Jingo – The Art Of Loving

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One of the artists which has truly excited and impressed without reservation over the past couple of years has been UK band Jingo. The London based quartet has inspired critical acclaim and a hungry fan base through a series of diversely inventive and explosively creative singles. It has led to an impatient anticipation for the band’s debut album and now that it is here, it feels like we all short changed them with our hopes and expectations. The Art Of Loving is an exceptional encounter, a delicious collection of melodically fiery and emotionally intensive songs which have a revelry which seduces feet right through to the passions. Individually unique but uniting for a fluidly captivating adventure, the album brings some of their previously released singles together with striking new songs. Those older tracks though which fans already know well and love, have been revitalised in their mix as well as in their actual bodies to create nothing but fresh and scintillating exploits within the exhilarating album.

Jingo consists of guitarist/vocalist Jack Buckett, his American wife and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie, drummer Joseph Reeves, and bassist Chris Smith. Since its early days and shows across Brooklyn, New York and London, Jingo has gone from their first gig which saw them supporting Graham Coxon of Blur, to being compared to the likes of Fleetwood Mac and The Magic Numbers, and to gaining fevered attention and support from independent press and radio whilst becoming one of the most talked about bands with fans and again the underground media. Their nine singles marked the band firmly out as having the potency to break into the strongest spotlight of attention and recognition, now the year in a half making The Art Of Loving could and should be the doorway into that expansive scenery for Jingo.

With former member Sahil Batra adding his talent to some of the tracks too, the band instantly ignites ears and imagination with album opener Black Flowers. A heavy air and throaty bass coaxing engrosses ears straight away but it is tempered by the vocal seduction of Katie. It is a magnetically intriguing union of hungry shadows and vocal temptation which only gains further potency as post punk scythes of guitar add their voice to the compellingly brewing emprise of the song. Once hitting its sultry stride, the track is awash with evocative keys and a metallic resonance to riffs which adds mystique and intimidation to the encounter respectively. The song is a dramatically contagious and ingeniously crafted fusion of light and dark, merging the  heavier seventies rock essences of Jess & the Ancient Ones in majestic flirtation with the melodic beauty of The Magic Numbers and the atmospheric beauty of Solar Halos, but ultimately something unique to Jingo.

   The following Skypunch opens with an elegant caress of keys but also another imagination grabbing breath of dramatic breeding. It is fair to say there is a powerful drama to all of Jingo’s songs, all different but all building an intensity and climatic narrative musically and emotionally. The second track soon parades a cinematic landscape of sound and emotion, its thick yet warmly charming enterprise suitable for a narrative of global espionage or intimate emotional dilemma. Keys and drums entangle with strenuous ideation across the song whilst Katie roars with mesmeric beauty matched by the similarly vocal endeavour of Jack’s expressive guitar invention.

Both When You Want Me and Belong To You take the listener into imaginative journeys of tenacious and creative revelry. The first comes through a sonic almost sinister ambience to cup ears in an engaging vocal tempting amidst a

bordering on tempestuous climate which like the rhythmic enticement seems to grow and bulge with intent the deeper into the song the listener finds themselves. Looking like it is heading into a storm, the song instead twists back on itself to parade a glorious stomp of funk seeded melodies and boisterous rhythms courted by a psychedelic enticing of guitar and keys. It is an engrossing and impossibly infectious song almost matched by its successor. Belong To You opens with a bass lure which offers hints of The Pixies before joining a warm flame of chords and the even hotter vocals of Katie. With a masterful rhythmic dance from the sticks of Reeves creating a gripping spine, the song smoulders energetically with a sixties pop and psychedelic infectiousness but also a provocative aural melodrama to voice and the multi-flavoured textures erupting throughout the outstanding track.

That sixties feel with a just as strong fifties pop additive, brings the following title track to enthralling life too. Barely a minute long and simply the voice and harmonies of Katie accompanied by finger clicks, it is simply mesmeric and irresistible. Like Wanda Jackson meets Sarah Vaughan, the track is a small treat and soon making way for Home. Right away there is angst and drama, a word impossible not to use with every song, to the thick bass hues and short stabs of guitar which skirt the visually provocative vocals. The track is sensational, a seductive and mentally intrusive aural movie which sets body and emotions ablaze whilst coaxing thoughts to create their own personal adventures.

A gentler flight is brought by the brilliant Blue Wail. Exotic vocal expression and jagged guitar teasing wraps engrossingly around thoughts whilst bulging rhythms and bass sultriness adds to the Caribbean coloured canvas spawning the

Artwork by Katie Buckett

Artwork by Katie Buckett

creative devilry emerging above it. It is a transfixing fascination of sound for ears and imagination soon emulated in its own distinctive manner by Before You Were Born. The song is an emotively enchanting ballad but one still fuelled by vivacity through its rhythms and invention which keenly engages the striking heart felt vocal presence of Katie. It is a delightful embrace, if not as potent on the passions as other songs on the album, which shares its intimacy and passionate depths with the magnificent Jaclyn. Written about a friend of Katie who killed herself, the song is simply creative vaudeville set in the walls of one of the most creatively inspired and melodically pungent songs you are likely to hear this year. Every second, note, and syllable is soaked in passion, anger and love entwined in a fire of invention and yes aurally poetic drama. There is also a sultry seduction to the song which weaves and swerves curvaceously before ears to entice and pull the senses into the heated grandeur and personal fever of the track. Brilliance hardly covers it.

The jazzy elegance of Same Without You is next and cored by a piano grace, proceeds to cast a melodic temptress of itself melodically and theatrically to stand hand in hand with the similarly seductive vocals. With broody basslines and individual fires of invention lining the sensational enticement, the song is a climate of invasively emotive hues, melancholic ambience, and lustful invention, much like next up IQ84. The track from its first moment is parading an irresistible web of choppy riffs, jangling chords, and mountainously heavy bass and rhythmic sculpting. Complete with seventies seeded keys, a touch of The Stranglers not for the first time hinting away in keys, and virulently suggestive and flaming atmospheres, it is another stunning pinnacle in the release.

The Art Of Loving is brought to a close by the increasingly captivating beauty of Don’t Call It Love, a resourceful and melodically shimmering ballad once again allowing Katie to show the depths of her voice before utilising it in a crescendo of creative courtliness enclosed in a tempest of united passion and inventive energy. It is a slow burner of a song which given time matches the depths and heights of the other songs on what is easily one of the albums of the year. Fans of the band will probably expect to hear that but even they will have their breath taken away by its magnificence.

The Art Of Loving is released on September 1st @ http://jingomusic.bandcamp.com/album/the-art-of-loving

http://jingomusic.com/

10/10

RingMaster 31/08/2014

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Jake Evans – This is Life

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This is Life is one of those tracks which just triggers the sweet spot, treats it to a masterful seduction of stirring rock music which lingers and simply grows with time. It is perhaps no real surprise that the new single from UK singer/songwriter Jake Evans is so potent and exhilarating with its following of his acclaimed debut single Easy On My Soul, as well as impressive musical history, but there is something in its heart and presence which catches the breath and imagination far beyond expectations. It is a stunning encounter, thrilling and laying down a teaser of Evan’s forthcoming first album Day One which is irresistible.

Macclesfield based Evans first come to the fore with Rambo & Leroy, earning a reputation and spotlight which took him to the attention of Bernard Sumner and his band Bad Lieutenant after the second demise of New Order. As the band’s co-front-man, guitarist and songwriter, alongside Summer and New Order band mate Stephen Morris (also New Order) as well as Blur’s Alex James, Evans increased his reputation within the band’s success which led to invitations to support the likes of Paul Weller, New Order, Johnny Marr and Doves’ Jimi Goodwin once emerging as a solo artist in 2012. Easy On My Soul was drenched in eager acclaim upon its release slotting nicely in with highly praised appearances at Festival No 6 and the iconic Jodrell Bank music festival. This Is Life is the next adventure and certain to open up a new depth of ardour for his impressively evolving creative persuasion.

