Pussycat and the Dirty Johnsons – Dirty Rock ‘n’ Roll

pic debbie-attwell

pic debbie-attwell

As the band work and finish material to grace a new album, British rockers Pussycat and the Dirty Johnsons have linked up with Dirty Water Records for the long awaited digital release of second album Dirty Rock ‘n’ Roll and quite simply if you missed it first time around and have an instinctive appetite for insatiable bordering salacious punk infested rock ‘n’ roll, than it is a must.

Formerly in a band just called The Johnsons, the Basingstoke hailing trio is fronted by the wild feline wiles of vocalist Puss Johnson with founding guitarist Dirty Jake (Feckle, Lube) and drummer Filfy Antz (The Krewmen) alongside uncaging their own raw and incendiary antics. It is an explosive combination which saw their 2010 debut album Exercise Your Demons earn many plaudits as too over the years a blistering live show seeing the band share stages with the likes of The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Thee Oh Sees, The Fuzztones, Mad Sin, The Damned, 999, The Polecats, The Creepshow, The Rezillos, Bow Wow Wow, The Meteors, The Vibrators, Resurex, DragSTER, Trioxin Cherry, and Atomic Suplex.  Three years later, Dirty Rock ‘n’ Roll was the cause of even greater eager attention and acclaim upon Pussycat and the Dirty Johnsons; a spotlight sure to be regenerated by its digital uncaging ahead of as mentioned a new album.

Featuring eleven tracks spun from attitude loaded threads of everything from punk, garage rock, glam, psychobilly, garage punk and any other form of rock ‘n’ roll you wish to offer, Dirty Rock ‘n’ Roll is an explosive riot for senses and body alike. Produced by Alex McGowan and featuring guest double-bassist Phil Bloomberg of The Polecats on a couple of tracks, the album instantly prowls the listener as opener Burying The Bodies settles in to place, once set continuing to stalk but with an infectious swagger led by the biting beats of Antz. Straight away there is an obvious devilment in the band’s sound and the lusty roar shared by Pussycat, her presence and delivery a snarling seducing. With big hooks and winding grooves, the slab of predacious rock ‘n’ roll is an irresistible start to a release proving to be unrelenting in its fiery creative and aggressive incitement.

Hell Bent is swift agreement, its whining grooves courting flying rhythms and Pussycat’s plaintive cries, all united in another tenacious track which eyes you up with distrust yet reveals the most compelling enterprise amidst mouth-watering unpredictability before Livin’ With Mum And Dad sees the band move from raw rock ‘n’ roll into a more seventies flavoured encounter as much glam rock and power pop as it is old school punk. For personal tastes, it lacks the bite and spark of those around it but with its Pistols-esque hook and caustic catchiness there is no escaping being sucked in.

front-cover_RingMasterReviewPsychobilly flavours the magnificent stomp of Get Outta My Face next, Bloomberg bringing his masterful slaps to the Batmobile meets Imelda May scented stroll with Pussycat like a punk Wanda Jackson. Fiery guitar and senses badgering beats bolster the seriously rousing proposal as the song shows another aspect to the album and the Pussycat and the Dirty Johnsons sound.

The scuzzy blues punk of She Don’t attacks and excites next, its corrosive character and sound as virulently infectious as anything upon the album while Mirtazapine uses similar strains of flavouring for its own individual trespass. With a touch of post punks Bone Orchard to its untamed garage punk challenge, the track is a superb mix of rapacious restraint and unbridled furor taking ears and imagination into the darkest shadows of the fiercest volcano.

There is no let-up of the enjoyably exhausting confrontations as Why Do You Hate Me? sears the senses with its punk rock lava around a rhythmic tempest while Dirty Li’l Dog, with the magnetic craft of the Polecat returning, leaps around with uninhibited rhythmic rioting as blues guitars embrace numerous other spices around the carnival barker leadership of Pussycat.

The final trio of songs just epitomise the variety and devilish imagination in the band’s songs; Sort Yourself Out a fuzzy blend of growling punk and toxic blues within The Pirates like rock ‘n roll and Souvenir simply one glorious invasion of garage punk with a scent of The Cramps, Animal Alpha, and In Evil Hour in its unique best track earning triumph.

Closed out by the adrenaline fuelled and feeding Hideous, a final belligerent detonation of rabble-rousing incitement, the outstanding Dirty Rock ‘n’ Roll is its title and so much more. It might not be a new release but it deserves this new exposure and Pussycat and the Dirty Johnsons the fresh attention ahead of what can only be anticipated as another uncompromising uproar.

Dirty Rock ‘n’ Roll is available digitally through Dirty Water Records @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Pussycat-and-the-Dirty-Johnsons-Dirty-Rock-n-Roll/p/75045471/category=2793895 with physical options @ http://thedirtyjohnsons.com/shop/4564430166

http://thedirtyjohnsons.com   https://www.facebook.com/thedirtyjohnsons/   https://twitter.com/Dirty_Johnsons

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raw Fun – Won’t Be Told

Raw Fun_RingMaster Review

December is as good a time as any, maybe the best time with all the festive shenanigans, to get your teeth into something particularly tasty, and that is definitely what you get from Raw Fun. Their three track single Won’t Be Told gets its full release this month through Dirty Water Records/WTF, and fair to say it is a bracing and virulent slab of garage rock ‘n’ roll which strongly entices on the first bite, breeds intoxication with its second morsel, and tightens the grip on the taste buds with a third helping of contagion; it all living up to the band’s name.

Raw Fun Sleeve _RingMaster Review     Formed in the September of 2014, Raw Fun is a London based trio with a potent pedigree between them. Vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Patrice Picard also plays in garage revival band The Cannibals, a band which since the early eighties has uncaged ten albums and a stock load of keenly devoured singles whilst live thrilling audiences all over Europe and further afield when touring Japan twice. Bassist Joaquín Gonzalez has been the guitarist in Las Aspiradoras, fronted low-fi garage band Dedrines, and currently also plays in the reformed Johnny Throttle whilst drummer Manuel Santos has been part of Thee Tombitas and punk band Michael Jackson. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of The Stooges, Link Wray, Wilko Johnson, Johnny Thunders, and Stiv Bators, the threesome upon uniting quickly found and nurtured their own sound, playing their first gig three weeks after their first rehearsal. Just as swiftly Raw Deal also set about recording their first release, Won’t Be Told recorded on an eight-track tape machine with its mixing done by Jim Diamond, formerly of The Dirtbombs who had heard the band on Facebook and offered his help. With shows across the UK, France, and Spain, it has been a busy twelve months for Raw Deal, culminating in the spotlight grabbing release of Won’t Be Told.

The single’s title track comes first, Won’t Be Told releasing an immediately alluring clang with its guitars aligned to just as enticing melodic bait. Rhythms are soon jabbing with relish as the voice of Picard swaggers into view, each colluding with the bass of Gonzalez which prowls the song with its deliciously throaty but welcoming tempting. Those punk and garage rock spices are a swift hue to the song, not necessarily providing anything majorly unique but certainly stirring up a keen appetite for the unpolished and mischievous revelry holding attention.

The best track on the release comes next, Shades a bewitching incitement merging fifties and sixties rock ‘n’ roll with garage punk/psychobilly devilment. The track has a prime irresistible hook which works away right from the song’s first breath, a coaxing which only increases in success with its Bone Orchard meets The Cramps like incitement. Around it though, garage rock spicing colludes with a dirtier punk air as sultry surf rock flirtation seduces and enthrals ears and imagination. The song is superb, easily the pinnacle of the single though more than backed by the other two protagonists of pleasure.

