Hunter Kill Hunter – II

hkh_RingMasterReview

Building on its well-received predecessor of 2015, the new EP from British alternative rock quintet Hunter Kill Hunter is a striking affair. II is evidence of a band settling into their creative skin if yet to lure out the truly unique aspects of their sound though from start to finish the release captures ear and imagination alike. It is a bold and creatively tenacious affair which leaves a definite appetite for more from this emerging outfit.

Formed in 2015, the London five-piece soon drew attention with their live presence, which has gone on to see the band play with the likes of Jonah Matranga and The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, and find their debut EP Find A Way Home well received. Merging post hardcore roars with infectious alternative rock bred enterprise, Hunter Kill Hunter offer an emotionally charged, tempestuously intense affair which has found a new strength and maturity to fuel its visceral yet openly catchy tempting in the new EP.

Opening with the harmonically coloured enticing of Intro, band and release soon up the ante physically and emotionally with Too Much To Take. Instantly a snarling air grips ears and the textures of the song but equally catchiness is abound as vocalist Justin Jackson, revealing both his raw and melodic side, uncages the song’s heart backed by the similarly potent tones of Stuart May and his and fellow guitarist Kieran Harper’s adventurous enterprise.  It is a trait which infests the whole of the song, its twists and turns often seemingly familiar yet driven by a fresh imagination which ensures there is nothing predictable about the fine encounter.

hunter-kill-hunter-ii-cover_RingMasterReviewSinking From Within swiftly uncages a rhythmic proposal which demands attention next, the growling air of Rhys Kirby’s bass in league with the eagerly swung beats of Joe Lanigan. It is a formidable enticing as inviting as it is predacious and the lead into another potent blend of rapacious intensity and melody honed angst. There is a touch of Billy Talent to the song at times mixing in with further unexpected moments of Hunter Kill Hunter invention as once more expectations are evaded by the excellent track.

The reflection bred embrace of The Hunted is a mellower encounter but too equipped with an instinctive almost tempestuous edge which erupts in sonic crescendos between the plaintive warmth of the vocals. More of a grower against the more quickly impacting prowess of its predecessors, the song grows into another truly engaging affair with a lingering infectiousness before They’ve Traded Us For Gold finds an even calmer landscape for its resourceful proposition. As with the last song, its calm is interrupted with fiery expulsions of sound and energy, each outburst escalating an impressive hug of melodic and harmonic enterprise.

The imposing intensity and volatile climates of earlier tracks is enjoyably exposed again in the outstanding We Are The Blame, its eventful drama stirring ears and spirit in swift time while closing track Neverlasting Light is the darkest, arguably most intense moment within II as heart and sound expose their rawest qualities and honesty in a turbulent and pleasingly imposing tempest.

Another track growing to its full height with subsequent listens, it provides a thickly satisfying end to a highly enjoyable encounter with Hunter Kill Hunter. As suggested earlier, there are many familiar aspects to the EP yet it would not be wrong to say each is twisted or employed in something building towards a character of sound distinct to the band, and something rather easy to want more of.

II is out now @ https://hunterkillhunter.bandcamp.com/album/ii-2

http://www.hunterkillhunter.com/   https://www.facebook.com/hunterkillhunter/   https://twitter.com/hkhband

Pete RingMaster 17/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Ellipsis – Cold Cactus

the-ellipsis-pic-5_RingMasterReview

Earning plenty of praise and support for their debut EP Mind In The Sky earlier this year, and especially its dynamic single Wasted Potential Me, British rockers The Ellipsis look like repeating that success with new single Cold Cactus. A lively and meaty slice of pop rock, the song grabs ears and attention with ease; teasing with familiar spices before casting its own character of sound and imagination for just over three minutes of highly enjoyable distraction.

Since forming in 2013, The Ellipsis has played the length of the UK and graced numerous festivals including recently opening The Godiva Festival in their home-town of Coventry. Their first single White Feather caught ears and radio attention with the band sparking just as potent interest through an energetic live show which soon led the band to headlining Coventry OxJam in front of 30,000 rugby fans at the Ricoh Arena. The Mind In The Sky EP and its lead track subsequently whipped up a new swell of fans which it is very easy to see Cold Cactus matching.

About someone feeling out of place, physically and emotionally, Cold Cactus instantly grips ears with a guitar lure reminding very much of Billy Talent, that pleasing bait reinforced by the throbbing tone of Harry Green’s bass and the melody draped riffs from lead guitarist John Connearn and rhythm guitarist Henry Bristow. Framed and punctuated by the swinging beats of Alex Bonsor, the song quickly slips into its own individual guise led by the expressive and potent vocals of Bristow. Further melodic colour soon spreads from Connearn’s strings and enterprise, providing a bubbling tempting within the muscular and richly infectious proposition filling and thrilling ears.

As with Wasted Potential Me, its successor has ears and imagination roused but Cold Cactus simply has richer substance and uniqueness to its roar; a sure sign that the band’s songwriting and sound is evolving rather nicely.

Cold Cactus is out now.

UPCOMING LIVE DATES:

16th Sept – Warwick Uni (supporting The Bluetones)

1st Oct – Grosvenor Casino Coventry

14th Oct – Copenhagen (details tba)

29th Oct – Queens Hall Nuneaton

https://www.facebook.com/theellipsisuk/    https://twitter.com/TheEllipsisUK

http://theellipsis.co.uk/

Check out the video for Cold Cactus @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/video-selector/

Pete RingMaster 14/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Monster Truck – Sittin’ Heavy

pic by Brooks Reynolds

pic by Brooks Reynolds

Yet again Monster Truck lives up to the suggested weightiness of their name with their sound in new album Sittin’ Heavy. The eleven track encounter is a rousing rock ‘n’ roll roar embracing a landscape of bold styles and flavours. It is an adventure the Canadian band’s fans have become accustomed to and helped lead their Juno Award nominated debut album Furiosity to rich acclaim and hordes of new appetites two years or so back. Sittin’ Heavy carries on the muscular work of its predecessor, unleashing broad and robust rock ‘n’ roll you can only give full attention to.

The Hamilton, Ontario hailing Monster Truck quickly began stirring up local attention and support when emerging in 2009, backing it up with the release of their Gus Van Go and Werner F (The Stills, Priestess, Hollerado) produced self-titled EP the following year. The band linked up with producer Eric Ratz (Billy Talent, Cancer Bats, Three Days Grace) for its successor, The Brown EP in 2011, with surrounding singles pushing the band into the Top 10 on Canadian Rock radio. That initial live success has only accelerated and grown across the years too; tours across North America and Canada as well as supporting shows and festival appearances seeing the quartet sharing stages with the likes of Slash, Deep Purple, Guns N’ Roses, The Sheepdogs, Alice in Chains, ZZ Top, Buckcherry, Rival Sons and many more.

Furiosity put Monster Truck on bigger heavy rock/metal maps with its release in 2013, something the again Ratz recorded/co-produced Sittin’ Heavy will surely stir up and exploit further. Their first offering since signing with Mascot Records, the album charges at and through ears with opener Why Are You Not Rocking. Jabbing beats instantly grip attention before being quickly joined by fiery grooves around hungry riffs. Hitting its rousing stroll in moments, the track is a contagious stomp with the lead vocals of bassist Jon Harvey growling and enticing from within the busy web of Jeremy Widerman’s grooves and the seriously coaxing organ lures of Brandon Bliss. With drummer Steve Kiely inciting further involvement through his rapier like swings, band and song has hips, appetite, and energies ablaze with ease.

art_RingMasterReviewSittin’ Heavy is off to a mighty start which continues as Don’t Tell Me How To Live steps up next; its blues spiced grooves and tenaciously pressing riffs offering potent bait as they crowd the robustly snarling tones of Harvey. The song’s air is almost woozy with the melodic liquor fuelling the richly enticing grooving, their flirtation the lead into the suggestiveness of Widerman’s sonic endeavour and imagination. As the first, the track is a magnetic affair pleasing and simultaneously setting up the emotions and appetite for the even thicker weave of spicy textures and sultry invention that is She’s A Witch. As its predecessor, the song has a groove built net which quickly envelops ears as hips and feet are tempted and urged by the funk infused hooks and flighty flames of blues resourcefulness.

A southern seeded celebration is laid out by For The People next, its character and sound a familiar persuasion yet distinctly sculpted with Monster Truck invention and passion whilst Black Forest allows a rest for the body and inspiration for the imagination with its mellow yet still slightly tempestuous air and reflection. As with the last song, there is a sixties/seventies scented essence to the song; hues which align to a modern heartfelt blues seducing before having to make way for the wonderful discord twisted introduction of Another Man’s Shoes and subsequently its muscularly imposing and evocative body. The track is rock ‘n’ roll at its feverish yet controlled best, another skilful tapestry of textures and energies which Monster Truck, in this album alone, show themselves so accomplished at weaving.

From one pinnacle to another as Things Gets Better strides in with a keys sparked swagger that infests every aspect of the song. There is no escaping the unrelentingly persuasive and anthemic prowess of a song which never breaks into a riot of energy and sound but has the senses and spirit as aroused as if it had. The track also adds more of the flavoursome variety that makes up the album. As great as it is though, it and every song making up Sittin’ Heavy, gets outshone by the sensational incitement of The Enforcer. Straight from the big swinging rhythms which bound in under the control of Kiely, submission to its fiery charm is inevitable and even more assured as the soulful fire of sound and harmonies unite to seduce and stir the spirit. Grooves are almost toxic such their winy intoxication whilst the vocals of Harvey, backed by the rest of the band, simply provide virulent bait. Add biting riffs, piecing hooks, and more creative swing led by the bass revelry of Harvey, and you have one of the most incendiary tracks you are likely to hear this year.

To The Flame takes ears into a tantalising mix of sludge and stoner-esque adventure next. The track almost crawls over the senses whilst leaving a glaze of volcanic seduction, led by Widerman’s sonic lattice and the smothering allure of Bliss’ keys. Compelling the listener into full involvement, the track’s sweltering landscape adds another peak to the lofty range of the album, its success matched and surpassed by the devilishly creative and expressive throes of New Soul. The song has all the hectic and inflamed elements that makes the Monster Truck sound; elements which collude with individual craft and anthemic mastery for lusty rock ‘n’ roll to get hot and sweaty to.

Completed by the gentle, in relation to other songs, emotive embrace of Enjoy The Time, the irresistible Sittin’ Heavy is a band revelling in the varied strains of rock ‘n’ roll and their imagination in uniting them with their own invention. That in turn has ears and emotions similarly making feverish merry to the results.

Sittin’ Heavy is out now via Mascot Records, available digitally as well as on CD and Vinyl (which includes bonus track Midnight) across most online stores.

http://www.ilovemonstertruck.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ilovemonstertruck   https://twitter.com/monster_truck

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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One Morning Left – Metalcore Superstars

OML promo_RingMaster Review

Metalcore Superstars is the new album from Finnish melodic metalcore band One Morning Left, and our introduction to a sound which quickly you get the marmite factor feeling about in, it breeding love or eager dislike with little in between. As the eleven rousing tracks of the encounter run riot through ears with their bedlamic burst of styles and flavours, we quickly fell into the former opinion and keenly embraced its ferocious mayhem.

It has been three years since the quintet released their seemingly well-received second album Our Sceneration; it’s uncaging in 2013 quickly followed by the band increasing their live presence and hitting stages alongside the likes of like Adept, F*ckface Unstoppable (Bam Margera), Protest The Hero, and We Butter The Bread With Butter and more across Europe. 2014 saw the band begin working on Metalcore Superstars, its creation an extensive affair as the band honed their new ideas into its slightly psychotic character until arriving at the seriously eventful confrontation grabbing ears today.

Maybe the best way to generalise the One Morning Left sound is ravenous metalcore with the punk contagion of Billy Talent, the techno adventure of Silent Descent, and the mischievous prowess of Hollywood Undead; it coming with a hardcore/avant-garde surge of attitude. The result is a full-on and enjoyably unpredictable protagonist, even if one that flirts with a loss of control at times.

art_RingMaster ReviewOpener OML_KVLT sees the band announcing themselves in anthemic style, the vocals of Mika Lahti a busy and tenacious mix backed by those of guitarist Leevi Luoto. Checking out tracks from previous releases, there seems a lighter tone to the creative devilment of One Morning Left this time around with Metalcore Superstars but equally a more rabid snarl to their sonic and lyrical warfare amidst bolder drama to their imagination. The first track continues to stir ears and appetite with its fiery nature and pungent tapestry of flavours, subsequently creating a virulently infectious incitement that chews on the senses.

The following Heavy Metal Finland flirts with nintendocore like bait initially, it’s tempting aligned to vicious growling and broody dynamics which erupt further within the emergence of the tempestuous proposition. Without the constant spark of its predecessor, the track pleases as it toys vocally with heavy and death metal spices as well as similarly varied textures musically; enjoyably backing up the strong start without quite making the same impact.

The guitars of Luoto and Ari Levola aggressively dance with sonic attitude within ¡Derailed! next, but also they are unafraid to unleash some funk seeded flirtation whilst keys engage in a kaleidoscope of electro flavours and atmospheric suggestiveness. All the time moving towards a bruising confrontation, the track provides a galvanic finale within a formidable rhythmic web cast by drummer Niko Hyttinen before the outstanding You’re Dead! Let’s Disco! has body and energies fully involved in thumping aural devilry. Like Hadouken! meets The Browning, the track is a chest beating slab of sonic and vocal defiance again lit by the off-kilter imagination of keys and programming from Veli-Matti Kananen and bracingly driven by his bass lines and the swinging scythes of Hyttinen. Careering on the precipice of psychotic chaos, the track leaves body and emotions bursting with lust, a success matched by The Recipe, it a more controlled but no less forcibly resourceful and deranged web of concussive textures and fascinating theatre.

Kings and Queens throbs and pulsates straight after, its opening a haunted cascade of electronic splatters leading to a warmer toned but more punk bred aggressor as melodically engaging as it is infectiously cantankerous. That Billy Talent air is at its strongest here in a song with an inventive weave maybe less exploratory than others on the album but is still sculpted from a heftily flavoursome torrent of ideas. Its lean take on that thick diversity elsewhere works a treat, providing one more major highlight.

A muggy collage of metal and punk ‘n’ roll colours Fast and Furious 6.66 next, its electronic calms only bringing more intrigue loaded variety to ultimately an enraged bluster of the song whilst Devil’s Nest rumbles and grumbles from a sinister melodic entrance into an exotically hued adventure with duelling contrasts against aligning radiances and hostilities. A dogged but invitingly invigorating swamp of noise and flavour, the track grips attention and eager involvement with its theatre of enterprise leaving the album’s title track to bully and harry senses next, though it too is unafraid to seduce with the beckoning fingers of melodies and harmonies.

A great carnival-esque air comes with the riveting Eternity; the penultimate treat playing with a My Chemical Romance meets AFI hand within its just as potent murderous traits to ingeniously nag and thrill ears before making way for the closing turbulence of Sticks and Stones. Like being rabidly assaulted by a seductive temptress bound with irritable intent and wrapped in orchestral grandeur, the track is one enthralling end to an inescapably magnetic release.

For some, the creative turmoil and bordering on insatiable imagination of Metalcore Superstars may not hit the spot for ears or desires, but it only left us exhaustively wanting more. So be brave and take on the adventure One Morning Left offers with their latest proposal we suggest; it just might ignite your day.

Metalcore Superstars is out now in Finland via Inverse Records with full release from February 22nd in central Europe through Bleeding Nose Records, and across America and Oceania on Imminence Records.

http://www.onemorningleft.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Onemorningleft   https://twitter.com/onemorningleft

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Everyday Sidekicks – The Things I’ve Seen

Everyday Sidekicks _RingMaster Reviewhot

Everyday Sidekicks is another UK band emerging from the hot bed of fresh and exciting music that is Bristol, and another prospect leaving a want to know and hear more in its wake. Their sound is a fiery and gritty post-hardcore proposition and their new EP, The Things I’ve Seen, a potent nudge on national attention. Listening to the six track encounter there is the feeling the band is still on a journey of discovery with their sound, tracks often weaving in recognisable and at times expected flavours and hues to its undoubtedly inventive heart. That familiarity and lack of major uniqueness though, rather than providing a dampener on the EP’s lure, just adds more substance to the release and excitement to the potential of where the band can take their music and imagination.

Formed in 2012, Everyday Sidekicks soon became a keenly followed and supported prospect on the local scene spreading outwards, though it was with the release of the single Hometown Hero in 2014 that they began flirting with national awareness. Live the quintet has shared stages with bands such as Marmozets, Shvpes, and Coldrain; increasing their reputation simultaneously over the past couple of years whilst also drawing attention from new fans and media alike. The Things I’ve Seen is the next potent nudge to awaken thicker and stronger attention, a success easy to see coming as its sextet of tracks tempt and sear the senses.

Everyday Sidekicks Cover Artwork _RingMaster Review    Opener F.T.B is a minute long lure into the release but much more than an intro, its belly of craft and passion a potent roar on ears and indeed and already brewing appetite. Its strong coaxing is quickly matched by the punchy swagger of Mirrors. Straight away the anthemic swings of drummer Mat Capper and the dark alluring tone of Sam Hughes’ bass grip ears as a spiralling of sonic enterprise escapes the guitars of Tim Brown and Josh Pasley. It is a rousing entrance that continues to entice as the enjoyable varied vocal attack of Archie Hatfield blazes away with angst and passion. He shows a diversity and imagination in this song alone which is echoed throughout the band and song, and though Mirrors offers familiar spicery, it makes for a stirring slice of post-hardcore bred rock ‘n’ roll.

It’s All Smiles and Laughter rolls in with a lighter and brighter air, its infectiousness aligned to elegant keys and a cleaner vocal presence to Hatfield. Also embracing a pop rock ingredient, the song soon brews up a more volatile intensity and intent, its eruption stirring and when the track especially hits full potency. Across its length though, imagination and craft is a magnetic lure but it just lacks the same striking spark as its predecessor and indeed the following Pitch Black. It too merges emotive calm and beauty with a tempestuous irritability and angst, this time crafting a more balanced and perpetually stirring proposition with a healthy scent of Billy Talent to it.

The melodic enterprise already lighting tracks is given a full canvas with Rosa where guitars and keys converge in a misty coaxing before uniting for a contagious incitement which punctuates and at times inflames the emotive balladry driving the song. Beats are punchy and the bass a throaty tempting, even as their shadows become bound in the sonic tendrils spun by the guitars. It is a potent affair with moments of gripping adventure and though the clean vocals are not as impacting as they are in other moments in the EP, it is fair to say the raw charm of the song pleases whilst offering more variety to the release with its cleverly aligned textures.

The Things I’ve Seen is closed by How We Survive, a raucous and dynamic onslaught of fierce punk ‘n’ roll. it ensures the EP ends on a high, even if it lets its ferocious roar and in turn creative intensity ebb and flow a touch. Nevertheless it is a great end to a heftily satisfying proper introduction to Everyday Sidekicks. It is early days but the band has plenty going for them in sound and invention and a potential hard to dismiss.

The Things I’ve Seen EP is released November 20th through all stores.

https://www.facebook.com/everydaysidekicks   https://twitter.com/edskofficial

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Dearist – This House Has No Windows

Dearist 2015 new_RingMaster Review

Enticed by its name and enthused by the praise of others in regard to a previous release, there was real intrigue in place entering into This House Has No Windows, the debut album from UK band Dearist. This is a band beginning to stir up a healthy buzz around themselves and it is easy to hear why as song by song, the encounter captivated ears and imagination. Released through Close To Home Records, the Southend-on-Sea independent home of the likes of Faux, Sneeze, Tilde, Of Us Giants, Walleater, and Great Sale Day, the nine-track encounter is a fascinating proposal of unpredictable and diverse flavours that at its heights lights a fire in the passions and in its lesser successes sparks a hungry appetite for more.

The Wolverhampton hailing Dearist began as the studio side project for bassist/vocalist Adam Binder of Kyoto Drive, it soon taking over as his main focus and becoming a full live band with the addition of fellow Kyoto Drive band mate and drummer Mitch Davis alongside guitarist/vocalist Chris Tucker and guitarist Michael Ingram, with more recently guitarist Lee Jarratt bringing Dearist to a quintet. Last year saw the release of debut single Get What You Want, its attention grabbing success backed by album teasers Fix and Leecher. With a sound described as emo/alternative rock but much more involved and varied than that description can suggest, Dearist are now poised to poke at broader spotlights with This House Has No Windows, a success easy to assume.

dearist packshot_RingMaster Review   This House Has No Windows is on fire from its first second, opener Geneocide bounding in on stirring rhythms and an enjoyably piercing jangle of guitar. It is equally as sonically hazy as it is openly precise, the magnetic vocals of Binder and Tucker uniting in a warm but vociferous roar amidst similarly inflamed sound. Slips into mellower caresses only add to the seducing whilst accentuating the creative ferocity of the track’s rawer urgent energy. It is a glorious start carrying some recognisable if indefinable hues to its hooks and melodic prowls which just adds to the drama and persuasive power of the song.

The following Fix opens on a reflective kiss of piano before opening up its heart in another fiery but more restrained wind. It is a climate though which gets more intense as vocals raise their emotional energy and the guitars cast an evocatively alluring weave of invention and creative expression. With a unique character but matching impressive craft as its predecessor, the track reinforces the album’s strong start with Blemish adding its own potency straight after. Lying somewhere between My Bloody Valentine and The Jesus & Mary Chain, and with shadows draping its heart and melancholy fuelling its reflection, the song is a bewitching seducing leaving the imagination alive and easy pickings for the Billy Talent like resourcefulness and angst of Fake to make use of. Though a bit of a slow burn compared to the songs before it on ears, it soon emerges as another highlight as it increasingly enthralling and involving emotions with every passage of time shared.

Leecher steps up next to uncage its creative and emotional bellow, intricate melodies colluding with provocative textures, vocals, and the earthier touch of bass and swiping beats. Providing another chorus and indeed array of twists which swiftly lure participation from those within its tempest, the song has satisfaction brimming before making way for the brief and darkly ethereal Something Unreal. A hug of voices within a repetitious sonic haunting, the track is neither an intro nor feeling like something full, it more a glimpse into another parallel moment somewhere and throughout very intriguing if a little puzzling.

Both Reign and What You Want continue that level of tempting, each missing the same spark found in the bigger triumphs before them for personal tastes but with shadowy drama and magnetic layers within the first and the muscular skeleton of the latter courting an increasingly predacious rock ‘n’ roll air, each captures ears and thoughts with open prowess.

The album is brought to a close by Crawl and its fusion of melodic romance and vocal temptation with initially low key rhythms which become more imposing yet equally flirtatious in an excellent finale to This House Has No Windows, release and song ending on an inflamed crescendo of sound and emotion.

This House Has No Windows is an irresistible encounter becoming more forceful and impressive in its adventure during a listen and in subsequent plays. The fact there is still room where it might have made an even more enslaving impression makes Dearist one very exciting prospect and very likely the next musical passion for a great many.

This House Has No Windows is released October 23rd via Close To Home Records on Ltd Edition 12” vinyl @ http://closetohomerecords.com/webstore/dearist-this-house-has-no-windows-180g-12 and digitally through https://cthrecords.bandcamp.com/ as a name your price download.

https://www.facebook.com/DearistUK   https://twitter.com/dearistband

Pete RingMaster 23/10/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Calm For The Restless – Destroyed But Not Defeated

Calm For The Restless Promo shot_RingMaster Review

Roaring out of Hertfordshire, British alternative rockers Calm For The Restless show that the early promise of debut EP We Started A Fire from a couple of years back has, if not yet come to full realisation, been honed, reinforced, and expanded with Destroyed But Not Defeated. The band’s second EP is a roar of sound and passion which persistently grabs the imagination. At times its songs do undulate in success with personal tastes but from start to finish the encounter has ears involved and attention held whilst brewing a want to hear more.

The beginnings of the Stevenage quintet go back to 2007; the band founded by vocalist Don Macauley and rhythm guitarist/backing vocalist Mart Bradford. Drummer Mike Westwood was soon enlisted but other line-up and location issues led to the band going on hiatus before returning in 2012. The trio recruited bassist Mark Randall not long after, with lead guitarist Tom Holbrook linking up the following year. We Started A Fire was also recorded and released in 2013 too whilst around it and since, the band has been a hive of live activity across the south of England. Now Calm For The Restless are pushing forward with the national release of the enjoyable Destroyed But Not Defeated EP, an encounter fair to say revealing and revelling in, the open potency of the songwriting and sound of the highly accomplished outfit.

Calm For The Restless Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review     Musically Calm For The Restless embrace ears in tenacious rock ‘n’ roll taking inspirations from bands such as InMe, Incubus, Biffy Clyro, Muse, Billy Talent, Brand New, and Foo Fighters, and it is the latter which is most comparable to the rousing After Tonight which opens up the release. Guitar and energetically jabbing beats engages ears first, their inviting bait soon enveloped by but still adding to an infectiously lively stroll of riffs and tangy grooves. The drums sticks of Westwood are a rapid blur of rapier like rapacity from the start and remind as gripping within the now slightly more restrained gait of the song. The expression rich voice of Macauley equally makes a potent impact, his entrance seeming to spark even more eagerness in the melodic and grooved resourcefulness of the band whilst the song’s chorus is thick with Dave Grohl and co flavouring, a spicing which only lures ears deeper into the captivating tapestry of the song. The band’s current single, it is a thrilling welcome to band and release and one reason alone to go check Calm For The Restless out.

The following Shadow Of A Man opens on a warm but almost sombre enticing which soon blooms into an emotive reflection of melodies and voice. Guitars caress and suggest before rhythms incite a more boisterous blaze of intensity and sound for the chorus, though it is a slim crescendo in the mellow impassioned landscape of the song which seems to add just a little more angst and drama each time it erupts. The track fails to make the same impact of its predecessor but across its fascinating body, Calm For The Restless spin a weave of inventive twists and imagination sparking sounds to keep intrigue and interest high.

The excellent Blue comes next, bubbling sound the first beckoning, jabbing riffs, rumbling rhythms, and the ever alluring tones of Macauley the even more gripping second. Billy Talent is listed in influences to the band and though sound wise they are wide apart, the sculpting and thoughtful yet organic use of anthemic hooks and angst fired passion mutual skills. The track just grows within ears, every passing minute more enthralling and tempting than the last until it becomes a fire bursting with sonic flames and burning energy, all the time licking at the senses with just irresistible hooks.

Lost To The Ocean like the second song is missing something compared to those around it but again its catchy tone and creative pop punk like character only leaves a good and persuasive time behind. There is a glimpse and at times a loud whisper of distinctive ideation and uniqueness across Destroyed But Not Defeated, and yes here too but not as openly and vibrantly which is maybe why it lacks the richness of temptation of say Bury Me In The Waves, its predecessor. To balance that though the penultimate song still leaves full contentment in ears and thoughts before the closing encounter slips on sultry acoustic charm to fascinate with. Increasingly more dramatic and intensive as it grows, the song from a good if unsure start brews up into another highly pleasing and provocative roar from Calm For The Restless.

The potential of the band’s first EP is a ripened if not yet fully developed promise in Destroyed But Not Defeated but offering a wider and fuller look into the creative depths and imagination of the band. They feel like a band on a mission musically and emotionally and with more steps as potent as Destroyed But Not Defeated one suggests bright times ahead.

The Destroyed But Not Defeated EP is available digitally from September 4th through all stores.

Pete RingMaster 04/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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