Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters – Show Me Your Teeth

Show Me Your Teeth is a romping stomping slab of hard rock; a tenacious roar of defiance, attitude, and hungrily rousing rock ‘n’ roll. It is also the new album from UK rockers Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters proudly hollering out all the reasons why the band is riding a tide of success and plaudits.

Fan and critical acclaim are no strangers to the Cardiff bred quartet with previous debut album, Bad Habit, luring high praise and attention. Around and following its success, Beth Blade And The Beautiful Disasters have shared stages with a host of major artists such as Electric Boys, Dan Reed and Danny Vaughn among a great many and appeared on the KISS Kruise last November with the likes of KISS, Ace Frehley, Bruce Kulick, The Dead Daisies, Vintage Trouble, The New Roses as well as played Monstersfest with Dan Reed Network, The Dead Daisies and Tygers Of Pantang. The last year also saw the band concentrate on writing and creating Show Me Your Teeth, an offering which as potent and enjoyable as its predecessor was, leaves it waving from its wake whilst suggesting 2019 will be even busier for the foursome.

Show Me Your Teeth builds upon all the striking elements of that first album with relish whilst bringing its own individual enterprise and adventure to the fore. Swiftly it reveals the growth in the writing and imagination of the band and their prowess in casting boisterous riffs, inescapable hooks, and anthemic old school classic rock nurtured temptation; this fronted by the electrifying and hearty tones of Beth Blade.  It is a bolder affair with a breath suggesting the band has completely lost the shackles of trying to please and impress people and just go with their own hard rock passions and instincts. Certainly inspirations such as Halestorm, KISS, and Black Stone Cherry can be heard but Show Me Your Teeth embraces all familiar hues to its very own vociferous heart and roar.

The album opens with the outstanding Secrets and fair to say as its opening lung full sees Blade fronting up ears we were hooked. From there with the fuzz of guitar for company, she continues to coax the song to its feet, an air of menace surrounding its emergence before erupting in a contagious, attitude driven infestation of punk and hard rock. That raw edge continues to fuel its confrontation and rapacious catchiness whilst vocal harmonies seduce around the stirring tones of Blade. The track soon proved irresistible, increasing its enslavement as a delicious predacious bass growl and devious hues of unpredictable imagination became more vocal.

Such the first’s rousing and impressive tempting, the album’s following title track had a hard time to match its presence but with a teasing blues lilt, melodic wiring which just wrapped around eager ears, and the already predictable vocal dexterity and talent of Blade here was little to relinquish full attention to before Give It All You’ve Got shared its old school spiced rock ‘n’ roll. As the previous track, there was a strong familiarity to the encounter but equally an energetically passionate heart within just as open craft which manipulated and scooped up an already seriously contented appetite.

There is something of an early Pretenders-esque scent to next up On And On at times which combines well with its blend of nostalgic and hungrily fresh enterprise while You And I is a web of guileful hooks and melodic adventure around vociferously candid vocals which easily set another lofty peak in the album’s landscape.

From that incitement of controlled yet raucous persuasion, melodic calm accompanies emotive intimation hugs ears within successor Crazy. It is a simmering heart though as flames erupts around reflection and melancholic beauty. The track never erupts into a full blaze but boils over with stirring cunning as it too sets a major highlight within Show Me Your Teeth before I Ain’t Got Nothin’ (If I Ain’t Got Rock N Roll) provides everything you would expect from its title as it swiftly pulled our rocker instincts and animation into play.

Across the likes of Lost In You and Into The Light, the album only continued to tighten its hold even if neither track quite flattened the inhibitions of song and listener as those before them. Even so both are a tantalising and thickly satisfying fusion of melodic wine and barely restrained rowdiness which just hit the spot though the following 1974 soon eclipsed both with its virulent stroll and creative temptation. Its sound unsurprisingly echoes the rock ‘n’ roll era of its title’s decade but adds mouth-watering hues of punk and power pop which take it to another level of greatness.

Who Do You Love Now? with its own multi-flavoured mix of styles and decades is just as expert in persuasion and adept at casting a spell of enterprise and sound; another seriously captivating moment set down and one more than matched by the muscular, predatory almost grumpy stomp of album closer Jack And Coke. Inescapably enticing riffs and grooves collude to enslave ears, each seemingly knowing personal wants in rock ‘n’ roll whilst the song growls with infectious savvy and anthemic irritability.

As it started, Show Me Your Teeth ends with one of its most inspiring and thrilling moments and with so many more in between it is an album which we can only forcibly recommend. It is classic and hard rock, it is punk and pop rock all bound into one roar; quite simply rock ‘n’ roll at its and most electrifying best.

Show Me Your Teeth is out January 25th.

https://bethbladeandthebeautifuldisasters.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BBATBDofficial/  https://twitter.com/BBATBDofficial

Pete RingMaster 26/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The RingMaster Review gets together with Spanish hard rockers JJ Friends in interview

Hello and thank you for taking the time to talk with us.

Can you present the band for the first time and give us some background on how everything started?

JJ Friends was born from the idea of Jose Jarque (voice) who after several bands decided to focus efforts on creating a group in which the closest musician friends participated. JJ Friends was born, 11 songs were written and the sound was worked on, a raw sound, pure hard rock with influences from the 70s and mix of 2018, a challenge that I think we have achieved.

Our style is pure hard rock.

How have those previous experiences with bands impacted on your creativity now and in the style and direction of the band’s sound?

All the components come from different backgrounds, with a wide career, between 20 and 25 years in rock. The impact is the power to make our rock more serene, more worked and with everything learned in the scenarios.

Our style is hard rock, we love it, we feel good, why change? No, we will not change; maybe we can play with more metal parts or more pop parts, but always with the hard rock base.

What inspired the name of the band?

Friendship…being able to work with great friends and what better then to translate it into the name directly.

Was there any specific idea behind the formation of the band and also in what you wanted and your sound to offer?

Yes, the main thing was to gather those friends with whom we felt the same for rock and from the beginning we wanted to achieve a sound, powerful, seventies but at the same time modern today, I think we achieved it with a mixture of riffs and sounds.

…And now?

The idea of our band is the work, we create the themes, we polish them in the rehearsals and once finished, we continue working on them, re-polishing, until we are ecstatic with the subject.

Since its inception, how would you say its sound has evolved?

The band has little tour at this time, it only has one year of life, but it has evolved giving way to new songs within hard rock, more compact, more real.

Do you let things grow and evolve organically or deliberately look to try new things?

We are rock sound, we must listen to ourselves, and we are completely organic.

Probably throughout the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any that has particularly impacted not only on the music of the band but its member’s personal approach to and ideas about creating music?

Really like everyone we have musical references, ranging from Beatles, Rolling Stone, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Whitesnake, Deep Purple, Motley Crue, Scorpions, Van Halen, and in what gives us now the music we can name, Inglorious, Black Stone Cherry, The Dead Daisies, Richie Kottzen, and many, many more.

Is there a process in the composition that usually guides the writing of songs?

Previously we started with a riff; from there we composed a base melody and started to work on it, a thousand changes of structure, melody, etc. … until leaving a complete and compact base, then as indicated above, work without rest in the song.

Where do you most often draw inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

All themes are the product of our experiences, both personal and visual, sentimental etc. … a hard day of work, the feeling for our music, lack of love, love, party, etc. …Even a theme in which we reflect the feeling of the first minutes of being a father.

Are you a band that enters the studio with songs in their final state or do you prefer to develop them while recording?

When we enter the studio we have or try to have everything defined and very worked; really in the studio we go very fast and do not earn too much money with us studies, hahaha.

Tell us about the live side of the band, probably the band’s favourite aspect?

The party, we are a band that has fun on the stage, we try to give the warmth to the public, we want them to enjoy as much as we do; on stage we are partiers, we involve all the public and we want them to sing with us.

It is not easy for a new band to have a regional impact, let alone nationally and farther away. How are you finding it?

We are still in the process, it is a very difficult road, we know it, but we will not stop until the end.

Once again, thank you very much for sharing your time with us; something you want to add or reveal for the readers?

Give them the grace for your work and for including us in your magazine, we are delighted and we want JJ Friends to be heard in all corners of the planet.

Check out JJ Friends further @ https://www.facebook.com/JJ-Friends-969137536525542/

Pete RingMaster 17/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dope Out – Scars & Stripes

Formed on the first breath of 2013, French band Dope Out has earned a potent reputation in their homeland for their aggressive and stylish heavy rock sound. Now with the release of their highly enjoyable second album, Scars & Stripes, they are threatening to provoke the same kind of attention and support on a much broader scale.

Musically, the Paris quartet merges flavoursome traits from classic and hard rock with more punk, metal, and stoner essences for a proposition which feels familiar yet equally fresh and adventurous. The band has honed their sound and invention across a debut EP, All Hopes Inside, released that first year, and the well-received debut album Bad Seeds of 2014. The years between albums has seen Dope Out breach another level and maturity in their music; an evolution making Scars & Stripes a potently flavoursome proposal.

The four tracks making up the Lady Misfits EP which came out January 2016 made a tasty teaser of things to come, its potential straight away confirmed as Scars & Stripes hits ears with its title track. A lone bassline provides the first lure, its throaty twang soon joined by wiry riffs and rolling rhythms as the song brings its appetising bait all together for a predacious stroll awash with flaming melody. Once settled, the grouchy lead vocals of guitarist Stoner step up with attitude the fore, their irritated air matched by the hooks and grooves lining the slice of punk infused rock ‘n’ roll. Varied twists and turns follow to add to the captivation of the strong start to Scars & Stripes; a base the album only grows bolder from.

The following Dive is a just as appealing proposition, matching its predecessor’s success with its fiery web of grooves and enterprise spun by lead guitarist Crash over a rhythmic trespass driven by the jabbing beats of Mad and Doc’s heavy tempting bassline. As with the first, the song sets the tone of the album without exposing its deepest layers of imagination, that discovery really beginning from The Freakshow, which follows, onwards but still inciting a keen appetite for what is on offer so far.

The third song swiftly hits the spot, its initial pyre of sonic taunting mouth-watering but only added to by the rhythmic rumble which is soon aligned to a broadening design of flavours and invention.  Once hitting its resourceful stride, the track prowls like a mix of Dope and Marilyn Manson while its melodic blaze and earthy air has Gruntruck like hues to it. It is compelling stuff, only increasing its hold on ears as it twists and turns with imagination fuelled confrontation, blues grooves and steely tendrils increasing the fun.

Lady Misfits makes a more even tempered entrance, Stoner’s mellow tones joined by a just as relaxed melody as rhythms saunter with similar restraint. It is all a build-up though to a blaze of a chorus which after searing and pleasuring the senses slips back into the highly enjoyable calm, erupting with greater temptation throughout as the track continues to grow and reveal more of its captivating character and resourcefulness.

By now, the band and album has the lid open on their boldest adventure, next up Clan Of Bats bearing a spicy slab of imposing blues hued rock with an infectiousness breeding a chorus which is one of the truly memorable moments within the release. It is also the moment when you feel Dope Out really get to grips with their craft and imagination, the album having a real swagger to its presence and almost mischievous ambition.

The snarling rock ‘n’ roll of next up Shooting Gun keeps attention and pleasure high, its catchy swing and assertive intensity a potent mix before Nose White entangles ears in woozy blues grooves and stalking rhythms as vocals mix belligerence and invitation in their commanding persuasion. Carrying a touch of Black Stone Cherry and Hardcore Superstar to its body, only concentrated pleasure arises with it especially as its shadows darken and its tone and sinews become more invasive, luring the listener into its heart and the waiting devilry of Balls To The Wall. Another major highlight of the album, the song is a beast of almost violent rhythmic intent and sonic trespass, the guitars searing ears with their hook laden melodic flames whilst vocals scowl as the heart of the track erupts.

The album is brought to a just as feverish close by firstly Again, a song with infectiousness in its DNA and blues rapacity in its veins. As many of its predecessors, it has feet twitching and hips swinging with increasing relish, exhausting and pleasuring the body ready for the mellow caresses of closing encounter Soulmate, an acoustic reflection playing like a warm and increasingly enthusiastic night cap on a boozy rock ’n’ roll session.

It is hard to say that Scars & Stripes is overly unique yet has plenty of new elements to provide a truly fresh and increasingly enjoyable encounter; a proposition quite possibly coaxing a great more of the world to listen to Dope Out.

Scars & Stripes is digitally out now.

https://www.facebook.com/Dopeout/   https://dopeoutunited.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacktop Mojo – Burn The Ships

The past four years since forming has seen Texan rock band Blacktop Mojo court a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, all the time increasingly nudging global attention to turn their way. The release of second album Burn The Ships is the moment that awareness just might happen, the release a striking and thickly accomplished slab of highly flavoursome, sinew moulded rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in September 2012 by vocalist Matt James and drummer Nathan Gillis, Blacktop Mojo swiftly leapt into the live scene with the intent of playing as many shows and tours as they could. It is a hunger which prevails to this day, the Palestine, TX quintet sharing stages with the likes of Bon Jovi, Candlebox, Drowning Pool, Aaron Lewis, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Whiskey Myers, Dirty River Boys, and The Bigsbys among a great many others over the years. Debut album I Am stirred things up at home with its release in 2014, similarly inviting broader notice of the band’s hearty hard/melodic rock sound. Burn The Ships though is a wake-up call to bigger spotlights upon the band, the Philip Mosley produced and Austin Deptula mixed and mastered encounter a fiery roar very hard to ignore or avoid finding a healthy appetite for.

The Blacktop Mojo sound is arguably not the most unique, the band drawing comparisons to the likes of Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Soundgarden yet has an individual character and diversity which lifts it from the crowd with ease. All the evidence lies within Burn The Ships and its inventive and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll; a proposition hitting the ground running with its majorly rousing opener Where The Wind Blows. A lone melody with a country rock twang makes the first beckon, a sister lure swiftly by its side before muscle bound rhythms loom over ears amidst the continuing invitation of that initial welcome. Soon into its thick and potent stride with the growling tones of Matt Curtis’ bass rich bait alongside the meaty swipes of Gillis, the track has its infectious claws firmly around ears and appetite with James’ delivery leading the way and in turn the listener into one peach of a chorus impossible not to get fully involved in. With the riffs of rhythm guitarist Kenneth Irwin equally steering the temptation as lead guitarist Ryan Kiefer spins wiry grooves, it is a seriously compelling proposal,

The following End Of Days is just as formidable and satisfying, its robust rhythms and gnarly grooves alone gripping body and an instinctive passion for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll. As its predecessor, the song carries an irresistible chorus to back up the already successful lures at play and the album’s powerful start, success its title track continues. As provocative guitar temptation wraps its flame lit charms around ears, Burn The Ships quickly shows itself an equal to those before in enticement, gaining even greater strength in that trait as its groove takes on a nagging quality as it meanders around the vocal potency of James. With Seether-esque hues involved, the song croons and roars; flexing its muscle as it spins its inventively intoxicating sonic web with each passing second. The track is pure drama and the pinnacle of the album though challenged throughout.

The earnest strains of Prodigal follow, its Staind lit serenade a mellow emotive caress allowing for a breath whilst enjoying its melodic heat, suggestive flames building  into a bigger blaze before Shadows On The Wall smoulders and erupts in a 3 Doors Down scented fire next, subsequently  followed by the virile throes of Sweat. The trio do not quite teach the heights of the first three tremendous tracks but each with their individual natures and temptations leave plenty to embrace and firmly enjoy.

The snarling properties of Pyromaniac bring the album back to its loftiest heights, the song as heated as its title suggests with irritability in its riffs and a bass grumble so easy to grow lustful for. Melodically, there is a 3 Days Grace air contrasted and complimented perfectly by the grungier textures at work on the senses, both linked by an instinctive catchiness  which again features in potent form within the predacious 8000 Lines, a song stalking ears with rapacious riffs and antagonistic beats as sonic enterprise and vocal drama ignite. The track is outstanding; its unpredictability enhanced by melodic beauty as an oasis of calm shares ears with its tempestuous heart.

Both Dog On A Leash with its red-blooded plaintive call and the reflective cries of Make A Difference leave satisfaction full, each revealing further twists in the album’s make-up and enterprise while Chains brings a web of athletic grooves and beefy rhythms in a burly persuasion raising the ante again. It is pure captivation preying on an already eager appetite for sound and encounter.

Concluded by the emotionally charged Dream On and the melancholic musing of Underneath, the impressive Burn The Ships has plenty to see the band make the next step towards global recognition. Its songs are shapely and sound rich if not always on the truly unique side. Its craft and imagination more than compensates though as ears embrace the open potential also lying within a triumph of a listen.

Burn The Ships is out now through Cuhmon Records @ https://blacktopmojo.bandcamp.com/releases or http://www.blacktopmojo.com/store

http://www.blacktopmojo.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BlacktopMojo   https://twitter.com/blacktopmojo

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fragile Things – Broken Sun

fragile-things-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Formed last year, British rockers Fragile Things have already began luring close attention and are intent on making 2017 a big year with a full UK tour for starters. They kick it off before that though with a reboot of their debut EP Broken Sun; four tracks of heavy rock bred in the inspirations of bands such as Alice In Chains, Guns ‘N’ Roses, Black Stone Cherry, Velvet Revolver, Audioslave, and Pearl Jam.  It presents a sound as familiar as it is refreshing; a proposition proud in its influences but showing signs and potential of its own individual character.

fragile-things-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewFeaturing former members of Heaven’s Basement and Endless Mile, Milton Keynes based Fragile Things have recently completed a host of dates alongside the excellent Slam Cartel and are now, as suggested, concentrating on breaking national exposure starting with Broken Sun, a proposal getting straight down to action with its opener Enemy Is I. With acidic riffs and robust rhythms, the song bounds in from a distance with vocalist Richie Hevanz leading the charge, his tones impressive and expressive. Once in full view, it settles into a feisty stroll with tangy grooves from Mark Hanlon lighting up crunchy beats and steely riffs, all subsequently entwined in fiery melodies. Group vocals are the rousing icing on the infectious enticement, the track not particularly surprising but richly satisfying to start things off.

Its striking traits are just as potent within the following Open Cage; its body heavier and darker though as the grumbling bass of Steve Lathwell colludes with the hefty swiping beats of Hugo Bowman. With a snarl in its heart and touch, the song swiftly has body and spirit involved; its anthemic prowess inescapable as it brings both to the boil ready for the EP’s title track. Showing another slight shift in the style and design of the band’s sound, the track is a web of hooks and mouth-watering grooves around less forceful but commanding rhythms; vocals again striking a chord in word and touch. As those around it, those earlier mentioned influences are easy to pick out but again flavouring adding to the potency of song and release.

Closing with So Cold, a track which takes longer to persuade as fully as its companions but only ever satisfies, the Broken Sun EP is a strong and highly enjoyable introduction to Fragile Things.  It is easy to hear why the foursome is persistently grabbing new fans and spotlights and if they can build on this strong start that broader recognition should be a given.

Broken Sun is out now.

https://www.fragilethingsofficial.com/     https://www.facebook.com/fragilethingsofficial/

https://twitter.com/fragilethings_

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dog ‘N’ Style – Pub’s Calling

dognstyle-promo-pubc-3_RingMasterReview

Unleashing a flavoursome dose of rebel and spirit rousing rock ‘n’ roll within its muscular walls, French heavy rockers Dog ‘N’ Style have just released debut album Pub’s Calling. A hungry and virulent roar from start to finish, the ten track encounter revels in the band’s stoner and hard rock shaded rock ‘n’ roll which in turn inspires ears to greedily devour what is maybe not the most unique incitement but certainly one which leaves thick satisfaction.

Formed in 2013, Epinal hailing Dog ‘N’ Style quickly hit their stride live, the following three years seeing the Spinalien quartet play over a hundred shows across France and further afield including tours in Russia, Spain, and Luxemburg. Sharing stages with the likes of No One is Innocent, The Casualties, Tagada Jones, Ultra Vomit, and Burning Heads along the way the band’s melody infused heavy rocking has been increasingly praised while their self-titled debut EP of 2015 introduced the band to a broader attention which Pub’s Calling can only further ignite.

An earthy revving of an engine opens up the album, its growl welcoming the meaty body and sound of The Best of Me. Straight away the song sets the character and intent of sound and release, riffs and rhythms heavy and imposing as fiery flames of guitar and rich melodies collude with an infectious boisterousness. As most songs within Pub’s Calling, there is something familiar about the opener but a recognisable air which wraps the band’s commanding and enterprising songwriting to fine effect.

art_RingMasterReviewThe great start to the album continues with I Did Something Bad, the growl lined vocals of Greg Hal a magnetic essence as swinging riffs and rhythms unite while the guitars of Yan Pierrat and Hal spin a web of sonic and melodic adventure. Like its predecessor, there is an instinctive catchiness to the song which is irresistible even when the bass of Robin Rob’s grooves along on its own. The band lists inspirations as the likes of Black Stone Cherry, Steel Panthers, Red Fang, and Nashville Pussy, and it is those kinds of influences which especially leap around within the album’s second track.

Pretty Fly reveals a grouchier intent in its nature and sound from the off yet again grooves and the inviting tones of Hal are quickly seducing ears as the mighty rhythmic swings of drummer Boub Tchak resonate. A cantankerously toned bassline entangles the warmer but no less intrusive riffs and grooves of the guitars, it all contrasting and mixing masterfully with the melodic and fiery imagination which blossoms across the track before One Day springs its Gruntruck spiced proposal and in turn Bad Motorcycle swaggers in with its hard/classic rock fuelled stomp. Neither track quite live up to the heights of the first trio of songs yet spicy grooves and infectious roars as well as the sonic dexterity offered ensures both leave enjoyment high.

The release hits top gear again with Night Losers, its funk infested basslines alone sparking an already eager appetite as the tendrils of tangy guitar entangle ears. Again vocals and rhythms involve the listener with ease and though originality is maybe limited the imagination is swiftly hooked by the songs inventive twists, turns, and snarling enterprise.

With its southern rock hued melodies, the same applies to the excellent Running Out which swiftly seduces as sultry sonic sighs amidst calmer vocals and energies immerse ears in its smouldering but rhythmically imposing climate. Carrying a fierce snarl in its mellower stroll, the track is outstanding, best track contender which though closely rivalled within the album leaves the moment which lingers longest even as the bruising and thickly catchy rumble of Never Trust An Asshole mightily consumes ears and pleasure next.

The album’s title track is heavy rock ‘n’ roll at it most compelling and rousing, rhythms and riffs enslaving instincts as grooves and almost toxic melodies infest the imagination. It too is a battleground of attitude loaded aggression and energy infused with a tapestry of warm melodic invention and dustily charming harmonies.

Ensuring the album ends on a high similar to how it started, it calls time on the boozy rabble-rousing with the final Couple Of Beers, a track again weaving all the traits and contrasting shades of the Dog ‘N’ Style sound and invention in one exhilarating escapade. It is a fine end to Pub’s Calling, an album which may not be about to change the direction of muscle driven rock ‘n’ roll but certainly gives it something to get lively about.

Pub’s Calling is out now across most online stores.

 

https://www.facebook.com/dognstylemusic   https://twitter.com/dognstyle

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Patriot Rebel – Cynics Playground

PatriotRebelPromo_RingMasterReview

With their first new slabs of muscle bound rock ‘n roll since the Two Worlds EP in 2013, UK quintet Patriot Rebel take another attention grabbing and impressive step to the fore of the British rock scene. Quite simply the Cynics Playground is a thumping collection of rousing incitements, a multi-flavoured EP that stirs up the spirit.

Formed in 2011, the Nottingham hard rockers have constantly honed their sound and lured greater focus the way of their ear pleasing creative roar. Drawing on inspirations ranging from Alter Bridge, Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Avenged Sevenfold, Patriot Rebel poked at acclaiming attention with the aforementioned Matt Elliss (Black Spiders, Terrorvision, Skarlett Riot) produced Two Worlds. Live the band equally earned a potent reputation, taking in shows with the likes of Y&T, Tesseract, The Treatment, Jettblack, and Skarlett Riot along the way. Last year saw the release of the similarly striking video single Propaganda, a track taken from their first EP. Now with Ellis again at the helm, the band returns with Cynics Playground and a sound which has noticeably grown in maturity, power, and downright magnetism.

Patriot Rebel Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewOpening up with Digital Mannequin, the EP hits the ground running. Led by the most irritably growling bassline to get an appetite for, the song is soon driving through ears with the riffs of guitarists Danny Marsh and Dave Gadd stirring the senses as vocalist Paul Smith roars. It is a thick and almost muggy assault with every element crisp and precise within the infectious tempest, throughout Marsh’s grooves entwining the imagination, binding the sinew swung beats of Aaron Grainger and the persistently grouchy tone of Will Kirk’s bass.

It is an outstanding start, with at times a whiff of System Of A Down to it, which leaves a lingering impression and pleasure before being matched in creative kind and potency by Self Hate. The second track similarly has ears and eagerness devouring its robust throes of riffs and rhythms, presenting another imposing yet inviting entrance which commands attention and enjoyment with swift success. Smith again stands magnetic within the boisterous energy and aggression offered, his delivery a fiery snarl with contagious prowess to match the virulent enterprise of the guitars and rhythms, which in turn means one stirring encounter.

Two songs in and the Patriot Rebel sound while never afraid to reveal some of its influences, shows itself to be at its most unique and individual yet, the emotive power balladry of Dying Breed continuing that welcome trend as it ebbs and flows with emotional and physical intensity amidst sonic invention. More a smouldering success than its predecessors, the track emerges as another highlight within Cynics Playground, being quickly equalled by the rhythm swinging, antagonistically riffed All I Wanted. It is a beast of a proposal, that irritability of bass in the opener fuelling every aspect of the mighty incitement. The song takes no prisoners, guitars and beats biting as they entice and land alongside the predatory nature of the bass which in turn courts the catchy lead of the vocals and the infection sharing instincts of the track itself. Equally though, there is room for some sonic and exotic melodic imagination to be seriously tempted by.

The EP closes with Miss-Guided, a song which reveals all the Patriot Rebel attributes with consummate ease while sharing the new depth and adventure in the band’s sound. Though it might not quite live up to those before it, the song is an impressing finale to a thrilling release. Cynics Playground is Patriot Rebel on a new plateau yet the feeling is that the band is still working towards their true creative heights; so happy days for UK rock ‘n’ roll ahead we suggest.

The Cynics Playground EP is out now through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/patriotrebel    https://twitter.com/patriotrebeluk

Pete RingMaster 24/06/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright