Turning on the LoveSick Radio

US rockers LoveSick Radio “bring a distinctive blend of unapologetic rock guitar coupled with pop melodies and a little hip-hop swagger, creating a fresh sound all their own. “ The words of their bio are swiftly backed up by a sound which infests body and spirit and a live presence which has had halls bouncing long before the likes of All-American Rejects, Bon Jovi, Dorothy, Bobaflex, Scott Weland of Stone Temple Pilots, Justin Bieber, Blue October, Kid Rock, Steel Panther, Three Days Grace, Hinder, Twenty One Pilots, Safety Suit, Paramore, Dead Sara and New Found Glory have followed the band on stage.

A short while back we had the pleasure thanks to the guys finding out more with the band, chatting about origins, their sound, songs, and much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

David (Guitar):  Thanks for having us! We are LoveSick Radio & we play honest rock & roll with a touch of blues/punk. This line-up started when I reached out to Troy, our singer. I asked him if he wanted to sing on a track I had & he was game. Oddly enough we have known each other forever but can’t remember how we met. That song snowballed into bringing in Glenn & the Matts. We’ve been writing & touring ever since.

Were you involved in other bands previously? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe style or direction?

Glenn (Bass): All of us have played in a bunch of bands prior to coming together and doing this one. We’ve all brought a lot of what we learned in the other bands, as far as what makes a band work and what doesn’t and what we want out of music, to this band. Everyone’s past musical experiences have really shaped the way this band operates. Being in a band is like a relationship: you have to go through some tough ones to discover what you want.

What inspired the band name?

Matt B. (guitar): Our previous drummer was going through a breakup. Whilst on his way to rehearsal he kept hearing all these songs about heartbreak on the radio & when he got to rehearsal he made a comment about how the radio seemed lovesick & everyone thought it sounded cool so we went with it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Matt S. (Drummer): I wouldn’t say there were any specific ideas about forming the band.  We are just 5 guys who vibe well with each other musically, have an almost obsessive passion for music, and the drive to write and play day in and day out.  All of us have differing backgrounds musically, but at the heart of it, we love rock and roll.  The sound is a culmination of the individual influences of all of us, but more importantly, we just want to write good songs.  A good song is a good song, regardless of the genre.  Some might sound heavier, more twangy, or more soulful than others, but that’s all of our personalities coming out.

Do the same things still drive the band from those fresh faced days or have they evolved over time?

Matt B.: Essentially writing great songs that we get off on performing & connecting with an audience has always been the driving force within the band.

As the band evolves the drive to widen our reach & get our music out to the masses becomes stronger & stronger

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Troy (Singer): “Early days” kinda makes me laugh as I still feel like we are in our “early days”, but as far as evolution I think that honestly happens from song to song. Not just in our sound, but as a band overall…getting more comfortable with one another and for me as a vocalist pushing myself to new places. I think evolution has started since day one for us.

Are those things, that evolution, something organic or more the band deliberately setting out to try new things?

Matt S.: We aren’t afraid to try new things or experiment musically.  It just depends on the mood of the song and what makes sense.  We don’t just follow a music equation, but obviously we want our music to be accessible to everyone.  From the time that someone shares an idea, we build on it, we practice it, and we finally record it, the song could be almost completely different.  I’d like to think it happens organically.  When we get in the studio, that’s where the fun and experimentation begins.   On the current album we are working on, we have instruments which we do not have live on stage (strings, keys, horns), the band plays kazoos and sings gang vocals, we stomp, we clap, we play instruments that we have never played before, just to get the sound and vibe that we hear in our heads.. 

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

David: Yes everyone in the band love a million different things but I think the artist the inspire our approach are Aerosmith, AC/DC, The Stones, LED Zeppelin, Sex Pistols, The Rival Son & Stereophonics to name a few. These are all iconic bands & that’s what we strive to be one day. So we are constantly pushing ourselves to be the best we can be.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

Troy: There are always gonna be some variations, but music usually comes first…typically a killer riff. I’ll take a rough demo and live with it for a while…usually spend time driving around coming up with ideas and bring them to rehearsal where everyone chimes in. So in the beginning it’ a very “isolated” process but as we get things worked up, the band as a whole will bring in all the different influences.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Troy: Inspiration for me is always life…either something I lived or something I am watching someone go through. The only time it would vary is if I am asked to write for a specific TV or movie thing, but even then I have to draw from personal experiences…As an introvert I spend a lot of my time just watching people. I write what I see.

