Miss June – Bad Luck Party

Miss June demand attention”

These words leap out at the end of the band’s biography and the fact that the likes of The Foo Fighters, Shellac, Wolf Alice, Idles and Die! Die! Die! have all grabbed New Zealand hailing Miss June as support on stage is strong evidence. Even stronger confirmation of their declaration comes with debut album, Bad Luck Party, a collection of songs impossible to ignore which make no apology in their virulent contagion and rousing insistence.

Released on the eve of their world-wide Bad Luck Party Tour, the album is a persistently boisterous and often belligerent stomp of punk rock bred, pop fuelled rock ‘n’ roll honed into eleven tracks which effortlessly captivated. To be honest the band’s sound is far richer and animated than that description suggests, each song additionally holding mischief, defiance, and energy in their hearts.

Twitch kicks the album off, a controlled squall of guitar its introduction before a swift addition of swinging beats adds to the immediate fuzz soaked temptation, the song quickly hitting its infectious stride. As the guitars of Annabel Liddell and Jun Cheul Park unite in their scuzz coated virulence, the former’s magnetic tones dance in ears, a smile accompanying every syllable shared. There is something akin to Blood Red Shoes meets Sonic Youth to the temptation exuding from the speakers though already there is no mistaking it is a proposition individual to its creators.

An attention grabbing start it is only eclipsed by the following Best Girl. From its first breath the song nags ears, its stroll more of a march on the imagination as hooks and rhythms toy with the listener. A great confrontational edge lines Liddell’s delivery, the same tone infesting the devilry of guitars and the irresistible persistent nagging of Tom Leggett’s beats courted by the similarly compelling and brooding bassline cast by Chris Marshall.

Then from one major highlight of the album to another with Two Hits which instantly dived under the skin as the rapid fire vocal exuberance of Liddell rides the boisterous roll of Leggett’s rhythms. It is the trigger to an irresistible surge of garage infested pop punk, every element an insatiable incitement finding no defence to its irreverent virulence before Anomaly calms things down with its melodic swing and seductive charm. It is a mellow breeze of sound yet carrying volatility in its breath which erupts in squalls of sonic flame and rhythmic rapacity.

Similarly Orchid shares tranquillity prone to incendiary eruptions, vocals and melodies respectful caresses on senses subsequently scorched by the track while Double Negative from its Young Marble Giants-esque post punk elegance erupts in a fire of rapacious shadows and dark moods. Though unique in their character and bodies, there is a matching beauty to both which beguiles and in the second haunts for a fascinating crepuscular seduction.

Each track within Bad Luck Party brings an individual experience amidst a web of intrigue, the predacious Enemies with its compulsive noise punk voracity and the sonically discord soaked Aquarium further rousing evidence. The latter is as psychotic as it is hungrily catchy, the guitars and vocals alone gluttonous temptation while its successor, Scorpio, with its pop loaded canter and hook ridden antics had swift subservience in its hands like a devious temptress.

The final pair of the punk rock spawned, truculence fuelled Please Waste My Time and Polio with its initial leaden crawl leading to an irritable post punk tempest simply brought further magnetic faces to the kaleidoscopic personality of Bad Luck Party. The first was an immediate infestation of ears and appetite the second a longer persuasion but both wholly compelling and thrilling proposals just as the album itself; another of the year’s true highlights.

Bad Luck Party is out now via Frenchkiss Records.

Bad Luck Party Tour Dates:

September 18th – Maze – Berlin

September 19th – Blue Shel – Cologne

September 20th – Reeperbahn Festival – Hamburg

September 23rd – Cinetol – Amsterdam

September 24th – Trix – Antwerp

September 28th – The Flapper – Birmingham

September 29th – Yes – Manchester

September 30th – Headrow House – Leeds

October 1st – Poetry Club – Glasgow

October 2nd – Sneaky Pete’s – Edinburgh

October 5th – Tiny Rebel – Cardiff

October 6th – Port Mahon – Oxford

October 7th – Rough Trade – Bristol

October 9th – Latest Music – Brighton

October 10th – The Lexington – London

October 14th – Rough Trade – Brooklyn, NY

October 15th – Once – Boston, MA

October 16th – DC9 – Washington, DC

October 17th – Kung Fu Necktie – Philadelphia, PA

October 19th – Velvet Underground – Toronto, ON

October 21st – Subterranean – Chicago, IL

October 23rd – The Basement – Nashville, TN

October 24th – The Earl – Atlanta, GA

October 27th – Bronze Peacock – Houston, TX

October 28th – Hotel Vegas – Austin, TX

November 1st – Valley Bar – Phoenix, AZ

November 2nd – Morrocan – Los Angeles, CA

November 4th – Rickshaw Stop – San Francisco, CA

http://ihatemissjune.com/   https://www.facebook.com/missjunenz/

Pete RingMaster 07/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Dollyrots – Daydream Explosion

A party in the ears, romp with the body, and riot with the imagination; descriptions which can certainly be suggested upon the sound of the Dollyrots to date but definitely and strenuously applies to the band’s new release, Daydream Explosion. Across fourteen slices of the band’s inimitable fusion of punk, rock, and pop, the album incites and captivates but equally fascinates more than anything from the Los Angeles duo yet as diversity and adventure fuel an eclectic mix of contagious goodness.

With previous album, Whiplash Splash, one of the rousing treats of 2017, vocalist/bassist Kelly Ogden and vocalist/guitarist Luis Cabezas have pulled out all the creative stops to outshine that acclaimed release with Daydream Explosion. From the moment it gives its first eager breath we can declare aim accomplished and an irresistible slab of infectious enterprise bred.

Produced by the band with long-time producer John Fields, Daydream Explosion immediately had ears and attention in its hands, a teasing hook bringing in the pop ‘n’ roll of opener Animal. Ogden’s seductive tones swiftly join the broadening stomp of the track; Cabezas’ soon after and as magnetic as the rhythms and riffs which collude in a charge of flirtatious punk nurtured hooks. As catchy and inescapable as barbed wire, the song effortlessly gets the album off to a rousing start.

With beats swinging, riffs nagging, Everything steps up next and just as devilishly infests body and spirit. Again vocals simply incite participation as easily as the rhythms manipulate feet, the song’s chorus a heightened exploitation of an already fired up appetite for the record and eager subservience to its pop persuasion.

In Your Face comes with a steadier gait after but even in its shimmering sway there is a zeal and energy keen to break out which it does in another contagion of a chorus, the song’s seductive pop increasingly volatile and riveting before Naked uncages its alternative rock devilment like a pop infested Blood Red Shoes. With a rock ‘n’ roll shaped heart the track quickly builds its own character and grinning escapade to be unique Dollyrots.

As expected hooks escape the band like rocker instincts bound in one listening to the album, next up Last Ones on Earth relishes its own host of ear snaring conjuring. With a pop breath seemingly taking inspiration from an array of decades the song commands air and attention while exploring more eighties pop seeded breeding I Love You Instead follows to get the body popping all over again and sap the lungs just a little more of their willing breath. With all songs, but here especially, you can almost feel the fun and big broad grins the pair should have had creating one devilish encounter.

Through the ear smooching sixties girl group toned Watching the Storm Go By and the frenetically stomping I Know How to Party, band and album only pulled attention further away from reality, both tracks major moments among only highlights with the latter carrying a mischievous nod towards Andrew W.K. in certain moments while Kat’s Meow more than matched their glories with its virulently frisky stroll.

There is no decline in pure temptation as No Princess springs its own individual pop punk epidemic straight after nor as Flippy In My Red Dress infests hips and passion with its rampant rock ‘n’ roll seduction.  Like a mix of The Hillbilly Moon Explosion and Stray Cats but pure Dollyrots, the song is sublime, a major favourite track challenger though tested throughout the album for that honour as proven by the feisty Oblivious and Talk Too Much with its senses taunting hooks and melodic dance, a combination far too potent to resist.

The album closes up with Daisy’s Song, a final slice of punk ‘n’ rock temptation as instinctively sinful as it is masterfully manipulative and simply beguiling. And that pretty much describes Daydream Explosions as a whole, creatively wicked and unapologetically infectious and most likely the best piece of pop punk you will embrace and devour this year or possibly next.

Daydream Explosions is out now via Wicked Cool Records/ The Orchard; available @ https://thedollyrotswcr.bandcamp.com/album/daydream-explosion

http://www.dollyrots.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thedollyrots/    https://twitter.com/thedollyrots

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Noseholes – Ant And End

 

 

Such the dark majesty and ravening twisted exploits of debut album Danger Dance last year, we found it hard to imagine that Noseholes could eclipse its striking character and triumph. Well with its successor the German outfit has done just that whilst taking their sound into new intrigue loaded, virally compelling devilment. Ant And End has not wiped the floor with its illustrious predecessor but built on all its dark and aberrant brilliance to forge a whole new and sensational Noseholes escapade so easy to greedily devour.

Within a sound bred from the voracious instincts of post punk, no wave, and anomalous disco, the Hamburg hailing quartet of Henk Haiti, Steve Somalia, ZooSea Cide, and TH have ventured into darker corners and brighter trespasses with Ant And End. Still the body was a puppet to the band’s fiercely manipulative antics as they sprung a creative harassment to drool for, but the imagination was taken into the crevices of a more dystopian exploration bringing new esurient peril to their compulsive dance.

The album opens with Snowsuit Ranger and instantly roams the body with devious grooves and atypical enterprise. Rhythms tease and taunt, directing song and listener with their infernal bounce as eagerly tantalising vocals and deviant electronics are embraced by a quirky web of guitar. Like a distant relative of a merger between Au Pairs and Blood Red Shoes, the track is glorious, setting the voracious tone of the album and submissive mood of its victim alike.

The following IQ Model is just as rich a tempting, its gait a calmer virulent but clothed in mysterious atmospheric smog of intimation. The similarly reserved stroll of the radiantly dour bass fuels the blossoming industrial espionage of the song, vocals the magnetic narration to its seduction before the album’s title track got under the skin and had feet, hips, and instincts abound again. Whether an inspiration or coincidence, again eighties bred post punk/new wave spices up a slice of inescapable insistence, the likes of Delta 5, ESG, and Pylon hinted at.

The pure captivation of Vacuum Flies followed, its initial teasing shadows and suggestive drama alone hooking unbridled attention, the Essential Logic-esque flame of sax ear manna across the equally compelling rhythmic saunter which riveting vocals intimately drape over. With a Bauhaus hue adding to the pleasure, the song just mesmerised before letting Glimmering Mamba infest body and spirit with its hungry contagion. Not for the first or last time, there is a Gang Of Four lining to the irresistible rhythmic pestering, a nagging matched by the often simple but skilfully woven hooks and swarm of electronic baiting, but as always for all the hints given song and sound are unapologetically uniquely Noseholes.

Casino E Vino provides its own infective canter next, breeding a pandemic of temptation which lingers far beyond its final greed soaked lure while Radio Universe links its wires to body and imagination, the body in turn dangling and dancing like a willingly submissive puppet.

The album closes out with the pair of Jackson 4 and Baked Beans. The first springs its indie pop involved post punk exploits with boisterous intent, once more hooks and chords as lively and hungry as the inimitable rhythmic shuffle infesting is persuasion. Its successor though heavier, darker, and far more sinister manages to be even more viral like in its strands of temptation and collective jeopardy. Increasingly catchier and irresistible by the second, the track is a glorious end to a simply stunning album from Noseholes.

 Ant And End provides one of those moments when music proves why it is the most addictive and vital thing in a chaos searching world; indeed the second such revelation with Noseholes.

Ant And End is out through ChuChu Records on May 17th; available @ https://noseholes.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NoseholesBand/

  Pete RingMaster 17/05/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Noseholes – Danger Dance

If you are looking to have your imagination twisted into torturous shapes matching those drawn from the body, then checking out the twisted disco of German outfit Noseholes is a must. The ticket to its no wave/post punk/noise rock devilry comes with debut album Danger Dance, an encounter living up to its title in deed and temptation.

The Hamburg hailing quartet of Henk Haiti, Steve Somalia, ZooSea Cide, and TH have already been teasing and tempting through a host of well-received tracks which now collude with equally as compelling adventures within the band’s first full-length. Danger Dance opens up with its title track, a flirtatious bassline leading the coaxing as beats stroll alongside. Soon an equally seductive melody escapes the guitar, the combination reminding of the Au Pairs even as vocals spring their web of temptation and intrigue. The suggestive spice of keys and the alternating female and male vocals all add to the captivating drama relentlessly driven by addiction stirring rhythms

A just as potent rhythmic lure fuels the following post punk shuffle of Lush Box. Spirals of guitar and flames of sax latch onto the swagger of beats and bass; the song’s jazz bred discord and post punk dance bouncing around like a Delta 5 meets Blood Red Shoes tango before Styling shares its own riveting devilment with a similar but quickly individual template of flavours. To be honest the rhythmic heart of the first trio had us trapped hook, line and sinker, all the other psyche infesting imagination icing on their inimitable cake with only the briefness of each song a frustration, a common niggle across the album.

Yelzins Affair makes a more tempered start but one with intrigue and noir lit shadows in its breath and sound from the off. Creating a tapestry of creative languages and suggestion over rapacious rhythmic pulses and lean but potent melodic tendrils the song is a mysterious fascination allowing a breath for the body and adventure for thoughts.

Tenacious endeavour and energy breaks again in Ex Driver, a track which in its sonic webbing has a definite early XTC deviousness, while Bed Smoker bounds in on a boisterous rhythmic skip and melodic manipulation which has the body and imagination eagerly bouncing like a four year old. Both are manna to any post punk/noise pop bred appetite while the closing Aspirin Nation is pure joy to jazz infested noise rock mania. Its acidic instrumental dissonance and rhythmic pounce is captivation enough but add the Essential Logic-esque squirts of sax and again attention was lustful.

Danger Dance teased, taunted, and pleasured pretty much our every personal want from music; it may very well do the same for yours. Only one way to find out…

Danger Dance is out now through ChuChuRecords / Harbinger Sound; available @ https://noseholes.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/pg/NoseholesBand/

Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Guilt – Self Titled

Here to give your senses an abrasively bracing blasting and the body an irresistible work out is the debut self-titled album from Swedish duo The Guilt, a band which just might be the most exciting thing to happen to punk rock in recent times. Musically the pair of vocalist Emma and guitarist/beat caster Tobias create something angry and seductive from styles bred from electro punk to heavy rock and any flavour of rock ‘n’ roll your ears desire, or as they call it, laserpunk. Bottom line though is that The Guilt creates instinctive punk rock to rouse the spirit and assault the world in one of the year’s biggest treats so far.

The Guilt emerged in Helsingborg 2012, Emma and Tobias making a fresh musical start after the death of an old friend. Initially the pair used an iPod for synths and beats rather than replace the drummer before turning to a Roland synthesizer resulting in the fine mix assaulting the listener from within their first album. 2015 saw the release of their maiden EP on Heptown Records, who now release the album, with another outing for it last year through Suicide Records. It was a nudge on attention now being followed by a mighty slap courtesy of, as already suggested, one of the essential moments of 2017.

An electronic squiggle draws ears to the waiting clutches of opener Cunty Mess, the song swiftly taking advantage of intrigue with its scuzzy riffs and wandering groove. Once the voice of Emma saunters in, defiance reeking from every breath and syllable, the song just comes alive. Tobias conjures a web of hooks and unpredictability as a gnarly bass grabs its piece of an already lusty appetite for the track’s punk ‘n’ roll. Bouncing with catchy enterprise across its body but especially a pop infested chorus, the song seduces within its first spirit inciting roar.

The following Hate Hate Hate is swifter to unveil its antagonistic attitude, guitar and synth colluding in devious coaxing before Tobias unleashes a deliciously nagging groove as Emma stands hollering, irritation fuelling her presence and attack. She almost prowls song and listener, building her zeal loaded rage for the rapacious chorus; the sounds around her just as dynamic and predacious. Yet there is virulence to the repetitive groove and tenacious beats which has limbs and body as involved as energy and thoughts, dancing and rioting united in one song, though pretty much all the tracks within the album spark matching reactions.

I Don’t Care follows with its dose of crabby rock ‘n’ roll, the track simply punk rock to its core. Like L7 meets Midnight Mob, the song strolls along with a militant air; its middle finger raised under the defiance stoking shout of Emma and driven by the equally ferocious sounds of Tobias. The track is superb, maybe even eclipsing its predecessors before I Just Know It has feet and hips bouncing to its electro pop punk antics. With a touch of The Objex to it when it snarls and a whiff of The Knife in its calmer electronic shuffle, the song epitomises the band’s ability at fusing danceable pop and threat loaded punk rock if showing more restraint of its aggression than those tracks before it.

Having your senses crawled over; imagination fingered does not come much more potent or enjoyable than the start of Bad Things. It infests ears with its dark deeds and growling textures, the Roland popping away with its electronic spots to highlight rather than temper the irritated heart of the track; a union only blossoming to bigger exploits as the song boils over in another anthemic chorus surrounded by enjoyably corrosive flames.

The stunning Anomlays is next; the band’s latest single an incendiary eruption of punk and pop sounding like Animal Alpha leading Morningwood into a pit of hellacious body corrupting toxicity. One of the highest pinnacles in nothing but across the album, its success is closely matched by It’s Not Me It’s You. A little like Blood Red Shoes given a hefty dose of animosity but again emerging as something unmistakably unique to The Guilt, the song swings and grooves while spreading venomous fun and ravishing attitude; electro pop and punk has never sounded so delicious together.

That is another key thing about the album; for all the references we suggest or others different people may offer, The Guilt has a sound which stands alongside no-one. Its voice, imagination, and character is one of the most original around right now yet feels like a friend from its first hungry touch. Next up When The Honey Comes is proof, the track swaggering through ears with another grimace to its tone but is as quickly springing infectious flavours and hip provoking exploits as guitar and bass niggle away with their great persistence.

The release is brought to a fiery close with firstly the cantankerous stomp of Give It and lastly the psychotic hop of Ovaries. Both tracks leave exhaustion and instinctive pleasure in their wake, the first with its primal punk ‘n’ roll and its successor with its electro punk revelry though even with its kinetic web of sound and contagious consuming of the body there is something inescapably predatory to the album’s thrilling conclusion.

The Guilt is beginning to catch and excite new ears and passions in droves, their album shows exactly why. It assaults, infests, demands, and rewards in equal measure; most of all it gives music and its fans the kind of fun time and rebellious streak it has arguably been missing lately. We say let their album be your next port of call and as for us, they just might be your new favourite, probably obsessive passion.

The Guilt album is out May 5th through Heptown Records.

http://www.theguilt.se/    https://www.facebook.com/theguiltsweden/    https://theguiltswe.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 05/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Vukovi – Self Titled

Even before seeing her, Janine Shilstone, the lead singer of Scottish outfit Vukovi feels like a blend of Barbarella and Harley Quinn; a bold vocal seduction of beauty and devilry, glamorous temptation and mischievous warrior which her visual presence and energy only accentuates. Vukovi matches that inescapable focal point with a sound and energy just as tenacious and creatively boisterous not forgetting hungrily imaginative. It is all in evidence within the bands self-titled debut album,  a rousing and enjoyably imposing roar of pop infested rock ‘n’ roll as colourful and attention grabbing as its vocal protagonist’s hair.

Emerging in 2010, Vukovi have earned an acclaim ridden reputation for their live prowess which has more recently seen them successfully play festivals such as at Download, T In The Park, Hard Rock Calling, Live at Leeds, and British Summer Time Festival as well as open for Highly Suspect late last year. Equally a clutch of singles, many bringing their thrills to the album, have lured increasing attention which now the band’s first full-length will surely explode into even eager life such it’s striking fun and adventure.

Vukovi, band and album truly explode into life with opener La Di Da, a recent single which leaves the speakers shaking and body exhausted. Immediately, as a strike of musical drama scythes across ears, the titanic presence and roar of Shilstone ignites the imagination, her vocal strength and character a glorious trespass as warm and inviting as it is formidable and striking. Bass growls and swinging beats are equally as dynamically riveting, Hamish Reilly’s riffs almost stabbing the senses as Shilstone continues to blaze. A song partly inspired by the singers almost obsessive appreciation of the relationship between The Joker and Harley Quinn, it is a volcanic pop and rock stomp with a touch of Djerv about, indeed the Norwegian band’s vocalist Agnete Maria Kjolsrud the closest comparison to Shilstone’s distinctive presence that we can suggest.

The track is immense, a plateau setter which the album does not always match from thereon in but certainly worries track by track starting with And He Lost His Mind. With steely riffs quickly chaining ears with their predacious intent, and  vocal cries and rebel rousing just one trap in its manipulation of ears and body, the track borders the carnal whilst unleashing a catchiness as invasive and inescapable as it’s primal urges. For no obvious reason, post punks Xmal Deutschland frequently come to mind during the song, well a pop version of them, the track carnivorous in its earthy air and sonic snarl.

Weirdo has a lighter pop flirtation to its body yet still riffs and bass add their already established barracuda growl and heavy prowl to the stirring tempting. Drummer Colin Irving jabs with relish as melodies swirl with their own raw magnetic flair around emotion lined vocals before the Blood Red Shoes meets Morningwood stroll of Target Practice involves more caustically shadowy endeavour. Again bassist Jason Trotter brings a deep dark edge to the affair with ears while the catchy tenacity of its predecessor is equally matched as Shilstone robustly serenades with increasing passion.

Through the Paramore-esque charm of Prey, though we would suggest that the Americans have never discovered the instinctive thunder in their sound as that which persistently frequents song and album, and the controlled but naturally frantic exploits of Bouncy Castle, ears are aroused and buffeted with feet unreservedly worked on with zeal as the imagination is fed a variety of textures and enterprise.

Vukovi is more often than not tagged as a pop rock band but already the album has established them as real rock ‘n’ roll with a skilled hand at creating the warmest moments of infectiousness and emotive intimacy as betrayed in the beguiling Wander; a song where vocals alone seem to come from an inner flame of personal revelation. Similarly, I’M WIRED has that potency of word and expression within its cauldron of lava-esque sound, mercurial rhythmic incitement, and melodic radiance. Both tracks beguile; their personalities from another place on the Vukovi spectrum of creativity and as powerful and compelling as anything around them.

Next up, Animal has things lustfully bouncing again, its rhythms a driving infection as spiny riffs grizzle alongside the ever radiant vocal lament of Shilstone who in turn is hugged by the siren calls of keys, while Boy George leaves little to be further desired with its Animal Alpha hued stew of sound and imagination if admittedly it does not quite ignite personal passion as much as other songs, their success rather than any deficiencies within it the reason.

He Wants Me Not is another which only pleases with its crystalline grace and rousing energy but cannot quite live up to the heights of certainly the likes of La Di Da and Wander, though by its close satisfaction is overflowing and hips weary but still willing to embrace the gentle swing and roaring heart of closing track Colour Me In.

Produced by long-time collaborator Bruce Rintoul, Vukovi is our introduction to its creators, an encounter which with no expectations of it, surprised, thrilled, and certainly across its first two thirds just blew us away; its final stretch only confirming a new lusty appetite for the band’s sound. We do not expect to be alone in that realisation and strength of enjoyment.

The Vukovi album is out now through LAB Records, physical copies available @ http://vukovi.tmstor.es and digitally @ http://labrecs.com/VUKOVI-iTunes

http://www.vukovi.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/vukoviband      https://twitter.com/Vukoviband

Pete RingMaster 22/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Raketkanon – Florent

 

    Raketkanon

    Raketkanon is most likely a name still relatively or entirely unknown to the wider expanse of British ears and appetites, but a situation unlikely to remain the same after the release of the band’s debut UK single. Florent is sheer noise alchemy, an insatiable and ravenous temptation. It is also the first teaser for the band’s new album, a larger and easy to suspect no less potent proposition with the potential to make the Belgian band a new lustful passion for a great many across the UK.

Hailing from Ghent, Raketkanon (meaning Rocketcannon in Dutch) have a sound which launches itself on the senses with zeal, relish, and devilish invention. It is easy to offer comparisons to the likes of Melvins and Tomahawk upon the band’s music, yet it defies real tagging as equally essences can be found of nosier exploits like Kabul Golf Club, Butthole Surfers, and Coilguns. It is a proposition which more than likely will draw different ideas and references from different sets of ears, and a sound, alongside the band’s presence on stage, which has led to the release of the single on Jazz Life Records, the label of Blood Red Shoes. Laura-Mary Carter of the British band recently commented on Raketkanon, saying “After seeing their first London gig and being pinned to the back of the wall by the sheer force and insanity of them playing live, I knew we had to sign them to our label.

Feedback and sonic enticement make the opening lure, bait swiftly reinforced by a heavy rhythmic stroll and he discord kissed enterprise which springs from the intriguing start. Consisting of Jef Verbeeck, Pieter de Wilde, Lode Vlaeminck, and Pieter-Paul Devos, Raketkanon soon has ears and imagination immersed in their thick, unpredictable experimentation. Sludgy atmospheres collude with quietly psychotic textures whilst just as reserved droning comes to play with the senses. Each though is just a strand in the fascinating and incendiary tapestry of noise conjured by the band, post punk seeded bass and guitars aligning with rapid fire beats for a psyche twisted dance bound in a sultry and equally bedlamic synth cast seduction. Courted by the increasingly deranged delivery of vocalist Pieter-Paul Devos, the track is a bedlamic croon, a distorted and unhinged serenade sending shivers of joy across senses and imagination.

Florent is quite sensational, an insatiably and creatively irrational seduction which is not only frighteningly captivating but an irresistible temptation to the band’s forthcoming album RKTKN2#. Britain and the world is about to be seriously infected and after being tainted by Florent, it cannot come fast enough.

Florent is available on limited 7” white vinyl through Jazz Life Records from March 30th whilst RKTKN2# is released via KKK Records on April 13th.

http://www.raketkanon.com   http://raketkanon.bigcartel.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Raketkanon

RingMaster 23/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/