Til the End of the Song is an instant eruption of punk ‘n’ roll devilry with pop infectiousness to its swing and attitude to its rough and ready character. As its predecessor, there are plenty of flavours enrolled in the fiery body of the song, many slim and often subtle hues adding up to one easily accessible but equally uncompromising slice of, well raw fun to be honest.

There is really no better time to treat yourselves than now and if it is to be with some rousing rock ‘n’ roll then Raw Fun gives a very satisfying option.

Won’t Be Told is available from December 14th via Dirty Water Records/WTF @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/Raw-Fun-Raw-Fun-EP-+-download/p/56898794/category=2749844 on 7” vinyl or download.

https://www.facebook.com/rawfunwontbetoldwhattodo   http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/rawfun/

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Inca Babies – The Stereo Plan

INTREPID FOX oct[1] copy

From the days when the devil thrust his evil designs into music, dark rock ‘n’ roll has been a persistent and endearing temptation. From the leather clad hip and vocal lures of Sweet Gene Vincent to the modern psychotic seductions of Dedwardians, it is a delicious trespass of ears and imagination that continues to evolve rich adventurous psyche twisting pastures. The likes of The Doors, The Cramps, The Birthday Party, Bone Orchard, The 69 Eyes, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster, The Dropper’s Neck to name a few, have continued to expose the senses to new ravenous depths of sinister sonic exploration over the decades. One band which from their emergence in 1982 has also sculpted a perpetual warped seduction is Inca Babies. Their almost serpentine invention and dark musical incitements have continued to inspire and invigorate, even during the near on twenty years they were absent from the music scene, but since returning in 2007 you can only suggest that the UK trio must have shaken hands on a new deal with Lucifer as they have risen to truly become one of the leading lights and template setting protagonists of British rock ‘n’ roll.

The evidence is already boldly apparent in their two albums since reforming, the acclaimed Death Message Blues and Deep Dark Blue of 2010 and 2012 respectively. Both releases ignited an already ravenous gothic rock scene and duly deserved all ardour given but each in many ways was just an immense but leading appetiser for the glory of The Stereo Plan. Released towards the end of 2014, the band’s seventh studio album is a masterpiece of the dark aural arts. The third instalment of their death blues trilogy, its fourteen-track proposal twists and turns through the primal essences of post punk, surf, garage punk, trash blues, and every other dark flavour available, but bred in the imagination of Inca Babies transforms into a recipe of ingenious alchemy. It is a transfixing and slightly menacing proposition which has everything from feet to the passions ablaze.

Listening to The Stereo Plan is almost like immersing in a greatest hits collection of songs, every encounter of such irresistible and impressive invention and contagion that there is no time to take a breath and reflect until the final note of the release drifts away. It all starts with the album’s title track and its opening tangy lure of surf bred toxicity. It is an instant inescapable invitation for ears and imagination, the percussive shuffle which soon adds its bait only increasing an enticement which deepens again with the thick bass prowls of Vince Hunt. Continuing to bind ears in his guitar’s delicious spicery too, Harry Stafford pounces with his vocal and lyrical dance, as everything in the song colludes to create satanic rock ‘n’ roll majesty, especially as rhythms grow in intensity and devilment with the vocals to arouse an even lustier persuasion.

How to follow such a magnificent start would have many bands in a cold sweat but not Inca Babies as they match its majesty with a just as compelling incitement going by the name of Scatter. Stereo Plan Front 1The swinging beats of drummer Rob Haynes recruits eager attention right away, swiftly adding appetite as riffs and bass grooves unite with his anthemic beats and the incoming catchy vocal delivery. Into its stride the song expels a punk causticity around its driving rhythmic spine, the fingers of Stafford continuing to dance over the strings of his guitar to create a web of sonic addiction. The aforementioned Dewardians comes to mind as the song bounces with venomous mischief and also Eighteen Nightmares At the Lux with its scuzzy textures.

The salty smoulder of Damnation comes next, an Orson Family like countrified shimmer fuelling the temptation of guitar and rolling beats. As the opening pair of songs, psychobilly bred rapacity coats the song but also here a more garage punk tenacity emerges and grows to an even more potent persuasion in the following River To the Centre of the World. A haunting slice of upbeat balladry with a chorus which simply infests the senses, the track is dark poetic manna for ears and imagination. It also continues the mouth-watering diverse landscape of the album, each song a blossoming of individual and unique gothic theatre bred in sinistrous ideation.

The Cajun cast spell of Stand Down Lucifer keeps listener and album in lustful realms next, its sinuous shimmer and invention a creeping and inescapable seduction whilst Feast With Panthers strolls in with stalking rhythms and demonic hooks within again a fine and alluring vocal proposal. Like Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers meets The Screaming Blue Messiahs, the latter a band easy to offer varying degrees of comparison to across the album, the track swings it frame and flirtation with mischief in its eyes and a wicked lick on its melodic lips. The Stereo Plan began on a lofty pinnacle and this pair again sublimely ensures that there is no slip from such heady heights.

   Last Flight Out of Saigon with its pulsating bassline and acidic sonic veining croons suggestively in ears next, its minimalistic yet cavernous presence a mesmeric hex before the garage pop feistiness of Absolute Leader of the World leaps at the senses. Holding a great raw seventies/eighties punk essence to its contagion, the song is a sweetly caustic roar of blues rock which re-ignites body and energies after the resourceful ‘rest’ found in its predecessor.

Returning to the insidious charms which festered wonderfully in the early songs, Devilfish Anarchy stalks and romps with that gothic blues meets psychobilly predation and devilry. Beats and basslines are the instigator to lust fuelled whiplash as vocals and melodic toxins work away on thoughts and emotion. It is an exhausting pleasure whose rigorous nature is swiftly tempered and contrasted by the funereal stance and classical elegance of Still Mountain, a bewitching ballad wrapped in imposing and provocative shadows.

A dirtier yet restrained heavy rock pushes the walls of Damn Our Hides next, its persuasion not as instant as elsewhere, though swiftly a captivating companion for ears, but slowly burning away behind the scenes and repeatedly nudging thoughts after the event, as so many other songs on the album. Its enduring temptation is another striking aspect of The Stereo Plan, each twist of its design able to return at leisure and with potency, just as the heated jazziness of Ghost Ship. The track is ablaze with sultry trumpet flames, filthy basslines, and delirious sonic enterprise combining for a fiery musical sunset on an apocalyptic landscape.

The album is finished off by the excellent psyche/ surf rock stomp of Blacktop Speedway and finally the garage rock serenade of Late Night Frankie Brittle, a croon which simply grows in weight, intensity, and sonic rabidity with volcanic imagination. The pair makes a thrilling end to one irresistible encounter.

Admittedly having a soft spot for the type of sounds Inca Babies revel in went in their favour, but also it brings more demands but once again the Manchester trio stand tall over them as they again help lead British rock ‘n’ roll into new and exciting explorations.

The Stereo Plan is available now via Black Lagoon Records

http://www.incababies.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/incababies/

RingMaster 11/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Secrets and exposures: an interview with Tricore/An Entire Legion

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Tricore

More a secret than they should and deserve to be, UK metallers Tricore has been one of the most inventive and exhilarating bands within the British metal underground scene for close to a decade. With its member’s sister project An Entire Legion, the band has continued to intrigue, surprise, and thrill with an unpredictable and persistently adventurous intent in sound and ideation. Recently both bands released strikingly re-mixed and re-mastered versions of the albums Less than man…More than rabbit and Flame Wizard, from Tricore and An Entire Legion respectively. This gave The RingMaster Review a nudge to delve deeper into the bands which we had the pleasure of doing with vocalist/drummer Chris ‘Kerl’ Kerley, guitarist Mark Carstairs, and bassist Chris Allan who also kindly offered the opportunity to win a digital copy of both albums.

Hi Guys, welcome to the site and thanks for sharing your time with us.

Kerl: No worries man. It’s a pleasure. Thank you for being such a proponent of our music.

You have just released remixed and re-mastered versions of your Tricore debut album Less than man…More than rabbit and the Flame Wizard full-length as An Entire Legion. Before we take a closer look at the releases and yourselves can you clear up the situation with the projects as I know some people have been a little confused; are Tricore and An Entire Legion working as separate projects still, as I know there was talk of merging under just one name at one point?

Kerl: Haha, yea it can get a bit confusing. For us as well. The musicians are much the same in both projects but musically they generally differ. Tricore tracks are generally straight up heavier, riff driven, longer tracks, slightly more technical in parts. Legion tracks vary in tone more; the melodies take more of a front seat, tighter structures and catchier choruses.

Chris A: Though the lines have been blurred with the Flame Wizard release.

Kerl: Yea. It’s possible that future releases will be under legion because it’s the preferred name. Either that or we’ll make up another new name to piss more people off!

 

Tricore

Tricore

As it was the early days of Tricore where we first discovered your sounds, tell us about the beginning of the band and your musical histories up to that point.

Kerl: Tricore was formed in 2006.

Mark: I joined the band a month after it was formed and we did our first gig as Tricore only a couple of weeks after that!

Kerl: Yea you did well to get the shit down man. Before 2006 we were called Unbound. We named our debut EP after the old band. A few of the ideas on the Less than man…more than rabbit album came from the Unbound days. I’ve been in bands since I was like 13-14 playing drums. First band I was in was called Undercurrent. I only started getting heavily into song writing when I started Unbound in my late teens.

Mark: I also started playing in my teens back in Scotland. I was in a local band before moving down south.

Chris A: Same for me… Been in bands since my teens and all through my twenties. All of us come from similar musical backgrounds. All of us are self-taught.

The band’s sound is unique and distinct, wonderfully difficult to pin down. What have been the major inspirations to your ideas and music?

Kerl: Variety! Spice of life and all that. Same applies to music. Learning about and respecting different genres of music can only aid you when it comes to song writing. I grew up on a diet of mostly rock & metal in the nineties and always preferred the bands I felt “stood out”. Bands who had their own thing going on a la Korn, System of a down, Slipknot, Sikth, Incubus, Paradise Lost, before that Pantera, Nirvana, RATM and many more. As time went on my tasted broadened and I started listening to all sorts, from orchestral to indie to electronic, new and old. Like the bands above we always try to stand out with our music, whichever project we’re working on.

Mark: I’ve been influenced by pretty much the A to Z of heavy metal!

Kerl: Yea man, Marks got one of the largest cd collections I’ve ever seen. Its nuts!

Your first EP Unbound in 2007 made the first mark, increased dramatically by the Follow EP four years later but it is the Less than Front cover, less than remasteredman…More than rabbit album which still rings the most potently with fans. Is that what you have found and why you have re-visited it for the new release?

Kerl: It was more about making the older releases sound as phat as possible. Less than man always felt a little too tinny to our ears which was a mix issue rather than a mastering one. Sean Magee did a great job at Abbey Road studios first time round. But we felt a re-mix and re-master would bring the music up into line.

How did you look at the album in regard to re-mastering and remixing it, where did you feel you could enhance its strengths and colour further?

Kerl: Everything needed at least a little tweaking. The vocals needed to be eq’d and brought forward, the guitars were given more thickness. The hi-end needed to be reduced universally. We met a great dude who mastered the new releases for us giving them the final polish they needed. And all for the right price! Which is always a factor when you’re producing yourself.

Was it the same reasons for re-working the Flame Wizard album under An Entire Legion too?

Kerl: Yes. Though those tracks were recorded more recently and had fared better. I think both releases are now really solid, production wise. I can’t see there’ll be a need to revisit them again. We’re not going to do a “George Lucas”.

When did An Entire Legion become a valid proposition alongside Tricore for your ideas and what inspired you to make the distinct separation?

Kerl: An Entire Legion was created in late 2009/10 primarily to go down a slightly more melodic route with our music.

Mark: Initially it was also a step we took in an attempt to find a drummer who could replace Chris, freeing him up to do vocals.

Kerl: Yea. The idea was that I’d remain on drums in Tricore and sing for Legion. Unfortunately we had no luck finding a suitable replacement on either drums or vocals.

Mark: Despite caining the auditions!

Kerl: I still remain doing both. After a while Legion became a place we could put those songs we felt didn’t quite fit under Tricore. Now it’s pretty much an anything goes, which is why both projects have blurred.

An entire legion

An entire legion

Did having the two projects on the go simultaneously make the songwriting a more interesting adventure and maybe more difficult. Deciding where melodies or, rhythmic twists as examples, would best fit?

Kerl: Luckily the writing for both releases was completed at separate times. Most of the music on Less than man was written in 2008. The tracks on Flame Wizard during 2011/12 so there were no difficulties due to overlapping. Though we have several projects we usually just focus on one at a time.

Have you a preference (not favourite) or find a greater ease in regard to the two bands when it comes to creating songs?

Kerl: Honestly no. I love creating music. I live for it. There’s no preference when it comes to band music for me, I just try and keep things interesting and distinctive.

Mark: Playing wise, I prefer the heavier tracks from any of our projects. But listening wise it’s great that we don’t limit ourselves and feel free enough to head down different routes when the itch arises.

Chris A: Yea I also appreciate the variety. As a player it keeps things interesting, challenging.

It seems like in the current climate of metal and rock; bands with something truly unique about them and their sound get passed over and often disappear far too soon. How have you guys managed to keep your passion and drive for two projects, three when we include Rind Skank, all this time criminally without the nationwide and beyond recognition we feel your music deserves?

Kerl: Cheers Pete man, awesome of you to say. It’s really easy to keep creating music because we love it but yea, things are tough out there right now. Zero exposure by mainstream media has kept some of the country’s best musicians and songwriters in relative obscurity.

Chris A: Piracy…

Kerl: Yep. Piracy has wrecked music sales, which used to be a vital revenue stream for bands. Heavier types of music are acutely affected by the loss of music sales because there are fewer ways to make up for the losses. Obtaining ad or film placements for heavy music, which can be a great source of income for songwriters in other genres, is rare. Touring is expensive and is not feasible for a lot bands without financial backing. Merch sales are directly linked to touring. Indie labels mostly sign what they know and what they feel safe taking on, so most of their rosters end up filled with bands that appear to be imitating one another. They can then group these guys up and send them out on hard-graft tours, which are rarely particularly lucrative. As for major labels, well they barely touch heavier acts. Why would they, there’s no longer any money in it. For us, like many bands, it’s difficult. We’ve lost key members in the past because they could no longer see a future in playing heavy music. Reality gets in the way of the ideal.

So my advice to anyone who wants to see the genre grow is to purchase the music of the bands whose music you enjoy. Purchase directly from them if possible. Keeping the industry financially healthy isn’t only about providing opportunities for current bands it’s for all the future ones as well.

Concerning how we personally keep driving forward. Pretty much by ignoring the above and crossing our fingers 😉

Briefly tell us about Rind Skank.

Kerl: Rind Skank is a rock/metal/dance fusion band we started in 2012. It was a chance to play around with things in another direction, which is always great fun.

Mark: We took out the need for a drummer by playing over synth beats, which gives us a project that we can play live as a three piece.

Chris A: Recently though we’ve been attempting to introduce acoustic drums into the mix, so we’ll see how that goes.

I believe there are a couple of previously unreleased tracks also within the new re-mastered releases. Tell us about them, they are brand new AEL flame wizsongs written recently?

Chris A: Yea, we released the tracks Richest Eyes and Twist the gimp on the Flame Wizard album. Both those songs were recorded in 2012 and were originally created for a different project, currently shelved. We dig the tracks and thought they’d fit well on the album. Both use more electronics than our other songs usually do. They’re also the only tracks I’m on because I only joined the band in 2012!

How does the songwriting work within the bands, is it the same method for both?

Kerl: I write the music for all the projects give or take some parts here and there and some of the solos (the better ones were written by Rich Wood). The process is usually – I write at home and then bring the songs down to practice where we can all pour over them.

What can new and especially existing fans specifically find different within the new outings for Flame Wizard and Less than man…More than rabbit from the originals to get their juices flowing again?

Kerl: Aside from the couple of new tracks on Flame Wizard it’s all about the production quality. We’ve just raised it up to a higher level than it was before. Considering our releases are self-produced with no fancy top end studio involved, I think we did a pretty good job.

What is the future for both Tricore and An Entire Legion, do you have specific plans or intent for 2014 and beyond with each?

Kerl: Nothing’s set in stone at the moment, though plenty of ideas. That’s the positive thing about being unsigned, no deadlines! Unfortunately there are some negatives. As the primary songwriter, these days, what I would like to do musically and what I have to do in order to make a living frequently conflict. Every time we record a significant amount of material, and I produce, it pretty much wipes out 3-4 months. That’s time we don’t get paid for up front. The main way to recoup is via sales of music and merch, which doesn’t cover it. The money we get from shows, when we’re able to play, is negligible.

Mark: Normally ends up costing us.

Any new songs and release on the horizons too?

Chris A: We have hopes to release a Rind Skank album at some point later this year, or maybe 2015. We may start a crowd-funding project to see if we can raise enough to make that feasible, which is something we’ve never done before

How about live, can we expect any venture on that side?

Kerl: Playing live has always been a rollercoaster for us. Constant line-up issues over the years have kept us grounded for a lot of the time. And I don’t mean that to sound like we’re a revolving door band with new members every week. Quite the opposite, our problems are finding the right people in the first place…People with the musical chops and a good working ethos. We’re looking forward to getting a more stable line-up and playing live more frequently.

Where is the best place for people to keep up with all things Tricore and An Entire Legion?

Kerl: Any of these sites,

Our bandcamp page for releases – http://tricore.bandcamp.com/

Our MySpace or Facebook for updates – https://myspace.com/thetricore

https://www.facebook.com/anentirelegion

https://www.facebook.com/tricoreuk

Or our hub site – http://tricor1.wix.com/underdogelite

Thanks once more for talking with us, any last thoughts you would like to share?

Kerl: It was an absolute pleasure man. Keep up the great work!

Mark: Cheers!

Chris A: Great talk dude.

Tricore pic 1

To win a digital copy of Less than man…More than rabbit or Flame Wizard, simply check out the last Bone Orchard podcast @ www.audioburger.com and tell us which Tricore track was featured in the comment box below. Closing date for entries is Sunday June 8th

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 22/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Sixth Dimension – Přežít !

6th D

Since first submitting tracks for inclusion on our Bone Orchard podcast at Audioburger.com, Czech thrashers Sixth Dimension has been a regular fuse to strong responses and a hunger for more from the show’s listeners. Still relatively a secret outside of their homeland the band look set to amend that with the release of their new EP Přežít !, a four track uncompromising confrontation of raw and predatory thrash metal. With a sound certainly not stretching boundaries but giving the genre a stronger carnivorous and captivating presence, the Most and Teplice based quintet has uncaged their most potent and accomplished release to date with the new EP, one leading to hopes and expectations that the world will be hearing more from and of the band ahead.

Sixth Dimension was formed in 2002 and across the years as well has earning an impressive reputation for their sound and adrenaline fuelled live performances, has released a couple of well-received CDs in the aggressive forms of Respekt (Respect) in 2006 and especially  Nikdy nevíš kdy (You Never Know When) of 2012.  Earlier this year saw the release of the Live On Il Fest 2012 DVD, further confirmation of the strength and passion of the band live, but it is Přežít! (Survive!) where you suspect the trigger to fuller awareness of their force is to be found.

Opening track Skrytá Bezmoc steps from a crowd scene to immediately savage the ear with rapacious riffing from  guitarists Peter ‘Špirda’ Špiroch and Filip ‘Bombo ‘ Skoumal. They take no prisoners especially with the thumping rhythms of drummer Peter ‘Buchy’ Buchner stamping authority over proceedings and the bass of Jan ‘Johnnies’ Hirsch stalking the onslaught with a throaty growl.  It is a sizeable slab of intimidation compounded in menace by the caustic growling of vocalist Paul ‘Paolo Wiďuz’ Wieden. There is little to worry new invention with the track, but standing brutal and holding an adventure especially from grooves and a melody drenched solo, the song is an impressive and infectious lure into the band’s newest tempest.

The following Bezmoc (Věnováno Davidovi Kaplanovi) like its predecessor goes straight for the throat but with an even more vicious and hungry torrent of corrosive riffing and malicious rhythms. Taking little time to begin involving exciting melodic invention into the sonic design cast by the guitars, the track twists and turns whilst bombarding the senses with intensive heavyweight thrash antagonism. If you have not seen their live DVD this track alone give a mighty hint as to the band onstage and the force of their skilled provocation.

Third track Zkrat has an indefinable familiarity to certainly its opening persuasion and perpetually tempting groove, but soon immersed within the Sixth Dimension ferociousness and unbridled intensity it only works as extra bait to the thoroughly satisfying incitement. Drums and bass as on all songs create a sinewed sculpted frame which barges and pressures the senses into submission whilst riffs and especially the acid enriched solo at the song’s conclusion, only seed greater hunger to the already greedy appetite for the release.

The EP is brought to an end by the prowling brutality of Maska, the song providing a predominantly lumbering gait with the passion to expel shards of sonic ruin and melodic enticement from its intensive body. A mighty beast inciting senses and passions it brings the equally towering EP to an impacting conclusion, cementing Sixth Dimension at being their most creatively potent and muscular best. If this band has yet to assault your ears then there is no better introduction and intrusion to welcome than the excellent Přežít ! EP, European thrash at its rawest best.

https://www.facebook.com/sixth.dimension.5

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Top Buzzer – The Sprollie EP

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It has been two years since pop punksters Top Buzzer paraded their irresistible talents and mischievous sounds on debut album Outside Is a World, twenty four months or so full of impatience certainly in the past half a year waiting for more of their devilish goodness. Finally the London based quartet has returned to tease and rummage in our ears with a new energetic slice of punk rock devilment in The Sprollie EP. Consisting of four songs which in many ways continues where the album left off whilst bringing another fresh sail to their contagious flights of creative fancy, the release does not exactly surprise in any shape or form but as an encounter which leads the passions and body into a compelling dance of pleasure, it is one thrilling riot of enterprising infectiousness.

Hailing originally from Jersey and formed in 2011, the band has driven their own path from day one, creating their own label Back2Forward Records as they made their debut with The Hands Up EP and forging an impressive reputation for their live performances especially once they relocated to London. First single Remission and the aforementioned album took the band into the media awareness of everyone home and in the US from Kerrang, Rock Sound and Big Cheese in the written press, Kerrang, Q Radio, BBC Introducing, KROQ, and Marky Ramone’s Punk Rock Blitzkrieg show on the radio, and internet forging shows like Audioburger.com and The Bone Orchard. The new EP follows their stunning contribution to the 2012 Rebel On The Underground – A Tribute To X-Ray Spex compilation, a release in aid of the US charity Sweet Relief, and sees original members vocalist/bassist Dukey, guitarist/vocalist Becksi, and drummer/vocalist Welshy joined by newest member on guitar and vocals Soni.  Alongside the release of The Sprollie EP, Top Buzzer are currently playing European shows with Californian legends Face To Face and CH3 leading to their appearance at the Rebellion Festival. They have never been away really despite our opening line, with a wealth of gigs but something tangible in hands and ears for everyday use is what was yearned for and now satisfied by this delicious treat.

First to accost and light up the ears on the release is Mannish Girl, an irrepressible piece of pop punk with the distinctive Top Buzzer a0483369368_2stamp of irritatingly addictive hooks and tongue in cheek intent, though that part of the song’s anatomy does wander to lick at and incite everything from ear and senses to thoughts and passions. From the opening flurry of riffs and rhythmic beckoning the song launches straight into its tempting chorus which lays its lures in two parts before Dukey begins the simple and irreverently appealing narrative. Flames of grooves and melodic barbs swing out from within the hungry drive of the song, the guitar sculpted persuasion reminding of The Vibrators whilst the vocal mix and melodic suasion offers a mix of Baddies and seventies band The Flys from within something wholly Top Buzzer.

The following Look At You initially gallops into view with hooks and riffs open before finding a canter of fiery imagination ridden by the ever boisterous delivery of Dukey vocally and on bass matched in eagerness by the rhythms of Welshy and the great group backing vocals. There feels something different to those to be honest, whether that is the presence of Soni adding his tones we will find out in due course , but there is a great variety behind the lead delivery which captures the imagination as much as the heated guitar play around them.

We Are Merely Filters has the sense of early Buzzcocks to its initial impression, the again virulently infectious call of the song leading energies on a rampant swagger of invention and rascality. Midway the song slips into a blues/ska smelling stroll which for personal tastes pulls the charge of the song up into a near stall though its creation and craft is excellent, but back into the romping pace and energy which set off the track it leaves only the strongest taste and pleasure in its feisty wake.

Final track Wet Pets is one minute of Dickies like shenanigans, a burst of punk roasting with the anthemic heights of a bunny girl. It is pure bliss and completes another scintillating release from one of Britain’s best punk rock bands. The Sprollie EP is a real joy and rock ‘n’ roll at its infectious best, and as the release plays in greedy ears whilst writing another thought comes to life…maybe in all the best senses of the description Top Buzzer is the twenty first century reincarnation of The Leyton Buzzards…just a thought.

http://www.topbuzzer.co.uk/

9/10

RingMaster 29/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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PseudoNympho: Eponym

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Having been intrigued by and thoroughly enjoying a couple of their early tracks maybe around two years ago, enough to feature them on The Bone Orchard podcast, we have been waiting for UK rock band PseudoNympho to realise the open promise and potential they offered back then. Well the release of their debut album Eponym certainly graces the hopes and expectations suggested and then steps well beyond their  limits and the fact that the thirteen track album still provides the feeling the band is only part through the destination to their ultimate sound makes it and the future all the more exciting.

Eponym is an intensive and inventive beast of a release, a deeply thoughtful, musically and lyrically, journey which asks for maybe extra involvement and time from the listener than many others but offers challenges which only bring the strongest rewards. There are times where, especially with some of its ambience woven brief pieces of composition, that it loses the less able mental interpretation of this reviewer but it immediately pulls one back on course with music and imagination that simply fires up senses and passions. Combining furies bred from the likes of hard rock, progressive metal, grunge and much more, the album is an enthralling confrontation for mind and emotions that places the band as one of the most potent and promising heavy rock bands in the UK.

Hailing from Leeds and consisting of vocalist/guitarist Wolfgang C. Bailey, lead guitarist Ben Marsden, bassist/vocalist Rio Goldhammer, 15385rhythms guitarist Sam Evans, and drummer Don Demrow, PseudoNympho open up their Bunnysnot Records released album with the brief instrumental Apotheosis. A rhythmic web within an industrially sculpted disturbed ambience, it is a provocative opening which still does not give a solid clue to what is ahead except to indicate it will be intensive. What emerges with second track Accident Of Birth is a tempest of magnetic imagination and towering sound. The start of the song gently weaves a sonic mist upon the ear, guitar and keys combining to paint an evocative sense veined by the great rhythmic persuasion of Demrow. There is a Sicilian (the best way to describe it) air to its beckoning which acts like a magnet, holding attention tight for the impending spiral of hungry beats and flaming grooves to entice further the now mighty call of the song. The strong vocals of Bailey expressively fire the lyrical narrative onto the now intensive heart of the enterprising storm brewing whilst guitars scorch the erupting energy with sonic coals of exploratory craft and heat. Dramatic and powerful, it is an immense full start to the album and evidence of how far the band has matured and come.

The following Pathetic Island Fallacy is equally as impacting, though this time it cages the appetite in a mesh of feisty rock ‘n’ roll with wanton tendencies and hook lined infectiousness lining against a more serious dark heavy metal incitement straight away. It probably does not quite match the heights of its predecessor but more than captivates full attention and satisfaction its way with skill and clear enterprise. It is followed by the short mystery of Zaphod Beeblebrox’s Morbid Prophecy, a track which intimidates and distorts thoughts as part of the overall narrative of the album. It did leave an unsure conclusion about its offering but the fun interpreting these moments is all part of the fullness of the release.

Both the caustically touching rock expanses of Sunshine And Lollipops and the excellent Buried Alive with its rapacious assault on the senses and destructive breath leave a wealth of pleasure and uncompromising impact. The second song a finely tuned brawl of predacious metal protestation and equally rabid hard rock boisterousness all shaped by a fluid and well defined merger of ideas and passion drenched energy. There is a schizophrenic air to its course too, especially in its near bedlamic climax which only reinforces its might and ingenuity, if also becoming probably a menace too far for some.

The punk /funk treat Lunch is a passing blur of dark and light, anger and peace, which sets up the melodic fire pit Big Enough For Rehab, its blues driven solos and guitar flames the skin on a heavy rock body that drives straight to the primal rock ‘n’ roll hunger waiting eagerly inside. This is then followed by the ok instrumental The Air Is Thick With A Palpable Miasma Of Willful Ignorance, another apocalyptic/industrial suggestion which inspires numerous ideas though maybe not related to the intent of the band. That is the purpose though and no matter thoughts on the presence of these pieces they do leave the listener active in finding their intent.