Please give us some background to your latest release.

Glenn: Our latest release is a song called “Young Hurricane”. It’s written kind of like a poem in the way the vocals are structured. Basically it’s just about sticking’ to your guns and doing what you know is right (kind of a metaphor for playing rock n roll in 2019). A lot of the really cool elements of the song came together in the studio when we had a chance to really sit down and play with different ideas to build the song.

Give us some insight to the collective themes and premise behind songs.

Troy: I think it is fair to say we have some pretty universal themes with all our tracks…def some self-reflection and overcoming, some rebellious middle finger flipping and of course love and loss. I’d say our next release “Bloodshot Eyes” falls in the self-reflecting/ overcoming category but doing the reflecting in some smokey bar if those still exist…haha

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

David: It happens both ways in the studio. But a lot of time we will have the music done to a certain point & start tracking before the vocals are finished. The bed tracks might influence Troy to do something different then what we had for the rough demo. We are never married to an idea. We are always changing or rewriting trying to get the best out of the song.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

With the live show we want to sound like a freight train going a full speed. So we work on dynamics, power & energy. We want you to feel it when you come to a show.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

Matt S.: Like any other band, you have to put in the time.  We have played for empty rooms, we have played for packed houses, and we have played festivals where you can’t see the end of the crowd.  People seek out good music.  The hard part is introducing it to them (luckily the internet exists).  I feel that we have the sound and energy to lure people in, and to keep them coming back to shows.  It doesn’t matter if it is regionally or worldwide.  As long as you connect to the crowd, you will build a following.  Whether it is a home show or something across the country, we put on the same game face each night and try to win over every crowd we play for.  We have found that people like the resurgence of good old fashioned rock and roll everywhere we go, so everywhere feels comfortable and like our neck of the woods.

Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands and talking of the internet how has social media impacted on the band to date?

Glenn: Absolutely. It all comes down to a band’s desire and willingness to push themselves and go outside of their comfort zone to grow and do something cool and original. Social media and the internet are a great thing for bands because it allows us to reach people all over the world as independent artists. Without the internet, we might not have the opportunity to do this interview!

Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Troy: I think there will always be both negative and positives whether being the “underdog” band on the come up, or at the top trying to stay there. I think the internet and social media will always have the ugliness and trolls looking to tear you down, no matter what your status….however, the positive of how many people can be reached is hard to argue. Honestly with this band being started in the “new world” of technology, it’s really all we’ve known so is kinda our new normal.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

David: Thank you again for having us!!

If you would like to check out us & the music you can go to these links. See you on the road!

AppleMusic: https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/lovesick-radio/203509719

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/feels-so-good-single/1436316245

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/7zca83vBdFEDg0119J8thJ?si=4bw6zx7-RL-fbpKajO1aHw

YouTube: Youtube.com/lovesickradio

Instagram: @lovesickradio

Twitter: @lovesickradio

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoveSickRadioBand/

 & anywhere else you stream & download music

Pete RingMaster 03/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

CRNKSHFT – Self Titled EP

Photo Credit – Alex Barredo

We surely have a soft spot for things carrying real punch and that is exactly what the new self-titled EP from Canadian outfit CRNKSHFT has in sound and presence. The four track offering is an imposing roar of hungry and varied metal but equally shows a blaze of hard and melodic rock ‘n’ roll, a trait even more compelling in the successor to their previous well-received debut EP helping stir up a very healthy appetite for the band’s fierce and rousing attack.

Hailing from Vancouver, CRNKSHFT (pronounced crankshaft) have begun waking attention far beyond the local scene they have already been devoured by. Support slots for the likes of Lordi, Prong, Grim Reaper, and The Veer Union have capped a powerful live presence and reputation to date, one like their releases beginning to stir broader spotlights. Providing the evidence, their recent single Systematic won an award from the Academia Awards Academy in Los Angeles and there seems little to stop the Daren Grahn (Metallica, Hedley, Mötley Crüe, Bon Jovi) produced EP nudging greater focus their way.

That single opens up the EP, Systematic instantly stroking ears with grouchy riffs before a wave of tenaciously swung beats and wiry grooves join the initial wave of snarling guitar and the mutually striking tones of vocalist Shane Jolie. With equally rapacious melodic strands breaking through the aggressive trespass driven by Josh Lauze’s potent beats, the song develops a Nonpoint meets Five Finger Death Punch like incitement loaded with the band’s own fresh and inventive attributes. The infectious growl and stride of the song is inescapable, guitarists Geoff Way and Sebastian Mark Pulse casting a web of voracious enterprise as intrusive as it is flirtatious; a union the song embraces as a whole.

The following Tears Me Apart bursts into life with its own antagonistic yet welcoming blaze next, riffs and rhythms ravishing the senses but equally content to pause for melody warm breaths. The calmer moments still have a shadowy air as the bass of Trevor Miles courts the peace while Jolie springs his own diversity of magnetic attack throughout. With unpredictable essences emerging, occasionally with a Korn like nature, the song leaves pleasure full before Old Habits has its go at exciting ears. Another of the singles tempting anticipation the way of the EP, the song assertively simmers and boils; its robust imagination lined body a raw fire of Three Days Grace/ Bring Me The Horizon like dexterity and adventure.

Again, it is a song with something individual to CRNKSHFT in its dynamics, a welcome trait even bolder in the dark prowl of Breaking The Silence; a track virtually stalking ears from its start before its emotive and volcanic heart erupts, a cycle then repeated with fluid craft and invention. The most unpredictable moment on the release, it is as cantankerous as it is melodically reflective in tone. Fierce and venomous whilst contagiously engaging in touch, the song ensures the EP ends on the same major high it started with, heights closely nudged in between.

With familiar textures and essences in its design, the CRNKSHFT’s sound and EP do not quite find major originality but the signs are there, as strongly proven by its closer, whilst enjoyment is already a done deal. Things are looking good for band and ears.

The CRNKSHFT EP is out now across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/crnkshft/   http://www.crnkshft.com/

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacktop Mojo – Burn The Ships

The past four years since forming has seen Texan rock band Blacktop Mojo court a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, all the time increasingly nudging global attention to turn their way. The release of second album Burn The Ships is the moment that awareness just might happen, the release a striking and thickly accomplished slab of highly flavoursome, sinew moulded rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in September 2012 by vocalist Matt James and drummer Nathan Gillis, Blacktop Mojo swiftly leapt into the live scene with the intent of playing as many shows and tours as they could. It is a hunger which prevails to this day, the Palestine, TX quintet sharing stages with the likes of Bon Jovi, Candlebox, Drowning Pool, Aaron Lewis, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Whiskey Myers, Dirty River Boys, and The Bigsbys among a great many others over the years. Debut album I Am stirred things up at home with its release in 2014, similarly inviting broader notice of the band’s hearty hard/melodic rock sound. Burn The Ships though is a wake-up call to bigger spotlights upon the band, the Philip Mosley produced and Austin Deptula mixed and mastered encounter a fiery roar very hard to ignore or avoid finding a healthy appetite for.

The Blacktop Mojo sound is arguably not the most unique, the band drawing comparisons to the likes of Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Soundgarden yet has an individual character and diversity which lifts it from the crowd with ease. All the evidence lies within Burn The Ships and its inventive and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll; a proposition hitting the ground running with its majorly rousing opener Where The Wind Blows. A lone melody with a country rock twang makes the first beckon, a sister lure swiftly by its side before muscle bound rhythms loom over ears amidst the continuing invitation of that initial welcome. Soon into its thick and potent stride with the growling tones of Matt Curtis’ bass rich bait alongside the meaty swipes of Gillis, the track has its infectious claws firmly around ears and appetite with James’ delivery leading the way and in turn the listener into one peach of a chorus impossible not to get fully involved in. With the riffs of rhythm guitarist Kenneth Irwin equally steering the temptation as lead guitarist Ryan Kiefer spins wiry grooves, it is a seriously compelling proposal,

The following End Of Days is just as formidable and satisfying, its robust rhythms and gnarly grooves alone gripping body and an instinctive passion for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll. As its predecessor, the song carries an irresistible chorus to back up the already successful lures at play and the album’s powerful start, success its title track continues. As provocative guitar temptation wraps its flame lit charms around ears, Burn The Ships quickly shows itself an equal to those before in enticement, gaining even greater strength in that trait as its groove takes on a nagging quality as it meanders around the vocal potency of James. With Seether-esque hues involved, the song croons and roars; flexing its muscle as it spins its inventively intoxicating sonic web with each passing second. The track is pure drama and the pinnacle of the album though challenged throughout.