The song is a tide of virulent hooks coming in varied shapes and designs, the first an immediate temptation as This is Life opens. A sonic Jake Evans a2486262845_10sigh lights the fuse to a weave of acidically melodic guitar bred hues which instantly recalls The Cult, delicious bait which subsequently embraces the shadows of Sisters Of Mercy too as a great throaty bass seduction and crystalline keys explore the imagination. Evans’ voice has a slightly grainy feel to his expressive tones which only adds richer colour and texture to the contagious enticement, his delivery holding a whisper of Paul Marsh of The Mighty Lemon Drops, as does some of the melodic suasion lapping around his voice. It is a gloriously fascinating proposition which only flourishes further through fine guitar coaxing and a steady but potent rhythmic framing to the smouldering intensity and passion of the song.

Those essences of eighties and nineties bands bring a familiarity to the song which only increases its contagion and appeal but equally there is an originality and invention which as mentioned at the start, fondles and incites an instinctive rapture to the impressive encounter.

It is impossible not to breed a healthy anticipation for the impending Day One from This Is Life alone but placed alongside Easy On My Soul expectations and hopes reach skywards, though you sense they will be well fed and pleasured by Evans when the time comes.

This Is Life is available digitally June 16th @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/this-is-life-single/id879180547

https://www.jakeevansmusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 15/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Embracing individual shadows and unique lights: an interview with Katie Buckett of Jingo

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Across the past twelve months or so, UK based band Jingo has been one of the biggest surprises and persistently unique propositions to keep the site excited and busy with a regular presentation of singles. Recently the band unveiled the final three tracks in a series of four which were released one by one over a four track period. As almost expected now but always impressed by, the songs came with individual character and stylishly varied sounds wrapped in an equally mesmeric imagination.

There was the poetically evocative Before You Were Born, a song which opens with the ever sirenesque voice of Katie Buckett courted by just as elegant melodic caresses and pungent keys. Heart bred and emotively enchanting, the song immerses senses and thoughts in a striking aural narrative which grows and brews in intensity across its length, Kate’s husband Jack alongside Joseph Reeves and Sahil Batra casting a magnetic web of sound and vocal support, not forgetting sonic drama which is mouthwatering. It is a glorious song which shares diversity and startling persuasion with Home, another song which is able to simultaneously seduce and inflict an intrusive adventure upon the imagination and passions. The drama of the previous song is again, as across most of their songs, a thick temptation which shares shadows and sultry colour with the equally delicious sounds and gripping premise of the encounter. The track is a brilliant aural movie for mind and heart, a provocative suitor for ears and senses, and an ingenious lover for the imagination, just like the last of the single released in that aforementioned quartet. Turn Around is rhythmic enticement around which vocals and harmonies flame and melodies dance with a flirtatious summer bred festivity. Again the track offers something new from and about Jingo. It is a trait all of their ten plus singles has succeeded in impressing by, here a Caribbean swagger and warmth aligned to a psychedelic coaxing a bewitching venture to which Katie excels, once again.

Jingo is a band which surely cannot be a British secret for much longer, their invention and craft too big to be contained you suspect and hope, especially with the forthcoming release of their debut album which the band are finishing as you read. With a long overdue move to find out much more about the band; its past, present, and future we had the pleasure of having Katie share time with us and revealing…

 

Hey Katie and welcome to the site, thank you for talking with us.

Thanks for liking our music.

Tell us about the beginnings of Jingo, where it all started and on which side of the ocean; oh and was it band or romance first? ;)

Jack (guitar) and Joe (drums) brought their band to New York for six months to live the dream. They rented a basement flat in The McKibbin Lofts, a converted warehouse in Bushwick where I had been living for a couple years. I ran an open mic in the building where I first met them and there was a really great community vibe in the area so I guess you could say music brought us together, but it all really came together when Jack and I got married and we decided I should move to London. It was tough, I trained long and hard, but sure enough I mustered the strength to swim across the Ocean. Soon after their other band came to an end, we started playing music and calling it a band little over a year ago.

So what specifically inspired the relocation to London from the US?

Well Jack said in the event of a nuclear catastrophe, in which the only way he could survive was to move to the US, he would only just consider it, so I packed my bags.

Did Jingo start out with any specific intent and vision for the music and its presence? jingo3

The most important thing has always been making good music. Sometimes I make the mistake of asking Joe if my hair looks okay and he always says, “I don’t give a shit.” People sometimes ask questions about our varying styles of songs or our fluctuating stage antics but we don’t really care. We’re still growing and I think our attitude towards the music will lead us in the right direction. A Jingo can be stuck in their ways and no one wants to be that guy.

As evidenced by the mass of singles released over the past couple of years, your sound is as diverse as it is contagious; how would you describe your music in a single sentence for newcomers?

Rock and Roll Dinosaur Electronia that the girls can dance to.

Listening to your songs you get the feeling that they organically spring to life with their own ideas on character and then you hone and sculpt them; how does the songwriting works within the band?

Usually I’ll have the skeleton of a song with some words and Jack will refine the melody, then we’ll jam it out in the studio. Sometimes it will start with a guitar riff or more recently we’ll jam the whole song into being. We never really know when a song is going to come out, but at the moment they are coming out our ears. We don’t like to be very formulaic we just take them as they come.

It is a democracy when it comes to creating songs or is there a core source more often than not?

It is a democracy in the sense that whatever sounds the best is law. Sometimes it’s a matter of demonstrating your point, but most times we end up agreeing in the end. People naturally fall into their roles. Jack is definitely the band leader, lyrics are mostly all me, but the all-round writing of the song is very much a group endeavour.

Your songs always, however emotively shadowed they might be, come with a stroll and smile; this is a reflection of you as people and your wants from good music?

I think that even if you write a sad or dark song, you want the listener to enjoy the experience of listening to your music. Bad experience can unite us and a bumping beat is the best remedy. And you can never take yourself too seriously.

What inspires the lyrical side of your music? Some of the songs are quite dark at their core.

It’s not the same for everyone in the band, but for me art can be a sort of therapy. There are some things that have happened in life that are hard to conceptualize in any other way besides writing a song. I had a troubled friend who killed herself and our song Jaclyn is a combination of anger and loving life in her honour. Sometimes rocking out and screaming your heart out is better than suppressing love and loss where no light can get to it.

As mentioned you have released a tide of singles, how do you see your sound has evolved and grown since the first and the recent Turn Around?

I don’t think we’ve found a specific sound yet, but we are starting to play a lot more songs that aren’t as dark. Jack had only just started music production with these first recordings, so we’re definitely improving fast in that way. We’re becoming a lot more relaxed with each other and with our new band-mate Chris, who also produces electronic music. We’re really excited for what the future holds.

You are obviously a band who pushes themselves and embraces different styles and flavours; what past and currently has inspired you most potently?

I think we all get down with the music our parents listened to in the 60s and 70s- Led Zeppelin, Jefferson Airplane, Crosby Stills Nash & Young, King Crimson, Jimi, Beatles, . We are all avid music listeners. Our heroes of now are Jack White, Queens of the Stone Age, Interpol, Jeff Buckley, Radiohead, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Neil Young, Pearl Jam, Tame Impala, Grizzly Bear, Lana Del Rey, Prince, Haim, First Aid Kit the list is endless.

jingo4Live you are renown for your exciting performances, your first ever show being support for Blur’s Graham Coxon. How did that come about?

We run an open mic called Cable Street Electric. Once in a while we do a charity night, one of those was at Mother London in Shoreditch. When they wanted to do their own charity night for Shelter, they thought of us and invited us to play, just so happens Graham Coxon was playing after us, pretty dope.

Would you say it put you swiftly under a certain spotlight or it did not really aid the emergence of the band other than in experience?

It’s always great to play for fresh ears. I don’t know if we really benefitted especially from that night as far as the band goes, but it makes for a great story and none of us will ever forget it.

I am assuming band members have a ‘real ‘life’ and job outside of the band, so how does Jingo manage to be so prolific with their songwriting?

We’re really lucky in that music is what we do. We intentionally don’t have full-time jobs so that we can put as much into our music as possible. We all have certain skills that we can get by with for living costs, but the music is always at the forefront of our minds. We practice often, have a good work ethic, but also have a ton of fun doing it.

What has been your favourite single to date, or the one which you feel epitomises Jingo for new ears?

That’s a hard one, I’m sure it’s different for everyone, but I really liked the release of When You Want Me. We won a competition where we got to record at Strongroom studios where Radiohead and a load of others have recorded. It felt for a second like we were big dogs and they treated us really well and we got to tinker with all their toys.

Tell us about your forthcoming EP? What can we expect and how does it push on from the excellent singles which have already seduced so many?

It’s a full album silly! We are releasing our last couple songs with the record and they are quite fresh so we’re really excited about it. Also I’m a painter, so I get to do some artwork for it so I’m pretty pumped about that. There are some surprises with all that and two new music videos coming out around the same time. We aim to please.

Your singles have all been released for free downloads, are you going the same way with the album?

Nothing is final but we are definitely selling our album. With putting out free singles we really wanted to build a fan base and give everyone a chance to get to know us, I hope our fans will return the favour and purchase a copy so we can make more and tour potentially.

What were the ambitions for the band when it first began and for you when first making music, and have they changed or evolved since?

The ambition has always been to make great music; I don’t think that will change. The next cloud would be to make a living at it, I think we are well on our way but only time and hard work will tell. Maybe I can get the guys to all wear animal costumes, I’d get a kick outta that.

What is planned for the rest of 2014?jingo2

There are definitely secrets in store of which I can’t divulge. All I can say is stay tuned; album, videos and more to come soon.

Again a big thank you for chatting with us and providing such great and richly loved songs for our podcasts :)

Thank you so much for listening and sharing, we owe it to people like you putting a signal out.

Any last thought you would like to leave us contemplating?

All you need is mom’s spaghetti, a brick and a bin bag.

Lastly if you could schedule a stage at a festival with Jingo headlining, what emerging bands which you have played with or come across would you invite?

Not Blood Paint, Bird Courage, Bailiff, Pat Dam Smyth, Bad for Lazarus, Steve Nelson

http://jingomusic.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 08/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Phono Emergency Tool – Get The Pet

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If originality was high on your lists of wants then Italian rock band Phono Emergency Tool probably would not register too highly but if fun, contagiousness, and straight forward enterprise is the desire then their new album Get The Pet might just go down a treat. Comprised of twelve varied and easily accessible romps fusing, in varying degrees, alternative and indie rock with power pop vivacity, the album provides a pleasing and adventurous friendship; one with a definite already established familiarity but thoroughly enjoyable all the same.

Phono Emergency Tool began with guitarist/vocalist Andrea Sgarzi who provided a song for a compilation on Fridge Records in 2003 called Soniche Avventure VIII. From there the project took its first live steps as a full band in its home town of Bologna, Andrea joined by bassist Sandro Sgarzi and drummer Marco Lama. The trio fused together perfectly from that moment, going on to release two albums, a self-titled in 2005 and Get Lost four years later, as well as playing a wealth of shows across Italy and into the UK. Earlier this year saw the release of third album Get The Pet on Red Cat Records, an encounter which without any immensely striking dramas more often than not hits the sweet spot in pleasure and creative mischief.

The instantly urgent Floating so Fast launches at ears first, guitars releasing a great noise rock scrub of riffs before rhythms punch in their presence and the bass brings a throaty coaxing. Vocally too the song is an appealing proposition as it strolls with energy and a pop punk swagger into the imagination. The core hook of the song through those still slightly caustic guitar rubs has a slight Buzzcocks lilt to their bait whilst in full flow the song leans on a definite eighties power pop breath which only helps the song become a heavily catchy entrance to the release.

The following Five in Four matches the success of the first with another mix of naggingly infectious hooks and enticing rhythms, this time within a more blues dressed pop rock premise. Like all addictive songs it has irrepressible bait which repeats and repeats with incessant potency to capture imagination and emotions. Again there is little which is unsurprising but much which leaves you wanting another healthy helping of its revelry, the same which can be said about On the Air even if it does not quite match those early heights set. Fusing a Nirvana like voice to its presence with a Weezer flavoured sound, the track makes for another appetising encounter although vocally it sometimes misses the mark.

Blow Moulding Machine pushes the album back to that previously higher step with its dark basslines and choppy riffs, the song a reserved but engaging melody enriched stomp, before the outstanding pair of I Don’t Belong and especially Hevo take things to a new level. The first of the two shimmers and prowls with a masterful pop rock temptation soaked in what is best described as a Blur meets The Zanti Misfitz. It is an impossibly riveting slice of indie rock which almost alone makes Phono Emergency Tool a band to keep an eye on but alongside its impressive successor is a done deal for attention and appetite. The second of the pair pierces ears with a persistent jab of sonic delight which the roving dark sound of the bass soon aligns itself too. The start of the song has a definite XTC feel about its tempting before opening its inventive arms with an additional punk rock adventure and creative wantonness which has more than a touch of The Barracudas to it. An energetic quickstep of flirtatious hooks and boisterous rhythms, the track takes top honours on the album whilst reinforcing the increasingly enticing presence of the band.

The intrigue coated charm of Crimentology unveils another twist in the variety of the album, it’s plainer but no less appealing rock exploits tantalising thoughts though its chorus is slightly less inspiring compared to the excellent design around the verses, whilst Better Stay Home produces a quirky slightly off kilter piece of pop infested ingenuity. It is song which maybe should not work but the band turn it into a deliciously alluring and salaciously bewitching tempting hard to tear away from.

It has to be said that from here on in the album slips away in potency and power though the next up sixties blues dressed rocker Don’t Stop Making Money is riotously infectious leaving a smile on lips and in the imagination. Neither the more predictable Farther nor the underwhelming A Lower Life manage to raise anywhere near the reactions most of the previous songs inspired, their undeniably accomplished offerings lacking the spark to make a real impact whilst the closing Heyday meanders without really going anywhere. They cannot prevent Get The Pet ultimately being wholly entertaining and joyful company which shows a definite potential within Phono Emergency Tool still waiting to be discovered.

Get The Pet is available via Red Cat Records now!

http://www.phonoemergencytool.it/

http://phonoemergencytool.bandcamp.com/album/get-the-pet

7.5/10

RingMaster 16/05/2014

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Jingo – Black Flowers

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Earlier this year, London based Jingo more than impressed with a trio of single released a couple of weeks or so apart from each other. Each was a distinct emotional soundscape with scenery of melodic and colour drenched narratives lyrically and musically capturing the imagination. It is fair to say each of the three left thoughts and emotions eager and happy to declare the promise and an assumed potent horizon of the band. Well it turns out that we were merely on the appetisers for greater things, the songs just hints and temptations of what was to come ahead and certainly with their fourth release. Black Flowers is simply magnificent, a flame of creative mastery which leaves as great as they were, its predecessors well back in the shade. Jingo have truly arrived and in a fire of adventure.

Consisting of husband and wife guitarist/vocalist Jack and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie Buckett, alongside drummer Joseph Reeves, and Sahil Batra on keys/bass/guitar/vocals, the quartet certainly took no time in drawing attention, their first gig as Jingo coming as support for Graham Coxon of Blur in March this year at a sold out charity night at Mother London. That same day saw the release of debut single IQ84 soon after followed by Same Without You and subsequently Matador. Each song left a stronger and increasing appetite and thirst for their descriptive musical narratives and rich lyrical expression, something Black Flowers more than quenches. Comparisons in many ways to bands such as Fleetwood Mac and The Magic Numbers have been mentioned but it is fair to say Jingo have already managed to stand alone, and even more so with the more intensive and formidable single.

As soon as the drone kissed riffs of guitar and bass opened up the air there is a feeling of darker more intensive things afoot. The addition of the glorious vocals of Katie offers an immediate seduction but they cannot dismiss the shadows draping eagerly over the ear. It is a magnetic welcome which only deepens in lure and intensity as the drums flex their forceful sinews and the guitars bring a greater gnarly caress to the encounter. With the keys expanding their richly hued imaginative presence within the veins of doom spawned  corruptive contagion, the blend of light and dark is pure ingenious whilst the exceptional enchanting vocals and harmonies act like a beacon to restrain the musical and lyrical darkness. Other songs maybe have sparked thoughts The Magic Numbers etc. but Black Flowers seem to find a kind of kinship with bands such as Blood Ceremony and Jess & the Ancient Ones.

Black Flowers is outstanding, a track to thrust the band into the heart of British rock music, though you get the inkling that Jingo will never settle in one camp, and that makes them and their new single even the more exhilarating.

Stream/download Black Flowers https://soundcloud.com/jingomusic/black-flowers

https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic

10/10

RingMaster 07/09/2013

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Imagination bred caresses: an introduction to Jingo

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It is always a strong pleasure to be introduced to a band who impress beyond hopes and without warning. Such is the situation with London based band Jingo, a quartet who dances with the passions as they wrap the senses in colour rich melodic embraces and emotive landscapes. Consisting of members originating from both sides of the pond, Jingo creates flames of riveting pop expanses which tenderly or feistily whatever is their want at the time, takes the listener by the hand into vivid emotion packed scenarios sound-tracked by seductive aural tangos.

Jingo is guitarist/vocalist Jack Buckett, his American wife vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie, drummer Joseph Reeves, and newest member Sahil Batra on keys/bass/guitar/vocals. The quartet of musicians have been playing and creating music in bands in Brooklyn, New York and London for many years before coming together as Jingo but once formed they took no time in making their mark, their first gig seeing the band supporting Graham Coxon of Blur in March of this year at a sold out charity night at Mother London. The day of the show also saw the band release their debut single IQ84, followed within a couple of weeks by second track Same Without You and in the same time gap again by third release The Matador, all available as free downloads from their Soundcloud profile. The three distinctly unique and individual tracks show a band which is already skirting the precipice of truly great things with songs which are adventurously and gloriously sculpted, employing equally scintillating textures, imagination, and beauty in their striking presences. It is impossible not to be excited by the band as their sounds coax thought and emotion to play within their descriptive musical narratives and potent lyrical expression, and hungry to hear so much more from the foursome.

Debut track IQ84 instantly has ears and attention rigidly alert and it is no surprise the track has received heavy traffic in its direction. Opening with choppy riffs soaked in pop mischief and reminding of Oingo Boingo in many ways, the song soon soars from its impressive opening stance into a greater temptation through the outstanding vocals of Katie Buckett. Her voice is drenched in captivating lures, a melodic pull which is strong and firm in its hold on the listener whilst making a mesmeric call which initially distracts such her quality. All the time the song is unveiling a wealth of respectful yet eager to impact rhythms and sonic whispers which almost sneak up on the listener, though once into its stride with the drums of Reeves adding more throat to their thumping presence and the guitar toying with a mix of riveting hooks and flames, everything is in the open. The song goes on to further enthral with flumes conveying suggestive atmospheres as the persuasive lyrical and visual craft ado their work with the result an excellent and exciting first taste of the band.jingo 2

    Same Without You was the next song unveiled and stood openly distinct from its predecessor yet seemingly part of its core story. The gentle piano touch of the ear is soon joined by the again strikingly emotive temptress that is Katie’s voice, their melancholic union an irresistible beckoning into the emerging guitar resonance and brooding bass line. All coming together with energy lifting its keen head into a bolder stance, the smouldering burn of the song brews little fires of elegance and classical tones through keys and harmonies whilst rhythms ensure there is a fever constantly waiting to break out, which it does in small climatic expulsions of invention and intrigue across the length of the incendiary seduction. A track which reveals more glorious depths with each encounter whilst leading the passions into inescapable lust, it is a sensational enticement and thrilling dive into fascinating emotive hues.

Their third song The Matador instantly stands proud with a Latin American coaxing from the guitar and mutually sultry vocal cry grabbing the ear before a sultry sway of melodic kisses and narrative casting vocals tread brightly but gently across thoughts. They cannot retain their restraint for long though and soon erupt in a blaze of sizzling heat and sound before repeating the course again with additional harmonies raising the temperature of the ambience enveloping the senses. There is a folk lilt to the Spanish caressed pop rock voice of the track, a blend which lifts the imagination into a cabaña hailing heart and its emotive tale and once more leaves a blissful pleasure in its wake.

Jingo, through just three songs, leave a lasting and inspiring allurement in their wake, an aural taste which the lips of passion can never get enough of. The band has given themselves a strong plateau to build upon with a very potent horizon safely in their own hands and we for one will be impatiently awaiting their next melodic alchemy.

Steam and Download the three singles @ https://soundcloud.com/jingomusic

https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic

Check out the Jake Strunk created video for Same With Out You below as well as upcoming live dates.

Fri 19/07 – Tramlines Festival, Sheffield

Sat 20/07 – IYAF Festival, Kingston, London

Thu 29/08 – Northern monkey, Leeds

Fri 30/08 – The Green Room, Stockton

RingMaster 14/06/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Funeral Suits – Hands Down

Hands Down is the stunning new single from Dublin quartet Funeral Suits, a song as mesmeric and captivating as it is bold and inciteful. Taken from the excellent Lily Of The Valley album, the song is a dramatic and atmospheric weave which leaves one lost in thought and imagination whilst igniting the fullest pleasure.

The quartet of Brian James, Mik McKeogh, Greg McCarthy and Dar Grant, lit up the year with their album within which Hands Down was a golden moment amongst a plethora of melodic fires. Arguably it was a little overwhelmed within the context of the heated inspiration the album brought but standing alone it truly unveils its impressive and beautiful heart and invention. Released via Model Citizen Records and produced by Stephen Street (The Smiths, Blur), the majestic track is aural gold, a melodic treasure to immerse within.

Funeral Suits begin the song with smouldering harmonies, solemn beats, and with the guitar leaving little sonic fires across the roof of the song.  The vocals shimmer with energy and restraint within equally gaited music for a sensual ambience. As the rhythms quicken their pace there is a sense of something still to be defined brewing within the pulsating heart of the song. Eventually the passion and insatiable breath of the song erupts in a burning crescendo of energy and emotion, the full rock stomp incendiary and compulsive.

Hands Down is three minutes of instinctive and glorious invention, a thoughtful and evocative song to spark imagery and ignite raging emotional fires. It is a real gem and an absorbing experience which all should pay attention to.

There is also a video to the release which carries on the theme from the video for previous single All Those Friendly People. It is not for the faint hearted and can be seen below.

http://funeralsuits.com/

RingMaster 12/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright