Steaming Satellites – Self Titled

Steaming Satellites_RingMaster Review

Steaming Satellites is an Austrian band that for the past ten years has been a major lure and adventure in their country’s music scene, underground and within stronger spotlights. The fact that it has taken their new and third album to find, like for so many others, our attention shows how little of the vast music world anyone has a hold on at any given time. We can only be thankful that the Salzburg band’s new self-titled release has found its way through to thrill ears and ignite the imagination though because it is simply bewitching.

Consisting of Max Borchardt (vocals/guitar), Emanuel Krimplstätter (keys/bass), Matthäus Weber (drums, programming, keys), and the recently joined Manfred Mader (bass), Steaming Satellites casts a sound bred from indie rock but welcoming to an array of flavours from blues, funk, soul, and electronic enterprise. Their previous pair of albums were strongly acclaimed propositions whilst live, with shows alongside bands such as Thin Lizzy, The Ravonettes, and Portugal. The Man amongst a great many, the band has earned a potent reputation for sound and performance. Now it is the turn of album three to stir things up and as for the umpteenth time the release lights our ears and revitalises emotions, the thought of Steaming Satellites becoming a ‘household’ name across numerous territories seems a thick possibility.

It opens with Together and a caress of acoustic guitar; a gentle coaxing aided by the immediately enticing and expressive tones of Borchardt. Soon stringed tempting wraps around ears and in turn a dark moody bassline strolls through the emerging colourful and creative landscape of the song. As keys jab and harmonies unite, the song blossoms into an infectious romance for the imagination and a swiftly open appetite for the release. As catchiness and shadow kissed drama similarly grows within the fascinating proposal, feet and hips become eager whilst thoughts only greedily consume the impressive entrance of the album.

cover_RingMaster Review   Its indie rock swing is emulated in the following Rocket, though electro tempting is the first bait to engage ears to lead them into the military funk of the rhythms and the fiery dance of the guitar. Its air becomes a sultry breath at certain points, always returning to its lively endeavour though as varied spices burst from the festive heart of the track, again with feet and voice in eager involvement. Like The Flaming Lips trying on the psych rock of The Doors and the creative intimacy of Billy Momo, the song excites before departing, leaving lingering trails behind it though the fuzzy revelry of Unreal soon has attention all to itself thanks to jangly hooks and a deliciously roaming, slightly grouchy bassline which toys with the melodic radiance of the keys and harmonies. At its heart, the track is a funk bred romp but as already shown, Steaming Satellites never leave anything to settle into predictability, always keeping invention and surprises potently shimmering.

Both Honey and Restless Robot keep pleasure high and enterprise blooming, the first with its tangy Arctic Monkeys/Kings of Leon shuffle within a flirtatious smile and the second through a rhythmically dark and sonically sultry Portugal. The Man meets Futureheads tango. There are many other slithers of spice bringing a whisper of varied bands to the song, and album, but in the hands of Steaming Satellites all get turned inside out and honed into something unique and as here forcibly captivating.

Door is a heavier emotive croon which, without matching the successes before it, enthrals with its evocative textures and instinctive bounce aligning perfectly with the song’s moodier atmosphere and vocal heart whilst Circles slips into a bluesy Black Keys-esque character with stomping riffs, crisp rhythms, and spicy grooving. It too pleases without tapping up the lustier reactions found by earlier songs and definitely ignited by the outstanding Unfold straight after. The track is pure magnetism, a resourceful serenade of intimate vocals and emotive smouldering which just gets bigger and more persuasively spellbinding with every passing chord and melodic spice. It is as much an anthem as any raucous sing-a-long rocker, a compelling contagion of sixties keys, seventies melodic drama, and indie imagination.

Through the raunchier funk ‘n’ roll of Back And Forth, the feisty post punk meets indie/electro rock of Phone, and the dark White Stripes rock ‘n’ roll of Fill The Cup, album and listener continue to be fully involved in each other whilst Secret Desire employs a more restrained stride and melodic haze to its crystalline sparkle of keys and guitar to further engage the imagination. Tempered by the earthier tones of the bass and the grounded delivery of Borchardt, the track is the perfect blend of dark and light; maybe a slower burn on the passions than other treats within the album but another leaving long term hooks in its wake.

The album is completed by Move On, a gorgeous slice of lively balladry cored by ever impressing vocals and coloured by a virulent and imaginative tapestry of melodic and sonic colour. The track is a tremendous end to an outstanding release, an encounter which gets more commanding with every listen. It is hard to imagine Steaming Satellites being a relative secret from now on, but then as we said music is so big that the ease with which one can miss things is inescapable. Our suggestion is that band and album, is not another you allow to pass you by though.

The Steaming Satellites album is out from October 30th

https://www.facebook.com/steamingsatellites   http://www.steamingsatellites.com/

Pete Ringmaster 29/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Harper – Feel So Hollow

Photography by Luke Weall

Photography by Luke Weall

     Offering a sultry climate within which a blues bred persuasion takes the imagination on a keen yet subdued stroll, Feel So Hollow the new single from UK rockers Harper, is a magnetic encounter which awakens appetite and intrigue for the accomplished quartet. Only the second release from a band less than a year old, the single declares its creators a proposition well worth watching closely.

    Hailing from East London and Essex, Harper bring a fusion of blues and alternative rock to the ears, a sound which has already bred an eager response and following through the band’s appetite for gigging. The summer of 2013 saw the release of their debut, the Drawing Blood EP. It was a release which was soaked in promise and gave a potent invitation and indication of what the band was all about. Feel So Hollow is a stronger declaration, a big step forward which retains the potential and qualities of its predecessor but stretches and presents them with a greater maturity and open invention. Recorded near the end of last year in drummer Toby Thacker’s home studio, the single lights up senses and emotions; it still suggests there is plenty more to come from the band too but strongly hints that Harper’s horizons are going to be eventful and potent for them and us.

     The opening twang of guitar awakens song and attention, instantly bringing thoughts alive with its smouldering evocative a3159707955_2embrace especially when the dark tones of bass from Jamie Simpson begins prowling the scenery too. The crisp slow jabs of Thacker are an equally compelling lure as the song wraps blues drenched atmospheric tendrils around the senses. Vocally guitarist Matthew Broadbent, like the music, takes his time delivering the pungent textures of the narrative whilst Daniel Bhattacharya’s guitar skill designs a web of sonic enterprise around them adding further engaging enticement from the song. It is a minimalistic presence that is offered but one with layers of adventure and almost cinematic colour which spark the body and effect of the proposition to greater heights. Increasingly addictive the more you plunge into its immersive bordering on psychedelic tones, the single is a quite riveting suasion.

    There is a definite Black Keys feel to the song too which is not a bad thing, a flavoursome spice to use whilst the band evolves their own truly unique sound ahead, something you feel is already coming. The production is good without giving the track the strongest opportunity to shine in greater potency, the union of vocals and music especially not as smooth and equal as it could be, but it cannot deny a great song and performance from making a compelling statement. Harper is a vibrant and exciting prospect which Feel So Hollow makes an impressive and rigorously pleasing invitation to. Do not take our word for it though simply grab the song as a Buy Now name your price download below for proof.

http://www.harperband.co.uk/

http://harperband.bandcamp.com/track/feel-so-hollow-2

8/10

RingMaster 20/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Howling Tongues – Keep The Dust Down

The Howling Tongues pic

If you have an appetite for some old school rock n roll with vibrant resonance musically and passionately dripping from every note and element then Atlanta rockers The Howling Tongues is the band for you. Taking rich influences from the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Who, The Raconteurs, Band of Skulls, and Black Keys into their own distinctive ideas and adventure, the quintet leave thoughts and emotions aflame with their ‘Southern Rock & Roll Revivalist Movement’. This is a band on a rapid rise since forming two years ago and their EP Keep The Dust Down giving all the evidence as to why.

Ignited into action as a band in 2011 by guitarist Nick Magliochetti, vocalist Taylor Harlow, and drummer Tylor James, they soon recruited bassist Zach Smith and keyboardist Thomas Wainwright as the project instantly took off. An early EP and their live performances garnered a hungry and rapidly growing fanbase for their sound as they filled and lit up notable venues such as The Vinyl and The Hard Rock, their sound, self-termed as “no regret rock-n-roll”, igniting a greedy appetite in fans for more. Keep The Dust Down is their response, a six track burst of insatiable rock with loud guitars, thumping drums, and fiery melodics primed to ignite the passions. Recorded with top producer Tom Tapley, the release easily backs up the claim of a great many that the band is destined to be a household name in the very near future, as well as sparking the mightiest anticipation for their debut album currently being recorded and mixed for a release later this year.

The EP opens with a song whose title says it all, Party. Swaggering into view with stick beats and a lone beckoning guitar, the trackhowling tongues explodes into a muscular stroll of scuzz lined riffs and throaty bass calls within a cage of rhythmic sinews and acid warm keys. Taking a breath for the vocals of Harlow to start their lyrical declaration with an effect coating to his expressive delivery, the song stomps its rhythmic feet and waves a welcoming sonic finger at the emotions which is irresistible. There is wantonness to the stirring and sturdy spine of the song whilst the keys and melodic caresses within the riotous breath bring virulently infectious sultry temptation.  The track dances like a combination of The Black Keys, Kings Of Leon, and Eighteen Nightmares At The Lux, leaving no passion and primal urge untouched.

The single from the release Makes You Tick  walks up to the ear with bulging beats from James offering a hypnotic lure to trigger instant intrigue before the guitar flashes its singular persuasion.  Once the outstanding vocals of Harlow and the keys of Wainwright bring their flames to the surface of the song the seduction is in full swing and reinforced by the outstanding bass invention of Smith, his dark grizzly notes prowling and enticing the senses with imagination and devilment. Like its predecessor the song has a confidence which recruits full captivation of ear and thoughts whilst the inventive textures and shifting gait of the track are incendiary temptations to fall hungrily before.

Both Nagasaki and One-Eye’d Barber induce further glee with their thrilling enterprise and imaginative blues enriched escapades, the first a track bringing stronger ripples of vintage breath, its engrossing melodic theatrics and again inciting swagger offering thoughts of the likes of Led Zeppelin and The Black Keys as well as in lesser strength other such as The Doors and Kyuss, whilst the second of the two is a slower emotive heat of intent and passion. It is as all the songs, locked in a mesh of formidable and enslaving rhythmic strength which entraps the listener so the potently expressive outpouring of the vocal and melodic narrative from the heart of the offering can seize the fullest focus and welcome.

The bass of Smith leaves more gravelly paws on the ear as next up Alibi sizes up the listener before strutting straight on through to the emotions with the guitar of Magliochetti scoring with impressive riffs and inventive teasing hand in hand with the continually outstanding bass taunting. Once the great vocal harmonies slip into play with scintillating variation to court the equally magnetic keys, the track stands to its full height with compelling and contagious grandeur consequently inducing a large sigh of bliss between its departure and final song José No Sé, yet another to induce predator strong greed for much more.

Keep The Dust Down is an exceptional release which makes the wait for the album impatient and probably irritable for you can never get enough of a good thing and that is certainly what The Howling Tongues bring. That idea of the band being a household name has certainly got impressive legs to its charge after this.

Get the album Keep the Dust Down for FREE @ www.noisetrade.com/thehowlingtongues/keep-the-dust-down

www.thehowlingtongues.com

9.5/10

RingMaster 10/05/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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