Owl – Orion Fenix

There are places and experiences you fear engaging in but still feel compelled to immerse in; dark and imposing yet inescapably seductive propositions which lure and ensnare despite their ravenous shadows.  Orion Fenix is one of those propositions or rather one which takes you and your imagination into such a shadow thick emotionally dark landscape so beguiling the only real option is to lose yourself in its tenebrific majesty.

Orion Fenix is the new EP from Owl, the solo project of Valborg guitarist/vocalist Christian Kolf. A single track, 22 minutes in length, the song is the creation of instinct and emotion, a piece which Kolf said in regard to its birth, ”There was no big thinking behind it, I just wrote it and that’s it. Let my feelings go.” It is an organic affair with flows over and envelops the senses like a tempest bearing lover; engaging and inflaming the imagination with every new twist and turn. Its epic length is like a slowly revolving kaleidoscope, bringing new emotive scenery and shades of light and shadow in an exploration which never truly repeats any of its fascinating moments or bewitching trespasses.

Emerging from sonic mists with a throaty resonance, immediately there is an alluring invitation from Orion Fenix but one with a portentous edge to its smouldering beauty. Graceful yet with a threat in its tone, the track rises until its tempestuousness sparks a heavy doomy gait. Its corrosive suggestiveness though is instantly tempered by the harmonic tones of Kolf, his voice similarly pure enticement and menace laced melancholy.

That early mellow air is in time a burning pyre of emotional and physical dissonance but just one passage in the journey as ill-boding lines a new relative calm from which melodic charm blossoms within the bleak climate; it in turn evolving into a desolate yet magnetic consumption.

And so the song continues, every minute a fresh suggestion, each turn a harbinger of new instinctive exploration either reassuring or unsettling; usually simultaneously both and always enthralling.

Quite simply Orion Fenix is stunning; invasively glorious and hauntingly torturous. It is also a riveting appetiser for Owl’s forthcoming full-length album Nights In Distortion; an experience which now just cannot come soon enough.

Orion Fenix is available now via Zeitgeister Music.

https://www.facebook.com/owlmetal

Pete RingMaster 28/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Pavillon Rouge – Dynasteia Klub

Continuing the conflict in their self-acclaimed “War on the dancefloor”, French metallers Pavillon Rouge are poised to unleash their latest assault in the shape of third album Dynasteia Klub. It brings an escalation in their sonic violence, drama, and virulent trespasses as well as thickly bound fascination as the band’s fusion of electro, industrial, and blackened extreme metal breaches new thresholds and heights in creative dissension. It is a one of a kind hostile pleasure invading body and psyche like a contentious puppeteer.

Formed by guitarist/programmer Mervyn and drummer YVH back in 2008, Pavillon Rouge swiftly made a potent impact with their merger of black metal and hardcore techno bound in atmospheric suggestion but especially caught attention and acclaim with debut album Solmeth Pervitine three years later. Its success and strengths were subsequently eclipsed by its successor Legio Axis Ka in 2015, an inescapable assault and incitement capping a time seeing the Grenoble hailing outfit play with the likes of Psygnosis, Himinbjorg, Svart Crown, and The CNK. Both releases were fuelled by a sound which showed real individuality and now finds even stronger character and adventure within Dynasteia Klub. It has the body dancing, the imagination conjuring, and the senses cowering to its bold invasive tempest; guitarist/vocalist Mu Cephei, bassist E.Shulgin, drummer XVH, and Mervyn, a line-up completed live by guitarist ADB, voraciously trespassing with industrial uniqueness.

Album opener L’Harmonie et la Force instantly spreads an atmospheric breath around ears, intrigue and shadows blending within its intimation as melodies begin to vein the lure. All the time a rhythmic pulse is brewing, looming closer with portentous hues and eventually driving the heart of the sonic incursion. Vocals scowl and holler as beats throb, melodic enterprise as toxic yet magnetic as the black raw intensity of the track. Within seconds the body was bouncing, ears devouring, and enjoyment brewing, the track increasingly offering the kind of predacious enterprise which marked out the last album but with greater craft and maturity not forgetting fresh character.

The following Ô Legions, Ô Triomphes initially gives respite for the breathlessness drawn by its predecessor, synths colluding in the song’s melodic weaving though all the time you sense an underlying voracity and urgency which soon takes the reins of another quickly and fiercely addictive challenge. Even then it still retains its control as vocals and heavy shadows accentuate its theatre of threat and manipulation though a mercurial edge lines it all ensuring a lack of predictability.

The album’s title track immerses the senses next, its weave of electronic, industrial, and grievous metal an infestation of irritable infectiousness around vocal and rhythmic discord and temptation respectively. There is a cosmopolitan hue to the guitar’s melodic web, a theatre echoing the lyrical aspects such as discipline, joy, and forgiveness bred in the release’s Ancient Greek Philosophy inspired themes. Again the band refuse to release the listener from its invasive physical tenacity; ebbs and flows in its gait only adding to the inescapable infectiousness before Le Rayonnement Du Temple Nouveau brings a relative calm with its initial invitation. Soon though, an intrusive tapestry of sound and emotion envelops ears, its grasp dark and suggestive as it explores the senses and imagination.

From its first breath, the outstanding In Aenigmate grips with insatiable hunger, senses whipping rhythms pushing its boisterous trespass as guitars and bass flirt with the same rapacious intent while Bodhisattva offers a kinder intensity though it is just as potent in its creative maze and emotional ferocity led by vocal friction. An inventive fusion of the familiar and fresh, the song did not quite inflame the passions as many before it but with the body uniting in its energy and appetite in its drama, the song left pleasure full before the more atmospherically and physically barbarous Notre Foi Brûle Encore took limbs and lungs on another solicitous ride. As with all tracks, unexpected twists and turns add to the drama of its insatiable intent without ever bringing a deviation from the creative, emotional, and corporeal voracity.

The album concludes with firstly another of its pinnacles in Dans L’ailleurs Absolu; a song which, if not in sound, rhythmically and intensively has something of an early Killing Joke feel to it behind a collage of samples and riveting textures. Its unbridled magnetism draws the listener into the closing ethereal embrace of Ad Augusta. Unsurprisingly it has a tempestuous heart which breeds ravenous rock ‘n’ roll, a storm of enterprise continuing to be draped in the melodic poetry of synths.

It is a tremendous, energy sapping end to an album which relentlessly devours the listener as much as it persistently pleasures them. Like many we were hooked on Pavillon Rouge’s warfare thanks to Legio Axis Ka, now the even more creatively powerful and striking Dynasteia Klub brings lust into play.

Dynasteia Klub is released March 30th through Season of Mist.

http://dynasteiaklub.com/    https://www.facebook.com/LuxDiscipline/

Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Calligram – Askesis

UK set Calligram has a sound which somehow manages to be as seductive as it is debilitating, though even that kinder temptation is fiercely invasive and senses crushing, and comes to a tumultuous and compelling head within the band’s new album, Askesis. Its title means “the procedure of demonstrating self-control and determination of action and purpose”; acts which in sound, emotion, and animosity are skilfully embraced and menacingly twisted across six transfixing punishing tracks.

The successor to their well-received Alan Douches (The Dillinger Escape Plan, Every Time I Die, Darkest Hour) mastered debut, Demimonde of last year, London based Calligram have taken its bleak and often distressing atmospheres and textures to new inventive lands and heights within Askesis. Across its blackened hardcore bred inescapably immersive soundscapes, it teases and taunts, caresses and violates; emotionally and physically devouring the senses, suffocating them as it rips shreds off their suffering hides. Yet it is a joy to fall before, the grooves and infectiously venomous hooks and twists it conjures a masterful salve to the toxic malignancy unleashed.

Opener Della Mancanza instantly invades and sears the flesh of ears with the pestilential tones of vocalist Matteo Rizzardo to the fore swiftly followed by a tide of sonic animosity veined by grooves which just inflame attention and appetite. It is a rabid tempest of punk, black, and death metal; a mercurial but inhospitable scourge which just hits the spot even as it expands its atmospheric grasp and virulent hostility. The guitars of Bruno Polotto and Tim Desbos are a persistent enticement and malefaction, both extremes colluding in the song’s animus where the rhythms of bassist Smittens and drummer Ardo Cotones are similarly anthemic and destructive. Whether in  a rabid charge or its moments of ruinous calm, the track is unstoppably compelling, an irresistible incursion on body and imagination led by Rizzardo’s individual assault, his rancor leaving ears bleeding and scarred just as you imagine his throat is under his friction wearing delivery.