The earnest strains of Prodigal follow, its Staind lit serenade a mellow emotive caress allowing for a breath whilst enjoying its melodic heat, suggestive flames building  into a bigger blaze before Shadows On The Wall smoulders and erupts in a 3 Doors Down scented fire next, subsequently  followed by the virile throes of Sweat. The trio do not quite teach the heights of the first three tremendous tracks but each with their individual natures and temptations leave plenty to embrace and firmly enjoy.

The snarling properties of Pyromaniac bring the album back to its loftiest heights, the song as heated as its title suggests with irritability in its riffs and a bass grumble so easy to grow lustful for. Melodically, there is a 3 Days Grace air contrasted and complimented perfectly by the grungier textures at work on the senses, both linked by an instinctive catchiness  which again features in potent form within the predacious 8000 Lines, a song stalking ears with rapacious riffs and antagonistic beats as sonic enterprise and vocal drama ignite. The track is outstanding; its unpredictability enhanced by melodic beauty as an oasis of calm shares ears with its tempestuous heart.

Both Dog On A Leash with its red-blooded plaintive call and the reflective cries of Make A Difference leave satisfaction full, each revealing further twists in the album’s make-up and enterprise while Chains brings a web of athletic grooves and beefy rhythms in a burly persuasion raising the ante again. It is pure captivation preying on an already eager appetite for sound and encounter.

Concluded by the emotionally charged Dream On and the melancholic musing of Underneath, the impressive Burn The Ships has plenty to see the band make the next step towards global recognition. Its songs are shapely and sound rich if not always on the truly unique side. Its craft and imagination more than compensates though as ears embrace the open potential also lying within a triumph of a listen.

Burn The Ships is out now through Cuhmon Records @ https://blacktopmojo.bandcamp.com/releases or http://www.blacktopmojo.com/store

http://www.blacktopmojo.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BlacktopMojo   https://twitter.com/blacktopmojo

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Of Kings and Captains – Jack My Boy

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Ahead of their new EP Give ’em Hell Son, British pop rockers Of Kings and Captains have released new single Jack My Boy, a mercilessly infectious slice of robust rock ‘n’ roll lying somewhere between The Pirates, Eddie and the Hot Rods, and The Wildhearts. It is hard to imagine that the Black Country hailing band could have found a more rousing teaser for their new EP, the new single taken from it one of those proposals which instinctively grips ears, voice, and bodies easily enlisting their eager involvement in short time.

Stourbridge bred, Of Kings and Captains released their debut album in 2015 to eager reactions; its success backed up by a potent live reputation which has seen the band share stages with the likes of McFly and Kids in Glass Houses among many and recently undertake a five date stadium tour with Bon Jovi. The foursome of vocalist/rhythm guitarist Luke Wassell, lead guitarist Joshua Lomas, bassist Dean Greatbatch, and drummer Kieran Lock linked up with producer Gavin Monaghan (The Twang, Editors, Niplozi) and Joseph Murray for Give ’em Hell Son and if Jack My Boy is anything to go by, with thrilling success.

A song according to Wassell which is “…about self-confidence and defying people who doubt you! it’s all about sticking to your guns and being yourself regardless of how people might put you down. It’s about being individual and kicking back against the norm“, Jack My Boy has all attention leaning its way from the initial lure of drum enticement. Lock’s magnetic rhythms are quickly joined by an anthemic bassline and eager twang loaded riffs, they in turn turning to an array of fifties seeded hooks as Wassell’s tones whips up even more infectious bait to the already catchy encounter. From there the track continues to lead the listener, drawing them towards seriously virulent choruses, they irresistible peaks in one, from start to finish, spirit arousing stomp.

It takes just one listen to be firmly involved in the song with every encounter after drawing keen and full participation. If Jack My Body is a sign of things to come with Give ’em Hell Son, the EP is a must.

Jack My Boy is out now with the Give ’em Hell Son EP available for download from all good digital retailers September 9th.

Upcoming Gig Dates:

Sept 9th – Katie Fitzgerald’s – Stourbridge (Acoustic Show)

Sept 29th – RiverRooms – Stourbridge

Sept 30th – The Shed – Leicester

Oct 15th Wulfrun Hall ­‐ Wolverhampton

https://www.facebook.com/ofkingsandcaptains   http://ofkingsandcaptains.com/   https://twitter.com/ofkingsandcaps

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lawless Hearts – Creatures Of Habit

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Coming off a highly successful 2014 which saw the band play Austin’s renowned SXSW and undertake a praise earning European tour, Florida quintet Lawless Hearts look to make this year just as potent in their emergence with the release of debut EP Creatures Of Habit. Offering four songs which draw on some of the best essences of classic rock for a modern slice of rock ‘n’ roll, the release is an attention grabbing and thoroughly enjoyable introduction to the band.

Hailing from Jacksonville, Lawless Hearts takes inspirations from the likes of Bon Jovi, Guns N Roses, Led Zeppelin, Boston, and Foo Fighters into their energetic and melodically expressive sound but equally as their EP pleasures the ears, it is easy to suggest that maybe artists like Heart, Fleetwood Mac, and The Pretenders have made some impact on the band’s tastes too. Creatures Of Habit is not a proposition which blows you away or reeks of major originality, due to those influences maybe, but equally it does have a blaze of freshness and enterprise which ensures the band is not just one of the crowd.

Creatures_Large     The EP’s title track is the first song to touch ears and instantly wraps them in a sonic embrace which soon broadens into a potent stroll framed by pungent rhythms and coloured by a guitar bred melodic enticing. Things settle down with the full entry of Alex Marie’s magnetic vocals, her impressive voice swiftly a full engagement between ears and pleasure backed strongly by members of the band. The guitar of Michael Thomas also brings another rich ‘voice’ to the encounter, infusing the song with more imagination melodies around a flame soiling solo. As riffs from rhythm guitarist Justus Sutherland similarly entice and the dark throaty tones of Rob Joseph’s bass enthrals, the song blossoms into a flavoursome captivation.

The fiery air and textures of the first song continue to be explored by the following If I Have To which erupts with an immediate pop rock infectiousness. The crisp beats of drummer Corey Ahlquist hold court across the infectious encounter, driving things on in a vivacious stroll as vocals and guitars cast their individual tenacity and feisty charm. Like its predecessor, and the EP as a whole, it is hard to say you will hear anything startlingly new yet for enjoyable and refreshing rock sounds and imagination Lawless Hearts leaves no one wanting. The delivery of Alex Marie, as the sounds seems, to gain even greater heat in its passion too whilst the guitars once more dazzle in craft and adventure.

Oblivion is the source of that earlier mentioned hint of The Pretenders, the evocative hues around its verse especially reminiscent of the distinct flavour found in the UK/US band. A more restrained but no less impassioned proposition, the track provides a rock pop croon thick on emotion and full to the gills with transfixing vocals and harmonies.

It is final song Fallout which steals the show though, opening with a reflective balladry which evolves into a mighty rock ‘n’ roll stomp complete with rumbling rhythms, vocal roars, and melodic intoxication. The track is irresistible and alone reeks of the potential within Lawless Hearts which suggests this is a band really going places. The other tracks on the EP are no slouches in making similar hints, but the last proposition on the EP simply soars above their accomplished and enjoyable presences to majorly impress. Once more it is probably right to say no new templates are being set in place with the song but rock music does not often come much better or thrilling.

With their first album also appearing to be in the works for 2015, it is looking like being another big year for Lawless Hearts with Creatures Of Habit a rich and pleasing start for it and the suspected wakening of big spotlights upon the band.

Creatures of Habit is available from April 21st via Pavement Entertainment on most online stores.

http://www.lawlesshearts.com/   https://www.facebook.com/LawlessHeartsMusic

RingMaster 21/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

 

These Reigning Days – Opera of Love

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There has been a great many, us included, who thought that These Reigning Days could and would be the next big thing in British rock because of their exceptional parade of gripping and insatiably contagious singles. It has not quite happened yet, but now with the release of their sensational debut album Opera of Love that anticipation is back in full force. The album is sensational, pulling in all the brilliance of their singles, revitalising them, and laying them beside new creative emprises to send ears aflutter and emotions into overload. The Devon trio create rock songs which are as skilled in their textures and invention as they are virulent in their anthemic catchiness, the result an album that is one of the invigorating melodic roars of 2014.

The past couple of years have been a busy time for the band, their increasingly recognised presence seeing the band relentlessly touring and playing at numerous festivals such as Glastonbury and Hop Farm, play with the likes of Metronomy, Echo and The Bunnymen, and The Feeling, and more recently unleash their sounds before 60,000 fans at Milan’s San Siro Stadium supporting Bon Jovi. The past summer was consumed with a host of UK and European dates in support of the new album as well as an appearance at Vladivostock Rocks in Eastern Russia and Emerge in Mumbai, Dehli, and Bangalore. Now the Yoad Nevo (Goldfrapp, Moby) produced Opera of Love, with additional production and mix on the band’s previous singles by Ade Bushby (Muse, Foo Fighters), gets its moment to ignite the country and such its inescapable enticement it is hard to see it failing.

The album reveals its might and intent straight away with opener Stand Down. The song opens with the voice of guitarist Dan Steer waking up ears in the embrace of keys. It is an elegant start but even in its gentle coaxing provides the hint of something waiting to spring forth. When it comes it is not the expected surge but a dramatic stroll of thumping rhythms from drummer Joe Sansome and throaty bass tempting from Jonny Finnis. That in turn, with Steer’s expressive tones still in poetic league with the piano melancholy, leads into greater intensity and subsequently a contagious persuasion, the first anthem of the encounter. The melodies cast by the guitar and the radiance of keys only light up further the striding beauty of the song and its irrepressible march on the passions.

The impressive start is surpassed by Changes, an opening croon of bass and guitar matched by voice, luring the imagination into an ethereal flight of keys over an evocatively hued fiery landscape. As the song plays with thoughts there is a TRDfamiliarity to this and others songs which refuses detection, that is until the realisation comes that the recognisable feel is from the band itself and the impact of their sound through previous singles like the sensational Too Late, which itself follows the outstanding new single Thrones. The album’s third song erupts with a throaty tone to its energy and persuasion, the bass especially vocal in its sinew stretched address on the imagination. Harmonies equally spring at the senses with similar success and strength, whilst keys and beats make a respectful but rigorous frame for the blossoming beauty within. The song is unrelenting in its melodic charge, offering a rowdy but composed tempest of beauty and bewitchingly textured ingenuity.

Too Late just as impressively swipes its share of the passion next, riding in on a dark magnetic bassline through sultry scenery of Morricone kissed scythes of guitar. Steer is just as potent as his expels the narrative of the song, everything building to a crescendo of heady hooks across bulging bass bait and tenacious beats with a chorus only the dead could refuse joining in on. Adding a Latin hue to its climactic tone and air, the track is a seriously intensive captivation.

A brief atmospheric instrumental called simply Interlude allows a breath to be snatched before latest single and title track bounds in with melodic seduction and drama fuelled vivacity. The electronic side of the band takes centre stage across the song but with plenty of room for the tight temptation of guitar and rhythmic enterprise to enslave ears and thoughts. Again there is an infectiousness which allows no escape of its binding grip whilst the warm soar of keys apply a provocative seduction. Its triumph is swiftly emulated by I Need Time, a song which takes longer than some to get to the same lofty heights. Featuring the enticing vocals of Jazmyn Mary in duet with Steer, and soaring harmonies courted by romantic melodies, the track is a gripping and mesmeric soar across the senses.

Both the electro stroll of Smoke and Mirrors and the shimmering aural light of Fish Bowl escort an already eager appetite to new hunger The first is seeded in an eighties synth pop revelry but just as alluringly adds a torrent of feisty riffs and energetic rhythmic unpredictability to further stir up its increasingly addictive bait whilst the second sends electronic ripples around and off of a sturdier drive of guitar and rhythm bred tenacity. Though neither matches the lofty heights of say Too Late both leave ears and thoughts basking in their warmth and invention before the dynamic endeavour of Living It Up descends on the passions. Starting with Steer crooning into another subtle yet colourful caress of keys, the track soon rumbles with muscle infused rhythms which in turn sparks a rampant energy infused with snarling riffs and taunts from guitars and bass. Subsequently entwining both sides of its scintillating ingenuity, the song expands into another inimical anthem in the severe contagion of the album.

Through the emotive majesty of English Rose and the similarly evocative breath of the Brit pop like Shine On, band and album show new twists in their creative characters to keep everything fresh and vibrant. That aspect of the album is a given before the pair share their evidence to be honest and reinforced by the following cinematic escapade of Satellite. With a sinister air to keys and bass and fascination to hooks and the more aggressive hues of guitar, the track creates its own unique and pungent enslavement of body and emotions.

Opera of Love is closed by the short McCartney-esque ballad The End, Steer weaving a melancholic finale with equally emotive keys. It is a tightly enticing close to one of the year’s major highlights, and the latest confident declaration that These Reigning Days is ready to crack that intensive spotlight.

Opera of Love is available via Ecco Recordings on September 22nd @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/opera-of-love-special-edition/id911377967

www.thesereigningdays.co.uk

RingMaster 22/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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October Rage: Outrage

A sturdy and fiery merger of riotous rock n roll and sizzling melodic rock, Outrage from Australian band October Rage is an album which either when rampaging with eager energy or is enveloping the ear with fine melodic craft, makes for a thoroughly enjoyable and invigorating experience. The band and release sits easily amongst the likes of Saliva, Shinedown, Hinder, and Nonpoint. It may not stand out as anything ground breaking but has a freshness and spark arguably lacking in the recent releases of those other bands. If you are looking for an adrenaline driven yet thoughtful and warmly enterprising time than Outrage is a rewarding treat to party with.

From New South Wales, October Rage began in 2008 with brothers Nick (vocals/guitar) and William Roberts (bass). After a long search which took them to looking as far as America, the band was completed with the addition of Rory Bratby (drums) and Tim Ciantar (guitar), two musicians they had been to school with though in different years. Now complete the quartet built a strong local fan base which their debut single of the following year, Silver Line, took to a wider recognition. Recorded with world renowned producer Adrian Hannan, the release marked the beginning of a definite rise for the band. They soon followed this with a performance in front of a 50,000 strong audience in Sydney supporting Bon Jovi, an opportunity brought from winning a radio station contest. The latter part of 2011 saw the band entering the studio with again Hannan, to record Outrage. Since its completion the foursome has toured the US supporting both Steel Panther and Sevendust as well as undergoing a line-up change with guitarist Josh Gilbert and drummer Alan Toka replacing the departed Ciantar and Bratby. As the album stretches around the globe the band is pulling in more and more devoted followers, which with the infectious and strong sounds it offers is no real surprise.

From a relatively unadventurous opening intro instrumental in Lords Of Wyrd, the album sets to work on the passions with the rampant Set You Free. Within seconds it has ears pricked and senses open to charged riffs and thumping rhythms. With strong vocals from Nick and an anthemic gait to its chorus, the track is a familiar but enterprising encounter to fire up keen enthusiasm. As mentioned earlier about the whole release, there is nothing strikingly new going on but as limbs and the sparked unbridled eagerness to get involved with the song shows, there are plenty of energised reactions to its strident sounds spawn.

Moving into the equally robust and energetic Wayside, the release has a full captivation ensured. Like its predecessor the track is a thumping engagement which just leaves one breathless and invigorated, the great guitar craft and raging intensity tempered with scorching melodic invention, a fuse to deeper pleasure. It is from this point that Outrage unveils its varied and impressive strengths. Songs like the next up Silver Line with its mellower pace and less urgent caresses and its successor Rain, expand the scope of songwriting across the release. The second of these two is a simmering heat with sonic explosive outpourings of tremendous vocals and equally dynamic guitar invention. With a snapping bass and jabbing drum smacks to add steel to the song, it is a contagious companion to rile up the heart.

From the more than decent radio friendly sounds of Home and the seductive tones of Supernova, its rock inspiration seemingly drifting in from the expressive rock of bands like Nickleback, the album moves from a gentler yet potent breath to a more sinewy attack with songs like the bluesy Eastern Road and the snarling Metallica like Two-Sided Blade. Whilst neither song finds the riot of the earlier songs on the album, they offer a bite and muscular intensity for another shift in the diversity of the release.

With two passion soaked slow songs, Into the Night and Under The Wind, sandwiching a grungy tinder box of a slow burner in Reign of Fire for a closing trio of strong emotive ballads, the album leaves thoughts and emotions on a high if calm plateau. It is a fine end to what is an impressive album. With more careering slabs of rock n roll like Wayside, Outrage would have challenged personal end of year lists but without doubt October Rage has delivered one of the more gratifying and energising releases these past months. Make a note of the name as the Australians will be making big waves ahead in rock music ahead.

http://www.octoberrage.com

RingMaster 14/11/2012

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