The excellent more grungier rock of Matryoshka with a Stone Sour spice to its temptation, provides the next highlight well into the depth of the album whilst both Educate Yourself and the closing Ugly Inside leaves Eponym a lingering presence in thoughts and emotions. Certainly there are moments across the album which raise questions and inspire talk of undiscovered promise which the band could of and will explore ahead, but it is a striking and rousing release which marks PseudoNympho as a band with a massive future.

http://pseudonympho.co.uk/

8.5/10

RingMaster 27/07/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Venus DeVilo – Edgar Allan Ho EP

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Let us introduce you to the dark seductiveness of Venus DeVilo, an artist which preys on the passions like a sultry vampiric temptress bred from artistic alchemy raised from the fire of Imelda May, the snarl of Wanda Jackson, the energy of Fay Fife, and the devilry of Dick Venom, not forgetting a pinch of the infected essences of Horrorpops. Her creative world is one of shadowed carnivals, blood drenched burlesques, and dead borne vaudeville; her music pure sexual fascination and the Edgar Allan Ho EP the perfect introduction to the temptress before the arrival of her debut album Til Death Do Us Party, which we hope will see daylight in the near future, such the hunger now raging.

Hailing from the cemeteries of Dublin, Ireland, well probably a very nice comfortable abode but that hardly goes with the theme does it, Venus since 2011 has frequented and lit up rock/metal bars, Burlesque and Cabaret nights, open mic nights, and other numerous venues around her home city and much further across the country with her Goth-Shock anthems. The host of a series of popular horror themed gigs at the Twisted Pepper, Dublin which have become an almost monthly event, the sonic siren has captured the imagination of the internet media with her dramatic sounds, becoming the favourite sister of the likes of Elegant Savages webzine and the Bone Orchard podcast. Since its release the Edgar Allan Ho EP has drawn lustful attention and it is hard not to understand why as it stalks the minds darkest imagination and cinematic desires.

    Heartless Horseman steps up to tempt the passions first, its initial acoustic guitar stabs and instantly potent vocals the 602969_406666232785880_346571255_nentrance into lyrical and musical stalking of night terrors and their romantic suasion. There is a rockabilly feel to the song which reminds of The Creepshow whilst the excellent soaring vocal imagination and drama of its delivery brings thoughts of Agnete Kjølsrud and the band Djerv as well as Dominique Lenore Persi and Stolen Babies. Unafraid to twist and turn the gait and intent of the track, Venus also sends it into angular and less accessible turns which make suggestions of Lene Lovich. For all the references we offer though, do not make the mistake of assuming the sound of Venus DeVilo is not something quite unique to the graveyard walking beguiler.

The following Apocalips equally enthrals with predominantly acoustic guitar and vocals, though rhythms and bass prowl with devilment in their hearts and wide mischief on their grinning lips too. The song sways and swaggers with the wantonness of a fifties siren and the intimidating composure of instinctive rockabilly, but like the band references these pointers to the sound are only whispers of the full hue of flavours making up the wholly contagious shards of mesmeric aural delight.

Penny Dreadful Love is a song you know should play in the bowels of any mausoleum, its funeral caress punctured and kissed by the again outstanding voice and delivery of its creator. As the lady and song lace the senses and thoughts with their visceral evocation, Venus provokes another comparison, this time to Lesley Woods of Au Pairs in the way she at times slaps words and syllables into the ear. It is a style that is impossible to resist and one which makes the forthcoming album so exciting and this song a dark hearted romantic serenade.

The best song on the release comes with Ringmaster, and no we were not biased in our decision. The vibrant waltz of the colourful enchantment goes hand in hand with the dark carnivale touch, guitar and vocals swinging across the high tented air of the hypnotic mystique and elegant poise. It makes for a glorious soaring flight of theatrical imagination honed into a glorious sirenesque aural spectacular which leads the listener on a tightrope walk of tension and astounding adventure, and note for extra spice its core call around the chorus is a dead ringer for one of the greatest songs ever, Killer Klowns From Outer Space by The Dickies.

The release is completed by firstly Carmilla’s Return, a song which initially has the shadow clouded  ambience reminiscence of Bauhaus song Bela Lugosi’s Dead  and goes on to atmospherically swarm around the ear with the chants of the ‘dead’ harmonising behind the continually powerful and virulently enticing tones of Venus. Once more it is a song which transports you within the sweeping sinister mists of a cinematic painting whilst its successor Miss Frankenstein is simply an epidemically catchy romp with big bold rhythms shaping the cage you are enslaved within. It has a delicious toxicity which leaves you no option but to throw voice and feet into the twisted majesty.

Venus DeVilo is an artist who will scare as many as she seduces but one who will only ever leave a lingering mark in her shadow and if it is anything like the Edgar Allan Ho EP, this dank earth will be a better place.

https://www.facebook.com/VenusDeViloSongsFromTheStalkersPointOfView

10/10

RingMaster 24/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Snarling with varied weaponry: an interview with John Robb of Goldblade

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Punk has been treated to some exceptional albums so far this year and none any better than the new album from UK giants Goldblade. Their sixth album, The Terror Of Modern Life, is a masterful, openly diverse, and ferocious strike of irresistible and inciting riots of invention and enterprise. One of the most thrilling releases to unleash its triumph upon 2013 so far, the thirteen track brawl snarls and provokes thoughts and senses with pure imaginative craft. Seizing the opportunity to talk with band founder and vocalist, John Robb, we charged up our questions to ask one of the genre’s biggest creators about the album, punk itself, and his own history.

Hi John and welcome to the site, thank you for sharing time to chat with us.

Album six, The Terror Of Modern Life, has just unleashed its confrontation on the world; does the feel, thrill, and anticipation change from release to release?

Of course…and it gets to be a bigger thrill.  It’s a mixture of thank fuck we are still doing this and surviving in the collapsing music business and still have enough inspiration to still want to make music!

With this album we felt really excited. We knew we were onto something good with this record a long time ago. We got the sound we wanted from the start and we worked hard to get the songs right. We wanted a variation of styles- from fast kinda hardcore rushes to anthemic punk to dark tribal stuff to droning post black metal apocalyptic pieces. It’s like a collection of all the various strands of punk and its off shoots – we wanted something people could dance to at gigs, something full of hooks but also fuck with things a bit as well. We wanted to make a record that reflected the underlying darkness and unease of these times, times where the word ‘terror’ is the key word like the word ‘clash’ was the key word in the punk times and caused the classic band to name themselves.

We immersed ourselves in the album and pushed ourselves to the brink. We then made the sound the way we wanted, in a way we never got close to before. We wanted something darker and heavier- we wanted the bass to sound right- I had reformed my old band The Membranes for a few gigs and played bass again and it reminded me of the fundamental power of that instrument if you stick it though a rat pedal and play it with a direct venom- this cross pollinated into Goldblade and infected the album and it really places us back into the place we wanted to be- that twisted end of punk occupied by Killing Joke, Dead Kennedys, Stranglers, Black Flag, whilst continuing the great quest of the Clash but updated to a 21st century feel because we have never stopped listening to new music.

The year has already seen the outstanding new UK Subs album XXIV provoke and impress and now your scintillating encounter, it feels like the ‘old brigade’ is still driving and leading UK punk, does it feel like that for you?

There are great younger bands around- Dirt Box Disco album is stuffed full of great songs- I think it’s a case of older bands not giving up in their dotage- with discipline and concentration you can make the best and most urgent history of your history. Punk, by its nature, doesn’t have leaders- we just operate in our own space! The UK Subs album is great and Charlie is an inspiration to anyone, there have also been great albums from Killing Joke, the Stranglers and other bands from that generation- it’s like those bands have found their teeth again- maybe they also feel the urgency of these times…

The Terror Of Modern Life is as with your previous albums a collection of songs which steer through, challenge, and stand eye to Goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life-296x300eye with injustices and social wrongs, but your most potent and venomous yet?

I think things are getting a bit helter skelter out there and it’s hard not to reflect this, the last ten years has seen things get very unsteady in the world and that’s bound to get into the music- we have no interest in lecturing people, we just reflect what’s happening- people can make their own minds up or just dance to the music- it does not concern us what people think of the words, the world seems to be in a fast forward towards several different conclusions and out album reflects this tension.

Do you feel the impact of politically fuelled songs whether on the personal, social, or world level is still as strong as it used to be within not only punk but music as a whole? Do people and especially the latest generation of young people listen to songs and music the same way as those before them?

To be honest the impact has lessened in some ways and yet in others it’s got stronger- music, the music discourse is no longer driven by the counter culture and there are many strands of thought out there, but that’s inevitable because people don’t have the time and the impact of being a political song is less than when it first came about in modern culture. I don’t think young people are less political than they were years ago- that’s a bit of a myth. Not all of punk was political and it didn’t have to be- punk was many things- it could be comic book like the Ramones or political like Crass and both were genius for me. I think people sometimes feel overawed by the world these days and feel detached from the political process and that’s creating dangerous vacuums. We don’t claim to have all the answers but we have definitely have all the questions.

You obviously grew up with and were inspired by the birth of punk and the bands sculpting its first mighty wave; do you still see and feel the same essences politically and musically in today’s punk bands outside of yourselves and the still provocative bands from back then?

First wave was important for me but I don’t wallow in there for ever- those records always sound magical and powerful but I love lots of new music as well even it affects me in a different kind of way. Modern punk bands are as varied musically and politically as any bands were back then, it has changed in many ways as well- even if it was a business then as well it seemed to be a bit more haphazard and suicidal- now it’s a long term operation and band’s gigs are very different. In some ways punk has become a tradition like jazz or blues and a way of making music or dressing- and that’s understandable – the music and the style are very attractive and create a cool- the only danger is getting trapped which is a contradiction of the punk spirit!

For those unaware of your intensive history within music could you give us the history of John Robb between say ’77 and the emergence of Goldblade?

Wow, that’s long and complex!

Born in Blackpool, formed The Membranes in the punk period and also started a fanzine called Rox. The Membranes became a big underground band with noisy records inspired by the dark zone in the middle of punk and post punk- we toured the world and were critic and John Peel faves. At the same time I started writing for Zig Zag and then Sounds and covered all the fallout of the punk generation from the goth to grunge scene to Madchester to baggy to punk itself- being the first person to interview Nirvana and also coining the phrase Britpop, formed Goldblade in the mid-nineties to fly the flag for rock n roll in the middle of the non-rock n roll decade! Wrote books on punk and the Stone Roses and the eighties underground scene as well as doing TV and radio stuff…and that all continues now with Goldblade playing all over the world etc…

As you mentioned your writing, something you are renowned, has that experience and aspect of your life impacted or brought a view upon your music lyrically and in regard to creating sounds which brings something different to Goldblade, something other bands might lack?

Of course, even for the simple reason that I hear lots of music and it also keeps me fully engaged in the culture and keeps me interested and investigating everything. I’m a compulsively creative person who keeps making, creating and writing stuff. Apart from hearing so much stuff I think the impact on Goldblade is more minimal as that is a very instinctive thing, we make the music that entertains us and the songs are kicked about in the rehearsal room till they sound and feel right to us and not to fit in with anybody, anywhere!

Listening to The Terror Of Modern Life alone, one has the sense inspirations are far wider than just the early days and sounds of punk. What does give you food for thought musically?

You got it- some people think we operate only within punk but we have a far wider listening base than that- even punk was originally about dub and other musics- it’s good to mess with things but keep the focus and the energy- sometimes it’s great to switch to fast and furious punk rushes just to get that adrenalin fix, sometimes it’s good to find a different rhythm or atmosphere- it could be from black metal or from dub reggae but it must always be put through the Goldblade mangle and made to sound like us.

Goldblade 5Did you approach the new album any differently to your previous releases?

We wanted something a bit more extreme, more heavier, and rawer; we felt the last album had been too tame and too much click track and production- we wanted the record to sound live and if the songs speeded up towards the end then great! Because they speeded up with excitement- ‘rock n roll should speed up’ as Guy Stevens told the Clash during London Calling recordings…we had to record the album twice because of a fallout with the label but the second time we recorded it in two days flat and mixed it in 2 days- the urgency was vital to the album, it gives it an edge and we are addicted to the edge…

The songs on the album strike hard lyrically and deliver them with some of the most deviously addictive hooks and grooves, which comes first in your songs as a generalisation?

It can be either- we can have songs and bash them out in the rehearsal room and work out a vocal melody or it can be a phrase or some lyrics that come with a tune and we build the song around it- it’s a very varying process.

Is there any particular moment on The Terror Of Modern Life which gives you the strongest satisfaction?

I think the playing by the band is amazing, brother Pete’s guitar is fantastic- every time I listen I hear something new, even on the songs I mainly wrote! And getting the bass sound the way I wanted it to be- as heavy and raw as it should be- that made a big difference- when we finished the album we were really happy with it, I listened to it over and over- normally you feel a bit down when it’s finished but this time I could actually listen to this as an album and felt really excited by the sound and the reaction we have got so far with all the great reviews has proved this.

And anything you would have changed or like to have evolved further in hindsight?

That’s for the next album!

I would change the way people consume music- I think it’s getting almost impossible for people to record and release music now unless they are rich- the download thing has killed it for small underground labels and studios and everyone is really struggling out there- this is our first release where most of the people listening will have not bought the record but downloaded it from the internet and from the pirates- it doesn’t make me angry as technology is part of music- but it may mean that making another album may be almost impossible for us and lots of other bands. We will have to think of other ways of making and releasing music in the future.

The late seventies and punk gave freedom and realisation to bands and people that they could make music as they wanted, on their own terms. Do you think that freedom or realisation is still as potent, has the internet and the digital world given back that belief?

In some ways yes- you can get heard more now and the consumer has the power which we love- cult bands can be heard now and don’t have to grovel to the mainstream media for attention- that’s been very important to the underground and made a real difference- this is coupled with the real problems that many studios, labels and shops are having because of the pirate thing- we felt that if you want to give your music away for free that’s up to you and not someone else but we realise that there is nothing we can do about it- the internet is young and its effect on culture cannot be measured yet- at the moment its chaos out there and like the wild west- and as punks we love that aspect of it but we are not so servile that we want people we don’t know to make money out of us!

There has always been a unity and kinship between punk bands, certainly in its origins, do you still think it exists, can you feel that Gold Blade Smallunity now?

Yes we all know each other, some bands are more friendly than others but there is a unity- I think we all face the same problems!

You have just come off a tour with the Misfits, and a band we love and feature constantly on our podcasts The Bone Orchard and The Ringmaster Review, Dirt Box Disco who you mentioned earlier. How was the tour and did you have to put those punk n roll freaks from DBD in their place 😉

DBD are good people and a great band and there songs are killer- I think they will be one of the biggest bands on the scene by the end of the year and we can then go and support them. It was great to tour with them and I had to chuckle when we played with them at the Manchester Ritz when their stomach problems were quite loud back stage. 🙂

You have toured all over the world it seems, any particular places other than the usual countries which you enjoyed and surprised you with their knowledge of your sounds?

Algeria was amazing- we were the first band to play there for 20 years and yet people knew our songs – that’s the power of YouTube for you- the songs that were on YouTube they were singing along- we have played all over- we have played Russia a few times and there is talk of going to China…

Once more a big thanks John for talking with us, anything you would like to add?

Join our Facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/goldbladeband

Review the review of The Terror Of Modern Life @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2013/05/19/goldblade-the-terror-of-modern-life/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 30/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Expanding the Extreme: an interview with Giannis K of Dark Vision

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For over fifteen years Greek extreme metallers Dark Vision has earned themselves a strong reputation in the metal underground for their expansive death metal sounds. The recent release of their Ingrowth EP shows the band is stronger and more inventive than ever, their melodic death metal sound soaked in blackened overtones and stirring essences of classic metal and rock n roll a compelling encounter which stands out for band and extreme metal. Seizing the offer to find out more about band, its history, and the new release we set about drummer Giannis K with plenty of questions…

Hello Giannis and welcome to the site.

Firstly for those yet to discover your sounds please introduce the band and the entity that is Dark Vision.

Hello! First of all we would like to thank you for the opportunity to speak through your magazine. Dark Vision exists since 1996, we started playing atmospheric/heavy/black metal continuing these days into a straight forward death/black metal. Our influences lately covering many genres such as death/black metal, rock, classic heavy and all these under a rock’n’roll attitude…  If someone really needs to put a table about our genre, we can say that band’s like Satyricon, Behemoth, Black Sabbath, Voivod, etc. defined our nowadays style.

The band began in 1996, longevity many bands can only dream of. What has kept you inspired and passionate as a band?

The reason that this band started many years ago, was our love in this specific style and also for its subgenre. This made us to continue until now.  The magic moment when you creating a song or you are on stage, keeping you vigilance.  Another very important reason is that as a band we are not playing as professionals but at the same time we are trying to act as much a professional do.  In simple words, when a band is playing for the money there is a certain point that the musician will consider most of the time firstly the profit… In our case as we said because we are not playing for living we have the privilege to play whatever we want in our way.

How has your music and intent as a band evolved over the past 16 or so years?

We have definitely evolved all these years.  Apart of the several line-up changes we grow up as personalities, this made us think with more mature in every way from creating music to acting live. With the current line up the band continues the last years a specific way which evolving us.

Dark Vision is a band which has like so many survived numerous line-up changes, how has that impacted on the band generally and do you think and feel  certainly for Dark Vision, that this inevitable process actually benefits bands creatively for the main?

Following all these years we can say for sure that all these line-up changes firstly made us stronger and secondly helped the band to evolve as it is today. Of course this doesn’t mean that if a band having a standard line-up for years will not evolve, but in our case helped a lot. The only think that we can say was against us in every chance, is the time and the preparation until the band became ready to act again.

You have just released your excellent  Ingrowth EP through Bluntface Records though it had its first release as a vinyl exclusive last 113375year for your fifteen year anniversary. How has it been received so far and has this new unleashing from the independent US label brought a deserved energy and awareness to the EP?

Thanks for your good words! Bluntface Records definitely played a very important role in this release. From the very beginning we realized that with Otto from Bluntface Records we can work very smoothly and creatively together. We choose to release “Ingrowth” in vinyl. A part of the 15 years anniversary, it was a dream since the beginning of the band. We strongly believe that vinyl is more complete and at the same time nostalgic than the nowadays cd. The press worldwide hugged this release since the very beginning and we received very flattering words, we are thanking all of you for your support up to now.

How would you say the new release has evolved from and offers predominantly different to previous album Bestial Remedy?

We worked different this time. From creating the songs to the recording process everything was different. We worked at the recording sessions with more live feeling, which means that we didn’t use this time metronome, but we played all together in order to be closer to this live feeling.

Definitely! “Bestial Remedy” was the begging of a new era for the band and after all these years we can assure you that “Ingrowth” is a big step beyond for us, not only on the composing side but as an experience in the recording sessions.  This time with “Ingrowth” we focused more in the emotional, although our technical skills became better with results on this album.  The songs are approaching better death/black forms and all this under a “rock’n’roll” attitude.

There is a great melodic groove and breath to Ingrowth and its blackened death metal stance. Has this aspect naturally emerged or was something you wanted to intentionally explore?

Most of the things that we are doing are coming out naturally … after “Bestial Remedy” it was natural to continue and evolve this style under our way.

How are songs written within the band and what is more often than not the initial spark to an idea and song?

Composition process usually can be with 2 ways, sometimes our guitar player Mark is writing the song and presenting to the rest of the band in our rehearsals, and another way is to start in the studio working all together on an idea.

What are the strongest influences upon your writing musically and lyrically?

Many influences from daily matters up to religion (from a historical point of view), other times songs can describe personal situations or even our darkest thoughts…

Did you have set ideas and vision for songs before recording the EP in the studio or did they change and grow their own different character whilst bringing Ingrowth to life?

Most of the ideas in “Ingrowth” album were conceived in the preproduction. When the recording process started, we preferred to stay more close to technical matters (microphones set up, Amplifiers, etc), of course, in general if any last minute ideas arise and are worthwhile we are willing to try it.

IMG_4029Ingrowth investigates, as your previous releases, the deepest and richest of shadows, is there an underlying theme to the EP?

We were just felt free to do things without second thought. The result is what you are now hearing and we are proud for that.

Is there a particular moment on Ingrowth which leaves the proudest feeling inside and alternatively is there something on the release which you are now inspired to explore further in future songs?

Yes, definitely the rock n roll element affected us regarding our music and emotionally at the same time.

On a recent episode of The Bone Orchard podcast I featured your track Garden of Nuclear Mushrooms. Can you give some back ground to the track?

Thank you for this! Garden … is a song that refers to the Apocalypse from our point of view …

Across the years you have shared stages with the likes of Mayhem, Satyricon, Sodom, Rotting Christ, and Septic Flesh to name a small few, what have been the biggest moment live and any artists you would sell a kidney to play with? 😉

Hahahaha! … Nice question ….. ! Hmm… probably for a special worldwide tour with Satyricon, Rotting Christ, Dimmu Borgir, Behemoth…!

There have been quite a few very impressive metal and rock bands bursting out of Greece in the past couple of years. Is the scene there as vibrant and impressive as it seems from the outside?

Yes! Over the last years lot of bands are doing a good job holding high the Greek flag of our metal scene…

What is next on the agenda for Dark Vision?

Next thing will be a live concert in Athens at 6th of April with other local bands…. Also writing news song at the same time…IMG_4263

Thanks for taking time to talk with us any final thoughts you wish to share?

Thank you! Check our new album “Ingrowth”

Lastly which are the artists to have made the biggest impact on you as musicians?

Daily we hear a lot of things … we are always trying to expand our music  influences … of course musicians such as Frost from Satyricon, Inferno from Behemoth, Ihsahn from Emperor, Jon Nodtveidt, John Gallagher, we admire them and their influences guiding us , also lately Kvelertak from Norway is one of the bands that made something fresh in the scene …

The RingMaster Review 08/03/2013

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