For personal tastes, the release never quite hits that stunning peak again yet savages the sweet spot time and time again starting with Sinking Into Existence. From its first breath, the track is a torrent of sonic violation and vocal torment within black metal smog but again the guitars weave some beguiling melodic toxins and lures to entwine eager ears. There is a predatory side to the track too, a calmer but no less threatening trespass which lifts the song to new captivation and richer emotive depths before Scourge envelops the senses with its own considered but rabid grudge. Again Calligram merge raw essences and viciousness with melodic enterprise and beauty, everything tainted in varying degrees but equally fascinating as it heads towards a passage of murderous rock ‘n’ roll and haunting sonic corrosion, and out again; Rizzardo magnetically guiding the creative pestilence.

The brief dark elegance of Murderess lures the listener into the waiting clutches of Entwined, itself a slim provocation on body and imagination but one spawned from the coupling of cancerous discontent and melodic suggestiveness. Both pieces are connected by emotion and craft, drawing the listener deeper into the album’s heavy anguished fuelled heart and the irresistible embrace of closing track Lament. A tapestry of styles and flavours all soiled and violated by the unique touch of Calligram, the song is an adventure which ebbs and flows, twists and turns; the listener’s thoughts and emotions making a similar journey within its beguiling asphyxiation of their senses.

It is an end as potent and outstanding as the beginning, and with the middle something pretty special too, Askesis is a must for fans of extreme metal, raw hardcore and simply punishing excellence to check out.

Askesis is out now through Basick Records; available @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/askesis

https://www.facebook.com/calligrammusic/    https://twitter.com/CalligramMusic

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Something visceral this way comes: entering the wicked clutches of Skitarg

Like hell’s harlequins with dark intent entangled in pestilential rage and humour, Swedish extreme metallers SKITARG is an encounter which violates the senses at every turn and pleasures an appetite for “heavy, violent and evil metal” just as eagerly. The evidence is open in a live presence which devours the its audiences and four acclaim garnering albums; the fourth in Los Pulkerz released earlier this year. We grabbed the chance to brave the band’s blackened death bred clown metal trespass with vocalist Barnet, exploring its origins, that new album, and the Swedish language….

Hi, can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and how you all came together?

Sure, the band started waaaaaay back in 2005 when me (Barnet, which means “The Kid”) and the other singer Necrofilip (which means…er…”Necrophilip”) were checking out some porn on his balcony, as one is want to do. We were talking about starting a new band – we had been playing in a band called HEAD for the last six years but ended that band – and we wanted the name to sound super pissed off. And so it came to be, this year of the unlord 2005, that we named the band SKITARG (which literally translates to “shit angry”, but more idiomatically aptly translates to “pissed off”.  It also translates to “free sexuality”, “social security” and “Volvo”, but then again EVERY word in Swedish means that too.).

Have you been involved in any other bands before? If so how has that impacted on what you are doing now, in maybe style or direction?

You bet, I have been in about 15-20 bands and Necrofilip about the same. The other band members (who seem to change every now and then) also play in a lot of bands.

Playing with Necrofilip in HEAD was a great learning curve since we´d come to rehearsals with a new song and that song could have a musical element that we hadn´t known yet up to that point. It could be things like playing parallel thirds to a melody, or playing triplets over straight eights or stuff like that…So we´ve definitely grown up musically together.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer and do they still continue to steer the ship?

Yes, to sound pissed off. I think this might have been covered thus far.

You can only stay pissed off for so long before you need to have a laugh, and since me and Necrofilip love laughing more than we have the energy to be angry, the band soon started introducing comedic elements. I wouldn´t say we´re comedians but we definitely have a dark sense of humour and kind of need that perspective to get by in everyday life.

Since its first days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We started out pretty raw and still have that in us today, but rather than just beating the shit out of the drums and guitars, we put a little bit more finesse into it these days.

The first album was pretty direct and simple, the second album had way more harmonies and layers, the third was more melodic in the riff structure and the fourth album is a sort of return to the original simple sound with sprinkles of off-beat songs. One song sounds like Tom Waits, another like orcs raping The Prodigy and a third one is an excerpt of the tapes that Necrofilip recorded on his small tape recorder when he was nine years old. We really don´t have any kind of regard of what we put on our albums to be honest.

Has any evolving in sound and ideas been more organic movement or you deliberately wanting to try new things?

No, we´re pretty aware of what we want to do with our songs. Of course most songs start out with an inspired idea but from that we usually have a pretty clear vision of what needs to be added.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

As you say, there´s too many, but I can tell you what bands we are NOT inspired by: Slipknot and Insane Clown Posse. We sound nothing like them! (Ok, I´ll admit we kind of look like them, but hey, doesn´t every band?)

Is there a general process to the songwriting within the band?

Yes. We start out with some cabbage, add some salt, dance under the moonlight of a disco ball, choke each other until we laugh and then send the master to pressing.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Mostly it´s everyday stuff that pisses us off, like people walking too slow in front of us, dealing with jealousy, seeing animals and babies in peoples Facebook feeds and stuff like that.

Would you give us some background to your latest release, Los Pulkerz?

Our fourth album is a return to the original sound…actually, it´s just songs from when we started the band. We had been playing for 10 years when we started listening to the really old stuff that didn´t make it on to the first album. Some of the songs would probably work on a new release as long as we updated the sound and some of the riffs. I think we managed pretty well and even added some things that we haven´t had on our albums so far, like the song Sverige Facking Fosterland.

How about an insight into some of its themes and the premise behind it?

The premise is basically that the first 10 songs are songs that didn´t make it to the three first albums. The rest of the 15 songs are random tracks we recorded on our own as stand-alone songs or as in Rosmarie och Idioten where we get to hear an authentic conversation between 6-year old Necrofilip and a 5-year old girl called Rosmarie that he knew when he was little. His mom recorded the conversation on his tape recorder from another phone in the house and we found the tape years later (for all you kids: back in the day, people used to have land-line phones. That means that you could have several phones connected by lines to a socket in the wall in your house and if you picked up one of them during a phone call, you could listen in on the conversation between the person making the call from outside and the person taking the call in the house. Sneaky 😉

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Since we never hire a studio guy or rent a studio we´re creating up until the very end. We do everything on our own, so there´s never a cut-off on adding new stuff.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Oh yes. We´re dressed as black metal clowns and use dildos as our main stage prop. I think that´s a selling point as good as any.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We´ve done very well during these last 12 years in Sweden so I think we could do just as well abroad, if not better. Swedes are a pretty socially inept bunch and we (Swedes) don´t usually like to get too close to each other. So, since we manage to attract plenty of people to see us live in Sweden, we would probably do even better internationally. I mean, heck, if Rammstein made it with German lyrics, why can´t we with Swedish lyrics?

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive?

We are very much a band that owes our thanks to Facebook…it´s been imperative for us to reach our audience so the Internet has been great like that. It has, however, sucked all the money out of the business, so there are fewer venues in Sweden and fewer companies that want to risk financial backing for their band. We didn´t want to wait around for the record labels to get their money-grubbing heads out of their asses so we just went ahead and started recording, financing and promoting our albums on our own.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

There is no afterlife. Life is meaningless. Entropy will win, and your mom and dad probably had anal at one point. Sleep tight!

https://www.facebook.com/skitarg/    http://skitarg.tictail.com/

Pete RingMaster 03/11/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cranely Gardens – House of Decay

Allowing no hiding place, House of Decay is a tempest of psychotic noise and vicious dexterity; quite simply one of the best things to escape the extreme metal scene this year. The EP is the venomous creation of US band Cranely Gardens, an outfit which plunders the diverse landscape of metal to forge its own distinct and striking tempest now raging within one impressive encounter.

Formed in 2008, New Jersey hailing Cranely Gardens soon began weaving and honing the diversely flavoured sound which was to make debut EP Locust Valley a well-received encounter in 2015. The band has continued to nurture their individual sound and creative character, House of Decay a new plateau darker and more tempestuous yet finely crafted and a declaration that the band is ready to take on the biggest attention.

Once the sample built Muswell Hill sets the tone and atmosphere, History of a Drowning Boy seizes ears and imagination with its multi-textured tempest. It is a maelstrom of sound bred from a fusion of death and thrash metal, its imagination growing to create a cauldron of everything from nu and groove to blackened heavy metal in a forceful trespass which infests ears and psyche. Like a blend of French outfit Trepalium and UK’s Anti-Clone to give it some kind of identity, the track savages and seduces with every passing second whilst embracing an unpredictability which is not constant but brings rich surprises and twists when it breaks.

The excellent trespass features guest Will Ramos from A Wake in Providence, its successor Seven Faces sees For the Fallen Dreams vocalist Chad Ruhlig guesting. The track instantly submerges the listener in an invasive cloud of predatory noise, from the midst of which winding grooves and rampant rhythms driven by the vicious swings of Victor Figueroa break. His beats are pure venom in every touch, the bass of Alex Niszczak a predacious companion whilst the guitars of Randy Mac and Joe Fedele cast a sonic tempest built on technical and instinctive dexterity which is pure toxicity. The threat loaded throat of vocalist Chaz Macklin centres it all with an almost carnal prowess, his intensive examination just as compelling within next up Savages which has Dan Watson of Enterprise Earth and Sims Cashion additionally on board. On the surface, the song seems less adventurous than its predecessors though its grooves swiftly wind persuasively around ears but time and intent reveals the devious web at its core luring increased attention as a swarming of sonic temptation offers delicious bait.

Still it does not quite match up to those before or the following threat of Rapture where Narrow Vision frontman Josh Frazier adds his rapacious tones to the animosity unloaded by Macklin. Venturing into a more nu meets melodic metal terrain without defusing the same raw antipathy and corrosive fury of its companions, the track punishingly takes the passions.

Carry the Earth steps up next, the rhythmic ingenuity of Figueroa leading the way and not for the first or last time running with rock ‘n’ roll instincts before guitars and bass spread their cathartic animosity. The melodic hook feels a relatively familiar tempting across the EP but this certainly does not damage its impact either across the whole or in a track which scorches the senses and runs with the imagination like an unhinged predator.

The Challenger brings things to a close, its body also coaxed in by Figueroa’s tenacious invention; the subsequent highly resourceful sonic disturbance cored by a malignant cyclone driven by creative rancor. In saying that, its melancholic melodies are emotional sighs which add further drama and adventure to the concussive but gracefully primal finale. It is a volcanic close to an EP which just impresses more and more listen by listen. It is not the perfect offering but the potential sealing any cracks ensures it makes for a truly powerful and lingering incitement.

House of Decay is out now @ https://cranelygardens1.bandcamp.com/album/house-of-decay

http://www.cranelygardens.com/    https://www.facebook.com/CranelyGardens/    https://twitter.com/cranelygardens

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mordant – Demonic Satanic

cover_RingMasterReview

Released towards the rear of last year, Demonic Satanic the new album from Swedish black metallers Mordant just has to be looked at and recommended no matter the length of time since it’s unleashing. Fusing black, thrash, and death metal into one corrosively virulent proposition, the band’s sound and in turn album is a tempest of fearsome rock ‘n’ roll which welcomingly infests and devours the senses.

Formed in 1997, Mordant has released two previous albums in Momento Mori (2004) and Black Evil Master (2008), a trio of demos, and a split with Sabbat in 2013. Each has increasingly nurtured the band’s unique style of black metal fuelled pestilence now raising the cancerous infectiousness of Demonic Satanic out of the sole confines of its source genre. As suggested, the album is pure rock ‘n’ roll without losing any of the Swedish black/metal traits it has its seeds in.

Vengeance from the Dark is the album’s first trespass, the track swiftly luring ears with rhythmic bait and stabbing riffs before driving headlong into a scourge of raw rapacious riffs and toxic grooves. As the throat bleeding tones of vocalist Bitchfire scowl, the thrashier instincts of the band collude with melodic and sonic flirtation but are never allowed off the leash as the track confronts ears like a venomous celebratory waltz. It is a constantly enjoyable nag on the senses with hooks sharing character with old school rock ‘n’ roll, even at times rockabilly.

The excellent start continues as Devastating Storm… Evil Holocaust bounds in with its own incessancy of riffs and rapier like rhythms, the scything swings of drummer Necrophiliac managing to simultaneously bludgeon and be precise in their touch as the bass of Carnage growls with mercurial intent. As the intrusive assault of rhythm guitarist Soulmolester harries ears the grooves of Angelreaper wind themselves around the psyche, venom lining their every twist; masterful assets repeated in the album’s title track straight after. The track is as much psychobilly as it is extreme metal in many ways, that host of elements making up the Mordant sound diverse and expansive not only release by release to date but song by song upon Demonic Satanic. It is still blackened death metal at heart but as catchy as you could wish for; an epidemic of spiteful temptation.

Evil Impalers is another scourge easily taking limbs and appetite in its grip, its thrash sparked charge the drive for insidious suggestion and endeavour to seduce whilst courting the track’s bestial side before the Dals långed based quintet infest the Sabbat track Blacking Metal with their own creative curse. Both tracks leave nothing left to desire with the former pure incitement for pleasure, a potency tapped into by the hellacious outpouring of Desecration from Hell, a tempest of sonic poison also with an embrace of melodic adventure with persuasive toxins of its very own.

Through the pair of Infernal Curse of Evil and Screaming Souls, the senses are tormented and instincts aroused, the first as much a slab of salacious rock ‘n’ roll as it is emotional malignancy and its successor a web of injurious enterprise woven from varied strands of metal. Each leaves a greed for more with the former another peak in the album’s landscape.

Count Lucifer brings the album to a close, its tempest raw yet majestic and surrounded by a web of invasive imagination and magnetic craft. Again you can only describe the enmity as carnal rock ‘n’ roll and one hard to evade becoming enslaved by.

With thanks to Kunal at Transcending Obscurity who personally recommended the album, we may be late to it but have not missed out on something which may happily share its genre inspirations but is, as the Mordant sound, a fresh creative rancor to be in turn inspired by.

Demonic Satanic is out now through To The Death Records and available @ https://tothedeathrecords.bandcamp.com/album/demonic-satanic

https://www.facebook.com/mordantblackmetal

Pete RingMaster 03/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

3 Broken Limbs

This month sees the release of a trio of split assaults from New York based label Broken Limbs Recordings. Each is a raw and imposing echo of the darkest, dirtiest, and destructive traits of humanity and the world it has created emotionally and physically, and all propositions which leave a lingering imprint on the psyche as invasive as the sounds which sonically harangue and ravage the senses.

cover-art-2_RingMasterReviewNew Haven’s SEA OF BONES and New Hampshire’s RAMLORD come together for one of the incursions upon ears, each offering one epic trespass of their uncompromising sound and intent. Sea of Bones strike first with HOPELESSNESS AND DECAY, the trio of bassist/vocalist Gary Amedy, guitarist/vocalist Tom Mucherino, and drummer/vocalist Kevin Wigginton unleashing a cavernous soundscape soaked in predacious intensity from the off. For over ten minutes the trio breed a wall of confrontation as expansive and decayed as it is at times melancholically seductive. The track ambles, at times lumbers, across the senses, spreading its filth clad body and air with sludge fuelled hostility and moments of corrosive ambience leaving ears and emotions numb.

It is engrossing stuff matched in success by Ramlord’s proposal. INCARCERATION OF CLAIRVOYANCE is a mere few seconds shorter and just as enjoyably challenging. With a black metal/crust corrosiveness to their sound, the band explore a more urgent examination of the listener infesting them with their joyless yet at times fiercely infectious savaging with some inescapable hooks to be eagerly snared by. With essences recalling the likes of Discharge and Amebix, the track completes a powerful and gripping proposal.

Another of the three releases sees the coming together of Tennessee’s BLACK TAR PROPHET and from Pennsylvania IRON GAVEL. A seven track instrumental invasion again showing no btpig_RingMasterReviewrespect of the listener’s peace and sanity, the first half of the split is consumed by Black Tar Prophet’s sludge/doom powered incursions into the senses and imagination. Starting with the compelling persistence of MALIGNANT, a track living up to its name, the duo of bassist Greg Swinehart and drummer Erik Dever snarl in their distinct way across a further three incitements. As dark as they are heavy, as primal as they are strangely comforting and understanding to the darkest corners of one’s thoughts, Black Tar Prophet probe and transfix with RUINOUS DECAY and the deeply disturbed ABUSE especially momentous.

Iron Gavel have a less thick climate to their music but one which still crawls over the senses like a venomous predator and seeps into the corner of every emotion like erosive smog. Consisting of Dan Martin and Ryan Advent, the band taps into the psyche with their sonic and rhythmic explorations whether it be through vast and wonderfully nagging crawls like their first track here TEETH/THORN or through the shortest swinging assaults as its successor SHROUD, a concussive tempest of an aural dispute. Completed by the band’s pungent and relentlessly acidulous but refreshing GERM, the split is a match for the previous mentioned threat and at times eclipses it.

guiltcover_RingMasterReviewThe last of the Broken Limbs offerings is GUILT AND HIS REFLECTION, thirteen tracks bringing Texans CARA NEIR and WILDSPEAKER together in a split which sees its concept realised through both bands revolving around cannibalism in a post-apocalyptic scenario. The first seven songs escape the creative potency of Arlington, Texas crust duo vocalist Chris Francis and multi-instrumentalist Garry Brents. Starting with the sonically and vocally raw but melodically seductive HALO OF GREY, Cara Neir proceed to explore not only the psychological depths and impact bred in an apocalyptic environment but those of the listener too as tracks like CLINGING TO MY LAST BIT OF SANITY and THE VIEW THROUGH THIS FOG seem to flirt with ears and imagination as fully as they wonderfully antagonise them with their blend of black metal and post rock infested punk. Each of the band’s songs leave a potent impact with the outstanding almost poppy EGO EATS MAN stealing the pair’s half of the show.

Fort Worth based Wildspeaker brings their blackened crust tempests to the release with just as much creative venting and eagerness. Also featuring their partners in adventure’s Brents, the quintet go for the jugular from the off with the hellacious storm of hell DESECRATION PLAGUE. Led by the savage riffs of Nelson Favela and Zak Pitts as vocalist Natalie Kahan spills her rage, the track is as dirty and visceral as its name suggests with toxicity just as potent and appealing in its successor SINS OF DESPERATION which takes best track honours on the second half of the split. Driven mercilessly by Ricky Rivera’s drums, the track devours the senses but exciting them at the same time. With FIRST TASTE OF FLESH, another big shout for the biggest pinnacle of the release, and HIS REFLECTION especially notable among nothing less than six energy sapping uncompromisingly enjoyable whippings, Wildspeaker complete the third of a trio of splits which abrasively spark and forcibly ignite the senses.

The Sea of Bones/Ramlord Split is available @ http://brokenlimbsrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/sea-of-bones-ramlord-split  Limited to 300 12″ copies: 200 black, and 100 orange vinyl, each with a download card.

https://www.facebook.com/Sea-of-Bones-35253450819/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ramlord/116149375131744

The Black Tar Prophet/Iron Gravel Split is available @ http://brokenlimbsrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/black-tar-prophet-iron-gavel-split Limited to 300 12″ copies: 200 black, and 100 red vinyl, each with a download card and poster.

https://www.facebook.com/blacktarprophet   https://www.facebook.com/irongavelpa/

The Cara Neir/Wildspeaker Split is available @ http://brokenlimbsrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/guilt-and-his-reflection Limited to 100 white shell cassettes

https://www.facebook.com/caraneir     https://www.facebook.com/wildspeaker

https://brokenlimbsrecordings.net/pages/releases

Pete RingMaster 22/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright