal tastes though still adding to the EP’s success.

Nyeevise gets the appetite keenly back on track, its opening brooding presence carrying a whiff of Breed 77 to it before bolder sinews spin a glorious web of steely riffs and rapacious senses twisting grooves. Like a mix of Halestorm and Forever Still, the song growls and seduces; vocals and guitars providing an alluring blend of contrasting textures and creative drama.

Bringing the release to a highly satisfying close is I Admit The Blame, an emotive serenade with fire in its heart and melancholic beauty in its roar as well as creative attitude in its body. Another which grows with every listen rather than making a swift impact, it is a fine end to a thoroughly pleasing encounter. We are still not sure about the harsh side of the vocals, they missing the ‘savagery’ desired, but still an inventive part of the fresh blaze fuelling the Sertraline sound which will only take the band to higher plateaus.

The Guilty EP is out March 3rd @ http://www.wearesertraline.bigcartel.com/

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 Pete RingMaster 02/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Yugal – Chaos & Harmony

Yugal_RingMasterReview

We have had a little bit of a wait for their debut album, having been impressed and increasingly hooked on the Yugal sound through previous EP Enter the Madness, but anticipation has been forcibly rewarded by one richly enjoyable confrontation in the shape of Chaos & Harmony.

Carrying an organic continuation of their earlier sound but with the more unique surprises and elements its predecessors lacked, Chaos & Harmony is a fierce and imposing tapestry of contrasting and conflicting textures spun from the seeds of hardcore, death, and thrash metal. Its sound reflects the disparity yet balance suggested by the album’s title and the band’s Tibetan language derived name, both a representation of “the concept of universal duality” where two antagonistic constituents are indivisible.

Hailing from Vannes in Brittany, the 2010 formed Yugal lured awareness the following year with the demo From Pain to Pleasure before six track EP Illusion of Time two years later sparked concentrated attention upon the quartet which Enter The Madness reinforced and pushed on in 2014. The time between EP and album has seen the band hone their sound and songwriting to new heights and though at times it feels like Yugal are still on the way to rather than having found their final sound, Chaos & Harmony has replaced any ‘deficiencies’ before with a new individual and fresh forged imagination boldness.

The album opens with the gorgeous enticement of Khamsin, a Middle Eastern flavoured lure of guitar within seconds leading a seduction equally hinting at the entangling musical dissidence to come. The instrumental’s melodic romance and exotic charms are courted by shadows and the portentous thump of anthemic beats; a union which entices but with an element of intimidation before Once Upon a Lie rises up to consume ears with rapacious riffs and bludgeoning rhythms. Wiry grooves are soon entangling the song as the throbbing bait of the bass grips ears as potently as the throaty growl of vocalist Guillaume. A commanding fusion of death and thrash, the song is quickly a potent proposal but truly comes into its own as suggestive melodies and psychotic twists begin to emerge; each more glimpses than song changing elements but all adding drama and unpredictability to the song.

cover_RingMasterReviewHeavy Mental follows devouring the senses with vicious riffs and senses whipping beats as grooves taunt and the bass subsequently spins its own threat loaded magnetic dance. Drops into reserved but more predatory passages surprise and thrill as too the variety of voice and melodic enterprise; it all an absorbing web spun again by From This Day I Will Rise in its own individual design. Opening with a Breed 77 like coaxing, again as exotic as it is welcoming, the song looms up around that continuing lure with a wall of imposing rhythms and grouchy riffs. It is a threat which never fully lands but evolves into an invasive and invigorating trespass again still cored by the Eastern elegance and mystique the track started with.

From one superb offering to another as Dogma prowls and taunts the senses; its muscular rhythms and choleric intensity almost bestial but again an aggressor on a leash which allows clarity to the elements within and their infectious union. A further momentary pull on its reins allows a calmer attack opens the flood gates to thrash inspired riffs and an energy which alone invades and excites, though that in turn only leads to another twist in the song’s mercurial and relentlessly impressing landscape.

The imagination and cantankerous aggression already lighting the album continues as Illusion of Time stalks and flies at the listener with open fury, though a respite from the enterprising hostility is forthcoming through the brief instrumental Interlude. A close relation and in many ways continuation of the opener and an echo of the melodic beauty lying within the tempest of the previous track, it seduces ears and imagination before they are again under siege, this time from the barbarous attack of Silence is Golden. It too is an uncompromising tapestry woven with animosity and a virulent catchiness which is as venomous as it is addictive; each further bound in spicy melodic strands.

Another stirring moment within Chaos & Harmony, its quality and success is matched by the punk infused Lost Mind, the band’s hardcore influences at their most vocal but sublimely countered by the wires of Eastern promise which circle them and the variety of vocal imagination, something the band should definitely explore more ahead.

The album’s title track closes up Chaos & Harmony, a proposition which more than lives up to its name in tone and sound as it relentlessly courses through ears. Raw and rugged it ensures the album leaves with force and though it does not live up to what came before, the song  confirms Yugal as a band coming of age and ready to grant global attention.

Chaos & Harmony is out now on iTunes and through other stores.

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Pete RingMaster 07/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Circle Of Reason – Faith Or Theory

COR_RingMasterReview

On the back of a collection of releases which have taken ears and enjoyment on an adventurous ride, anticipation for the debut album from British alternative rock band Circle Of Reason has been rife and ripe for quite a while. The wait is now almost over and a new creative escapade from the Southampton quartet waiting to be greedily devoured; a reaction hard to see Faith Or Theory missing out on.

Emerging in 2011, Circle Of Reason was soon stirring up their local scene before poking at broader recognition a year later with their excellent debut EP, A Favour For A Stranger. Led by outstanding single Silver Scene, the three-track introduction lit the ears and spirit whilst revealing the potential of bigger and bolder things to come. And so they did with a big leap in the These Hands & This Mind EP of 2013/14. With their music inspired by the likes of Mastodon, Deftones, Biffy Clyro, Muse, and Queens Of The Stone Age, the second EP showed the band developing their own distinct and eventful sound. There was a new imagination fuelled character to it without defusing the already established fire and creative enterprise in their sound and an increasingly renowned live presence seeing Circle Of Reason share stages with bands such as Feed The Rhino, Marmozets, Neck Deep, Inme, Mallory Knox, Heck, Allusondrugs, Freeze The Atlantic, Breed 77, Zico Chain and many more over the years.

The past months has seen a slight line-up change and the creation of Faith Or Theory. It too is an open step on from past triumphs; bringing a bolder maturity and imaginative zeal with its fascinating body that demands attention. Opening with the band’s new upcoming video/single, Never Enough, the album has ears gripped within its first sound bulging seconds. Instantly a barrage of thumping beats and hungry riffs collude to envelop the senses, spicy grooves emerging from the inviting tempest to entice an already eager appetite. Straight away there is something unique to the band’s proposal from the start but also their recognisable hunger and energy to take ears on a new adventure.  As the song expands into a web of melodic enterprise and rhythmic tenacity, the tones of vocalist/guitarist Simon Osman quickly hit the mark, reminding of his already established quality and emotive expression. The same applies throughout the band, in the evocative strains of Gary Slade’s guitar inventive bait and the growly hues of bass from its  newest member, he only going by the name of Rob so far, which add an almost bestial edge to the enjoyably raw air and roar of the track’s fiery escapade.

circle-of-reason_RingMasterReview The great start is soon eclipsed by Questions, it too holding a heavier and enjoyably intimidating essence to its virulent proposal. The versatile swinging beats of Andy Milwain leave no spot unmarked whilst the hooks of Osman and addictive grooves of Slade swiftly get under the skin with their melodic colour and varied flavouring. At times there is a touch of Reuben to the song, other moments of bands like Freeze The Atlantic, and persistently a tapestry of rock and alternative spicing keeping things inventively unpredictable whilst making it easy to be caught up in the contagion.

My Emergency steps up next with a less intrusive and imposing nature yet it too has a tempestuousness to its energy and emotion which intrigues as it whips up another increasingly robust and catchy affair. Backing harmonies court Osman’s ever impressing delivery whilst guitar and bass almost entwine like lovers in their infectious and dramatic endeavours around Milwain’s potently jabbing beats. Leaving body and spirit bouncing, the track makes way for Clarity. It also has a less forceful attitude to its persuasion but a host of ear seizing and imagination sparking twists and turns within its slowly and increasingly anthemic arousing of sound and pleasure cored by a rhythmic spine and nagging riffery which worms into the psyche.

Every song makes an immediate impact but maybe none as striking as In Other Words. It opens on a seductive and slightly melancholic melody with an almost theatrical feel to it; the coaxing continuing to keep ears hooked as the song opens up with voice and additional vines of poetic melodies matched in imagination by the evocative lures of bass. As it builds up in intensity, emotion, and creative fire, there is a definite Muse like quality to the song but only enough to add colour to the band’s own sonic and inventive drama.

The following Tie Up The Sky uncages its enthralling and volatile tempest from the first breath, again rhythms a prowling network of enticement within the sonic and melodic theatre captivating ears and thoughts around Osman’s plaintive and dynamic croon. Circle Of Reason has the great knack of being aggressive, almost fearsome at times, and ridiculously infectious and vibrantly inviting; this compelling offering epitomising that potent quality in rousing style.

Completed by latest video single Colours, a track which climbs over the senses and into the passion with exotically hued grooves and a thick drama of sound and emotional suggestiveness, Faith Or Theory rumbles and blazes with heart bred fervour amidst an invasive quality. It feels like the Circle Of Reason sound has come of age yet something still says there is plenty more yet to come, which can only be very good for the UK rock scene.

Faith Or Theory is released 27th May via Freefall Records.

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Pete RingMaster 09/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Anti-Clone – The Root Of Man

Anti-Clone_RingMasterReview

If asked at the start of the year which was the one release we were most anticipating in 2016 there would have been no pause of thought involved in saying the debut album from UK metallers Anti-Clone. They had us addictively hooked into their own distinct nu-metal bred, psyche twisting sound from the outstanding Hands Sewn Together EP, which had its highly successful national release back in 2014. Its tracks were a regular part of our podcasts too, finding the same eagerness across a horde of other shows and stations with the mainstream media soon waking up to the band’s emergence in turn. Now two years on and quickly following reputation cementing and pushing performances supporting Mushroomhead and Sanguine on certain dates of their recent UK tour, the Boston hailing quintet are poised to unleash The Root Of Man.

The question was never going to be would the album live up to expectations seeded in the last EP and the hefty fuss around the band, that just seemed to be a given in thoughts, but would their music have grown and evolved enough to make them a real contender to stir up the metal scene beyond the UK as earlier songs suggested. Well, the answer is found within the first few tracks of the eleven song incitement alone. Together they give a rousing confirmation with their creative roar, only being forcibly backed by the rest of an album which in some ways continues where the Hands Sewn Together EP left off but immediately shows a craftier and imaginatively more exhilarating, not forgetting broader, weave of styles and flavours in its boldly sculpted songs. The Root Of Man is Anti-Clone on a new mature imagination drenched plateau from songwriting to sound to presentation. There is inventive confidence and fierce adventure at every turn as the scent of inspirations from the forefathers of the nu-metal scene are again embraced, twisted, and honed into openly fresh textures within the band’s own fascinating experimentation.

art_RingMasterReviewFormed in 2011 but really finding its creative mojo once the current line-up was in place a couple or so years later, the Lincolnshire band soon sparked a hungry and swiftly growing fan base for their dramatically addictive sound which reached its first pinnacle in the Hands Sewn Together EP. Live too, the band has grown to be one of Britain’s prime incitements, sharing stages with the likes of American Head Charge, Kindred, ESO, Breed 77, Sworn Amongst, Maplerun, Evil Scarecrow, and Bloodshot Dawn amongst many along the way. Linking up with EP producer Matt Hyde (Machine Head, Trivium, Fightstar, As I Lay Dying and Slipknot) again for The Root Of Man, the quintet of brothers Drew (drums/ programming) and Peter ‘Mr Clone’ Moore (vocals), Conor (guitar) and Liam Richardson (guitar), and Mike Bradbury (bass) are seemingly poised to set their place at the head table of the UK and indeed European metal scene.

