Deadly Circus Fire – The Hydra’s Tailor

DCF_RingMaster Review

Casting a creative and impassioned roar which just gets richer and more compelling with every listen, The Hydra’s Tailor is a majestic beast of an album; a release that invasively seduces and cantankerously snarls. The second album from UK metallers Deadly Circus Fire, it has been the source of much attention and highly enthused praise already, so time we thought to get involved in its acclaimed proposal and fair to say disappointment was not on the agenda.

Fusing persistently unpredictable explorations of progressive metal and rock with just as magnetically carnivorous textures, The Hydra’s Tailor is already no stranger to drawing keen attention, just like the band’s debut album The King and the Bishop which was heartily embraced by fans and media alike. Drawing on inspirations such as Tool, Mastodon, and Deftones, the London based Deadly Circus Fire laid down a fiercely inviting teaser for this their latest emprise of sound and imagination through a couple of eagerly welcomed singles and since their release, they have signed with Musicarchy Media for the release of the crowd-funded, The Hydra’s Tailor as well as share stages with the likes of Crossfaith, Funeral For a Friend, and Bleed From Within across the UK and Europe. Right now they are lighting up European venues supporting Skindred on their Pump Up The Volume tour, just as The Hydra’s Tailor does the same to ears and speakers.

Artwork_RingMaster Review     The album starts with In Darkness We Trust, its keys spawned melancholic air embracing the immediately enticing and impressing voice of Adam Grant. The duet is bewitching, a solemn yet magnetic coaxing into the heart of the album and second track Animal. Riffs instantly begin prowling ears as it opens up predatory scenery, vocals again a potent enticement as the firm swings of drummer Paul Igoe resonate and the guitar of Save Addario spins expressive sonic enterprise around the still ravenous riffery. Grant again strikes with compelling vocals, his presence backed as resourcefully and potently by the tones of Mike Enort, whose basslines are no slouch when it comes to casting dark temptation either. Whereas the opener was a minimalistic treat its successor shows the shape of things to come with its unpredictable and seamlessly diverse landscape, it also a triumph in its own right.

The following Where It Lies expands from an acoustic flirtation into another mesh of wiry guitar tendrils and emotive flames, ebbing and flowing in aggression and intensity but relentlessly seducing in charm and adventure. As vocal craft and imagination shadows every step made by the ideation building the track, a scent of bands like Circles and Palms lay upon the fascinating encounter, Karnivool too in the song’s mellower moments but all spices to something already showing Deadly Circus Fire uniqueness.

Victim is another entering with an antagonistic glint in its creative eye, rhythms and riffs aligning their rapacious natures as Metallica-esque grooves line the emerging tempest. This time there is a whisper of bands like Bloodsimple and Lamb of God to another song which needs little prompting to evolve into new pastures of tenacious ideation and compelling craft, subsequently an air of Porcupine Tree and Tool just as suggestive across the outstanding incitement.

Another pinnacle comes with the stunning blaze of Devil’s Opera, a track as infectiously catchy as it is mouth-wateringly involved. It takes ears, emotions, and the imagination on a heady ride of united enterprise and individual exploration, a flight which twists and turns with an inventive turbulence that only ignites the appetite to greedier intent towards album and band. It is a forceful yet respectful invasion of the senses continued in Rise Again, it too aligning riffs and rhythmic rabidity with a fire of sonic invention and emotion driven melodic expression guided by the superb voice and delivery of Grant.

The brief instrumental tempting of Martyrs provides a relaxation for the senses next and a new spark for the imagination to play with before the exceptional House of Plagues groans and grinds ears with guitar endeavour around an enjoyably volatile blend of vocals. That bestial intent continues as melodies catch flame and rhythms jab with the stealth of a predator, all contrasts uniting in a scintillating emprise of emotive and provocative ingenuity, one that gets more ravenous and thrilling over each passing minute. Amongst so many within The Hydra’s Tailor that linger and relentlessly lure constant attention, as the album itself, the track is pure addictiveness as it takes best track honours.

Through the bold air and wonderfully fluid and varied tapestry of Aeden and the climatic atmosphere and soundscape of the album’s title track, The Hydra’s Tailor continues to enthral and tempt lustful reactions, its namesake another especially mesmeric blaze of dexterous songwriting and skills matched in sound. Both songs add thick layers to the epic nature of the album with the next up Turning the Tide equally as mighty with its agitated rhythms and sonic swirl of discontent. Equally within its stormy nature though, melodies brew, calm emerges, and bewitching harmonies entice to engross and excite before the turmoil returns in similarly exhilarating style.

The album is closed by the celestially lit, intensively aired Universe; a song which soars and bullies its way into ears and the psyche whilst leaving a great resonance and glow from its respective merger of harsh and tempestuous textures with absorbing beauty. The song is just masterful, repeating the major success cast before it across The Hydra’s Tailor with its own impressing adventure.

The good things heard and read about Deadly Circus Fire barely do the band justice, and now having been infected by The Hydra’s Tailor it feels safe to say if there are those yet to feel the power and prowess of the band the chance of finding reactions breeding the same kind of enthusiasm as us here, is high. There is only one way to find out of course and that is one of the heartiest recommendations made at The RR this year, go explore.

The Hydra’s Tailor is out now via Musicarchy Media @

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Stone Cold Dead – Lava Flows

STONE COLD DEAD _RingMaster ReviewPhoto 1

Lava Flows is one of those encounters which grabs rigorously, cuts off all forms of escape and in turn plies you with intoxicating persuasion which leaves you woozy and desperate for more. The heavy weight groove fest is the debut album from Greek metallers Stone Cold Dead, a band entangling the richest essences of groove and heavy metal with those of experimental and alternative rock. The result is a virulent form of predatory rock ‘n’ roll which leaves a thick greed for more as ripe as the outright enjoyment experienced from its thrilling introduction to a band destined to great heights.

Stone Cold Dead is the brainchild of former Rotting Christ and Nightfall guitarist George Bokos, a project which is not so much a solo adventure but one luring the talent of equally experienced and innovative guests. The Athens hailing Stone Cold Dead gave a potent hint of the quickly impressing sound fuelling the album a few short weeks back with the release of the single Hubrism, a teaser which awoke intrigue and anticipation with ease band now proven to be just the one facet of a triumphant beast.

The first inescapable seduction of the album comes through the union of Bokos’ glorious baritone guitar enticement with that of Charis Pazaroulas’ (ex-Ostrobothnian Chamber Orchestra) irresistible bowed contrabass temptation. Both aspects are a theatre of invention and controlled rabidity, of creative attitude and expression colluding to create bestial stomps of fierce rock ‘n’ roll with an unrelenting appetite to devour and incite ears and imagination. That ingenuity alone makes Lava Flows a must investigation but add the majestic and fearsome rhythmic bait bullying and igniting the senses throughout , and you have a proposition which is pure metal alchemy. Split into three sections; Stone, Cold, and Dead, which “unfolds along the Cosmic Tree, which connects three different realities”, Bokos has given the three tracks in each part to a trio of exceptional drummers to drive, twist, and elevate the nature and personality of each movement within the album. Yannis Stavropoulos takes the first section, to be followed by Dimitrios (Vorskaath) Dorian, the multi-instrumentalist behind Zemial, and Nile drummer George Kollias respectively. It is an aspect to the release that just adds further formidable drama to the provocative journey of the album, a potency which makes more of a thrilling impact than was definitely expected.

cover_RingMaster Review     The album opens with Climbing The Cave and straight away it is prowling ears with sonic craft as a rhythmic rumble builds into an anthemic addiction. As becomes the diverse mouth-watering norm across the release, riffs nag and gnaw on the senses as quickly enslaving vocals and the jungle of beats from Stavropoulos descend to seduce and ravage the body. Like a mix of Bloodsimple, Killing Joke, and Black Tusk, the track swings its bait whilst drilling deeper in to the psyche with every torrent of rabid riffs and web of insatiable grooving. It is probably right to say our passions were hooked from this point, a submission ensured by the contrabass seducing of Pazaroulas but only confirmed time and time again across Lava Flows starting with Cyclone Speaking.

Instantly the second song is more bestial in the tone of guitar and bass, and strolling with an antagonistic gait soon drawing in melodically enflamed roars of sound and voice. Rhythmically things are another maze to explore and be willingly trapped by as the melodic tenacity of Bokos flirts and explores new designs and instincts within the bruising rock ‘n’ roll climate. As with its predecessor, swift submission and a lusty reaction from body and thoughts are given, a success found again by the album’s title track. Lava Flows, as its title suggests, smoulders and crawls from its first breath but around an already keen burst of rhythms which provide the spark for a subsequent sludge bred swagger as volatile in energy and hunger as it is immersive in weight and ambience. Pazaroulas again bewitches with his bow on strings whilst Bokos and Stavropoulos entrance as they turn limbs and neck muscles into their puppets.

An apt colder steely hue flows through the album’s Cold section, Death Drive preying on ears with increasing intensity and energy as a punk ‘n’ roll attitude and irritability runs through the song’s pulsating veins. The craft of Dorian has a more rock ‘n’ roll energy and swing to its attack which is translated in the sound around it, that in turn creating another strain of alternative and groove metal united in stoner-esque toxicity to grip ears.

Both The Black Snake and Hubrism transfix with their individual invention and natures, the first emerging on a tribalistic, mystique clad trespass breeding a caustically flamed swing of riffs and incendiary grooves. The perpetual niggling quality of both continues to make the juiciest irresistible bait matched by vocals, rhythms, and that contrabass and bass ingenuity, manna throughout the album. Here it creates an emprise of colourful melodic and sonic mystique within a net of addictive creative voracity whilst its successor is a more sinister and disentangled weave of voices and atmospheric intimidation crowded by a great irritant of waspish grooves and robustly dynamic rhythms. Once more songwriting and sound infests and twists the listener this way and that with startling invention and imagination, and though many elements are familiar there is no doubting they are employed and evolved into something rabidly fresh and unique to Stone Cold Dead.

The exceptional Deconstructing The Architect is the first offering in the Dead segment of the adventure, Kollias sculpting a wonderfully intrusive and anthemically invigorating wall of rhythms as the guitars open up their own net of inimitable and irrepressible imagination and craft. The body becoming a puppet to the strings of band and album is nothing new at this point but certainly strung out and sent into their biggest frenzy yet as the song builds into its Torche meets Mastodon meets Trepalium emprise of sound and temptation.

A shamanic scent opens up with the entrance of Umbilical Cord next, the guitar again spinning a sultry and exotic coaxing before the track erupts into its muscularly predacious and erosive glory, which itself is never absent of unpredictable and smouldering flavours from distant shoes and cultures. The track, as all, simply engrosses and thrills, a tempting emulated in the closing extensive exploration of And The Tree Becomes A Sphere, a travelogue of sound and inspiring hues in its own right that has ears and thoughts as enslaved as the emotions amidst a massive greed for more.

Lava Flows is real heavy groove woven magnificence for the ears, and even if others find themselves to be not quite as lustful in reactions as we found ourselves to be, Stone Cold Dead are still a big reward all should give themselves a chance of getting excited over.

Lava Flows is out now via digitally and on CD via Volcanic Music @

Pete RingMaster 10/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Counting Days – Liberated Sounds

Counting days_RingMaster Review

With their new album our first acquaintance with and taste of UK metallers Counting Days, we cannot suggest how strong the anticipation for Liberated Sounds was, but such its thrilling ferocious roar there is no doubting its successor sometime ahead will be the subject of thick and eager contemplation. The London band’s momentous debut full-length gloriously gnaws on the senses, its metalcore/hardcore fury savaging and bruising the same with equal animosity, but it is a ferocity bred with a creative virulence and open imagination that simply whips up a frenzied appetite in body and emotions.

Counting Days emerged in 2014 from a union of former members of TRC, Heights, Rough Hands, and Last Witness. The heartbeat came through the continuing song-writing partnership of guitarist Charlie Wilson and drummer Lasselle Lewis, the pair previously uniting song providers in TRC. Next former Heights vocalist Thomas Debaere was enlisted to the new project to become Counting Days, his addition followed by that of former Last Witness guitarist Bobby Daniels and subsequently Rough Hands frontman Alex Dench who was brought in on bass and additional vocals. A leap forward to now and first album Liberated Sounds, which was produced by Fredrik Nordstrom (At The Gates, Arch Enemy, In Flames, Opeth, Architects, Bring Me the Horizon), Counting Days is poised to shake certainly the UK metal scene, but suspicions are it will not stop there, ahead or with this stirring debut.

cover_RingMaster Review     The quintet start it with Burned By Faith and an immediate vocal roar which backed by a wall of rhythms and riffs has ears bent back as in a wind tunnel whilst the senses cower. Without losing its raw intimidation and strength, the track twists into a vociferous stride driven by raging vocal roars, this in turn spawning a predacious and eager canter of musical hostility. Fearsome from the start, the rhythms of Lewis become more agitated and robust as the metalcore seeded tempest rages, they sparking jagged lines of riffs and caustic grooves within a lyrical look at the things people do in the name of religion. It is an intensive and attention grabbing launch by the album, one already showing signs of an invention which becomes increasingly pronounced in following tracks.

Die Alone is next, spinning a tasty groove from its first breath as the rapier swings of Lewis collude with the predatory tones of bass. The vocal union of Debaere and Dench abrases as it entices, the former arguably finding more vitriolic charm and hardcore potency in his delivery than in his previous band, whilst around them the track explores melancholic and stringed textures within its unrelenting rancor.

As impressive as the first two are, the album just gets bigger and more exhilarating, finding its pinnacle in the next clutch of songs starting with Beaten & Scarred. Spinning on an addiction of a groove, the track spews a creative and emotional animus that is as contagious as the anthemic vocal calls and irritable rhythms driving the torrent of catchy riffery. A punk raging and metal hostility, the song is superb; it’s swerving grooves and nagging hooks alone ensuring the maliciousness in its veins is greedily welcomed.

From one major triumph to another pair in Life & Death and the album’s title track. The first rumbles with rhythmic thunder and cantankerous guitar rabidity, both matched in fierce kind by the air scarring vocals. With a touch of Static X meets Bloodsimple to it, the song intensely and explosively bellows within a landscape of melodic enterprise and sonic imagination, the savaging fuel of the song never diluted by the more refined invention within it and that captivating imagination defiant to being overwhelmed by the storm slamming through it. The band’s latest single is the same, Liberated Sounds a merciless festival of debilitating intensity and voracity infused with deliciously gripping grooves, potent vocal variation, and a contagiousness that infests and ignites the soul with lingering ease.

Five tracks in and ears are ringing and the body breathless, whilst enjoyment is flooding thoughts and emotions and fair to say no respite from any of it, thankfully, is forthcoming as firstly Fire From The Sky uncages its heavy metal meets post hardcore antagonism . The song’s climate is a muggy and unforgiving swamp of incitement veined by the thick melodic enticing of guitar, a blend which gives further substance to the song’s look at the mental effects of war. It is a hard task matching up to the previous trio of tracks but the invasive and provocative heart of the song leaves no-one short changed before making way for the caustic embrace and inventive accosting of Days Go By and in turn the short and evocative instrumental oasis of The Vines. Its calm gives a respite whilst igniting the imagination with warm strokes of sound within a somewhat haunting ambience.

Sands Of Time descends on the senses next, again a prime groove wrapped in great irritable textures coring a blustery climate whipping up the senses before Prison Of Misery through an initial bewitching melodic drama and coaxing, turns into a bestial rampage of scathing vocals, scarring riffs, and a sonic snarl that turns every note and beat into an inescapable and greedily devoured vicious incitement. It is another major highlight, amongst many, of Liberated Sounds, rock ‘n’ roll taking no prisoners in its vehement entrapping of ears and passions.

The album is closed by the equally acrimonious, unforgiving, and enjoyable Cold Truth and finally similarly crafted and toned Reunion. The track is a fine end to the album but just a touch too samey to its predecessor, a slight issue which does crop up in slithers across the album. The final pair of songs is where it is most noticeable but with both tracks nothing less than fiery stirrings of pleasure it is a minor blemish just to try and temper our otherwise full ardour for Liberated Sounds.

All the members of Counting Days come with a good pedigree in their experiences and craft but for personal tastes they have hit a new plateau in their creativity and invention with Liberated Sounds, and yes already anticipation for its successor is brewing.

Liberated Sounds is out on October 16th via Mascot Records.

Upcoming live dates:

23rd October – Riverside, Sheffield

24th October – The Festing, Southsea

26th November – The Scene, Swansea

28th November – The Rainbow, Birmingham

29th November – Sanctuary, Basingstoke

3rd December – Packhouse, Leeds

4th December – Vic Inn, Derby

5th December – Grog & Fiddle, Cheltenham

12th December – Craufurd Arms, MiltonKeynes

Pete RingMaster 15/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dienamic – Afterlife

Promo Picture Dienamic_RingMaster Review

Norwegian metallers Dienamic offered themselves up as a seriously promising proposition with their debut album Surfing the Apocalypse. Now confirmation has arrived in the rousing shape of Afterlife, an attention grabbing confrontation which still suggests there is more to come from Dienamic and still to be discovered by the band within their creative depths, yet provides one compelling and very often incendiary incitement to leave nothing less than full satisfaction in its wake. The band is still establishing itself in many ways, yet to really step from the crowd, but with Afterlife as evidence is destined to be part of the staple diet of a great horde of metal fans now and ahead.

Formed in 2009 or 10, depending where you look, the Tromsø hailing Dienamic quickly unleashed their thrash fuelled, death lined raw metal via a self-titled EP the same year. That in turn sparked the band’s renowned live assaults and hunger which over the years have seen them tour the likes of Japan, Central and Eastern Europe, and of course their homeland. 2012 saw the release of Surfing the Apocalypse, a swiftly devoured and acclaimed proposal marking the band out as one of the new promise flooded protagonists in the world metal scene. Backed by that live presence, which only helped increase the stature and reputation of the band across 2013 and since, Dienamic has given confirmation of their blossoming sound and impact through Afterlife. With guitarist Eivind Kjær Killie, bassist Kenneth Iversen Muotkajærvi, and drummer Sebastian Jacobsson joining band founders in vocalist Gustav Harry Lindquist and guitarist Stein-Odin Johannessen, a line-up coming together late 2014, and the signing with Italian label Worm Hole Death too, Dienamic is ready to stir up some spotlights and appetites with their new album; something it is already beginning to do with its release a few short weeks back.

cover_RingMaster Review     The Reaping starts Afterlife off, a squeal of riffs the perfect appetiser to the barrage of feisty rhythms and nagging riffs which follow. It is a quickly riveting start which continues to worry and entangle ears in acidic sonic temptation. The grouchy growl of Lindquist is quickly in place to add to the intimidation and lure of the song, his input the trigger for a broadening weave of winy grooves and an addictive torrent of addictive riffs and rhythms. Like a mix of Pantera and Bloodsimple, the song is a masterful and persistently enjoyable start to the album instantly awakening full involvement of ears and appetite which Innocent Gun makes full use of straight after. The second track has a similar basic landscape but in different hues and shades of attitude, musically and vocally. Soon striding with a belligerence to its infectious bait of swinging beats and spicy grooves, the song reveals a whole new character to that of its predecessor whilst being the extension of its creative devilry.

Essences of bands like Testament and Exodus creep into the opening parade of enterprise within the excellent Revolution for Nothing, strains which get repeated throughout in between masterful roars of voice and emotions wrapped in infection soaked, melodic rich exploits. Good unpredictability also enriches the track, not bringing major moments to wrong-foot ears but enough to ensure every twist, each turn in the aggressive flight, is fresh and distinctly inventive, a quality highlighted again within the more primal Where God Feeds. Riffs are carnivorous from its first breath whilst the bass prowls the song with a predatory air as drums sticks swing some shuddering beats. Once more thoughts of bands like Pantera are lured out in the course of the ravaging grooving, as also of others such as Stam1na and Gojira for varying reasons.

The pair of Dance with the Devil and You Still Walk leaves the body breathless and a little greedier for more, the first through its thrash fury bound in anthemic ferocity and rapacious enterprise and the second, if not with quite the same impact, with an evocative storm of more prowling endeavour and skilled craft from each of the band. This is a song which grows and enthrals even more over time whereas others make a more instant impression, like the hellacious and riveting tempest of Generation Reboot. An infestation of rhythmic animosity and grooved seducing that bellows and buffets the senses with raw energy and rabid enterprise, it is easily one of the major highlights of the album.

One of but not THE one, that title falls upon Overthrown and its ordered bedlam of wicked beats, grievous riffery, and emotional intimidation speared by tendrils of sonic imagination. Again it is not easy to say the track is wholly original but all familiarity embraced is twisted into a tapestry of physical discontent and bordering on barbarous seduction as it stirs the passions. Amongst many impressive tracks it is the standout antagonist and more evidence of the quality within and still brewing inside Dienamic.

The album’s title track is breeding similar pleasures next, its fierce opening outpouring evolving into an oasis of melodic metal warmth before erupting into an even more venomous and intoxicating stalking of ears and air. The track is danger and bewitchment rolled into one before the melodic shimmer of The End completes the album. It is a melo-death seeded offering which as elegant and melodically entrancing as it is has a raging fire in its emotional belly, a furnace of angst and intensity which oozes from every pore of the album’s potent finale.

Dienamic are not close to touching their pinnacle yet but in Afterlife show they has all the armoury to become a highly notable presence in world metal and, as here, offer some highly satisfying and very often imposingly thrilling adventures along the way.

Afterlife is available now via Worm Hole Death.

Pete Ringmaster 02/09/2015

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The Bastard Sons – Smoke

The Bastard Sons _RingMaster Review

There is no escaping the buzz which has powerfully brewed around The Bastard Sons since emerging in 2011 and especially over the past couple of years, and no evading the reason why, once losing yourself in the riotous depths of the band’s debut album Smoke. It is a bulging sack of pure rock ‘n’ roll cast in a maelstrom of flavours showing exactly why the broad term rock ‘n’ roll is the best way to describe the band’s tenacious sounds. At times it is southern rock led, in other moments hardcore driven, and very often metal sparked; to be honest it is constantly all of those and far more, a beast of a stomp sure to incite the passions of fans to everyone from Down to Cancer Bats, Ghost of a Thousand to Black Tusk, Bloodsimple to Hellyeah, and Stone Temple Pilots to Stone Sour.

Around and since the release of their second EP Roads in the March of 2014, the British quintet has been a blur of activity drawing increasing success at the same time. A US tour with Throw The Goat pushed the band’s growing reputation stateside whilst praised appearances at Hammerfest VI and Bloodstock, a tour supporting hardcore punks Snot, and shows alongside ’68, the new project of Josh Scogin from The Chariot, and also Cavorts amongst many others has taken care of the appetites of British fans and media. Earlier this year the York hailing five-piece dropped a potent and quickly devoured teaser for Smoke in the shape of the single Release The Hounds, a dynamic hint realised and taken to greater plateaus by the album itself.

The Bastard starts things off, southern fried chords the initial lure, though for barely a squeeze of seconds as quickly the band with sinew loaded riffs and rhythms bursting set up a riotous stomp of energy and sound. Vocals, as the music, come in varied styles, hardcore and cleaner rock ‘n’ roll tones colluding in a tempestuous incitement with anthem tattooed to its gripping walls. There is a touch of Pantera, Motorhead, and Every Time I Die to the storm, but as repeated song by song, it is just flavouring honed into something unique to The Bastard Sons.

TheBastardSonsSmokeFrontCover_RingMaster Review  The earlier single comes next, and quickly Release The Hounds shows why it had so many feisty for the album, its opening grooves and vocal scowling within a rugged landscape enough to get ears smiling and appetite drooling alone. The heart of the track is unfussy rock ‘n’ roll, a balls to the wall roar coloured and constantly reshaped by flirtatious sonic enterprise and sudden compelling twists of unpredictability, musically and vocally. It is the seed design to all tracks within Smoke in many ways, but persistently twisted and taken down new and individual avenues as swiftly shown by Sobre La Muer… and before it A Lie Is A Lie. The third track rages and croons with incendiary textures and addiction forming grooves whilst its successor casts a sultry air more in Seether/Shinedown territory than anything else, yet with a predatory dark bassline and a steely touch to the guitars, it carries a constant intimidation which strongly expels its fury from time to time. Nevertheless it and the previous song are inescapable anthemic traps; the lure somewhere between Them County Bastardz and The BossHoss, and fiercely contagious.

Bottom Of The Ladder growls and sonically grizzles with scuzzy magnetism next, guitars and vocals a dirty incitement stirring up ears and soul whilst the group calls work, along with the thumping rhythms, on the body and primal instincts. As anthemic in intensity and roar as it is, the track also unleashes an agitated and gripping web of aggressive twists and belligerence toned creativity, its presence ready to brawl at the drop of a hook or scything beat.

The southern drawl of guitars brings I’m Only A Call Away alive next, the song once standing tall writhing like a barroom temptress with inescapable grooves amidst a volatile fistfight of rhythms and the ever fiery and impressive mesh of vocals. As already shown by their live history, The Bastard Sons has a sound which works with, and appeals to, a vast expanse of rock and metal styles, that diversity in no finer and pungent shape than on this fascinating riot.

Through the brief and hellacious, as well as uncompromisingly emotive landscape of the fiercely angry U.S Against Them and the classic metal lined rock ‘n’ roll of Listen Here, band and album keep the thrilling storm blazing whilst Cardboard Walls saunters in on a rhythmic confrontation bound in more of the sludgy southern wrapping the band breeds so invitingly. A suggestive hint of Crowbar appears at times within the fire of sizzling grooves and snarling riffing, but as you may assume the track, whilst being one of the more restrained adventures on the album, it simply layers more flavours and varied textures into one enthralling mix.

Like a sandstorm, vocals shower and scar Scene(ic) Root(s) next to thick success, but equally they slip into cleaner gaits with ease and power to match the similarly volcanic and pleasingly exacting sounds. The track burns on the senses, simultaneously exciting and bruising before Stay True spreads its warmer balm. Featuring Glamour Of The Kill vocalist Davey Richmond, the track is a shadow brewed serenade as atmospherically and vocally haunting as it is emotionally and physically mercurial, and quite mesmeric.

Smoke finishes with the equally potent but far more capricious and intrusive Exist-Distance, a track which kind of sums up band and album with its constant weaving of different flavours and creative twists within a perfectly coherently cultured body, and another song which stands individual in the cast list of easy to recognise Bastard Sons songs.

We gave a list of bands at the start which sort of gives a hint at who might find thick pleasure from exploring one of the year’s real treats so far. To simplify it though, if raw and passionate, imaginative and ravenous rock ‘n’ roll hits the spot than Smoke is a must.

Smoke’ is available from 7th August 2015 via Kaiju Records @

RingMaster 05/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright


False Flag – Nest of Vipers EP

Promo photo - false flag_RingMaster Review

As Nest of Vipers, the new EP from Canadian metallers False Flag ravages air and ears you can almost feel the body’s sinews being stretched to their limited and the psyche being devoured by the fierce enterprise fuelling the incitement. The release is an attention grabber, a confrontation unleashing a mix of sonic invention and fearsome physical confrontation, and ultimately one thoroughly satisfying adventure.

False Flag was formed in 2012 by vocalist/guitarist Russ Gauthier (Lordosis, Meggido, We Found The Body) and drummer Nick Purdy (Meggido) as a side project to their other projects. Bassist Garrett McElroy (AfterEarth) soon joined the band with first EP Orobas being recorded not long after. Once Dan Ishak (Meggido, Stinger) subsequently linked up with the band on bass, McElroy leaving to concentrate on AfterEarth , the band set about recording their eventually well-received debut album Suffer In Silence in 2014. Alongside all this, the band live has equally been earning a rich reputation for their hellacious assault on the senses and stirring stage craft, a potency which seemingly has been translated into their new release, such its live like fury. With a line-up of guitarist Mike Harach and drummer John Byskal now alongside Gauthier and Ishak, False Flag are setting a new benchmark for themselves with their four-track incitement, the Garrett recorded and Sacha Alan Laskow (Every Hour Kills) mastered Nest Of Vipers, a thick poke at broader spotlights.

FRONT_RingMaster Review     False Flag is frequently compared to Meshuggah and in the past that was probably a more relevant comparison but as opener Sacrifice Of Solitude shows alone, any likeness is a mere passing spice in a recipe which entwines varied flavours of extreme and groove lit metal. The first song emerges from a stark landscape blown over by a desolate sonic wind. It is an evocative entrance which is quickly immersed in rabid riffs, vicious rhythms, and already toxic grooving. With the rapacious vocal scowling of Gauthier spewing antagonism with every raw syllable, the track is soon a venomous trespass of the senses but in turn speared by melodic tendrils of searing guitar and a bruising but inescapable swing sculpted by those ever inviting grooves and the throaty bass of Ishak. It is simply a predator and one compelling and thrilling start to the release.

The sonic tapestry of Perfidious squeals and leers over the senses next, its initial acidity swiftly joined by infectiously groaning grooves and vocal antagonism. There is a definite Pantera grizzle to the song, the half clean/half raw tones of Gauthier a bear hug in the tempest of sound and becoming even more impressive when exploring an almost completely clean delivery later on to add further captivating texture. All the time riffs and rhythms constantly gnaw away at ears whilst the guitars spin an intoxicating liquor of melodic imagination to capture that of the listener.

Another venture into an imposing ambience brings Reversion Of Sin into view, this time a cavernous immersion of heavy shadows which subsequently give birth to a bestial stroll of malevolent riffs and piercing beats. Vocals also bring a savage intent with their guttural intimidation whilst the brutal body of the track savages whilst wrapped in classic/heavy metal and progressive seeded endeavour. The mercilessly heavy corruption from the song is delicious but personal tastes failed to find the same appetite for its melodic side and its fusion into the barbarous body of the still enjoyable track. It really is just taste dictating reactions as once again there is no escaping that band and song spew craft and adventure.

Nest Of Vipers has body and emotions back rocking with its title track, a mighty closer with crushing rhythms, insatiable riffs, and grooves which simply flirt with primal instincts. The best track on the EP, it is a maelstrom of physical predation, and sonic bedlam cultured into something superbly designed and as virulently enticing as the great varied vocals frequenting the song. A mixture of Bloodsimple and Lamb of God, Down to The Faceless rear their suggestions across the song but as in all tracks within Nest Of Vipers, what emerges is something not solely original but far more False Flag than anything else.

False Flag is a band knocking on metal’s global door with Nest Of Vipers it is fair to say; if it succeeds in unlocking that door time will tell but if not it is one enjoyable step towards that easy to suspect destiny.

The self-released Nest Of Vipers EP is available from August 4th @

Ringmaster 02/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @


Bad Solution – Self Destruct EP

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A juggernaut is the best way to describe the Self Destruct EP from UK band Bad Solution, a juggernaut of energy, passion, and anthemic potency, not forgetting scything rhythms and crushing riffs. Its quartet of songs also come equipped with a sonic and melodic enterprise bridging the voracious metal and inflamed heavy rock instincts which openly fuel songs and sound. The EP is a beast, a rousing introduction to a band many others have long been crowing over; a proposition easy to see forging an even more explosive and acclaimed presence within British rock ‘n’ roll ahead.

London based Bad Solution began in 2010 formed by guitarists Trix and Mariusz Chojnowski. With initially an all Polish line-up, the band recruited British vocalist Alex Willox late 2011 which was soon followed by the band making their live debut to rich acclaim a couple of months after. The current line-up, completed by bassist Wojtek Suberlak and drummer Joe Patterson, was in place by the December of 2013 and the band simply has gone from strength to strength with a live reputation to match their sound. They have shared stages with the likes of Gallows, The Blackout, Soulfly and many more along the way and released the well-received three track single Echoes of the Cry. Now the quintet is beginning to stir broader attention with Self Destruct and it is easy to see and hear why from its first roar.

cover_RingMaster Review   The EP opens with its title track and a melancholic tempting of piano amidst more sorrowfully ethereal keys. As the strong vocals of Willox join the embrace, so does a bass snarl and a spicy croon of guitar with more rigorous rhythms aligning themselves to the start soon after. It is a potent entrance becoming increasingly inflamed with every second, its volatile ambience eventually erupting into an energetic tempest of intensity and emotion. There is a definite Papa Roach air to the song, when that band was in its early prime, and equally a touch of Spineshank and fellow Brits The Self Titled to the evolving blaze of creative and impassioned ferocity. It is an immense start to the release, the band’s melodic and aggressive side resourcefully and strikingly merging in an impressive union.

To be honest, as mighty as it is, the following Nothing (You don’t know me) just outshines it with its Five Finger Death Punch/ Bloodsimple like riot. Willox quickly shows great versatility to his delivery, matching the furnace of enterprise and sound around him. Riffs chew on ears and rhythms swing lead like bait whilst the guitars stir up a maelstrom of ravenous and melodically seductive magnetism. Neck muscles are soon in allegiance to the brawling intensity, as too are ears and imagination to the heavier rock and melody hued exploits within the thick persuasion. It all results in another hellacious and compelling proposal easy to jump on board with and well before it’s reached its fiery climax.

Dear Sarah steps up next and similarly has attention and appetite eating out of its inventive hands. Though stalking the senses with their jagged tempting, riffs and rhythms carry an inviting swing to which tangy sonic tendrils wind their richly alluring endeavour. Again whispers of Spineshank and also this time 36 Crazyfists nudge thoughts but with every passing half minute, the song fluidly moves into new scenery drawn from varied metal flavours across a tenacious and imaginative landscape.

Fair to say Self Destruct just gets better and better with each proceeding track, ending on its pinnacle, the brilliant Desert Rock. A Middle Eastern spicing immediately coats the emergence of the song, traditional instrumentation colluding with predatory rhythms and antagonistic riffery before the latter takes over and sculpts a ferocious stomp of energy and sound. To this those ethnic hues add their thrilling hues from time to time, lurking and shining from within the groove stoked, rapacity lined furnace of anthemic sound and volcanic intensity. The track is glorious, an aural call to arms which no metal loving body and heart can resist, and surely the single to light the touch paper to national success and more.

Bad Solution is a band which guarantees a good, exhausting time with their music but as shown by the Self Destruct EP, they also bring inspiring energy, instinctive passion, and invigorating invention to the table. It might not be the most original EP you will come across this year, but without any doubts it will be amongst the most memorable and thrilling.

The Self Destruct EP is available now through most online stores.

RingMaster 18/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @