Worselder – Paradigms Lost

As French metal continues to prove itself a hot bed for adventurous new bands and voraciously tempting sounds, quintet Worselder add their stock to the brew with new album Paradigms Lost. A web of flavours and styles fused into ear pleasing, imagination catching encounters, the ten track release is a quick and easy to devour proposition revelling in additional time offered to blossom into something even more impressive.

Hailing from the foothills of the Pyrénées mountains, Worselder emerged in 2008. Quickly they tempted local and in turn national attention with a sound drawing on each individual member’s influences and experiences in previous outfits alongside nineties inspired thrash and power metal; an instantly rich mix only blossoming in depth and adventure across the years and releases. Debut album Where we come from was released in 2010 to strong responses though it was the MMXIV EP four years later which especially sparked critical acclaim and led to the band sharing stages with the likes of Firewind, Dagoba, Black Bomb A, and Huntress among many. Recorded across 2016 with Elise Aranguren and mixed and mastered by Bruno Varea (Dagoba, Satyricon, Lenny Kravitz), Paradigms Lost sees the Worselder sound and invention at a new level of maturity and imagination. It is a release which as suggested makes a potent impact straight away but shows greater strength upon subsequent listens as its layers and less open complexities are increasingly revealed.

Infighting gets things going, the opener luring ears with a brooding bassline before rapacious riffs and bone rattling rhythms courted by toxic grooves erupt. Equally rapacious vocals from Guillaume Granier and the band soon join the surge before things settle down a touch with the vocalist quickly showing his potent range and dexterity. There is a whiff of industrial metal to the track initially, Society 1 coming to mind as the track jabs with spiky discontent, but soon its melodic and grooved instincts are entangling and stretching its thrash fuelled charge.

It is a great start hinting at the wealth of flavours ready to embrace ears across Paradigms Lost and its next up title track. From the crackle of fire and portentous rhythms within a similar atmosphere, the song strides forth with melodic vocals and harmonies lying keenly on more rapacious and aggressive sounds. The guitars of Yoric Oliveras and Jérémie Delattre cast another instinctive incitement, a mix of predacious trespass and sonic imagination to be hooked on whilst the scything beats of drummer Michel Marcq rousingly pierce the heavy prowl of Yannick Fernandez’s bass. The track’s twists and turns are as fluid as the array of sounds woven together within the excellent proposal but carry an unpredictability which has the imagination firmly enthralled within the first listen.

The instinctive rock ‘n’ roll prowess of next up Seeds of Rebellion has ears won just as quickly; the similarly striking and irresistible song proceeding to instil that core with anthemic dexterity and spicy grooves. All is delivered with lust but control amidst expectations spoiling imagination loaded with a bold unpredictability before Idols unveils its classic/heavy metal attributes within an aggressively tenacious air. Though the track does not quite ignite personal tastes as forcibly as its formidable predecessors, it only grows and pleases more and more with every listen.

Through the melodically calmer waters of The Sickening and the old school spiced Severed, the album has total attention. The first is a tantalising mix of warm melodic temptation and more bullish volatility as vocal and lyrical insight explores ears and thoughts. At times sultry and exotic, in other moments a more rapacious challenge, the track captivates from start to finish, giving neck muscles and hips a workout with its emerging thrash inspired grooving. Its successor similarly casts a net of ear entwining grooves this time fuelled and coloured by that power/classic metal essence with Granier’s croons and roars on melodic fire.

My Consuming Grief has a darker edge and deceitful volatility to its heart; a shadowy emotive power skirting and courting the drama and adventure of the melodic power metal seeded exploits. It too has ears and imagination swiftly gripped before Home of the Grave dances on the senses with its opening melodic flirtation. It is a glorious enticement only increasing its invitation as darker heavier hues from guitar and rhythms join in. Managing to become more primal and charming with each passing minute, the track provides another addictive highlight to the release.

Worselder toy with the imagination through The Haven next, a song exploring dark hues more akin to the likes of Dommin and Rise To Remain though its instinctive classic metal attributes shape the excellent encounter before the album closes with the shadow clouded, atmospherically apocalyptic Land of Plenty. In its imposing darkness there is hope and elegant melodies bring that light as the song rises from its solemn beginnings to challenge and inflame the senses. More of a slow burner than other tracks within Paradigms Lost, it almost festers in ears and imagination as it makes a potent impact and striking moment to eagerly point out.

Inspirations to the band apparently include the likes of Coroner, Testament, and Pantera; a trio which across the whole of an album but especially in the final song alone you can appreciate in a release which simply draws attention back time and time again as we can attest to. Paradigms Lost has all the qualities and impressiveness to push Worselder into global attention, now it is up to the world to embrace them.

Paradigms Lost is available now through Sliptrick Records on Amazon and other stores.

http://www.worselder.com/    https://www.facebook.com/worselder/    http://worselder.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 20/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fallen Eight – Rise & Grow

FE_RingMasterReview

Fallen Eight is a Paris based quintet reminding all of the strength of the French underground metal scene right now. The band recently released debut EP Rise & Grow, a collection of songs gripping ears whilst being fuelled by attention grabbing potential. It offers six tracks which at times ignite the passions and in other moments leaves ears merely richly satisfied with the band’s unsurprising yet refreshing metal bred exploits, but from its opening second to its rousing last it only sparks a want to hear more.

Formed towards the rear of 2011 in Seine et Marne, Fallen Eight quickly set to writing and honing a sound merging the rousing essences of extreme and melodic metal with those of heavy rock. Within a year, they had the Paris music scene in their sights as locally they continued to be a potent live presence. Playing their first shows in the capital from 2013, Fallen Eight has gone from strength to strength in sound and support found, getting to the final stage of FallenFest that same year. The next year saw the band work on their first demo and open up for Black Bomb A while 2015 saw a line-up change within the band; vocalist Clément, lead guitarist Medy, and drummer JP joined by guitarist Florian and bassist Joffrey. That year ended with Fallen Eight having supported The Arrs and preparing for the release of Rise & Grow, which now is sparking a keen fuss and its initial teaser in the shape of the single Final Shot.

The EP opens with a bang, the band setting its stall out in sound and quality straight away with Reborn. From an initial vocal cry, quickly surrounded by feisty riffs and senses whipping rhythms, the track rumbles and growls; attitude and ferocity swift hues to the early Skindred like air of the song.  Almost as quickly its character evolves and expands as the band sweep across the senses with melodic tenacity without defusing their almost post hardcore meets melodic metalcore confrontation. Clément’s vocals impress as much as the musical craft and imagination revealed by the band, all combining for a powerful and thickly engaging opening to Rise & Grow.

EP Rise & Grow_RingMasterReviewThere is certainly some very familiar textures and essences to the song and indeed EP, but something to embrace as another flavour rather than admonish a song for as shown with Come From The Sky. Initially the second song caustically bellows with raw throated vocals to the fore but is soon in the process of weaving in clean harmonics and melodic imagination, subsequently alternating the contrasts thereon in. Whether the coarse vocals attack is also from Clément we cannot tell, the diversity suggests not, but whatever it is a major part of the band’s success and the enthralling tapestry of songs.

Leaving a Linkin Park feel in its wake, the excellent track is soon eclipsed by the EP’s best track, Final Shot. Its rhythms and riffs border the carnivorous, grooves and sonic enterprise the seductive, and all orchestrated by the outstanding and rousing vocal incitement of all involved. Listening to the track, you can visualise audiences swelling and rising as one to the track’s incendiary chorus alone, and especially the anthemic line incorporating the its title.

In some ways the EP is a proposal of two parts, the first trio of songs inciting the biggest reactions in personal tastes though that does not stop Breath Of The Ages making a powerful impact and keeping enjoyment on a lofty plateau. It just seems like the uniqueness of ideas are slimmer and less striking in the final trio, a spark missing, but as the fourth track reveals as it comes close to matching its predecessors, creative drama is as open and fascinating as ever. The irritability in sound and nature of the song is another virulent lure too with the vocals and individual prowess of all shining through.

Light prowls the senses next, its first riffs and grooves predatory before being reined in by a bluesy spicing to grooves and hooks as the band share some Avenged Sevenfold flavoured classic and heavy metal resourcefulness. It too has ears and appetite hooked before Worst Nightmare brings the release to a raw and ravenous close. The most aggressive and tempestuous track on the EP, its shows that Fallen Eight can savage the senses as skilfully and eagerly as they can seduce them with melodic imagination.

It is a fine end to a richly pleasing encounter from a band with the potential to indeed Rise & Grow to big things.

Rise & Grow is out now through most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/FallenEight   https://twitter.com/FallenEightBand

Pete RingMaster 05/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Whisper of Death – Noise of Obstinacy

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Noise of Obstinacy is an album which if you are in the mind to, you can pick at for its lack of real originality and at times over reliance of certain sounds and textures within its ten ravenous offerings, but at the end of the day the debut album from French metallers Whisper of Death is still one unrelenting buzz saw of enjoyment. Neck muscles and flagging energies are the testament to that. Accomplished and rigorously captivating with a seemingly Cannibal Corpse and Cryptopsy inspired death metal voracity with flavoursome extras, band and album leave ears and appetite gratefully satisfied and often excited.

Whisper Of Death hails from Ablis, a small village south of Yvelines and were soon drawing potent local attention after forming with their live presence which has seen them support the likes of Manimal, Leng Tch’e, Pitbulls in the Nursery, Black Bomb A, the Spirit of the Clan, and Betraying the Martyrs. The quintet released first demo Desossage in 2008, an introduction well-received by the band’s fans and underground. Its unleashing though was followed by a low key period for the band which saw a line-up change and one of its guitarist involved in a serious accident when he was hit by a car. It was unsurprisingly a slow time for the band but as soon as they were able to return to full strength, Whisper of Death released second demo Epilepsy in 2012, followed by the resumption of the band’s live attack. Last year was predominantly given to the creating and recording of Noise of Obstinacy at Studio Dark Wizard with François Ugarte (Pitbulls in the Nursery). Mixed and mastered by Alan Douches at West West Side Music (Nile, Mastodon), the album was uncaged towards the end of 2014, pushing Whisper of Death instantly towards a new attentive recognition.

     Cadaveric Discharge sets the ravaging off, emerging from a swarm of flies to grip ears and imagination with its artillery of lethal beats amidst a squall of savage guitars. It is a vicious Whisper Of Death - Artworkentrance but equally a magnetic one with a contagious swing lining emerging grooves and ferocious riffing. The vocals equally grab attention, a dual assault bringing variety to the malevolent delivery of venom soaked words and growls. With all songs sung in French and being linguistically challenged, lyrical adventures are unknown but there is no mistaking the rancor behind them. Turning more bestial with every second, the track is a formidable and pleasing start to the album backed right away by Cemetery Market.

Almost mischievously toying with ears with a quirky sonic flirtation, the second track needs little prompting to throw off the masquerade and show its malicious intent; ragged riffs and hostile rhythms colluding in one precisely honed provocation which is unafraid at times to uncage its darkest animosity and in other moments turn on expectations with striking and slightly warped invention. Across the album there are definitely certain twists and moments of ingenuity which break songs away from feeding assumptions and showing recognisable influences, maybe not enough to be honest, but as here when it occurs even in brief temptations, it turns songs and album into a very potent and potential fuelled proposition,

Both Desossage and Organ Bath pleasingly stir up air and senses, the first a blaze of raw antagonism with shot gun cocks and virulent scourges of tangy grooving making tasty additives to the infectious turbulence around them. The second has a slower gait, virtually lumbering along with low slung grooves and barbarous rhythms. There is still a ferocious intensity and energy to the encounter of course, just with a more pestilential intent rather than rabid instinct. Each hits the mark of enjoyment if not making startling impacts; something the following OBF has far more success with through its avalanche of rhythmic brutality and sonic toxicity. The track is a glorious truculence of sound and attitude, every swing of drum sticks leading to deranged bait whilst venomous grooves provide a sonic straight jacket twisting the psyche with their enterprise. With no lesser a devilish persuasion from the raw vocals and dark hearted bass rabidity, the track is the most adventurous and strikingly unpredictable on the album, and further reason to suspect Whisper of Death will emerge from the crowd if not now some point in the future with this kind of adventure.

Happy Burial whips up a blistering senses flailing storm next, not quite emulating the endeavour of the previous track but creating a bedlamic tempest to easily devour and enthuse about before Surgical Strike unloads its rhythmic torpedoes and sonic rapacity. Once again the track feeds the wants and matches levels already breached by the album but just does not go far enough to forge something truly remarkable. Nevertheless with a great agitation and psychotic mania to the changing assaults of the drums as the bass again finds the most salaciously dark lines to seduce with, the track has attention and pleasure tightly grasped.

Torture for Dummies bounces around like a serial killer waiting its moment to strike, a certain glee and excitement driving hooks and riffs as well as the catchy stride it initially offers. Of course this all plays out within a harsh landscape of sonic cruelty and toxic emotion which is just as bracing as the creative turmoil within it and helps turns Cannibalism Airlines into a visceral theatre of torrential spite and violently wanton rhythms. The track is another major highlight of the album, guitars and bass a flurry of intimidation and fury in their own right.

Battlefield brings the exhausting brutality to an end but not before creating its own peak in the album with a battering of flesh scarring beats, intrusively lingering grooves, and noxious vocals. It is the lighter caustic flirtations of imagination and psyche twisted endeavour which ignite the song predominantly though and ensures the album ends on a real high.

Noise of Obstinacy is as its title declares, a release doing its own things with zeal and defiance. It is not trying to reshape the walls and originality of death and extreme metal but increasingly it thrills and leaves emotions blissful, and I know which I prefer.

Noise of Obstinacy is available now digitally and on CD @ http://whisperod.bandcamp.com/

http://www.whisperofdeath.com/

RingMaster 28/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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