Dually looking at “the beginning of the human race, starting with Eve committing original sin which resulted in us being cast out of Eden” and symbolising the band’s beginning as a band; “These are the roots that we are planting to fully establish ourselves as our own entity, to establish ourselves as Anti-Clone“, the pledge music funded The Root of Man immediately grips ears and imagination with its title track. It is a brief but inescapable lure into the album, an as expected apocalyptically ambience clouded scene setter which is soon crawling portentously over the senses as steely bass and toxic grooves wrap the enjoyably familiar tones of Mr Clone. Its dark tempest rolls straight in to Deracinated which seamlessly draws ears into its own animus of intent and creative rapacity. Straight away an industrial toning merges with the schizophrenic nu-metal prowess which flows from the band, Society 1 meets Mudvayne like essences adding to the imposing character and trespass of the fearsome magnetism on offer. Ebbing and flowing in raw confrontation, the track bewitches ears and stirs up the appetite, setting them in an unfamiliar and disorientating yet welcoming blend of old school aired modern imagination for a seriously rousing slab of predacious incitement.

SwitchBlade growls at and brawls with the senses next, vocals from Mr Clone and the Richardson brothers almost pestilential in their psyche invading animosity as the sounds around them rise and fall with constant inhospitable adventure. Melodic calms and percussive invention are just as potent lures in the agitated imagination and landscape of the song; all colluding to savage and spellbind before A Sight For Sewn Eyes prowls ears with Fear Factory/Spineshank tinged ingenuity. As replicated across the whole of the album, every moment of the song brings greed breeding drama to the listener, Mr Clone showing his clean melodic tones are as fiercely agreeable as the rawer psychosis fuelled side of his vocal character. The song persistently twists and turns from the start before reaching a bedlamic crescendo that never truly departs once erupting as the song leaves on a groove bound web of suggestiveness.

With a constant range of peaks across its landscape as momentous and memorable as the Alps, B9 adds another with its Manson-esque textured slice of predatory heavy metal whilst Twisted Neck entangles ears in the intoxicating vines of toxic grooves which wrap a calmer melody hued serenade beneath a thickly tempestuous and predatory climate of sound and personality. Both tracks present a tapestry of styles and textures, the first also flirting with steampunk like elements where, not for the last time, Anti-Clone have a touch of the now sadly demised Shanklin Freak Show to them. Its successor flirts with a colouring which is more 6:33 meets Dog Fashion Disco though as always, it is hard to pin down a flavour such the Anti-clone ingenuity as they align spices to their own enthralling ideation.

A great punk metal hue seeps into the riveting and mercurial soundscape of Mechanical Heart, the track as welcoming as it is fearsome with sinister keys and avant-garde devilry lining another almost rabid mix of nu and industrial metal carrying at times more than a whisper of death metal to it. Compelling to the extreme, the track simply wants an apocalypse based Hellraiser movie to grace to see its majesty totally fulfilled, though fair to say there is no time to linger in thought with any song during the album as here Feed The Machine steals attention instantly with its vocally anthemic and physically bracing proposal. Repetition in word and sound within the track is a glorious igniting of instincts; that simplicity employed in another rich weave of roving grooves and a cantankerous rhythms skilfully sewn into an irresistibly unpredictable but dramatically galvanic onslaught. Like early Korn in some ways and Slipknot in others, the track still stands distinctively tall as another unique Anti-Clone ravaging of the senses and passions.

ComaSpace brings a moment of relative calm and the chance to catch breath next though unsurprisingly it too has irritability to its tone and dark imposing edge to its atmosphere. Vocally Mr Clone entices ears with a clean delivery as melodies merge acoustic and more aggravated hues into the Deftones spiced offering. Again the band has ears and appetite enthralled, though even being another impressive moment within The Root Of Man, it gets overshadowed a little by Astaroth. The band’s new upcoming single, the song is sonic slavery; the reason mosh pits and lustful reactions were bred into life. As barbarous as anything on the release and the most virulently contagious assault too, the track has everything you need to know about Anti-Clone and whether they are the tonic to your personal musical passions.

Completed by the grisly presence and voice of Sentinel, a sonic inferno of psyche burrowing riffs and grooves amidst an insatiable and concussive tempest of sound and attitude, The Root Of Man is the declaration of a new major force in UK and undoubtedly European metal. Anti-Clone is set to be one of those guiding their journeys over the following years whilst with this superb release, the band has placed themselves right there in stature alongside a great many of those who have inspired their adventure to date.

The Root Of Man is released 29th April  via PHD (Plastic Head Distribution) with more information @ http://www.anticlonehq.com

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Pete RingMaster 04/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Spreading The Disease – Viral

Front art std ep_RingMaster Review

Having teased and indeed savaged ears with their first single Bulldozer recently, British metallers Spreading The Disease reveal more of their crushing sound and intensive potential with debut EP Viral. Consisting of four anthemically vicious and belligerently compelling slabs of raw rock ‘n’ roll, the release is a rousing protagonist. It comes littered with crucial grooves, predatory rhythms, and an enterprise which is as in the face hungry as the intensity fuelling each conflict within. It is early days for Spreading The Disease but the suggestion posed by Viral is that the UK has another ferocious and invigorating adventure brewing within its metal/heavy rock landscape.

Formed late 2014 by Steve Saunders, the former bassist of The Self Titled who approached his new endeavour with the intent to allow “a different approach to both band policy and creativeness”, the Kent based Spreading The Disease quickly expanded its line-up with drummer Edd Saunders. In relatively short time lead guitarist Julien Riquelme, rhythm guitarist Martin Osborne, and vocalist Adam May were completing the band’s personnel with a handful of songs soon emerging. Inspirations to their sound include the likes of Pantera, Kill or Be Killed, and Stone Sour through to Slipknot, Machine Head, and Breed 77, essences audible in the unbridled fury of first single Bulldozer. Now it is Viral poised to emulate its success with a potency which pretty much is what it says on the tin, offering an invasive and sweeping brutally with the potential to stir up the national metal scene.

POSTCARD_RingMaster ReviewF.U.C.K.U. roars through ears first, the EP opener emerging from a percussive ring of an invitation to intrude upon and stir up the senses. An initial riff is the coaxing prelude to a predatory stroll of irritable riffs and punchy rhythms swiftly bound in just as magnetic and tetchy grooves. The energy and attack of the track enjoyably ebbs and flows without ever leaving the listener void of an incentive to respond in kind to its anthemic provocation whilst the imagination gets entangled in the magnetic craft of Riquelme and Osborne. With the raw at times vitriolic squalls of May’s vocals loaded in unbridled rage and emotion, the track is a thunderous incitement and impressive start to the encounter.

Lost Generation is a matching exploit in songwriting and volatile invention, it too with a reserved entrance which soon builds into a formidable and cantankerously imposing canter. The song never quite reaches the viciousness of its predecessor but certainly emulates its success in sound and creative tenacity. More diversity to the vocals courts unpredictable and gripping twists and turns within the metal meets heavy rock ‘n’ roll powder keg whilst grooves spawned just infect the psyche with their virulent toxicity. With rhythms battering and provoking with similar potency the track is the kind of weighty rock ‘n’ roll instincts get greed over.

Bulldozer comes next and gets straight to the aggressive point as the bearish tones of May skirt the senses within a sinew driven onslaught of sound. It is an intrusion soon veined by classic metal enterprise though, that fiery sonic tempering to the brutality around it shaping the fluid fusion of calmer if still volatile moments within the bestial and contagious tempest. With a fierce climax to take on the world with, the track forcibly reminds why as that first introduction to the band, it impressed and sparked strong anticipation for Viral. Fair to say it still ensures thick satisfaction and the need to make a physical involvement with each and every listen but the fact that it is put in the shade a touch by the other tracks shows the strength and depth to the Spreading The Disease creative infection coursing through its companions on the EP.

Evolution brings the release to a storming close. From its first rigorous step, the track is a full-on infestation of riffs and hefty beats which is unafraid to build on its quick and bruising contagion by either spinning melodic meanders of peace or casting almost schizophrenic brawls of sonic imagination. The most exploratory song on the EP with an exotic hue to its melodic suggestiveness, the track does not neglect the band’s ability to create rancorous and debilitating ferocity neither, it all led by the great mix of throat scarring vocals and the ever primal and enticing bass of Saunders.

The track is a hellacious treat to end an excellent fuller glimpse at Spreading The Disease and their developing sound. As impressive as it is, Viral also suggests it is early days with much bigger bolder trespasses waiting to be nurtured and uncaged as the band evolves. With more of the same equally as palatable to anticipation, Spreading The Disease is looking like being another British brute equipped to breach the broadest spotlights ahead.

The Viral EP is out now at http://www.stdband.com/store.html

http://www.stdband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/spreadingthedisease.official

Pete RingMaster 12/01/2016

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