Infectious roars: talking Rosedale with founder Mike Liorti.

Rosedale_RingMasterReview

The brainchild of Torontonian Mike Liorti, Rosedale is an aggressive pop band which commands attention. Formed in 1989, the band has moved and evolved through numerous personnel and situations, all the time Mike honing the sound and imagination which has lured potent praise to EPs and albums. With thanks to Mike we recently explored deeper into the world and body of Rosedale…

Hello Mike and thanks for talking with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Thanks for having me. Rosedale is currently just me. I have different members all over the place but I’ve been solo for almost 5 years.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I’ve produced, managed, and played keys/lead guitar for my friend Alex Baker. We recorded his album January Blues in 14 hours and toured it for a couple months. He’s an incredible artist and has definitely influenced me to keep it simple. I also filled in on guitar/guest vocals for a couple bands that played as my band such as Time and Distance (Charleston, WV) and Your Favorite Coastline (Virginia Beach). Both were very fun experiences. I programmed some FX and lights into their back tracks for fun. And they both taught me a lot about writing even before I played for them and I was just a fan. I also sang vocals on a Disney musical called Radio Rebel. I sing all the vocals for the GGGG’s character, Atticus Mitchell.

What inspired the band name?

The band name came from a street that was on our way to the local music store, L&M. We would walk to that music store almost every day and write songs on their awesome gear. We ended up becoming friends with all the employees and recorded with some of them. So that store and the walks to it represent our roots and where we came from. Still, to this day, I’ve met some of my musicians while checking out music stores, taught parts and sold gear to people in music stores, and we often get people saying “I feel like I walked into the lighting room at Guitar Center” as we’re about to start our set. So it’s safe to say I’ve always been the store rat. And it’s taught me more than a college degree would have.

rosedale2Was there a specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Initially we were very influenced by our local heroes, Moneen. The Used and Boxcar Racer/Blink 182 were also up there on our direction list, but every time we hit the clean channel, it was for Moneen. We were about growing pains and dreams to leave our home town (very original…) As everyone sort of fizzled out into real life and new bands, I migrated the message of Rosedale to more of a motivational message to stay focused on your dreams, show the world what you’re made of, be grateful for what you have, and never give up.

Do the same things still drive the project when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

They’ve definitely evolved over time, especially with new members coming in for tours. I try to take titbits of their influences into the parts/intros/endings so they have a little more fun every night and it keeps things fresh for me. And I definitely still enjoy playing old songs and putting a twist on them. Right now we’re doing an 8 minute “anniversary version” of our 2006 single you’ll count to Ten (for whatever ten people care) which I just now realized has some serious irony in the title.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved? Has it seen more of an organic movement of sound or more deliberate intent to try new things?

Rosedale’s sound has definitely matured into more of a listenable aggressive pop. We no longer put our amps on 11 and sing/yell from our throats the whole set. But there’s definitely a lot more raw passion and expression on stage and in the recordings so it’s overall much more authentic. There’s also a lot more orchestration and traditional symphony/big band instruments in the tracks now- big choir vocals too. That evolution just sort of came naturally through my classical upbringing and appreciation for classic movie score composers like John Williams and Hans Zimmer. I just figured ‘hey nobody has really mixed that with punk rock’ and it’s made some cool songs. It takes a lot of time to score them out and program them to sound realistic but it’s a really rewarding process to hear them back.

Are there any in particular inspirations which have added colour to not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

There are definitely influences all over the place in my music and approach on life (Some more surprising than others). You might not think Lil’ Wayne has a strong influence on the decisions I make, but he does. I don’t smoke or drink syrup, but I often think “what would Weezy do?” whenever I feel like closing up shop early after a long day in the studio. I watched a documentary on how Michael Jordan switched from basketball to baseball and I was just as inspired to work on my show from it as I was from seeing an Angels & Airwaves concert. So influences are drawn from everywhere for me. If it sounds good to me, I’ll roll with it, if it has meaning to my life, I’ll write about it.

Is there a general process to your songwriting?

My process is No Process. I like to change it up every time I write a song and challenge myself. If I started writing on piano last song, the next one I might write on guitar, or uke, or acoustic, or just a pad. If I was using pro-tools to demo it out, I’ll try Logic or ableton or Reason for the next demo. If I just finished a sad song, next one is gunna be happy; slow song, fast song etc. The last thing I would ever want Rosedale to be is a recipe that has every song on the album sounding the same…as much as that works for bands these days.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I just write. Personal life memories, something that is on my mind a lot, whatever the chords/song reminds me of. I try not to decide what I’m gunna write about before writing a song. I usually just dive into it, even if there’s no music yet, and realize what I’m writing about once there are a few lines down.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Rosedale was released February 2016 and is a self-titled release because it’s basically all about Rosedale; where it all started, my personal story, why I am who I am, and the struggles I currently face. I recorded it at the studio that mentored me into the recording world, Drive Studios in Woodbridge Ontario. I’ve been good friends with Steve Rizun for the past few years and knew that studio inside-out so it made perfect sense to do the album there. It’s every control freak’s dream to have the key to the studio and I was like a kid in a candy store. 14 hour days flew by in that place.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind its songs.rosedale_RingMasterReview

The on-going theme, naturally, is to do what you love and never give up. Sacrifice everything else for the one thing you truly wanna do with your life.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

A little bit of both. I do like going into a studio with all the ideas mapped out and just replacing the tracks with better tones/takes. But sometimes I’ll just have a couple tracks and a tempo laid out and say “I’m saving this one for the studio…I wanna get crazy with this one”.

Tell us about the live side to the band.

We have a programmed light show and a bunch of automation on our mics to make it sound like (and sometimes bigger than) the record. We also bring our own fog machine. It helps make every show epic and works well with our music. Whenever I think “man, I set all this stuff up for nothing” I’ll see someone taking a picture or video and lose all regret.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there?

Toronto is very tough to have as your home base. I rarely play it because it’s always such a let-down seeing everyone bail last minute. [With] most Canada shows that seems to be the case for some reason; like you have to create a big buzz elsewhere before your hometown cares about you again. I wish all it took was good music. The best place for music is Germany/Austria. Anywhere where German is the main language, good music prospers. I hear the same thing about Japan too but I’ve never been there myself.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

The internet and social media should be much more useful than it actually is. Contemporary social media has ruined music, straight up. It’s the independent musician’s worst enemy. It was great in the MySpace days but now, thanks to the corporate sharks taking over, it’s just one big useless distraction polluting everyone’s common sense. Will it ever be useful/free again? One can only hope. Don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot of positive things that social media is to thank for, like connecting with new fans personally has never been easier! But overall it’s just become one big cess pool of gimmicks, memes, vented personal matters, and ads.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Keep your stick on the ice.

https://www.facebook.com/ROSEDALEmusic   http://www.rosedalemusic.net/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 01/07/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Infectious bounds and spiky hooks: an interview with Pranx

PRANX_RingMasterReview

With a clutch of videos and a potent first EP behind them, Pranx is a German outfit beginning to lure potent attention. Their rousing live presence has equally drawn high praise. So to discover more about this upcoming proposition, we seized the chance to talk with the trio about their EP, progress to date, and all things Pranx in general.

Hi guys, many thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are PRANX, a Pop Punk band from Mosbach, Germany consisting of Marcel on drums, Rouven on bass and vocals, and Boris on guitar and vocals. We formed in February 2014. Rouven and Boris had played together in a band since 2008 but their drummer quit. Instead of just searching for a new one we decided to make a new start entirely and form a new band with a new name and new songs. We met drummer Marcel on Facebook to start PRANX in early 2014.

Being involved in other bands before, has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Like we said, Boris and Rouven had played together since 2008. Marcel was also involved in some bands before including a German hip hop band. I don’t think it affected the style we’re playing now with PRANX but it definitely had an impact on our growth as musicians in general. The good chemistry between our two vocalists regarding singing harmonies together for example has been cultivated while playing together in their former band.

What inspired the band name?

It’s a shorter version of Rouven’s and Boris’ former band Prank FanatiX. We wanted to have a name that’s easier for people to remember as it always was spelled wrong on flyers. The original Prank FanatiX name was inspired by the term ‘faith fanatics’ in Green Day’s song ‘East Jesus Nowhere’.

Pranx2_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As a band we hope to enrich some people’s life by playing music, just like all those bands we look up to did and still do to us. Music of those bands had such a massive impact on our lives over the past few years, so we hope that someday people feel the same thing about our music. That’s what we want to offer the people who listen to our music. Another idea behind starting this band is to create some kind of exit out of this daily routine. We want to achieve more in life than just working normal jobs and get stuck in boring lives like 99% of today’s society.

Do the same things still drive the band time?

Yes, we’re still driven by the same things. I think even more than when we started.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It hasn’t evolved that much since PRANX started but it definitely has since our first days of making music in general. Our very first songs clearly had a Blink-182/Green Day stamp on them whereas now our sound is much more individual (even though you can clearly still hear the Blink influences of course). Since a few years we’re also influenced by this new wave of pop punk bands that has appeared. Bands like Neck Deep and The Story So Far are also great inspirations.

Has it been more of an organic movement in your sound or more a deliberate wanting to try new things?

A mix of both I would say. A huge part of our sound comes from us wanting to try new stuff but sometimes while writing songs something new comes up and you hadn’t planned it. If it’s not something we had in mind for our sound but still sounds cool we go along with it and try to implement it.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

That’s hard to answer. I can’t think of anyone that changed the way we create music but I’m sure it happened subconsciously anytime along the way. All in all we’re still very conservative songwriters. Take a guitar, play some chords and jam some melodies until you find something you like and go from there.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

When someone has the idea of a new song he usually likes to write the first version of it all by himself. The process is writing the whole thing, making a demo with all the instruments and arrangements and then showing it to the rest of the band. Then we look at it together and see what we can optimize and change to make it the sound great.

Where are your lyrical inspirations drawn from more often than not?

The inspiration for the lyrics comes from situations of our everyday life. Things you go through in every stage of your life or even things and problems we notice in other peoples’ life around us can make perfect inspiration for song lyrics.

Can you give us some background to your latest release?art_RingMasterReview

It’s a 4 track EP called Things On Your Mind that was released in early 2015. There are two music videos so far and the third is released very soon, but we plan on doing one for the last song as well. All the videos are directed and produced by bassist Rouven. All in all I think the album is a great mixture of catchy sing-along choruses and cool punk riffs, spreading a lot of positive energy.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Another Year and Standard are more or less love songs about girls from the past. Especially for Standard I tried to write the cheesiest lyrics and make it as cliché as possible. You could see it as a kind of a tribute to all the 90s pop punk love songs. Pogo Romance is a song about failing while promising a glimpse of hope for getting back up again at the end. Nightmare is about social isolation and forgetting to live your life in the ‘real’ world.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Since we’re a band that’s short of money like every other band and studio time is expensive we try to do as much work for the record as we can before we enter the studio. This means we have the final songs all ready to record in their final state and try to make changes in the studio only when really necessary.

Tell us about the live side to the band?

For me playing live is the best part of being in a band. It’s not only having fun and partying on stage with your friends but also the time of the night where you’re not on stage and have the chance to meet new people and other musicians. There are so many cool people we got to know just by playing shows all around Southern Germany. Always nice to connect with and to play shows for awesome people!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it in Germany? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the want is there for new bands?

Where we come from is actually one of the worst places for bands to start. The music scene of our hometown is as good as dead and I think it always has been. We always have to travel a little bit further to play good shows. We have to rely heavily on the internet to reach people because there’s little to no interest in live bands in our region.

Pranx3_RingMasterReviewHow has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

I don’t know if PRANX would still exist if there was no internet. We probably [would not have] even found a drummer if [we had not] met Marcel on Facebook. 95% of people got to know us through Facebook or YouTube so without that I don’t think we had a chance to even reach people.

I think you can still use the internet to your advantage even when you’re a big band with greater success. But I also think it can be hard to influence whether it’s working for you or not. What works for one band does not necessarily have to work for another and sometimes the mass of people on social media is hard to predict or analyse. In my opinion, your music is what counts at the end of the day. You can do every single thing right when promoting your music through the internet but if your songs suck people still won’t like you. On the other hand you can get good exposure if your music kicks ass even if you’re not a social media pro.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for the interview! If you like, you can check us out at https://www.facebook.com/PRANXofficial to watch all our music videos and check regular updates. Watch out for our next music video for the song Pogo Romance that’s going to be released soon!

http://pranx.bandcamp.com/   https://twitter.com/PRANXofficial   http://www.pranxofficial.com/

Pete RingMaster

The Ringmaster Review 16/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

LaFlamme – Broken Hearted Sons

laflamme_RingMasterReview

Hailing from Surrey, LaFlamme is a punk ‘n’ roll fuelled band about to release charity single, Broken Hearted Sons, to raise funds and awareness for Muscular Dystrophy UK. It is a three track offering of instinctive and anthemic rock ‘n’ roll which, without fuss, pleases ears and sets attention the way of a great cause.

Formed in 2013 as floods and storms engulfed their home county, LaFlamme consists of guitarist/vocalists Richie Lambert and Kieron Robathan, drummer Dan Motchman, and bassist/vocalist Ditch. Breeding their sound and songs upon inspirations from the likes of AC/DC, The Ramones, Lou Reed, Blink 182, and Biffy Clyro, the band found itself headlining the Surrey Advertiser stage at Guilfest in 2014 and soon after playing support to bands such as The Ramonas and Sex P****Sed Dolls, as well lighting up a host of leading venues across the south east of England. A self-titled laflamme art_RingMasterReviewEP awoke further attention whilst the past few months has seen LaFlamme working upon Broken Hearted Sons in aid of Muscular Dystrophy UK; a release inspired by two of Kieron’s cousins who have muscular dystrophy and “have been such an inspiration to do what you love and never give up doing it.”

Broken Hearted Sons is the lead track; a rousing slice of rock ‘n’ roll which, from a subdued yet potent opening, uncages a torrent of rolling rhythms, spiky riffs, and sonic enterprise which simply flow with punk rock infectiousness. It is an undemanding but seriously catchy offering quickly whipping up involvement in feet and spirit, not forgetting an eager appetite for the band’s unassuming but magnetic sound.

With a whiff of Eddie and The Hot Rods to it, the track makes way for the more classic rock scented Breaking In. It’s initial hook and character has a Bowie-esque hue to it whilst further into its melody entwined body, a Thin Lizzy like flavouring colludes with the restrained but vibrant rock ‘n’ roll lighting up the ears.

The closing romp of Liar is similarly textured but soon reveals its own mischievous imagination and boisterous punk ‘n’ roll endeavour. Rhythms alone are a spark to keen physical involvement, eagerness only reinforced by the tenacious vocals and sonic exploits of the guitars.

All three tracks provide honest slices of perpetually enjoyable rock ‘n’ roll; straightforward uncomplicated proposals which get the job done whilst providing thick satisfaction. The fact they are raising funds and awareness for a very worthy cause only thickens the pleasure.

The LaFlamme charity single, Broken Hearted Sons is released 15TH April via Goloud Records.

http://www.laflammeband.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/LaFlamme/235358599953530   https://twitter.com/laflammeband   http://www.musculardystrophyuk.org/

laflamme show

Pete RingMaster 29/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Safe, So Simple – Too Close To Closure

S,SS_RingMasterReview

Hailing from Arizona and increasingly inviting ears with their mix of easycore/pop punk energy and tenacity, Safe, So Simple is ready to take big steps into stronger attention with the release of new EP, Too Close To Closure. It offers five bold and lively tracks rich in swinging melodies and boisterous energy but also carry a volatility which adds a great shade of unpredictability to a sound unafraid to openly wear its inspirations. In short it is an attention grabbing proposal from a band many feel is heading towards big things.

Hailing from Benson, Safe, So Simple weave essences of bands such as Chunk! No, Captain Chunk, These Hearts, A Day to Remember, Blink- 182, Taking Back Sunday, and New Found Glory into their feisty sound. They are spices, as suggested earlier, which are easy to pick out but only add to something which, if not yet majorly unique, is certainly a potent lure on ears as shown by the band’s previous releases and now Too Close To Closure.

The Cameron Mizell (Sleeping with Sirens, Hands Like Houses) and Matt Good (of From First to Last) produced EP opens with the short and fiery Within Reach, a track which picks and jabs at the senses as the band creates a raw and bracing introduction. It awakens ears and imagination with its brief tenure before Ghost In My Backseat whips up body and spirit with its frenetic but composed revelry. Featuring Joe Candelaria, the song is a swift stirring built on the bruising rhythms of drummer Derek Ausseresses and a rapacious bassline from Benny Garcia and further shaped by the wiry and at times ferocious hooks and grooves of guitarists Josh Striffolino and Derrick Fenn. For those influences previously mentioned, there is also a touch of Hagfish meets CIV to the song, a scent only aided by the great blend of vocals from across the band which equally drive the song.

art_RingMasterReviewTeeth Like Sharks is a matching collision of flavoursome and varied textures to its predecessor, one casting an arguably even more virulent line in melodic and harmonic enterprise. The busyness of songs in voice and sound bring that enjoyable unpredictability which gives Safe, So Simple something a little different to other like sounding propositions, the band’s new single/video vibrant evidence of its potency.

The aggressive bounce of Welp, Better Luck Next Year is next, band and song creating a tempestuous incitement for body and appetite which again crafts a great mix of concussive and seductive resourcefulness to grip the imagination as firmly as its wilful sounds grabs ears.

Closing with the inescapably infectious Do Or Do Not, There Is No Try and another roar of pop and hardcore punk involvement that challenges as pleasingly as it captivates with an unbridled catchiness, Too Close To Closure is an encounter which simply grows with every listen, only blossoming further in presence and its persuasion of thoughts and appetite over time.

Too Close To Closure might not be the most unique release you will come across this year but, given time, it will become a slice of punk devilry you are likely to strap on and enjoy more often than most.

The Too Close To Closure EP is released March 11th across most online stores and physically @ http://www.safesosimple.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/safesosimplemusic/

Pete RingMaster 11/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

The Shapers – Reckless Youth

The Shapers Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

Having gotten their melodic punk claws into other parts of the world, French trio The Shapers are now concentrating on the UK with the uncaging of new EP Reckless Youth which is set to be followed by a British tour. The release offers a captivating collection of songs bred from the heart of punk rock and brought up embracing its numerous strains. It is punk ‘n’ roll to breed a hungry appetite for and an encounter which starts with a bang and, though it arguably does not always maintain its initial impact, only leaves a want for more.

Hailing from Toulouse, The Shapers emerged in 2009 from the union of vocalist/guitarist Anthony Cauvin, bassist/backing vocalist Raphaël Bouissière, and drummer Benoit Holin. Quickly unleashing a hunger to play live, by 2011 the threesome was touring China and Indonesia to such success that the band retuned again in 2015 to eagerly awaiting fans, adding the likes of Thailand to their global CV. Two years after that first tour, The Shapers was going around North America where they shared stages with NOFX and Pennywise, the prize for winning a ‘best up-and-coming band’ competition. With the release of debut Everybody Needs To Have A Dream in 2012 equally drawing potent acclaim to go along with shows alongside the likes of The Flatliners, Silverstein, Face To Face, and Dream on Dreamer over time, The Shapers have been on a unstoppable roll set to continue with Reckless Youth.

The Shapers Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe EP opens with a gentle caress of guitar as Can’t Forget slips into view. Within a few more breaths it is rumbling through ears with sturdy beats and ravenous bass riffs as band shouts crowd the voice and guitar enterprise of Cauvin. Initially there are few surprises but certainly an alluring dose of hooks and anthemic prowess which has the body bouncing and energies aroused. Subsequently though, an electro hinting broadens its presence to sizzle and provoke, the song from an opening Blink 182/Pennywise like character with a hint of Buzzcocks to it revealing a fiery G.R.I.M scented invention. Melodies and adventurous twists only add to the increasing creative drama and virulent persuasion of the song, resulting in a superb and invigorating introduction.

The outstanding start continues with Secrets and straight away it is taunting with beats as the guitar enjoyably hassles the senses with its spicy intimidation. The grooved bait of the bass only adds to the swiftly gripping tempting, as too an excellent mix of lead and group vocals. Carrying a fuzzy electro pop mischief into its imagination and urgency, the song reminds of Russian band Biting Elbows in a punk ‘n’ roll stomp that only gets the body and emotions fully involved.

The following Another Chance equally shows its muscle and catchiness early. The bass offers the menace whilst beats and hooks uncage the infectiousness which fuels the songs’ surge into attention and a keen appetite. Again maybe uniqueness is not as high on the agenda of the song as stirring up a good time, but whilst lacking some of the spark of its predecessors, the track only pleases with its feverish enterprise and refreshing energy loaded revelry.

The instrumental Lonely Moments comes next with an acoustic guitar hug of melodic charm which is enjoyable but does not quite fit in with the company of the songs around it, something which No Regrets has less problem with. It too is an acoustic bass croon with Cauvin as potent as ever vocally and impressively backed by band harmonies. It also misses the same elements which made especially the first pair of songs so captivating but again it only leaves satisfaction full before Youth Disaster takes over with its grumbling riffs and skittish percussion around more of Cauvin’s engaging. Offering a tenacious landscape of classic rock laced, punk seeded rock ‘n’ roll, the track plays like a mix of Good Charlotte and Sum 41, blossoming from a strong start into an inescapable, almost stormy roar thick with anthemic persuasion.

Ending almost as powerfully as it certainly started, Reckless Youth is one of those releases easy to find yourself drawn back to time and time again. As mentioned The Shapers have their eyes on the UK now and going by the potency of their EP, it is hard to see them failing to stir up another wave of eager fuss.

The Reckless Youth EP is available from Friday 26th February through all digital platforms.

http://theshapersofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/TheShapersOfficial   https://twitter.com/theshapers

Pete RingMaster 24/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

On The Open Road – Storyteller

On The Open Road Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

With pop punk releases seeming to be coming thick and fast already in 2016, Storyteller is another well worth giving some attention to. The new EP, or should that be album with its eight boisterous tracks, comes from UK punksters On The Open Road. It is a collection of rousing and openly accomplished tracks which may not veer on the side of uniqueness but certainly provides plenty to be thoroughly satisfied by.

Formed at the beginning of 2013, the Nottingham hailing On The Open Road began as the school friend trio of vocalist/guitarist Tom Hawk, bassist Dan Abey, and drummer Ollie Green. The release of their debut EP was not long in coming or soon after, the decision to grow with the addition of lead guitarist Jack Dutton. Musically the band draws on inspirations taken from the likes of Blink-182, Sum 41, Chunk! No, Captain Chunk! and A Day To Remember, a mix flavouring a sound which quickly ensured the band was an eagerly followed live proposal. Last year, the quartet released the Harm’s Way EP to potent responses, a success easy to expect being emulated by Storyteller.

Chump! starts things off, band vocals leaping into ears straight away amidst an antagonistic yet welcoming collusion of rhythms and riffs. It is an enjoyably rowdy start which slips straight into the like-minded and similarly sounding No Rush. The opener is really an extensive ‘intro’ to the second track which soon involves ears in its own boisterous canter interspersed with calmer strolls and emotive escapades. Retaining its aggressive energy and highly catchy anthemic prowess throughout, the song provides a tenacious slice of high energy pop punk with a familiar wrapping to a fresh heart in sound and enterprise.

On The Open Road Cover Artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe following Smooth Sailing Is A Fool’s Thought makes a heady entrance too, quickly arousing ears with its infectious temptation driven by a vocal energy and variation from Hawk and band. It is a potent element matched by the predatory riffs and rhythms badgering and inciting the sonic flames and piercing hooks also trespassing on the senses. Though it holds a similarity to songs around it, a trait all tracks have to good and at times frustrating effect, and entangles ears in recognisable spices from elsewhere, the song is a roar to greedily and regularly devour.

The grouchier tone and inescapable contagion of Regret Me Not hits the sweet spot quickly too. Again it is easy to offer up comparisons such as Blink 182 and The All-American Rejects but equally there is no stopping the track’s irresistible lures and a rich enjoyment of its sparkling character and revelry.

Current single Rainy Days steps up next with rapier like beats and bulky riffs stalking ears first before vocals and melodies wrap suggestively around the song’s bracing bellow. It is a potent invitation into the release though for personal tastes it is outshone by the thick qualities of the previous pair of songs, each suitable as an attention grabbing single. Nevertheless it leaves a want to hear more which Bedrock keenly provides. Starting with a melodic seducing which rises into a voracious tempest of hooks and imposing rhythms driven by the vocal eagerness of Hawk, the track is a resourceful and pleasing confrontation which, as the release itself, impresses more with every listen.

The enjoyable This Is Goodbye (I Tried) keeps things ruggedly energised and attention still firmly in the hands of On The Open Road before letting The Worst Guy bring things to a ferocious close. Featuring Adam Connor, the track is a minute and a half of blistering punk rock with highly welcomed primal and hostile tendencies which stands up there with Smooth Sailing Is A Fool’s Thought and Regret Me Not as the major highlights of Storyteller.

On The Open Road has yet to find a sound which stands unique to the crowd but they do have an ability to create seriously catchy and anthemic exploits which stir up an appetite for more. A success so many others would kill for.

Storyteller is released on February 26th via all outlets.

https://www.facebook.com/ontheopenroaduk https://twitter.com/ontheopenroaduk

Pete RingMaster 24/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

UK POP PUNKERS, ON THE OPEN ROAD, UNVEIL NEW VIDEO!

Brit pop punk crew ‘On The Open Road’ have dropped their killer new video ‘Rain Days’ on, lifted from their forthcoming new EP ‘Storyteller’, out on Friday 26th February.

You can watch ‘Rain Days’ right now at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxA5HDh_Poc&feature=youtu.be

On The Open Road Online promo shot_RingMaster Review

Finding inspiration from a range of influences, On The Open Road have pulled from legendary punks such as Blink-182 and Sum 41, through to contemporary kings like Chunk! No, Captain Chunk! and A Day To Remember. The industrious crew have broken down the truest essentials of the genre and have produced a signature sound of their own that is punchy, energetic, and without doubt contagious.

Born in 2013 and hailing from Nottinghamshire, On The Open Road started life as a trio with school friends Tom Hawk on lead vocals and guitar, Dan Abey handling bass, and Ollie Green pounding on the drums. The three piece soon put out their debut EP, but it became clear that the band needed another guitarist to really raise their sound to the next level. New found friend Jack Dutton stepped up to fill the void on lead guitar. With a formidable live sound and an extra dimension to their music, the band extensively hit the road and started work on their next record.

The foursome release their new EP ‘Storyteller’ later this month, and it’s bursting with eight tracks of blistering pop punk. The first video single to be released is the anthemic ‘Rainy Days’ , which is a firecracker of a cut, loaded with a refrain that you just can’t shake. With tour dates lined up for the first part of the year, 2016 promises to be a gargantuan year for the band.

ON THE OPEN ROAD LIVE:. FEBRUARY – Saturday 13th – Mansfield (The Intake) – Diamond Days headlining; Friday 19th – Manchester (The Zoo Bar) – Pre-Deadbolt club night show – Six Time Champion headlining. Sunday 26th – Nottingham (Rescue Rooms) – ‘Storyteller’ EP release show – OTOR headlining. MARCH – Saturday 26th – Derby (The Victoria Inn) – Less Than Three Festival – WSTR headlining.

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